How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

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How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

Reena Gold KaminsFounderCollege, Career & Life, LLC.

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

Introduce yourself early in your high shool career and check in often. The average counselor in the US has more than 400 students to worry about. And, on average is only able to spend about a half hour with each student. IN FOUR YEARS. Those numbers are absurb. So, if you want her to know who you are when it comes time to submit her letter and to be able to say positive and genuine things about you, make sure you take time to get to know her. Pop in often and update her on what you’ve accomplished. But, don’t be a pest. Be sensitive to her time constraints.

Ryan VannAcademic Counselor

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

Showing your counselor how much you care about your current and future situation, definitely helps. I always advise asking questions. Not only will you gain information, asking questions also shows the counselor that you are interested in their expertise and opinion. This may open up opportunities, you never though were available. I had a great relationship with my Guidance Counselor in High School and that relationship opened up many doors for me while in High School. She also helped me become who I am today.

Natalie Sanchez CamposOwnerNext Step LLC

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

The same way you build a good relationship with any other human: be genuine, be respectful, be on time, be appreciative, and share information about your milestone successes! Also, ask for his or her preferred communication method, best times to reach him or her, and follow-through on what you say you are going to do! P.S. I love to volunteer for high school guidance counselors because I respect their work. They serve in so many ways for many, many people.

Natalie Sanchez CamposOwnerNext Step LLC

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

The same way you build a good relationship with any other human: be genuine, be respectful, be on time, be appreciative, and share information about your milestone successes! Also, ask for his or her preferred communication method, best times to reach him or her, and follow-through on what you say you are going to do! P.S. I love to volunteer for high school guidance counselors because I respect their work. They serve in so many ways for many, many people.

Rod BugarinFormer Admissions OfficerColumbia, Brown, and Wesleyan University

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

Here is my video response to the question.

Andrew BelascoCEOCollege Transitions LLC

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

As private college counselors, we are well-versed in the criticisms of school-based counseling. Unavailable, inexperienced, incompetent, lazy—these are the words that some within our industry often use to describe the professionals who work hardest to establish safe and supportive learning environments for our children. Research consistently shows that school counselors improve the academic achievement, health and psychological and emotional well-being of students—not to mention their college prospects; yet many continue to argue that our counselors are becoming obsolete. This argument is not only unproductive, it’s untrue. Yes, growing caseloads and increasingly manifold job roles have limited the extent to which many counselors can focus on college planning, making private counseling a progressively attractive solution to many students and families. However, it is important to understand that most school counselors can still prove as powerful advocates during the college application process. In the spirit of full disclosure, here are a few things that your school counselor can do (and that your private counselor cannot do) to help you get into college: Provide a letter of recommendation. Most colleges still require a letter of recommendation from a school official. At most high schools, this letter is written by a school counselor and is submitted as part of the secondary school report. Counselor-written letters that provide a personal, thorough and comprehensive account of the student can have tremendous influence on an admissions decision. Engage a college admissions office. At most high schools, counselors serve as the point of contact when admissions offices have questions or concerns about a student’s application. In the case of a “borderline application,” counselors may also provide an additional key piece of information or point of persuasion that moves a student into the “admitted” pile. Offer school-specific information and strategies. How many applicants from your high school have been admitted into the college(s) of your choice? Which teachers write compelling letters of recommendation? What courses are sufficiently rigorous and/or draw high praise? It is likely that a school counselor can answer these and other similar questions. In doing so, they direct students to the information, personnel and activities that improve their college credentials and help them make the most out of their high school experience. Evidently, school counselors can still do a lot for college-bound students; however, reaping the college-related benefits of school-based counseling requires that students be proactive. Today’s typical school counselor, though competent and hard-working, faces time constraints that preclude him from forging a deep and productive relationship with every student on his caseload. Therefore, you must take initiative, in particular, by: Starting early and visiting often. Introduce yourself to your school counselor as soon as possible, preferably before junior year, and make it a point to provide regular updates about your life inside and outside the classroom. Staying organized. This is especially important during your senior, as you and your counselor strive to negotiate the deluge of demands associated with the college application process. Staying organized requires that you complete application-related tasks on time and provide your counselor with all of the information she needs to submit a secondary school report, letter(s) of recommendation, and any other school-specific materials—well before the admission deadlines at your prospective colleges. Respecting boundaries. Do not make same-day requests and do not demand or expect that your counselor answer emails or phone calls outside of school hours. Being attuned and sympathetic to the many job demands placed upon your school counselor can go a long way in building rapport, as well as mutual commitment to your college-related goals. In sum, it is true that expanding job responsibilities have left many school counselors unable to adequately assist in several areas of college planning, but these dedicated professionals can still have a positive and significant impact. Students and parents are wise to consider the multitude of benefits that school counselors may bring to the college admissions process. Private counselors are wise to do the same, while acknowledging that cooperation—not criticism—is the only way to provide our students with the college-related guidance they need and deserve.

