How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

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How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Helen Cella

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Research the mission of the school

Nancy MilneOwnerMilne Collegiate Consulting

Interview Preparation

Thinking about your answers to potential questions can be invaluable. You don’t want to be caught off guard, stumbling through a response with “uhs” and “I don’t knows”. You can seriously demonstrate interest by showing how you “fit” at that school. Make sure you’ve done your research and have good questions to ask the interviewer as well. Don’t inquire about something that you could find the answer to yourself. Actually practicing with someone may help reduce the jitters, so don’t forget to have a dry run. Independent Educational Consultants can put you through some practice sessions, so that you will feel prepared.

Nicholas Umphrey

Preparing for interviews

Ask your guidance counselor for standard college interview questions, they either have a copy in their files, or they can find a web address with standard questions. I would spend some time before hand preparing for any potential questions you may get and do an outline of your responses. Do not construct verbatim responses because this will make you more anxious, and you will come across as ingenuine to the interviewer if your responses are scripted. Then record yourself by video answering these questions with the help of a friend. You can then look at your posture and body language in answering these questions.

Corey FischerPresidentCollegeClarity

Research and think ahead

Be prepared for questions such as: Who are you? What accomplishments, activities, people are most important to you? What and who made you into the person you are today? What interests you? What are your passions? Where are you going? What are your goals? What are your dreams? How do you see yourself developing over the next five/ten years? What course of study are you thinking you’ll pursue? Why this college? What is it about the confluence of your goals, your interests, your talents and your personal style that brings you to consider this college? What do you know about this college that tells you it would be a good match for you? How will this college help you reach your goals? Make a list of questions. Questions that you cannot find the answers to by simply picking up their viewbook. Show you have put some thought and effort into it. It is okay to pull out your list of questions and ask them, it shows you are prepared and organized. Ask questions about topics such as scholarships, interesting research going on, hot issues on campus, what the interviewer would say is the greatest area in need of change. Know your scores and grades. It is very frustrating, and a big red flag, to an admissions person to hear a student say “I don’t remember”. It is tempting to embellish a bit, but keep in mind, they will see your transcript and scores if you apply. Be honest!! It is a good idea to get an unofficial copy of your transcript to take with you.

Corey FischerPresidentCollegeClarity

Research and think ahead

Be prepared for questions such as: Who are you? What accomplishments, activities, people are most important to you? What and who made you into the person you are today? What interests you? What are your passions? Where are you going? What are your goals? What are your dreams? How do you see yourself developing over the next five/ten years? What course of study are you thinking you’ll pursue? Why this college? What is it about the confluence of your goals, your interests, your talents and your personal style that brings you to consider this college? What do you know about this college that tells you it would be a good match for you? How will this college help you reach your goals? Make a list of questions. Questions that you cannot find the answers to by simply picking up their viewbook. Show you have put some thought and effort into it. It is okay to pull out your list of questions and ask them, it shows you are prepared and organized. Ask questions about topics such as scholarships, interesting research going on, hot issues on campus, what the interviewer would say is the greatest area in need of change. Know your scores and grades. It is very frustrating, and a big red flag, to an admissions person to hear a student say “I don’t remember”. It is tempting to embellish a bit, but keep in mind, they will see your transcript and scores if you apply. Be honest!! It is a good idea to get an unofficial copy of your transcript to take with you.

Laura O’Brien GatzionisFounderEducational Advisory Services

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

When you go to an interview, take your resume with you. The interviewer will appreciate having notes to refer to during and after the meeting. Prepare a few specific questions about traditions or programs at the school. This will show that you are familiar with the college and will give you the opportunity to learn more. Interviews should be informative as well as evaluative.

Corey FischerPresidentCollegeClarity

Research and think ahead

Be prepared for questions such as: Who are you? What accomplishments, activities, people are most important to you? What and who made you into the person you are today? What interests you? What are your passions? Where are you going? What are your goals? What are your dreams? How do you see yourself developing over the next five/ten years? What course of study are you thinking you’ll pursue? Why this college? What is it about the confluence of your goals, your interests, your talents and your personal style that brings you to consider this college? What do you know about this college that tells you it would be a good match for you? How will this college help you reach your goals? Make a list of questions. Questions that you cannot find the answers to by simply picking up their viewbook. Show you have put some thought and effort into it. It is okay to pull out your list of questions and ask them, it shows you are prepared and organized. Ask questions about topics such as scholarships, interesting research going on, hot issues on campus, what the interviewer would say is the greatest area in need of change. Know your scores and grades. It is very frustrating, and a big red flag, to an admissions person to hear a student say “I don’t remember”. It is tempting to embellish a bit, but keep in mind, they will see your transcript and scores if you apply. Be honest!! It is a good idea to get an unofficial copy of your transcript to take with you.

