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We Are BC: A look at BC Football

BC Eagles Football

by Amanda Colwell

By Amanda Colwell
Unigo Campus Rep at Boston College

You may have seen us on TV—the sea of college kids dressed in gold and maroon, screaming “WE ARE BC!” and singing “Sweet Caroline” as we stomp on the bleachers of Alumni Stadium.

It is plain and simple: BC kids love BC football, whether they actually like football or not. We love the tailgates before the game, annoying our component with chants during the game, and standing for hours as one.

I entered BC as a freshman having never fully watched a football game. I prepare to leave having missed very few of the home games.

So what is it about BC football that attracts so many students?

Maybe it is the memory of Doug Flutie’s 48-yard Hail Mary. The pass landed the Eagles a 47-45 victory over Miami in the Orange Bowl, wowing a national audience on the day after Thanksgiving, November 23, 1984. Flutie won the Heisman that year, which is given to the most outstanding college football player in the country, and has been revered by Boston College ever since.

Or maybe it is the sense of togetherness at games that attracts the student body. Songs like “Build Me Up Buttercup”, “For Boston”, and “Livin� on a Prayer” have a special way of uniting freshman and seniors, juniors and sophomores.

Senior Dan Jarobe, a history major, believes the football games create a strong sense of community at BC. 

“Alumni Stadium is packed for the games—rain, snow or shine. It is a great atmosphere. I love standing in the cold with a bunch of kids who are screaming for BC because they love BC… It’s why I chose to come here,” he said. 

Games against rivals draw a particularly significant amount of students and nonstudents. BC enthusiasts favor games against Florida State University, Virginia Tech and especially Notre Dame.

The Eagles and The Fighting Irish have been at odds since September 15, 1975. Their saga, termed the Holy War, continues with fervor because BC and Notre Dame represent the only Catholic universities in the United States that compete in the NCAA’s Division I-A.

Brendan Deska, a senior and member of the football team, said the games against rivals really rev up the campus. He remembers the Eagles win, led by Matt Ryan, over Virginia Tech in October of 2007.

“There was only 11 seconds left on the clock — everyone went crazy when Andre Callender caught Matt Ryan’s pass. People were still excited about it when the team returned to campus. It was a really fun time to be at BC,” he said.

Cailin Brodel, a senior economics major, agreed.

“There was an air of excitement at BC when the team was doing well. Everyone smiled a lot… it brought the school together,” she said.

So what if you missed out on buying football tickets?

The campus is filled with adults, children and students tailgating and preparing to enter Alumni Stadium on game days. You may want to travel into Boston if you are looking for an alternate form of excitement.

However, for those who want to attend a game, remember that it is not difficult to find a ticket. Let other students know you are looking – whether through Facebook or through word of mouth. Typically, students will sell a ticket for around 20 dollars if they cannot attend the game.

That being said, do not except to pay 20 dollars for big matches. Prices for those games tend to be much higher.


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