Andrew BelascoCEOCollege Transitions LLC

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

As private college counselors, we are well-versed in the criticisms of school-based counseling. Unavailable, inexperienced, incompetent, lazy—these are the words that some within our industry often use to describe the professionals who work hardest to establish safe and supportive learning environments for our children. Research consistently shows that school counselors improve the academic achievement, health and psychological and emotional well-being of students—not to mention their college prospects; yet many continue to argue that our counselors are becoming obsolete. This argument is not only unproductive, it’s untrue. Yes, growing caseloads and increasingly manifold job roles have limited the extent to which many counselors can focus on college planning, making private counseling a progressively attractive solution to many students and families. However, it is important to understand that most school counselors can still prove as powerful advocates during the college application process. In the spirit of full disclosure, here are a few things that your school counselor can do (and that your private counselor cannot do) to help you get into college: 1. Provide a letter of recommendation. Most colleges still require a letter of recommendation from a school official. At most high schools, this letter is written by a school counselor and is submitted as part of the secondary school report. Counselor-written letters that provide a personal, thorough and comprehensive account of the student can have tremendous influence on an admissions decision. 2. Engage a college admissions office. At most high schools, counselors serve as the point of contact when admissions offices have questions or concerns about a student’s application. In the case of a “borderline application,” counselors may also provide an additional key piece of information or point of persuasion that moves a student into the “admitted” pile. 3. Offer school-specific information and strategies. How many applicants from your high school have been admitted into the college(s) of your choice? Which teachers write compelling letters of recommendation? What courses are sufficiently rigorous and/or draw high praise? It is likely that a school counselor can answer these and other similar questions. In doing so, they direct students to the information, personnel and activities that improve their college credentials and help them make the most out of their high school experience. Evidently, school counselors can still do a lot for college-bound students; however, reaping the college-related benefits of school-based counseling requires that students be proactive. Today’s typical school counselor, though competent and hard-working, faces time constraints that preclude him from forging a deep and productive relationship with every student on his caseload. Therefore, you must take initiative, in particular, by: 1. Starting early and visiting often. Introduce yourself to your school counselor as soon as possible, preferably before junior year, and make it a point to provide regular updates about your life inside and outside the classroom. 2. Staying organized. This is especially important during your senior, as you and your counselor strive to negotiate the deluge of demands associated with the college application process. Staying organized requires that you complete application-related tasks on time and provide your counselor with all of the information she needs to submit a secondary school report, letter(s) of recommendation, and any other school-specific materials—well before the admission deadlines at your prospective colleges. 3. Respecting boundaries. Do not make same-day requests and do not demand or expect that your counselor answer emails or phone calls outside of school hours. Being attuned and sympathetic to the many job demands placed upon your school counselor can go a long way in building rapport, as well as mutual commitment to your college-related goals. In sum, it is true that expanding job responsibilities have left many school counselors unable to adequately assist in several areas of college planning, but these dedicated professionals can still have a positive and significant impact. Students and parents are wise to consider the multitude of benefits that school counselors may bring to the college admissions process. Private counselors are wise to do the same, while acknowledging that cooperation—not criticism—is the only way to provide our students with the college-related guidance they need and deserve.

Hamilton GreggEducational ConsultantPrivate Practice

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

Show them you are interested. Really! Go visit them, but not to just visit them or stalk them. Go talk to them about things. Ask them good questions. Maybe ask them to give you their assessment of your academic performance. Ask them good questions about activities to be involved in or better yet, ask them what activities they found valuable when they were in school. Remember your guidance counselor is human. You can be just as comfortable with them as with any adult, unless that is hard for you. But then again, if you do have issues with adults, the guidance counselor is a great place to start. They can give you hints and ideas how to develop skills “relating” to people. These are skills you will need down the road. Your guidance counselor is a wealth of information, usually under utilized. Remember, you are not the only student they have to work with, be respectful of their time, but go. Also, if you have not met them yet, introduce yourself. Always a good thing to do. When I was a full time school counselor, I really enjoyed it when kids came to talk to me, ask my advice about things. Though I was busy with other tasks, talking to kids is what I love to do and welcomed the time to get to know students I work with.

