Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

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Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Reecy ArestyCollege Admissions/Financial Aid Expert & AuthorPayless For College, Inc.

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

It all depends who you’re calling and about what. Surely, no one needs to be a pest with questions that can be answered w/o the necessity of a phone call. On the other hand, if the student has developed a rapport (which they should have) with higher ups in admissions, etc., it’s an entirely different story.

Dr. Bruce NeimeyerCEO/PartnerGlobal College Search Associates, LLC

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

This typically does not impact your chances for admissions but it will help the college to better understand your level of interest and therefore will increase the amount of interactions and time that they spend on you as an applicant. As a result, you will become more informed of the school than if you had not contacted them regularly. Where it might assist you is if you are a borderline applicant. Having established a relationship with your admissions counselor in a meaningful way would provide them more insight into your potential to succeed at that institution. NOTE: I wrote “meaningful” way. Please don’t mistake this for calling them every day and chatting about what you read in the newspaper that day to impress them with your knowledge of current events. My advice here is to use your contact opportunities to make yourself know more that what you can offer via the application itself. Those pieces of information may or may not make a difference in some instances but you will never know unless you try. I also emphasize the borderline situation. If you are far off from the admission criteria, no amount of contacts with the college is going to change your admissions decision. The academics are always the most important part of the decision. Don’t kid yourself.

Brett RoerCollege 101 Teacher / College AdvisorCollege 101 Consulting, Founder

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

If you can meet an admissions officer from a college you want to attend, and they offer you their direct email address or phone number, not just the email or number for admissions, you should by all means use it! Making a personal connection with an admissions officer, so that someone can match a face to the application, can allow you the opportunity to advocate for yourself both during the application process and while colleges are deciding who to admit. You may want to contact the admissions officer after you have submitted all parts of your application to verify that it was received, or if you resubmit SAT/ACT scores, or there is a portfolio component to your application. There is a limit to how often you contact; you don’t want the fact that they know your name to become a negative factor either! However, speaking to admissions and asking if there are ways to strengthen your application, such as retaking SAT/ACT exam, or submitting an additional recommendation letter, can often lead to greater likelihood of acceptance if you are a borderline decision. I have seen students negotiate an acceptance letter out of admissions at competitive colleges, because admissions was willing to work with them and give them hints to present a stronger case for themselves. TIP: If your high school has a guidance counselor or college advisor who can contact admissions on your behalf, it can be viewed positively that an adult and professional is taking the time to advocate for you as well. GOOD LUCK!

Kiersten MurphyExecutive Director and FounderMurphy College Consultants LLC

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Absolutely, but it depends on the college. Demonstrated interest is weighed in the college admissions process.

Megan DorseySAT Prep & College AdvisorCollege Prep LLC

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Your contact with a college or university is considered “demonstrated interest.” Some schools consider demonstrated interest as part of their admissions criteria while others don’t. The philosophy is that a student who has taken the time and effort to make contact with a school is more likely to accept an offer of admission and eventually enroll. At a school that tracks and considers demonstrated interest, your contacts wit the college can impact your chances of admission.

Ellen [email protected]OwnerEllen Richards Admissions Consulting

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

There is a factor in the college admissions process known as “demonstrated interest”. The power of this aspect of one’s application cannot be ignored. Colleges want students who want them. Thus, students should sign up on every website for every college in which they are interested in, they should fill out cards or interest forms at any college fairs or visits from admissions offices to their schools, they should feel free to write to professors if they already have a Major in mind, and they should attend any events in the Summer or Fall that include speakers on a panel from the college(s) in which they’re interested in. On top of that, each time they come in contact with an alumna from a college, they should consider that an interview. The bottom line is that alumnus, (those who are actively involved with the college) have influence. However, beware. You certainly don’t want your private college counselor, your parents, or even you, calling an admissions office incessantly because while that will definitely make them remember your name, the recall will be for negative reasons and not positive. This maybe the biggest faux pas of all, is contacting anyone at a college, with a question, that is already answered in their literature or online because all that tells them is that you did not do your research and/or were looking for an excuse to call.

Todd WeaverSenior AdvisorStrategies for College, Inc.

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Yes. If you do not contact them at all, you probably won’t get in! Demonstrated interest is an important component of the admissions process for nearly every school. They encourage you to get in touch and ask good questions of the admissions staff. Visit (if possible), meet counselors at college fairs, and try to use the old fashioned letter (on paper!) to thank someone for taking the time to meet with you.