Scott Herrmann-KeelingCollege Counselor

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Practice so your responses are natural but not too polished. You don’t want to sound like you’ve said the same thing 10 times before, but you do want to make sure you get your point across. Find a friend, a relative, or your college counselor and spend a few minutes making sure you are making the impression you want to make. Spend some time before you go making sure you know what message you want to send. What is important that your interviewer learn about you? And do your research about the school. Try to have a couple of questions that can’t be answered by a quick search of the school’s website.

Nancy Smith

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

During the interview, remember that while you are trying to sell yourself to the school, the interviewer is trying to sell the school to you.  The ultimate point of the interview is to show that you are a good person – polite, and honest with a sense of humor about this unnerving admissions process.  To do this effectively you have to be yourself.

Richard Smith

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Prepare yourself by being ready to answer the following commonly-asked questions:

Why do you want to attend this school?

How will we help you to achieve your goals?

What do you plan on studying/majoring in and why?

Tell me about yourself, including who you are and what are some of your goals and dreams.

What books have you read lately? (Try not to discuss a book you read for school. It’s a rare fellow who reads Great Expectations for leisure. Interviewers want to see if you have a naturally-curious mind and that you enjoy learning outside of school. It can be helpful to get the conversation rolling if you bring a favorite book with you.)

What contributions can you make to this school?

What questions can I answer for you? (This is especially important because it is one of the most genuine opportunities for you to learn about the school from someone who knows. To have questions in mind also demonstrates your enthusiasm for the school. In any awkward silences, just ask the interviewer why he likes the school so much. Did he or she go there and what did they get out of it?)

Susan Smith

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Offer a firm handshake to express confidence.  Stand up straight and make eye contact. Try not to fidget. Speak in complete sentences, omitting slang expressions such as “like”, “you know” or “um.” Stop and think before you speak. Listen carefully to the questions asked, and express your ideas clearly as well as your enthusiasm for the school, both when asking and answering questions, as well as during the discussion.  The likelihood that you would attend the school, if admitted, can actually impact on your chances of acceptance. And breathe easy, as you’re not on trial! The interview is for your benefit as much as it is for the admissions office.

Diane Smith

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Honestly is my best policy. Don’t pretend. Don’t try to guess the “right” answer. Instead, feel good about yourself and try to convey that feeling to the interviewer. You can be positive about your accomplishments without sounding conceited. Since the interview is designed to help the school search for positive personal qualities, make sure the interviewer knows you can play well with others would likely become a congenial and productive member of the college community.

Nina BerlerFounderunCommon Apps

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

I have a hot list of interview questions on my computer, and I run through these questions with students before they go on interviews. By practicing in front of a mirror or with another person, a student can prepare him or herself for the real deal. There are some classic interview questions: strengths and weaknesses; challenges overcome; favorite subjects in school; goals and objectives. All students should know their answers to those questions before that meeting with the interviewer. I also have students – even young students applying to private schools – carry in their questions on an index card or sheet of paper. Interviewers often allot time for such questions, and they reflect well on the particular student and serve to reinforce his interest in the school.

Robert Smith

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Remember that you are the center of attention, so try to enjoy yourself.  Focus on being open and sincere.  Be yourself.  Try not to answer the interviewer’s questions with one-word responses, which will make it very difficult for him or her to learn about you, your accomplishments, and your aspirations. On the other hand, try not to ramble on with too many unnecessary details (especially if you’re nervous).

Lisa Smith

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Be ok with being nervous. Everyone who has ever sat in that chair, for generations before you, has been nervous.  It’s expected.  Take a deep breath, and consider even telling the interviewer “I’m nervous.”  It will enlist him or her to your side. Try to make frequent eye contact, but don’t look like you’re in pain or uncomfortable. It’s an interview, not a root canal. And don’t forget to get the necessary info to send a personalized thank you note, card, or email before you leave.

