Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

College Admissions

Our Counselors Answered:

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

Frances Gard

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

Colleges are not required to keep parents informed of the student’s progress. FERPA privacy laws state that the student is 18 and therefore are not under the parent’s jurisdiction. However, as the parent of a college freshman, colleges give the students the option to allow their parents access to some or all of their information. My child is pretty responsible so I requested access to the burser’s (place you pay) office and the financial aid office. I also have the ability to put money on her account for her to use on campus. Check with the college that you attend for options.

Annie ReznikCounselor/CEOCollege Guidance Coach

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

Per FERPA (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act), colleges are prohibited from sharing student information (including grades and course registration) with anyone.

Steven CrispOwner Crisp College Advising

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

Yes and No. It will also depend on the individual college’s system. Since the child is now 18, they are responsible for themselves so grade reports aren’t sent home. Everything is online. Some more advanced colleges allow students to give their parent’s access to certain parts of their information online. In other situations you can ask for the login information so that you can check on your own. But, I would say it is rare that grade reports are mailed anymore.

Patricia KrahnkePresident/PartnerGlobal College Search Associates, LLC

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

Short answer: No. Google Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA): “FERPA gives parents certain rights with respect to their children’s education records. These rights transfer to the student when he or she reaches the age of 18 or attends a school beyond the high school level. Students to whom the rights have transferred are ‘eligible students.'” Detailed answer: Once students enter college, it is their responsibility to communicate with their parents. By law, unless the student signs a FERPA waiver, the college cannot legally reveal anything to the parents. This is not just in terms of academics, but also in terms of any social difficulties. The following is information from the government FERPA web site: The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99) is a Federal law that protects the privacy of student education records. The law applies to all schools that receive funds under an applicable program of the U.S. Department of Education. FERPA gives parents certain rights with respect to their children’s education records. These rights transfer to the student when he or she reaches the age of 18 or attends a school beyond the high school level. Students to whom the rights have transferred are “eligible students.” Parents or eligible students have the right to inspect and review the student’s education records maintained by the school. Schools are not required to provide copies of records unless, for reasons such as great distance, it is impossible for parents or eligible students to review the records. Schools may charge a fee for copies. Parents or eligible students have the right to request that a school correct records which they believe to be inaccurate or misleading. If the school decides not to amend the record, the parent or eligible student then has the right to a formal hearing. After the hearing, if the school still decides not to amend the record, the parent or eligible student has the right to place a statement with the record setting forth his or her view about the contested information. Generally, schools must have written permission from the parent or eligible student in order to release any information from a student’s education record. However, FERPA allows schools to disclose those records, without consent, to the following parties or under the following conditions (34 CFR § 99.31): School officials with legitimate educational interest; Other schools to which a student is transferring; Specified officials for audit or evaluation purposes; Appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student; Organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the school; Accrediting organizations; To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena; Appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies; and State and local authorities, within a juvenile justice system, pursuant to specific State law. Schools may disclose, without consent, “directory” information such as a student’s name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, honors and awards, and dates of attendance. However, schools must tell parents and eligible students about directory information and allow parents and eligible students a reasonable amount of time to request that the school not disclose directory information about them. Schools must notify parents and eligible students annually of their rights under FERPA. The actual means of notification (special letter, inclusion in a PTA bulletin, student handbook, or newspaper article) is left to the discretion of each school. For additional information, you may call 1-800-USA-LEARN (1-800-872-5327) (voice). Individuals who use TDD may call 1-800-437-0833. Or you may contact us at the following address: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20202-8520

Nina ScullerDirectorCollege Prep

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

Not generally, a student has to give permission for parents to have access to their account. Since the student is considered an adult, it is the student’s responsibility to keep track of and inform parents of his/her academic progress.

Nina ScullerDirectorCollege Prep

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

Not generally, a student has to give permission for parents to have access to their account. Since the student is considered an adult, it is the student’s responsibility to keep track of and inform parents of his/her academic progress.

Diana HansonCommon Sense College CounselingCollege Mentors

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

Colleges do not keep you informed of your child’s academic progress–they only communicate with the student. Even though you’re considered financially responsible for your student until the age of 24 (or post Bachelor’s degree), you do not get any information about the student’s course work, progress, grades, health care, finances, or anything else, unless your student specifically gives the college permission to have contact you. Even then, you will be the one asking (your child or the college)…the college will not reach out to you.