Tira HarpazFounderCollegeBound Advice

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Yes, in both a good and bad way. Many colleges, and particularly smaller schools with few slots to give out, are interested in students who, if accepted, will attend their schools. A student can and should show interest in a number of ways: visiting a school, having an interview, going to an info session at your high school or at a location in your area, contacting a professor or administrator if you have a question about a particular academic or extracurricular subject, even posting on an online blog or website set up by the school. Not only will you show interest in the school, but you will also learn about the school and may even be able to use this knowledge on one of the application essays. However, you have to be very careful not to cross the line and become annoying. Don’t send emails if you have nothing to say or for no reason. Don’t visit three or four times, hoping to speak with an admissions officer, if you have been told that no such conversations are possible. And be aware that there are a number of schools, particularly public universities, where interest is not a factor at all.

Prilla OConnell

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

If you’re REALLY interested in a school, it is important to let the college know through contact. That really helps admissions know who is serious about coming to their school if they are accepted. I actually heard about a student who lived 20 minutes away from a school in CA that she was very interested in attending. She knew so much about the school because it was in her backyard that she didn’t contact admissions. It got down to the committee considering her and another student. The committee chose the other student because that student had reached out and the girl that lived nearby did not make contact. Now, do you need to call your favorite colleges daily? Of course not, but when you truly are interested, MAKE contact.

Diana HansonCommon Sense College CounselingCollege Mentors

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Contacting a college shows ‘demonstrated interest,’ an ephemeral but important piece of college admissions decisions. Colleges try to determine which students are most likely to attend, if offered admission, so, showing demonstrated interest can be a key component. You can show interest through contact with the college(s) to which you apply, through campus visits, emails to the admissions office, filling out a student interest form online, filling out a athletic interest form, and more. One caveat, though: make sure that the questions you ask are not ones readily answered through a little bit of time on the college website. For example, asking about deadlines would not be a good way to show interest, whereas a question about a particular major, campus activity, etc. would be.

Nora Kling

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

These days one of the factors taken into account in admissions decisions is demonstrated interest. Colleges will take into account the number of e-mails you sent as well as if you visit their campus. If you do visit their campus make sure that the admissions office knows that you were there. If if is a formal visit make sure you sign the attendance sheet and mark down your correct information. If you are unable to make a campus visit then write the admissions counselor in charge of your area of the country (or world). However, be careful about sending out mass generic e-mails to admissions officers. Each mail should include a detail pertinent to that school that shows why you are interested in that school. This gets across your ‘demonstrated interest’.

Brittany MaschalFounder/DirectorB. Maschal Educational Consulting

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Yes. Making direct contact with a member of the admissions office demonstrates your interest in the school. You may not know if this person is a member of the admissions committee, but they could be. Applicants can start by reaching out to have questions answered that are not readily available on the website or via an information session. Once this initial contact is made, you will have the opportunity to follow up with someones directly if needed pertaining to your application, application documents, and once a decision is made on your application. You can also utilize this connection to show continued interest if you are waitlisted. There is such thing as too much contact. Admissions officers and office staff in general are very busy – if you are calling and emailing weekly – this will not bode well for your application. Don’t be that applicant. Make the initial contact, follow up to show interest and have questions answered, and utilize your direct contact if need be later in the admissions process or if you are waitlisted – and leave it at that!

Carolyn FrancisFounder

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Demonstrated interest is the new watch word of college admission’s. I believe that at least 3 points of contact with the school of your choice is very important to a success college admission process. I always tell my students that everyone wants to be loved, and so it is with schools! They are more likely to admit the student who contacts the rep/admissions office, visits and follows up, than the student who does not. And while visiting isn’t always possible, skype interviews are popular and regional rep’s do visit the areas they represent. Contacting the rep’s in August through early Fall to find out their travel schedules and interviewing schedules will ease your way into the Fall Frenzy. Establishing a relationship with that person is important, but it is also important not to bombard someone with emails, letters and gifts! Just be yourself and tell them sincerely how much you want to go the school and why. Send thank you emails and follow up with any new successes after the application has been submitted. Contacting the college can have positive impact on your chances, but be measured and use common sense about what is appropriate and how much!

Ellen [email protected]OwnerEllen Richards Admissions Consulting

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

A factor in the college admissions process is “demonstrated interest”. The power of this aspect on one’s application cannot be ignored. Colleges want students who want them. Students should sign up on every website for every college in which they are interested, complete information or interest forms at college fairs and visits from admissions representative to high schools, write to professors if they have a major in mind, and attend events in the summer or fall that include speakers on a panel from the college(s) in which they are interested. On top of that, each time they come in contact with an alumna from a college, they should utilize the resource by asking questions and expressing interest (never assume that the alum does not have connections at the college or in the admissions office). On the other hand, private college counselors, parents, and even students should never call an admissions office incessantly because while that will definitely make them remember your name, the recall may be for negative reasons. Calling a college to ask a question that is already answered in their literature or online serves as the biggest faux pas of all; it sends a strong message that you did not do your research and/or were looking for an excuse to call.