Laura Smith

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

A few of my favorite tips include making sure the student makes the phone call to schedule the interview themselves. If possible, schedule the interview 2 or 3 weeks in advance and confirm your appointment the week of the interview. Before the interview, study the school’s catalog and online resources so you can respond to the interviewer’s questions and ask intelligent questions of your own. And definitely arrive early, especially for an on-campus interview, as it is very easy to get lost on a large college campus.  Plan on touring the campus, as well as attending the information session before your interview.  You will then be in better position to ask and answer their questions.

Michael Smith

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Make a great first impression by dressing reasonably well, including good grooming and neatness. They count! How you are dressed reflects how important this interview is to you. Definitely do not chew gum during the interview or wear a baseball cap (even if it’s for the school you’re interviewing with) and make sure your cell phone is turned off.

王文君 June ScortinoPresidentIVY Counselors Network

Mock interview

most selective colleges require interviews so you need to get ready and consider mock interviews as the best way to practice. Counselors are the best ones to work with. Be prepared to ask the right questions such as rention rate and career placement services etc.,

Ellen [email protected]OwnerEllen Richards Admissions Consulting

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Ellen [email protected]OwnerEllen Richards Admissions Consulting

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Tips for Acing Your Interview 1. Watch your body language. Regardless of how brilliant your answers to your interviewer’s questions may be, your posture and body language speak volumes. This means that it’s important to sit up straight (it helps to sit at the edge of your chair), avoid crossing your arms (this can give an impression of standoffishness), and to cross your ankles. If you’re feeling super-advanced, you can try “mirroring,” which is a technique wherein individuals subtly copy the body postures of their interviewers as a way to make them feel more comfortable. However, it’s best to use mirroring sparingly, or else your interview might end up looking like an awkward game of “Simon Says.” Another technique, used by expert public speaker and pollster Frank Lantz, is to sit at the edge of your chair and strategically lean in towards your interview (not too close) while emphasizing a point you think it’s important for your interviewer to notice. However, the “lean-in” technique should be used, at maximum, twice in an interview. 2. Avoid one word answers. Your interviewer might ask seemingly simple questions, like “Do you like hanging out with friends?” or “Have you visited our campus before?” While it’s tempting to answer these questions with a simple “yes” or “no,” always follow up with an explanation. Your response doesn’t need to be verbose or complex, but interviews are often short, and you should use every possible opportunity to make sure your interviewer knows all about how awesome you are, as well as how you might contribute to the student body at whatever school you’re applying to. 3. Stay away from Interview Clichés. While it’s important to make it clear to your interviewer that you’ll be a valuable academic, social, and extra-curricular asset to the school, try to steer clear of canned responses. Keep in mind that your interviewer speaks to hundreds of applicants, and it’s important to stand out. One of the best ways to do this is to be yourself! Share what you’re passionate about, whether it’s an experience with sports, an unusual pet, or an important relationship in your life. Many schools look for students who are “whole people,” which means that they’re looking for more than high grades and impressive test scores. They’re also searching for folks who can bring a diversity of experiences that would enrich the school’s community. Your interviewer might try and find out more about your passions by asking seemingly irrelevant questions that have nothing to do with school. The best thing to do in this case is to just go with it! Enjoy yourself, and let your awesome personality shine throughout the interview. You never know, it might just earn you an admissions letter!