Dr. Bruce NeimeyerCEO/PartnerGlobal College Search Associates, LLC

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

It is not likely that the parent will be informed of the students academic progress. Once student enter into college, they are considered adults and the law restricts what university personnel are permitted to share with anyone other than the student. Some colleges however have mechanisms in place that will allow student to indicate that information should be shared with the parents or guardians. But this is usually not automatic and requires the student to contact the appropriate office on campus and complete the necessary steps to allow such individuals access to their information. Keep in mind that this may give parents access but it is not automatic and typically the parents will need to reach and seek out the information each semester.

Ivery McKnight

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

Report cards are generally mailed home at the end of each term. However, parents should be mindful that the college experience does not provide daily monitoring of attendance and or academic progress that one may have experienced within the high school setting. It is imperative for parents as stakeholders of their child’s experience and future however, to maintain accurate records of their child performance in the event of discrepancies in Unit accumulation and order course completion for meeting degree requirements.

Mary Mariani

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

Colleges are not required to keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress. Once students attend a university, college, or even a community college, parents do not have the right to access information about their student. Students may select to give their parents access to this information by giving them the codes needed to access transcripts and any other information. I know that in many cases parents are not happy with this because many are financially supporting their children, but the institutions are governed by right to privacy laws that protects the students from anyone having access without their permission.

Shawn RogersAdmissions CounselorTemple University Japan Campus

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

Colleges do not give academic progress to parents of students who are 18 or older. This is because these students are legally considered adults, and distributing the records to parents would be considered a violation of privacy. That being said, most schools have some sort of release forms available. Basically, your student needs to sign these consent forms to allow the records to be released to you.

Kris HintzFounderPosition U 4 College LLC

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

No, because colleges want to protect the student’s privacy (just like HPPA in healthcare). A student has a login to go online to access his or her grades, and the parents can only see the grades if the student shares the login info with the parents. Given this situation, it is important for college students to develop independence and ownership of their college performance. This is ultimately the goal, isn’t it? Autonomous adulthood? Parents can help high school students develop those “independence muscles” so that they will be more prepared to be truly independent in college. If your student is not quite ready for total independence freshman year of college, it is essential for you as a parent to have the kind of relationship with your young adult that will promote openness about his or her college performance. Your student has to give you permission (and login info) to see his college record, so if you want to see it, you have to have a good working relationship with your kid.

Carita Del ValleFounderAcademic Decisions

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

No! It is against privacy laws. That is why good communication is vital before sending a child off to school.

Renee Boone

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

Colleges do not keep parents apprised of their student’s academic progress.

Eric Beers, Ph.D.College and Career CounselorAir Academy High School

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

No, because of the Privacy Act, parents are not kept informed of their child’s academic grades, attendance, or performance. Parents must learn from their children what is going on with their classes. Parents must also teach students to be self-advocates, because parents can no longer talk to their children’s teachers like they could in high school.

Cheryl Millington

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

Absolutely not! I’m also the mother of a son in university and I too wished that I can get regular updates of how he’s doing, but there are privacy laws against this. If you want to know how your child is progressing you’ll have to get that information from your child. Therefore, it’s so important to keep the lines of communication open through the school research and application process. I recommend that you start by knowing your child’s courses and schedule. This way when you communicate with your child on a given day, you can casually ask how their X lecture was today. Also, in your conversations casually ask about assignments they are working on or tests/exams they are studying for. It then becomes easier to ask how they did on each individual piece of work a week or so after the essay was due or exam written. Be positive and encouraging if they are disappointed with their grade. Remind and encourage them to get extra help from the various support services on campus. Likewise, congratulate them when they receive good grades. Don’t always ask about grades and when you do keep the conversation light. Hopefully, this will help to not only know how your child is progressing, but gives you a chance to continue to be a great support and a great parent.