Suzanne ShafferOwnerParents Countdown to College Coach

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Absolutely. Not enough contact communicates that you are not that interested in their college. Connections with school administration (financial aid and admissions) remind them that you are indeed interested and when they receive your application they will remember you. If you don’t show interest, they won’t be interested in you.

Jon Semcer

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

There is no question that the “interest” factor at many schools is very important. Today college applications are up at most schools and applying does not mean interest. Admission offices keep track of your “interest” data. each phone call is recorded and who called: make the calls yourself not mom or dad. The admission office will track if you spoke to a rep at a regional or state college fair, did you have a campus visit, did you stay overnight, did you come for an Open House program, did you meet the rep if they visited your high school cams and if an interview was recommended did you have one? Colleges want students who want them and who have an interest in their campus. Applying is one thing , showing real interest in the school is another. Of course, admission offices know that distance from their campus might prevent you from visiting and they take that into consideration. There are some other cases where the student can not fulfill the interest factors we discussed above and you should contact the admission office and offer a reason. Athletic events, personal & family illness, exam schedule, part time job schedule, prior commitment might be good a reason for not attending campus event. Finally, the interest factors will not overcome academic record that would leave the admission office with doubt as to you being successful in the classroom.

Pamela Hampton-GarlandOwnerScholar Bound

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

I presume you ask about your chances of getting into the school. It virtually has no impact on admissions, the viewers will look at your application to determine if it meets the admission guidelines and will read your statements and make a group determination regarding entry.

Andrew BelascoCEOCollege Transitions LLC

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

The number of times you contact a prospective college can indicate demonstrated interest, which may (slightly) improve your chances at some colleges, especially those in the private sector and which may be seeking to improve their admissions yield (i.e., the percentage of accepted students who ultimately attend). However, excessively contacting an admissions officer or other institution employee can come across as annoying or desperate. Generally, students should contact admissions officers (1) when making an initial request for information; (2) to thank them for their visit or interview; and (3) to seek clarification on an item within their application (when clarification cannot be obtained via a web or Google search).

Andrew BelascoCEOCollege Transitions LLC

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

The number of times you contact a prospective college can indicate demonstrated interest, which may (slightly) improve your chances at some colleges, especially those in the private sector and which may be seeking to improve their admissions yield (i.e., the percentage of accepted students who ultimately attend). However, excessively contacting an admissions officer or other institution employee can come across as annoying or desperate. Generally, students should contact admissions officers (1) when making an initial request for information; (2) to thank them for their visit or interview; and (3) to seek clarification on an item within their application (when clarification cannot be obtained via a web or Google search).

Daniel KramerCollege AdvisorThe Wight Foundation

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Many colleges and universities track the interest level of their applicants and demonstrating a clear interest in a school can serve those students well. If you have taken the time to visit, tour, interview, respond to emails from the college, log on to the college’s applicant page, and apply, you are letting the school know that if you are accepted, there is a solid chance you will go to that school. Is it a guarantee for admission? Of course not. Demonstrating interest and being academically appropriate for an institution are two very different things. The alternative, however, applying without making any contact at all with the school, cannot help you. In fact, it can send a message of, “I’m applying to your school just to apply,” or “I need a safety and I think I can get into your school.” Remember also that there can be such a thing as too much contact. 2 or 3 emails a day to your admissions counselor from you and your parents is way overboard.

Natalie Sanchez CamposOwnerNext Step LLC

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

It all depends who you’re calling and the reason for your call(s). Of course, no student wants to be “that guy” or “that young lady” who pests with questions that can be answered by looking at the college’s website. If however, you (the student) has developed a genuine rapport (which you would ideally do in person) with admissions staff and/or others, your meaningful effort to contact can be helpful.

Kristina DooleyIndependent Educational ConsultantEstrela Consulting

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

While the number of times you contact a college may not directly impact your chances of admission, it certainly shows your interest in the school. When making a final decision about an applicant, some schools will consider “demonstrated interest” which can include visits to campus, emails, calls, and participation in off-campus events/receptions. Though it’s important to make sure the schools you are interested in know that you’d like to attend their university, it’s also important to remember that there is a difference between showing interest and badgering….make sure your contacts are meaningful and have a purpose.

Roby BlustDean of Admissions & Enrollment PlanningMarquette University

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Here is my video response to the question.

Rachel Marx

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Many colleges do keep track of a student’s “contacts” with the school. However, this doesn’t mean you should schedule a daily call to your dream school’s admissions office! What schools are tracking are specific types of contact – specifically, whether an applicant visited the school, checked out the website, attended an information session, or scheduled an interview. By making these “contacts,” you can demonstrate how interested you are in the school, which can help your chances of admission.