Ellen [email protected]OwnerEllen Richards Admissions Consulting

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Tips for Acing Your Interview 1. Watch your body language. Regardless of how brilliant your answers to your interviewer’s questions may be, your posture and body language speak volumes. This means that it’s important to sit up straight (it helps to sit at the edge of your chair), avoid crossing your arms (this can give an impression of standoffishness), and to cross your ankles. If you’re feeling super-advanced, you can try “mirroring,” which is a technique wherein individuals subtly copy the body postures of their interviewers as a way to make them feel more comfortable. However, it’s best to use mirroring sparingly, or else your interview might end up looking like an awkward game of “Simon Says.” Another technique, used by expert public speaker and pollster Frank Lantz, is to sit at the edge of your chair and strategically lean in towards your interview (not too close) while emphasizing a point you think it’s important for your interviewer to notice. However, the “lean-in” technique should be used, at maximum, twice in an interview. 2. Avoid one word answers. Your interviewer might ask seemingly simple questions, like “Do you like hanging out with friends?” or “Have you visited our campus before?” While it’s tempting to answer these questions with a simple “yes” or “no,” always follow up with an explanation. Your response doesn’t need to be verbose or complex, but interviews are often short, and you should use every possible opportunity to make sure your interviewer knows all about how awesome you are, as well as how you might contribute to the student body at whatever school you’re applying to. 3. Stay away from Interview Clichés. While it’s important to make it clear to your interviewer that you’ll be a valuable academic, social, and extra-curricular asset to the school, try to steer clear of canned responses. Keep in mind that your interviewer speaks to hundreds of applicants, and it’s important to stand out. One of the best ways to do this is to be yourself! Share what you’re passionate about, whether it’s an experience with sports, an unusual pet, or an important relationship in your life. Many schools look for students who are “whole people,” which means that they’re looking for more than high grades and impressive test scores. They’re also searching for folks who can bring a diversity of experiences that would enrich the school’s community. Your interviewer might try and find out more about your passions by asking seemingly irrelevant questions that have nothing to do with school. The best thing to do in this case is to just go with it! Enjoy yourself, and let your awesome personality shine throughout the interview. You never know, it might just earn you an admissions letter!

Helen H. ChoiOwnerAdmissions Mavens

3Rs: Research, Relax, and Relax

Ok — so that’s not really 3Rs — but I think that relaxing is really important so I thought I’d list that twice! I have interviewed scores of students over 6 years for my alma mater, and I have learned that nothing makes for a great interview than a student who is informed about the school and relaxed! Students should definitely check out the school’s website for the latest school news and information and prepare some questions based on that preliminary research. There is nothing worse that interviewing a student who clearly has done ZERO research on my alma mater prior to the interview! It makes me think that this student does not have a strong interest in attending, you know? Now for the relaxed part — take a deep breath, smile and relax. The interview is going to be about the subject YOU know best! Why? It’s going to be about Y-O-U! No one will be testing you on calculus or asking you to recite a soliloquy (unless you really really want to)! They want to know more about the person behind the application! What kinds of books have you read lately? Do you read any newspapers? What do you like to do in your free time? Those are the kinds of questions that I have asked in the past, and I suspect that many other interviewers ask similar questions. Remember your 3Rs — and GOOD LUCK!

Karen Ekman-BaurDirector of College CounselingLeysin American School

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Some schools require (or recommend – think of that as “require”) an interview as part of the admissions process. Other schools offer interviews as a means for the student to learn more about the institution, but do not consider the interview for admissions purposes. And some very large schools don’t offer interviews at all because of the huge number of applications with which they deal each year. In any case, when you have an interview, you will want to put your best foot forward. – Get a good night’s sleep the night before. – Have a good breakfast the morning of the interview. – Brush your teeth and use mouthwash. You’ll probably be nervous, which could cause a breath problem, but DON’T go into the interview chewing gum! – Practice having a firm handshake and making good eye contact. – You will probably be asked to talk about yourself, which shouldn’t be difficult, but give it some thought ahead of time, so that you’re ready to talk about the things which you feel are most important for you to communicate to someone who is interested in knowing more about you. The interview time will be limited, so you’ll definitely want to address the most important things first. – Review your information about the school at which you will be interviewed. You may very likely be asked why you would like to come to that school, and you will make the best impression if you can speak about your interest in specific courses and programs offered. teaching methods which you find attractive, extracurricular activities with which you would like to become involved, and so on. – Be clean and well groomed. – What to wear can be confusing sometimes. If you’re going to interviews in the summer, it’s likely to be quite hot, but that doesn’t signal “beach attire”! When my son was visiting colleges and having interviews, we saw one young man, also a student visiting for interviews, in a black suit and tie. It was sort of embarrassingly “uptight”. During that same series of college visits, we also saw another young man with oily stringy hair wearing a T-shirt that had some kind of death head on the front with snakes coming out of the eyeballs. Too far to the other extreme! Of course, you want to be yourself, not something artificial, but consider presenting your “best” self. That doesn’t necessarily mean wearing your Sunday suit, but you might do well to avoid really extreme clothing. You might feel that you are making a “statement”, but it could be to your disadvantage. I hope that helps!