Lora LewisEducational ConsultantLora Lewis Consulting

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

College students are young adults. Most students are also over the age of 18, which means they are “legally” adults who assume full responsibility for their own lives, including their educations. It’s up to students whether or not they share their academic progress with their families. Colleges don’t send grades to parents or otherwise keep parents apprised of their student’s educational progress, even if the parents are financing or contributing to the cost of that education. This can make parents uncomfortable. How can they be sure their student is doing well? What if he is flunking out? What if she dropped most of her classes, joined the circus, and is keeping it a secret? There are definitely scary stories out there about parents who believed their kid was doing perfectly well in college until she came home at the end of term and finally admitted that she had been placed on academic probation or had already been kicked out of school. For better or worse, it’s up to the kid to decide what and how much he tells his family about his academic progress. The good news is that, even in the worst academic probation or dismissal cases, there are still ways for kids to complete a college education. It’s never the end of the world. Parents who want to know how their student is doing in college should ask him or her. They’ll get more honest, valuable information if they’ve established a supportive and trusting relationship with their student when it comes to academic matters. Kids don’t want to disappoint their parents, and if things are rough, they might not let mom and dad know right away. But they’re more likely to do so before the situation becomes dire if they know their parents will ultimately be supportive and will try to help them resolve academic challenges in a constructive way that is satisfactory to everyone involved.

Jeana RobbinsCounselor

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

They typically do not. This is a major point of contention for some parents, but there are legal guidlines that prevent this information from being distributed, even to parents who pay for tuition. There are exceptions to this rule, however, ideally, parents and children should communicate honestly and openly to avoid any issues arising in this area.

Jeana RobbinsCounselor

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

They typically do not. This is a major point of contention for some parents, but there are legal guidlines that prevent this information from being distributed, even to parents who pay for tuition. There are exceptions to this rule, however, ideally, parents and children should communicate honestly and openly to avoid any issues arising in this area.

Patricia KrahnkePresident/PartnerGlobal College Search Associates, LLC

Know Your FERPA

Short answer: No. Google Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA): “FERPA gives parents certain rights with respect to their children’s education records. These rights transfer to the student when he or she reaches the age of 18 or attends a school beyond the high school level. Students to whom the rights have transferred are ‘eligible students.'” Detailed answer: Once students enter college, it is their responsibility to communicate with their parents. By law, unless the student signs a FERPA waiver, the college cannot legally reveal anything to the parents. This is not just in terms of academics, but also in terms of any social difficulties. The following is information from the government FERPA web site: The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99) is a Federal law that protects the privacy of student education records. The law applies to all schools that receive funds under an applicable program of the U.S. Department of Education. FERPA gives parents certain rights with respect to their children’s education records. These rights transfer to the student when he or she reaches the age of 18 or attends a school beyond the high school level. Students to whom the rights have transferred are “eligible students.” Parents or eligible students have the right to inspect and review the student’s education records maintained by the school. Schools are not required to provide copies of records unless, for reasons such as great distance, it is impossible for parents or eligible students to review the records. Schools may charge a fee for copies. Parents or eligible students have the right to request that a school correct records which they believe to be inaccurate or misleading. If the school decides not to amend the record, the parent or eligible student then has the right to a formal hearing. After the hearing, if the school still decides not to amend the record, the parent or eligible student has the right to place a statement with the record setting forth his or her view about the contested information. Generally, schools must have written permission from the parent or eligible student in order to release any information from a student’s education record. However, FERPA allows schools to disclose those records, without consent, to the following parties or under the following conditions (34 CFR § 99.31): School officials with legitimate educational interest; Other schools to which a student is transferring; Specified officials for audit or evaluation purposes; Appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student; Organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the school; Accrediting organizations; To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena; Appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies; and State and local authorities, within a juvenile justice system, pursuant to specific State law. Schools may disclose, without consent, “directory” information such as a student’s name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, honors and awards, and dates of attendance. However, schools must tell parents and eligible students about directory information and allow parents and eligible students a reasonable amount of time to request that the school not disclose directory information about them. Schools must notify parents and eligible students annually of their rights under FERPA. The actual means of notification (special letter, inclusion in a PTA bulletin, student handbook, or newspaper article) is left to the discretion of each school. For additional information, you may call 1-800-USA-LEARN (1-800-872-5327) (voice). Individuals who use TDD may call 1-800-437-0833. Or you may contact us at the following address: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20202-8520

Lynette MathewsDirectorThe College Planning Center

Keep the communication open.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act or FERPA is a federal law that was passed to protect student education records. Once students reach the age of 18 years or attend college, schools can no longer provide parents with academic records – including grades, without the student’s consent. If a parent is interested in monitoring their student’s academic progress, I suggest they request that their student sign a consent form at the beginning of the school year BEFORE any challenges arise.

Sarah ContomichalosManagerEducational Advisory Services, LLC

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

Once a student is 18, by law colleges may not keep parents informed unless the student has signed a waiver allowing for this to happen.