Mr C CoakleyPresidentAcademic Coaching Services

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Contacts with a college or an admissions rep should not be arbitrary. You shouldn’t be “running up the score” just to look impressive. I always encourage students to ask questions about the campus, programs, and academic options. The more a student appreciates and understands a particular college campus (resources, traditions, etc.) the better choice he or she will make. College admissions professionals enjoy interacting with students and families who have a genuine interest in their communities. One should call or visit whenever possible and beneficial.

Zahir RobbCollege CounselorThe Right Fit College

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Yes, demonstrated interest can make a difference. You can demonstrate interest in many ways, particularly, by emailing your admissions counselor to ask questions, asking for information online, speaking with an admissions counselor at a college fair, visiting campus, etc. Schools want to accept students who will pick them over other schools. By demonstrating interest, you are showing that you are interested in the school and not just applying because someone told you to, or that it is a “safety”.

Nina BerlerFounderunCommon Apps

Contacting Colleges

The general rule of thumb on contacting colleges to do so wisely. That’s why students are generally told to send letters or e-mails or make phone calls when they have something newsworthy to report. That might include winning an award or being selected as captain of a school team. The NACAC recently surveyed colleges about what they called “demonstrated interest,” and found that only some colleges valued it. I know in my own experience counseling students that some schools appreciated the contact and others clearly did not; some colleges tell students on wait lists to not contact them at all during the waiting period. Students and even guidance counselors should be careful about when and how to contact admissions professionals.

Carita Del ValleFounderAcademic Decisions

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

It really depends on the quality of contact and the timing. Certainly more contact is good, as long as it is thoughtful and appropriate such as campus visits, interviews, college fairs, or a special admissions group. But, emailing and calling numerous times will probably not make the process go any faster and you may end up becoming more of a pain than a high quality applicant.

Suzan ReznickIndependent Educational ConsultantThe College Connection

Colleges will love to hear from you…

But don’t just contact them for the sake of contacting them. Don’t become an annoyance. Yes- having contact now does impact acceptances because all colleges are focused on their yields. A yield is the number of students who will accept their offer of admissions and attend. One key factor in determining yield is the level of interaction that a student has had with a college including, tours, open houses, Information sessions and interviews. If you call or email a college- have a genuine reason for doing so. Do not contact them for information that would be easily available on their website. Do reach out to coaches, professors and admit staff when it does make sense for you and there is a real need on your part.

王文君 June ScortinoPresidentIVY Counselors Network

not really

students should contact colleges as early as possible. records such as college visits, on campuse interviews, tours, etc are kept by colleges for showing strong interests. in terms of how many times is right for you, I believe each student has her or his unique situation and should not be copied without the details.

王文君 June ScortinoPresidentIVY Counselors Network

not really

students should contact colleges as early as possible. records such as college visits, on campuse interviews, tours, etc are kept by colleges for showing strong interests. in terms of how many times is right for you, I believe each student has her or his unique situation and should not be copied without the details.

Nancy MilneOwnerMilne Collegiate Consulting

Demonstrated Interest

Colleges love to hear that you love them. They would much rather admit a student who really really really wants to be there, than someone who is just applying for the heck of it. Statistics show that retention rates are higher for the students who apply early action, a common way of demonstrating how interested you are in the school. Whether you visit, call, email, chat with a rep visiting your area; often these contacts are logged and referred to when it comes to decision time. Of course, you don’t want to be obnoxious in your efforts to show them how much you can see yourself on their campus. Too much of anything can work against you, so proceed accordingly.

Jill KaratkewiczCounselorEast Hampton High School

Demonstrated Interest

Yes! On a very basic level, colleges want to send acceptance letters to students who are equally excited about attending their school! At many universities, admissions officers “track” the various ways/times a prospective student shows interest in their school. This can include everything from a simple email or phone call to attending an Open House, going on a tour, information session and/or interview, visiting a booth at a college fair, etc. The more times and ways you connect with that school, the more “demonstrated interest” you have shown. When it comes time to evaluate your application, the admissions counselor will certainly take in to account whether or not it appears you have shown interest, as they usually perceive this as an indication that you are seriously interested in their school.

Jill KaratkewiczCounselorEast Hampton High School

Demonstrated Interest

Yes! On a very basic level, colleges want to send acceptance letters to students who are equally excited about attending their school! At many universities, admissions officers “track” the various ways/times a prospective student shows interest in their school. This can include everything from a simple email or phone call to attending an Open House, going on a tour, information session and/or interview, visiting a booth at a college fair, etc. The more times and ways you connect with that school, the more “demonstrated interest” you have shown. When it comes time to evaluate your application, the admissions counselor will certainly take in to account whether or not it appears you have shown interest, as they usually perceive this as an indication that you are seriously interested in their school.