Karen Ekman-BaurDirector of College CounselingLeysin American School

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Some schools require (or recommend – think of that as “require”) an interview as part of the admissions process. Other schools offer interviews as a means for the student to learn more about the institution, but do not consider the interview for admissions purposes. And some large schools don’t offer interviews at all because of the huge number of applications with which they deal each year. In any case, when you have an interview, you will want to put your best foot forward. – Get a good night’s sleep the night before. – Have a good breakfast the morning of the interview. – Brush your teeth and use mouthwash. You’ll probably be nervous, which could cause a breath problem, but DON’T go into the interview chewing gum! – Practice having a firm handshake and making good eye contact. – Be clean and well groomed. – What to wear can be confusing sometimes. If you’re going to interviews in the summer, it’s likely to be quite hot, but that doesn’t signal “beach attire”! When my son was visiting colleges and having interviews, we saw one young man, also a student visiting for interviews, in a black suit and tie. It was sort of embarrassingly “uptight”. During that same series of college visits, we also saw another young man with oily stringy hair wearing a T-shirt that had some kind of death head on the front with snakes coming out of the eyeballs. Too far to the other extreme! Of course, you want to be yourself, not something artificial, but consider presenting your “best” self. That doesn’t necessarily mean wearing your Sunday suit, but you might do well to avoid really extreme clothing. You might feel that you are making a “statement”, but it could be to your disadvantage. – You will probably be asked to talk about yourself, which shouldn’t be difficult, but give it some thought ahead of time, so that you’re ready to talk about the things which you feel are most important for you to communicate to someone who is interested in knowing more about you. The interview time will be limited, so you’ll definitely want to address the most important things first. – Review your information about the school at which you will be interviewed. You may very likely be asked why you would like to come to that school, and you will make the best impression if you can speak about your interest in specific courses and programs offered. teaching methods which you find attractive, extracurricular activities with which you would like to become involved, and so on. – When speaking, slow down, breathe deeply, and resist the temptation to babble. – Think before you open your mouth to speak. Consider the question carefully before jumping into an answer. I hope these tips help. If you’re well prepared, you should be able to . . . Relax and enjoy the experience!

Karen Ekman-BaurDirector of College CounselingLeysin American School

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Some schools require (or recommend – think of that as “require”) an interview as part of the admissions process. Other schools offer interviews as a means for the student to learn more about the institution, but do not consider the interview for admissions purposes. And some large schools don’t offer interviews at all because of the huge number of applications with which they deal each year. In any case, when you have an interview, you will want to put your best foot forward. – Get a good night’s sleep the night before. – Have a good breakfast the morning of the interview. – Brush your teeth and use mouthwash before the interview session. You’ll probably be nervous, which could cause a breath problem, but DON’T go into the interview chewing gum! – Practice having a firm handshake and making good eye contact. – Be clean and well groomed. – What to wear can be confusing sometimes. If you’re going to interviews in the summer, it’s likely to be quite hot, but that doesn’t signal “beach attire”! When my son was visiting colleges and having interviews, we saw one young man, also a student visiting for interviews, in a black suit and tie. It was sort of embarrassingly “uptight”. During that same series of college visits, we also saw another young man with oily stringy hair wearing a T-shirt that had some kind of death head on the front with snakes coming out of the eyeballs. Too far to the other extreme! Of course, you want to be yourself, not something artificial, but consider presenting your “best” self. That doesn’t necessarily mean wearing your Sunday suit, but you would do well to avoid really extreme clothing. You might feel that you are making a “statement”, but it could be to your disadvantage. – When speaking, slow down, breathe deeply, and resist the temptation to babble. – Think before you open your mouth to speak. Consider the question carefully before jumping into an answer. – You will probably be asked to talk about yourself, which shouldn’t be difficult, but give it some thought ahead of time, so that you’re ready to talk about the things which you feel are most important for you to communicate to someone who is interested in knowing more about you. The interview time will be limited, so you’ll definitely want to address the most important things first. – Review your information about the school at which you will be interviewed. You may very likely be asked why you would like to come to that school, and you will make the best impression if you can speak about your interest in specific courses and programs offered. teaching methods which you find attractive, extracurricular activities with which you would like to become involved, and so on. I hope these tips help. If you’re well prepared, you should be able to . . . relax and enjoy the experience!