Hamilton GreggEducational ConsultantPrivate Practice

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

Show them you are interested. Really! Go visit them, but not to just visit them or stalk them. Go talk to them about things. Ask them good questions. Maybe ask them to give you their assessment of your academic performance. Ask them good questions about activities to be involved in or better yet, ask them what activities they found valuable when they were in school. Remember your guidance counselor is human. You can be just as comfortable with them as with any adult, unless that is hard for you. But then again, if you do have issues with adults, the guidance counselor is a great place to start. They can give you hints and ideas how to develop skills “relating” to people. These are skills you will need down the road. Your guidance counselor is a wealth of information, usually under utilized. Remember, you are not the only student they have to work with, be respectful of their time, but go. Also, if you have not met them yet, introduce yourself. Always a good thing to do. When I was a full time school counselor, I really enjoyed it when kids came to talk to me, ask my advice about things. Though I was busy with other tasks, talking to kids is what I love to do and welcomed the time to get to know students I work with.

Hamilton GreggEducational ConsultantPrivate Practice

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

Show them you are interested. Really! Go visit them, but not to just visit them or stalk them. Go talk to them about things. Ask them good questions. Maybe ask them to give you their assessment of your academic performance. Ask them good questions about activities to be involved in or better yet, ask them what activities they found valuable when they were in school. Remember your guidance counselor is human. You can be just as comfortable with them as with any adult, unless that is hard for you. But then again, if you do have issues with adults, the guidance counselor is a great place to start. They can give you hints and ideas how to develop skills “relating” to people. These are skills you will need down the road. Your guidance counselor is a wealth of information, usually under utilized. Remember, you are not the only student they have to work with, be respectful of their time, but go. Also, if you have not met them yet, introduce yourself. Always a good thing to do. When I was a full time school counselor, I really enjoyed it when kids came to talk to me, ask my advice about things. Though I was busy with other tasks, talking to kids is what I love to do and welcomed the time to get to know students I work with.

Hamilton GreggEducational ConsultantPrivate Practice

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

Show them you are interested. Really! Go visit them, but not to just visit them or stalk them. Go talk to them about things. Ask them good questions. Maybe ask them to give you their assessment of your academic performance. Ask them good questions about activities to be involved in or better yet, ask them what activities they found valuable when they were in school. Remember your guidance counselor is human. You can be just as comfortable with them as with any adult, unless that is hard for you. But then again, if you do have issues with adults, the guidance counselor is a great place to start. They can give you hints and ideas how to develop skills “relating” to people. These are skills you will need down the road. Your guidance counselor is a wealth of information, usually under utilized. Remember, you are not the only student they have to work with, be respectful of their time, but go. Also, if you have not met them yet, introduce yourself. Always a good thing to do. When I was a full time school counselor, I really enjoyed it when kids came to talk to me, ask my advice about things. Though I was busy with other tasks, talking to kids is what I love to do and welcomed the time to get to know students I work with.

Laura O’Brien GatzionisFounderEducational Advisory Services

The guidance counselor

First of all, discover which counselor will be responsible for you. You definitely need to visit with your guidance counselor so that when it comes time to write the counselor’s letter of recommendation, the counselor actually has something specific to include in that letter. Request an appointment after winter holidays your junior year and then try to visit with the counselor again in the spring to discuss college ideas. Drop by the office to explore the college brochures or reference books that are likely available. Ask the counselor where he went to college or stop in to discuss your extracurricular resume. Greet the counselor in the hallway on the way to class.

Michelle AronoffGuidance Counselor

Make an appointment, we don’t bite 🙂

Building a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor is simple: come to our office and talk to us! It can be about anything, but know that we WANT to know these things about you. We would love to hear about what you enjoy doing, or how you lost your volleyball game or hear you vent about your mom. Whatever is on your mind it is ok if you need a place to vent or want an adult’s advice or opinion. Getting to know more about you helps us advise you when it comes to choosing colleges to apply to and the better we know you, the more we can advocate for you in your college recommendation, for scholarships, etc.

王文君 June ScortinoPresidentIVY Counselors Network

start early and learn to work closely

it does require the student to show motivation for college admissions. counselors at prep schools love to work students highly committed. Parents must also play importmant role in in working with the school guidance counselor. if the student does his or her homework and ask questions about the best possible curricumlum, you can get your counselor on your side easily. it is the smartest thing to get people who are in the position to help you on your side and willing to get out his or her way to help you.