Tam Warner MintonConsultantCollege Adventures

Contact

Yes. It can impact it either way: if you are stalking the admissions rep, it hurts your chances. If you are friendly with the rep and ask intelligent questions, it will help. This is true particularly in smaller and mid sized colleges/universities.

Benjamin CaldarelliPartnerPrinceton College Consulting, LLC

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

The worst thing for a college is that they admit a student who chooses not to matriculate and they know that students who make contact with a school and visit the school are much more likely to attend than those that do not. Therefore, making contact is very important to increasing your chances for admission. On the other hand, contacting the college too often can be annoying and rude and have the opposite effect. It is appropriate and beneficial to contact a college if there is new information to share with them. For instance, if you have been placed on a waiting list, it is a good idea update the college of your more recent activity.

Annie ReznikCounselor/CEOCollege Guidance Coach

Demonstrate Interest, but Avoid Annoying

Nearly all colleges keep track of contacts with individual students, such as meeting at a college fair, visiting campus for an interview, attending an event, etc. Keeping track of student interactions informs future recruitment planning. However, some colleges use “demonstrated interest” (or the indication that you are seriously considering matriculation to an individual institution) as factor when making admission decisions. Colleges began to use “demonstrated interest” to off-set students who apply to a large number of institutions with little intentionality. And, the practice has evolved as a technique for maintaining a low admission rates and a high yield rates (both figures are used to calculate several national rankings). If you are applying to a school that utlizes “demonstrated interest” to make admission decisions, be sure to take advantage of all optional interactions (such as interviewing or meeting with a representative visiting your school). However, don’t “demonstrate interest” on a daily basis–that will likely become annoying.

Laura O’Brien GatzionisFounderEducational Advisory Services

Demonstrating Interest

Colleges like students who like them. Let the college know about your interest by visiting, by contacting the admissions office to ask specific questions (not answered on the website) and by requesting an interview. Do not be a stealth candidate–show your interest and it could impact how the college considers you as a viable candidate. However, do not make the admissions officers crazy by wasting their time.

Cindy ShermanGuidance Counselor/Crisis CounselorBloomfield High School

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

It couldn’t hurt! Writing, emailing, calling – the schools do keep a log of contacts. Also, call the school you are interested in, and ask for the alumni office. Explain that you would like to set up an interview with an alumni and meet face to face – and come prepared with questions!!!

Sarah ContomichalosManagerEducational Advisory Services, LLC

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Contacting a college is a way for the applicant to demonstrate interest. However, you do not want to appear to stalk the admissions office. Inquiries should be brief and relevant. Also, don’t ask questions that are easily answered on the website.

Chris PowersCollege Counselor and Philosophy TeacherPowers College Counseling

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Absolutely! Last time I was in the Emory University admissions office I saw how they account for points of contact. It is important that the contacts are meaningful.

Michelle AronoffGuidance Counselor

Yes

Yes it can. It is called “tracking interest.” Every college does not do this. A college will be honest and let you know if they do this, but only if you ask. This does NOT mean call and email the admissions counselors on a daily or weekly basis! It means call or email when you have questions or to check on your application status. If a representative visits your school, make sure you go talk to them. Go to visit the school, go to events they are hosting such as open houses or local information sessions (usually held at a hotel or convention center). They keep track of all of these things and you will be on their radar.

Michelle AronoffGuidance Counselor

Yes

Yes it can. It is called “tracking interest.” Every college does not do this. A college will be honest and let you know if they do this, but only if you ask. This does NOT mean call and email the admissions counselors on a daily or weekly basis! It means call or email when you have questions or to check on your application status. If a representative visits your school, make sure you go talk to them. Go to visit the school, go to events they are hosting such as open houses or local information sessions (usually held at a hotel or convention center). They keep track of all of these things and you will be on their radar.

Lora LewisEducational ConsultantLora Lewis Consulting

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Contacting colleges with meaningful questions or meeting with admissions folks during campus visits or college fairs certainly can’t hurt. It demonstrates your sincere interest in the school, helps you get to know people at the school, and, most importantly, lets you get your questions answered by the experts. When you talk with an admissions officer, either by phone or in person, be sure to get his or her name and contact info. It’s always nice to be able to follow up if you have more questions, and you should always send a brief thank you note or email. While it’s always fine to reach out with questions, be careful not to go overboard. Hounding admissions won’t help your chances, and it may even hurt them.

Helen H. ChoiOwnerAdmissions Mavens

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

It is important to contact a college if you need information, set up appointments for interviews, arrange for tours, etc. This is critical not only just for practical purposes, but contacting the college is important as it demonstrates a student’s interest in attending the school. “Demonstrated interest” is becoming more and more important! However, don’t confuse “demonstrated interest” with annoying and overburdening the admissions office! No need to inundate them with too many phone calls, emails, postcards, and other displays of your affection for the school. Too much contact may be more of a hinderance than a help.