Kristina DooleyIndependent Educational ConsultantEstrela Consulting

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Before heading to your college interview it is important that you make sure you have done some research on the school at which you are interviewing. Take some time to look at the school’s website, as well as any materials they have sent to you via mail or email, and begin developing a list of questions that you have about the school and its programs. It’s important to remember that the interviewer wants to get to know the real you, not a scripted version of yourself, so it’s better not to have rehearsed answers. Remember: the interview is a conversation, not a lecture, so make sure you come prepared to ask questions, too!

Kristina DooleyIndependent Educational ConsultantEstrela Consulting

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Before heading to your college interview it is important that you make sure you have done some research on the school at which you are interviewing. Take some time to look at the school’s website, as well as any materials they have sent to you via mail or email, and begin developing a list of questions that you have about the school and its programs. It’s important to remember that the interviewer wants to get to know the real you, not a scripted version of yourself, so it’s better not to have rehearsed answers. Remember: the interview is a conversation, not a lecture, so make sure you come prepared to ask questions, too!

Lora LewisEducational ConsultantLora Lewis Consulting

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

First of all, relax! An interview isn’t an interrogation, but a conversation. This means the student has to play her or her part in the process. Prepare for your interview by learning all you can about the school and then developing genuine questions you’d like to discuss. Put some time into thinking about your strengths, your challenges, and why you believe the school is a match for you. Be sure to dress appropriately (ties, jackets and high heels aren’t necessary, but no flip flops or shorts). Have something to eat and drink beforehand so you’re not distracted by gnawing hunger or thirst. Take a book you’re currently reading along with you; it will come in handy if you have to wait and can also be a good ice-breaker to start conversation with the interviewer. Most importantly, be yourself. Remember that you have a lot to offer and let all that you can bring to the school community shine through. And, of course, don’t forget to breathe.

Sarah ContomichalosManagerEducational Advisory Services, LLC

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Be familiar with a colleges strengths and weaknesses and be prepared to articular why you are interested in attending. Practice and have three points you wish to make to the interviewers.

Tam Warner MintonConsultantCollege Adventures

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Be yourself. Be genuine. Mind your manners, but you don’t have to be overly formal. (Be sure to send a thank you note once you return home!) Before the interview, PREPARE. Learn about the school; about the majors; about special programs. Go into the interview prepared to ask intelligent questions. Doing your homework will be impressive, and will help you get to know the college’s personality before you are seated in front of an interviewer.

Bill PrudenHead of Upper School, College CounselorRavenscroft School

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Regardless of the kind of interview one may have, the process always offers an opportunity for an applicant to make a good, distinctive impression. Consequently you should come prepared, ready to talk about yourself and the school—and how they might well come together in the future. Be ready to discuss the things that matter to you and about the aspects of the school that have drawn you to it. Be ready to share your passion and expand upon things you may have already discussed in your application. Be ready with some questions, but don’t ask the obvious—things that you could have learned through even a cursory look at the website. Ask about things that reflect your existing depth of understanding as well as your curiosity. Show yourself to be a thoughtful individual who will be a positive addition to the school community.

Chuck SlatePresidentCollege Advisors,LLC

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Prepping: students can get tremendous results in practice or prepping for the SAT/ACT, prepping (or re-writing) the Essay, and yes prepping for the College Interview. Practice makes perfect. Obtain a list of typical interview questions and rehearse. As you practice your answers first in front of the mirror to check posture and body language, then move to rehearsing in front of live bodies (parents, college counselor), finally try a school.I had my three children “practice” at a school we were NOT going to apply to, in order to get them real life experience. For the same reason, now I offer an interview prep service for my families A good interview is going to be like a good essay and relate the most important information the college is seeking: who are you and what do you bring to their college? One way to address the “Who Am I?” type of question–and believe me there are many variations on this question–Is to rehearse with a piece of notebook paper. Draw a line down the middle and on the left side, list all the things YOU HAVE DONE AND ENJOY DOING. On the right side list all the things YOU WANT TO DO, and HAVE YET TO DO. Practice going through several of these explaining what you like doing and WHY. Also what you are looking forward to doing at college and WHY. The college wants to know who you are. On one level we are what we do.