Michelle AronoffGuidance Counselor

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

No they don’t. Once the student is 18 they are considered an adult, no matter who is paying for the education. it is entirely up to the student themselves to keep up with their studies.The university communicates grades directly to them, usually through an online system.

Nancy MilneOwnerMilne Collegiate Consulting

FERPA

Do to federal privacy laws, unless forms have been signed allowing access, parents will be dependent on their children updating them on their academic progress. While this can feel frustrating, especially if mom and dad are paying the bill for school, it is etched in stone. Keep those lines of communication open with a healthy dialogue about expectations and support and all will be fine.

Pamela Hampton-GarlandOwnerScholar Bound

Colleges informing Parents about students

Remember your “child” is now an adult and to the college it is their responsibilty to inform you of their progress (even if you are paying). Remember the relationship changes when high school ends. The progress is reported but access is given or taken by the adult student. Establishing boundaries is the best way to remain involved throughout their college career, and recognizing that you (or your money) may have the upper hand, on your child, but you must first realize that your young adult is doing what you have raised them to be; adults.

Patricia KrahnkePresident/PartnerGlobal College Search Associates, LLC

FERPA

Short answer: No. Google Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA): “FERPA gives parents certain rights with respect to their children’s education records. These rights transfer to the student when he or she reaches the age of 18 or attends a school beyond the high school level. Students to whom the rights have transferred are ‘eligible students.'” Detailed answer: Once students enter college, it is their responsibility to communicate with their parents. By law, unless the student signs a FERPA waiver, the college cannot legally reveal anything to the parents. This is not just in terms of academics, but also in terms of any social difficulties. The following is information from the government FERPA web site: The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99) is a Federal law that protects the privacy of student education records. The law applies to all schools that receive funds under an applicable program of the U.S. Department of Education. FERPA gives parents certain rights with respect to their children’s education records. These rights transfer to the student when he or she reaches the age of 18 or attends a school beyond the high school level. Students to whom the rights have transferred are “eligible students.” Parents or eligible students have the right to inspect and review the student’s education records maintained by the school. Schools are not required to provide copies of records unless, for reasons such as great distance, it is impossible for parents or eligible students to review the records. Schools may charge a fee for copies. Parents or eligible students have the right to request that a school correct records which they believe to be inaccurate or misleading. If the school decides not to amend the record, the parent or eligible student then has the right to a formal hearing. After the hearing, if the school still decides not to amend the record, the parent or eligible student has the right to place a statement with the record setting forth his or her view about the contested information. Generally, schools must have written permission from the parent or eligible student in order to release any information from a student’s education record. However, FERPA allows schools to disclose those records, without consent, to the following parties or under the following conditions (34 CFR § 99.31): School officials with legitimate educational interest; Other schools to which a student is transferring; Specified officials for audit or evaluation purposes; Appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student; Organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the school; Accrediting organizations; To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena; Appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies; and State and local authorities, within a juvenile justice system, pursuant to specific State law. Schools may disclose, without consent, “directory” information such as a student’s name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, honors and awards, and dates of attendance. However, schools must tell parents and eligible students about directory information and allow parents and eligible students a reasonable amount of time to request that the school not disclose directory information about them. Schools must notify parents and eligible students annually of their rights under FERPA. The actual means of notification (special letter, inclusion in a PTA bulletin, student handbook, or newspaper article) is left to the discretion of each school. For additional information, you may call 1-800-USA-LEARN (1-800-872-5327) (voice). Individuals who use TDD may call 1-800-437-0833. Or you may contact us at the following address: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20202-8520

Erica WhiteCollege & Career CounselorMiddletown High School

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

Colleges do not keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress due to the fact this would be a violation of the privacy act. As a parent, you can have your child sign permission to allow you to have contact with financial aid, the bursars office etc. Due to the fact that many parents are helping to pay for the student’s education, students usually have no problem signing over permission for the parent to communicate with school.

王文君 June ScortinoPresidentIVY Counselors Network

not at all unless the permissions granted by the students

I ask my parents to check on the transcript for last year before they ready to send the check for this year. colleges does not inform the parents unless they have permissions from their kids.

Nicholas Umphrey

Keeping tabs on my co-ed kiddo

By FERPA law, colleges are not required to send parents grades in the way of report cards since almost all college students are legal adults at age 18 or older. Often it is up to the student to keep the parent informed. It is also easy for parents to view grades because this tends to be a paperless reporting system these days. If parents have a their kiddo’s login information, they can usually see final grades.