Helen H. ChoiOwnerAdmissions Mavens

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

It is important to contact a college if you need information, set up appointments for interviews, arrange for tours, etc. This is critical not only just for practical purposes, but contacting the college is important as it demonstrates a student’s interest in attending the school. “Demonstrated interest” is becoming more and more important in the crazy calculus of college admissions! However, don’t confuse “demonstrated interest” with annoying and overburdening the admissions office! No need to inundate them with too many phone calls, emails, postcards, and other displays of your affection for the school. Too much contact may be more of a hinderance than a help.

Rana SlosbergOwnerSlosberg College Solutions LLC

Demonstrating College Interest

Many colleges use college interest as a factor in their admissions decision. Contacting the college to get an information package, visiting the college, speaking to a college representative at a college fair and/or at your high school, and participating in a college interview (if available) are all easy ways that you can demonstrate your interest and increase your acceptance chances. However, don’t overdo things and contact the college so much that you become an annoyance to the admissions department.

Rana SlosbergOwnerSlosberg College Solutions LLC

Demonstrating College Interest

Many colleges use college interest as a factor in their admissions decision. Contacting the college to get an information package, visiting the college, speaking to a college representative at a college fair and/or at your high school, and participating in a college interview (if available) are all easy ways that you can demonstrate your interest and increase your acceptance chances. However, don’t overdo things and contact the college so much that you become an annoyance to the admissions department.

Erica WhiteCollege & Career CounselorMiddletown High School

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

75% of colleges say that demonstrated interest effects admission decisions. Demonstrated interest can be shown in multiple ways…campus visits, info sessions, college admission rep visits, college fairs, email contact, etc. Just be cafeful that you are not emailing the admission staff too much. You do not want to appear needy or demanding.

Bill PrudenHead of Upper School, College CounselorRavenscroft School

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

It can. There is no absolute rule and each school treats it differently, but demonstrated interest–campus visits, contact with the local admissions rep, attendance at local open houses, etc. all show this–is not infrequently a consideration given that schools want students on their campuses who want to be there. Again, how it is viewed varies from school to school, but showing your interest can never hurt. At the same time, your desire to attend only goes so far, and even if a school has had only minimal contact with student, if their record is truly outstanding, the school is unlikely to deny admission—although it can happen. Ultimately, it is more about your record than your interest.

Patricia KrahnkePresident/PartnerGlobal College Search Associates, LLC

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Short Answer: Many admissions counselors really, really, REALLY don’t want to hear from you; other counselors want to be helpful in any way they can. The problem is, when you call or stop by, you get what you get. You won’t know whether they care or not until they have1) blown you off and made you feel worthless, or 2) smiled and made you feel all warm and fuzzy inside. Detailed Answer: Contacting an admissions officer can work both for you and against you. I’ve known many, many admissions counselors who consider students and parents a pest. They believe that your application is your application, your academic record is your academic record, and any questions you wish to ask simply have no importance. I’ve also known admissions counselors who automatically believe the student or parent is lying about paperwork they claim to have submitted, or fees they claim to have paid. Every single time I have had someone tell me that they submitted paperwork that can’t be found, I discovered (after doing my own investigation) that the individual was telling me the truth: The document was stuffed into some pile, or scanned into someone else’s file, and the other admissions counselors just couldn’t be bothered to seek it out. But know this: If you are calling to challenge the decision on your application, the fact is that admissions counselors often cannot affect it. In particular, they cannot help you to get off the Wait List. What they CAN do is allow you to request reconsideration of your admissions decision based on senior year outcomes or trends. But that is something they may have no interest in, as well. If you are going to draw attention to yourself by contacting admissions and speaking to a counselor, you will help your cause if you 1) are succinct in the way you ask your question, 2) don’t make excuses, and 3) don’t make threats. An office I worked in installed an alarm system so that we counselors had a way of alerting our colleagues in the back that we felt threatened by a parent or student. So don’t pester anyone to the point that they call Campus Security to escort you off campus. If you truly believe your cause is important and you feel you are being blown off by a counselor, then ask to speak to their supervisor. That still may not get you anywhere – the fact is, no one really wants to talk to you, they’re too busy – but at least you will have had the self-respect and dignity of knowing you gave it your best shot. The bottom line is this: If you have a legitimate reason for calling to ask a question, then be a pest. But remember the old adage, You catch more flies with honey. Be nice, be respectful. Let THEM err on the side of rude and unkind behavior.