Helen H. ChoiOwnerAdmissions Mavens

3Rs: Research, Relax, and Relax

The best ways to prepare for an interview is to remember the 3 Rs: RESEARCH RELAX RELAX Ok — so that’s not really 3Rs — but I think that relaxing is really important so I thought I’d list that twice! I have interviewed scores of students over 6 years for my alma mater, and I have learned that nothing makes for a great interview than a student who is informed about the school and relaxed! Students should definitely check out the school’s website for the latest school news and information and prepare some questions based on that preliminary research. There is nothing worse that interviewing a student who clearly has done ZERO research on my alma mater prior to the interview! It makes me think that this student does not have a strong interest in attending, you know? Now for the relaxed part — take a deep breath, smile and relax. The interview is going to be about the subject YOU know best! Why? It’s going to be about Y-O-U! No one will be testing you on calculus or asking you to recite a soliloquy (unless you really really want to)! They want to know more about the person behind the application! What kinds of books have you read lately? Do you read any newspapers? What do you like to do in your free time? Those are the kinds of questions that I have asked in the past, and I suspect that many other interviewers ask similar questions. Remember your 3Rs — and GOOD LUCK!

Pamela Hampton-GarlandOwnerScholar Bound

Preparing for College Interview

Study yourself!!!! the purpose of the interview is to learn about you and what you have done throughout your life that makes you a great candidate for the school. Keep a copy of your resume with you so that you can highlight your accomplishments and know what makes you your best person and how you will incorporate that in your studies and at the university. Remember to read the mission and vision of the institution but don’t exaggerate your accomplishments and interests but they should be aligned with what the school is looking for.

Rana SlosbergOwnerSlosberg College Solutions LLC

Interview preparation tips

— Become familiar with the college before the interview. — Think about what you want the interviewer to learn about you. — Think about 3 or 4 strengths or experiences you want to share. — Think about what weaknesses you want to explain.. — Anticipate questions that may arise because of anything unusual in your application. — Prepare a few questions you have about the school. — Prepare a binder or folder with paper, pen, a copy of your resume, your SAT/ACT scores, your GPA, and questions you have for the interviewer.

Rana SlosbergOwnerSlosberg College Solutions LLC

Interview preparation tips

— Become familiar with the college before the interview. — Think about what you want the interviewer to learn about you. — Think about 3 or 4 strengths or experiences you want to share. — Think about what weaknesses you want to explain.. — Anticipate questions that may arise because of anything unusual in your application. — Prepare a few questions you have about the school. — Prepare a binder or folder with paper, pen, a copy of your resume, your SAT/ACT scores, your GPA, and questions you have for the interviewer.

Reecy ArestyCollege Admissions/Financial Aid Expert & AuthorPayless For College, Inc.

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Since the interview can be a pass/fail, interview prep with a professional is surely worthwhile. If that’s not possible, rehearse with friends or parents and visit a book store and read up on some interview strategies. You should also be aware of the 3 things you MUST bring to any interview.

Zahir RobbCollege CounselorThe Right Fit College

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Practice, practice, practice. Don’t go in to an interview cold. Have your counselor, parents, sibling or friend ask you a series of questions. Get feedback. Try answering a few questions in front of a mirror. It is ok to be nervous, but you don’t want to shut down in an interview.

Eric Beers, Ph.D.College and Career CounselorAir Academy High School

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Certainly practice can help, but don’t overpractice. Preferably practice with someone who is not a family member like a teacher or counselor. You can get a list of frequently asked interview questions from the internet (collegeboard has some for example). You don’t want to appear “not real” to the interviewer. Relax and be yourself. Interviews can only help your chances, they do not hurt your chances.

Heather TomaselloWriting CoachThe EssayLady, LLC

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Do your homework! During the interview, you want to demonstrate that you’ve selected that school for a specific reason. Many students select schools on name basis alone, but you’re not like many students. Differentiate yourself! Be as specific as possible. Make the case not for why the school is a great fit for you, but why you are the perfect candidate for it. Discuss how you plan to contribute and why you would make a fabulous addition to the school. And after the interview, be sure to send a thank-you note. Handwritten on a small card is best. Do this immediately, and get it into the mail as soon as possible. Very few students make the time or effort to write a thank-you and this alone will set you apart as a positive candidate.

Claire Law

How can a student prepare themselves best for a college interview?

Practice, practice, practice! Have a friend of yours ask you the questions you fear the most. Ask your parents or a counselor to do a mock interview with you. This is what we do as educational consultants to help students prepare for “evaluative” interviews. The Unigo college advisors would be glad to coach you. 🙂

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