Tam Warner MintonConsultantCollege Adventures

College and Parents.

NO. Colleges do not keep parents informed of grades, etc. Colleges treat your child as an adult, and if you want to know how your student is doing, you should ask them. You can, of course, make it a requirement for your child to send you their grades at the end of the semester, but it is a requirement for your student, not the college.

Benjamin CaldarelliPartnerPrinceton College Consulting, LLC

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

No

Corey FischerPresidentCollegeClarity

Your child is an “adult” now

Colleges do not tell you how your child is doing. I know–they make you pay, but they will not tell you anything–very frustrating. But those are the laws. They cannot, legally, devulge any information to you unless your child has signed permission for them to do so. Most parents circumvent this by just making the student give them the student account login information, that way parents can see when the student needs more meal money/book store money on their student card, as well as the grades.

Michelle GreenAdmissions ConsultantMy College Admissions Coach

The simple answer is No.

FERPA won’t allow them to update you about the student, unless the student and parents sign the form that says that mom and dad have access to your school records. Progress and grade reports do not come home, either. It’s usually up to the student to share this information with the parents. I have known students on academic probation whose parents had no clue until the student called to tell them that they “needed to come home”, which can be code word for academic dismissal. As a parent, I have asked my own kids to share their grades with me. I won’t bug them about their grades as long as they are making academic progress in good standing, but I expect that they will share this information with me. After all, I am helping them to get an education, the least they can do is tell me how they did in that Calc class!

Tyler BurtonPresident Burton College Tours

If you pay then you should know

Once your student turns 18 then you have no right to your child’s academic records. Be clear at home about your expectations from the registrars office. If you are paying for your child’s education then you have every right to see their grades. Insist that your children sign the waiver and have a copy of their grades sent to you.

Bill PrudenHead of Upper School, College CounselorRavenscroft School

Parents: To Stay Informed Communicate With Your Child

One of the best reasons to allow students to not only handle their own admission process, but also to encourage their ownership of the whole academic enterprise–i.e. Mom and Dad, keep the helicopter grounded–is the fact that due to federal privacy laws, once they get to college the school will tell parents virtually nothing. It does not matter who is signing the check, the schools communicate with the students. Consequently, they need to be prepared for the responsibilities inherent in that reality. Hopefully the right communication channels have been established during the high school years, but if not, adjustments will need to be made.

kati swansonCounselorTMCC HS

Colleges have very limited contact with parents

Due to federal privacy laws colleges can share very little information with parents of students. Academic progress is an area that is considered confidential is not shared with parents. Many institutions have waivers that the student can sign giving the institution permission to share information with specific people listed on the waiver.

Laura O’Brien GatzionisFounderEducational Advisory Services

FERPA

The Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act applies to all schools that receive funding from the U.S. Department of Education. Essentially, this law gives parents certain rights in regard to their children’s education. These rights transfer over the student once the student reaches the majority age of 18 or attends a post-secondary school. In order for parents to receive the education records of a college student, the student must authorize the parents to receive the information in writing.

Nina BerlerFounderunCommon Apps

Academic Progress

It is always amusing to me that parents often pay the tuition, but students have to grant permission for certain records – in my case my son’s tuition bill – to be forwarded. Some colleges may post on their websites that parents may request grades, but only if their son or daughter signs off on such a request! The reason is FERPA (the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act),which allows college students to determine who sees their records.

Jane McClurePartnerMcClure, Mailory & Baron Educational Counseling

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

Here is my video response to the question.

Suzanne ShafferOwnerParents Countdown to College Coach

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

If you student is 18, colleges are not required to inform parents. The best you can do is ask your student regularly about their progress. After all you are most likely contributing to the education expenses. If you’re investing you should know their progress.

Reecy ArestyCollege Admissions/Financial Aid Expert & AuthorPayless For College, Inc.

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

Some do, but most don’t, and you’ll need a Philadelphia lawyer to get a copy of their transcript!

Amberley WolfCollege ConsultantWolf College Consulting

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child’s academic progress?

Due to FERPA (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Policy) parents are not informed on their child’s academic progress unless the student has signed off official documents stating that their parents can have access to their academics. If a student does give parents access to this information, the parent still needs to be the one that is proactive to receive the information. The college will not call you if your child is not doing well in their classes, the parent needs to be the one that activates the conversation.

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