Angela ConleyCollege Admission ExpertVentureForth

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

My answer, “it depends.” Many institutions note the number of visits to websites and even log the number of calls or exchanges with student online respondents. The truth is that for some colleges and universities, actions such as these can impact decisions with regard to waitlist and scholarships. Professed earnestness within the context of evident interest can be impactful. More importantly for me, students and families who invest the energy and time to research schools of potential interest, will hopefully, make a more informed college choice.

Kerrie TrosethCollege Counselor

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Short answer – Yes. When students make contact with a college admission counselor, that counselor tracks it. Students who take the initiative to find out more about a college or to express their interest in the school are viewed in a positive light by the admission office. With that said, a student over do it and contact a college representative too much. This is viewed as an annoyance. If the representative visits your school, then attend the session and visit shortly with the person after the presentation. When you are choosing classes for your next year in high school, you can contact the admission representative and ask their opinion on the classes that you have in mind. Nowadays the admission office even counts twitter replies and facebook comments associated with their college as contact. Campus visits are also considered contact. A good rule of thumb is once or twice a year to have a telephone or email conversation with the representative.

Edward LaMeireCEOLaMeire College Consulting (lameirecollegeconsulting.com)

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Yes, if you do it too often you’ll look obsessive and myopic. Don’t contact these people unnecessarily; they’re exhausted during the fall and winter. Keep it to professional correspondence and relevant updates and questions. “Demonstrated Interest” (which is presumably the idea that this question is playing around with) can be shown through QUALITY contacts: visits, attendance of information sessions, interviews, tours, overnight stays, etc. Sheer volume can do nothing but make you look like you have a screw loose.

Penny DeckOwnerChampion College Counseling

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Whether multiple contacts from an applicant influences an admissions decision may depend on whether the college tracks interest and places a high value on a students’ demonstrated interest. Smaller schools are more likely to track interest (keep documentation/notes) on when and how often a student makes contact with the school. I know of one case where a student who was a stellar candidate, academically and otherwise, for a particular college did not get in because she never visited the school.

Joseph FrickCollege Guidance Counselor

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Not necessarily, but keep in mind that most colleges have everything you need to know about about the admissions process online, and that includes the status of your application in terms of whether they’ve received your SAT scores, transcripts, recommendations, and so forth. So before you email or call an admissions counselor, exhaust all of your online options. When you DO contact a school, for whatever reason, keep in mind that you could be communicating with somebody that has a say in whether or not you are admitted–and impressions matter. Emails littered with grammatical errors and an unprofessional tone do not reflect well on you, and neither does coping an attitude on the phone. I have heard admissions counselors say that a student calling to complain about the speed of her application being processed left a very bad taste in the mouth of the admissions counselor and that it affected that student’s chances. Admissions counselors are human beings, and during the college application season, they are very, very busy; you are one of thousands of perspective applicants, and you have to keep that in mind. With any contact, I like to tell my students to remember the three Ps: Politeness, Patience, and Persistence. You have the right to be persistent in getting information from a college–especially if you paid for the application!–but remember to be polite and patient, as it will ultimately reflect well on you.

Joseph FrickCollege Guidance Counselor

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Not necessarily, but keep in mind that most colleges have everything you need to know about about the admissions process online, and that includes the status of your application in terms of whether they’ve received your SAT scores, transcripts, recommendations, and so forth. So before you email or call an admissions counselor, exhaust all of your online options. When you DO contact a school, for whatever reason, keep in mind that you could be communicating with somebody that has a say in whether or not you are admitted–and impressions matter. Emails littered with grammatical errors and an unprofessional tone do not reflect well on you, and neither does coping an attitude on the phone. I have heard admissions counselors say that a student calling to complain about the speed of her application being processed left a very bad taste in the mouth of the admissions counselor and that it affected that student’s chances. Admissions counselors are human beings, and during the college application season, they are very, very busy; you are one of thousands of perspective applicants, and you have to keep that in mind. With any contact, I like to tell my students to remember the three Ps: Politeness, Patience, and Persistence. You have the right to be persistent in getting information from a college–especially if you paid for the application!–but remember to be polite and patient, as it will ultimately reflect well on you.

Christine LooCollege Guidance CounselorArchbishop Molloy High School

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

The answer to this is sometimes. Student demonstrated interest can affect your application. Some schools track how often you contact the school, make campus visits, etc. If they are really undecided about whether to accept you, it can factor into their decision. However, other colleges have stated that it has absolutely no impact on whether you get in or not.

Jessica BrondoFounder and CEOThe Edge in College Prep

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

It depends- sending a college 27 different letters of recommendations when they ask for two makes you look like you have no confidence in your own abilities and are relying solely on the fact that you are well liked to help you get in. Calling the admissions office to ask a question is harmless- they may or may not remember your name, but if they do it makes you look interested and eager not to mess anything up in your application. E-mailing is even better as you’re more likely to get a response (and they’ll be more likely to remember your name). Visiting the school multiple times can definitely have a positive impact on your chances of getting in because it shows you interested you are in the school and how much extra effort you’re putting in to make the trip there.

Ellen [email protected]OwnerEllen Richards Admissions Consulting

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

There is a factor in the college admissions process known as “demonstrated interest”. The power of this aspect of one’s application cannot be ignored. Colleges want students who want them. Thus, students should sign up on every website for every college in which they are interested in, they should fill out cards or interest forms at any college fairs or visits from admissions offices to their schools, they should feel free to write to professors if they already have a Major in mind, and they should attend any events in the Summer or Fall that include speakers on a panel from the college(s) in which they’re interested in. On top of that, each time they come in contact with an alumna from a college, they should consider that an interview. The bottom line is that alumnus, (those who are actively involved with the college) have influence. However, beware. You certainly don’t want your private college counselor, your parents, or even you, calling an admissions office incessantly because while that will definitely make them remember your name, the recall will be for negative reasons and not positive. This maybe the biggest faux pas of all, is contacting anyone at a college, with a question, that is already answered in their literature or online because all that tells them is that you did not do your research and/or were looking for an excuse to call.

Ellen [email protected]OwnerEllen Richards Admissions Consulting

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

There is a factor in the college admissions process known as “demonstrated interest”. The power of this aspect of one’s application cannot be ignored. Colleges want students who want them. Thus, students should sign up on every website for every college in which they are interested in, they should fill out cards or interest forms at any college fairs or visits from admissions offices to their schools, they should feel free to write to professors if they already have a Major in mind, and they should attend any events in the Summer or Fall that include speakers on a panel from the college(s) in which they’re interested in. On top of that, each time they come in contact with an alumna from a college, they should consider that an interview. The bottom line is that alumnus, (those who are actively involved with the college) have influence. However, beware. You certainly don’t want your private college counselor, your parents, or even you, calling an admissions office incessantly because while that will definitely make them remember your name, the recall will be for negative reasons and not positive. This maybe the biggest faux pas of all, is contacting anyone at a college, with a question, that is already answered in their literature or online because all that tells them is that you did not do your research and/or were looking for an excuse to call.

Mark GathercoleUniversity AdvisorIndependent University Advising

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Sure it can! Like anyone, colleges like to know you are genuinely interested in them, and staying in touch – especially with the admissions counselor who will read your application – to ask meaningful questions, can do that. Of course, writing the admissions person every day can impact your chances in a negative way! Don’t contact them just for “the effect”, but instead make a sincere effort to find out more about a college and let them know of your interest with regular but occasional emails.

Mark GathercoleUniversity AdvisorIndependent University Advising

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Sure it can! Like anyone, colleges like to know you are genuinely interested in them, and staying in touch – especially with the admissions counselor who will read your application – to ask meaningful questions, can do that. Of course, writing the admissions person every day can impact your chances in a negative way! Don’t contact them just for “the effect”, but instead make a sincere effort to find out more about a college and let them know of your interest with regular but occasional emails.

Heather TomaselloWriting CoachThe EssayLady, LLC

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Obviously you don’t want to make a nuisance of yourself. However, if you have specific questions regarding the universities you are applying to (that aren’t answered on the university’s website,) why not contact their admissions office and ask? The caveat here is that you ask politely, and do not call every day. Being “one of those” students can actually hurt your chances of admission, as admissions officers don’t want problem students or parents. If in doubt, ask your guidance counselor to reach out. Questions to Ask Admissions Offices 1. How many applications do you expect to receive, and how many students will be offered admission? 2. How much weight is given to the essay as part of the whole application? 3. How many people evaluate each application? 4. What kind of rubrics are used? Admissions officers should have no problem answering these questions for you. It always shocks me as I work with students how little they take advantage of this resource.

Heather TomaselloWriting CoachThe EssayLady, LLC

Can the number of times you contact a college impact your chances?

Obviously you don’t want to make a nuisance of yourself. However, if you have specific questions regarding the universities you are applying to (that aren’t answered on the university’s website,) why not contact their admissions office and ask? The caveat here is that you ask politely, and do not call every day. Being “one of those” students can actually hurt your chances of admission, as admissions officers don’t want problem students or parents. If in doubt, ask your guidance counselor to reach out. Questions to Ask Admissions Offices 1. How many applications do you expect to receive, and how many students will be offered admission? 2. How much weight is given to the essay as part of the whole application? 3. How many people evaluate each application? 4. What kind of rubrics are used? Admissions officers should have no problem answering these questions for you. It always shocks me as I work with students how little they take advantage of this resource.

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