Nancy MilneOwnerMilne Collegiate Consulting

Guidance Counselor Knows All

Guidance counselors are in this business because they truly enjoy working with teenagers. Because caseloads can be HUGE, it may be difficult for them to get to know everyone as well as they would like to. You can help by making a habit of stopping by, bringing them up to date on your application status and whatever else is going on in your world. Trust me, they will love to see your face and be happy to help you.

Nancy MilneOwnerMilne Collegiate Consulting

Guidance Counselor Knows All

Guidance counselors are in this business because they truly enjoy working with teenagers. Because caseloads can be HUGE, it may be difficult for them to get to know everyone as well as they would like to. You can help by making a habit of stopping by, bringing them up to date on your application status and whatever else is going on in your world. Trust me, they will love to see your face and be happy to help you.

Benjamin CaldarelliPartnerPrinceton College Consulting, LLC

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

The most important thing is to build the relationship over time. Make sure you meet and begin an ongoing conversation with your counselor freshman year. Be proactive and inquisitive, talk to him or her about your your developing interests, and goals. Respect their time, but keep them abreast of your progress through HS.

Benjamin CaldarelliPartnerPrinceton College Consulting, LLC

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

The most important thing is to build the relationship over time. Make sure you meet and begin an ongoing conversation with your counselor freshman year. Be proactive and inquisitive, talk to him or her about your your developing interests, and goals. Respect their time, but keep them abreast of your progress through HS.

Zahir RobbCollege CounselorThe Right Fit College

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

At a larger school it is important that you get to know your counselor. Start early by making an appointment and then drop by now and again to let them know what’s new. If you win an office at the school or land a role in the school play make sure they keep an up to date idea as to what you are up to. They will be writing countless letters of recommendation so make sure yours has that personal touch.

Rebecca JosephExecutive Director & Foundergetmetocollege.org

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

You build a good relationship by following all of your counselor’s requirements. Attend all required meetings, complete all required tasks, and then begin to personalize your interactions. Go visit your counselor once or twice a month. Ask different questions about colleges, classes, summer programs, or more. Don’t be a pest but try your best to get your counselor to know you as much as possible because counselors write letters of recommendations for you. Always focus on strengths and try not to focus on negatives with counselors. Ask for advice and try your best to thank your counseor as often as possible.

Megan DorseySAT Prep & College AdvisorCollege Prep LLC

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

I sat behind that desk at a large, public high school. Depending on your counselor’s case-load and personality, you may have an easier (or harder) time building a relationship. If possible, begin early. If you are introverted by nature, make an attempt to be more open and outgoing when you meet your. Make a point to say hi when you see him or her in the hall. By the time you begin junior year, let your counselor know your tentative college plans and what you are doing to prepare (course selection, activities, etc.) Stay in contact, so when it comes to application time senior year, you counselor already knows you.

Lora LewisEducational ConsultantLora Lewis Consulting

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

In these days when counseling departments are regularly hit with budget cuts, many students don’t even know who their counselor is, let alone have a good relationship with him or her. This doesn’t mean you should give up and go it alone. Counselors are in the profession because they love working with kids, and if you’re proactive, it’s very possible to form valuable connections with your guidance counselor. The best way to start? Make (and keep) appointments to see your counselor. Go to your meetings well prepared and with a list of questions. Check in regularly, and don’t wait for the mandatory junior and senior year meetings to reach out. View your counselor as an important resource, and share your appreciation with him or her. Spend time in the counseling office looking at view books and searching for scholarships; this will give you a chance to chat with counselors and also show them that you’re serious about college and taking the initiative to do research. It also can’t hurt to say hi when you pass your counselor in the hallway. 🙂

Sarah ContomichalosManagerEducational Advisory Services, LLC

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

Follow their instructions. Thank them for their input and give them plenty of time to write you recommendation.

Bill PrudenHead of Upper School, College CounselorRavenscroft School

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

Take the time to let your counselor get to know you. Give them all the information you can so that they can present you as fully and as effectively as possible. That will enhance their ability to present you to the schools in the most positive light. Be responsible and responsive each counselor has many students with whom they are working, but if you show your interest and your appreciation and do your part, your counselor will be happy to work hard to help further your dreams. If you give off a sense of entitlement you might discover that you are not entitled to as much as you might think.

Geoff BroomeAssistant Director of AdmissionsWidener University

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

Communication is key. Make sure that you engage your guidance counselor. Talk with them. Set up a meeting just to go over college stuff. Don’t make them have to call you down because you haven’t met with them yet. Don’t just settle for the obligatory once a year meeting. Keep them updated on things that are happening in your life, colleges that you are interested in, and career choices that you are looking at. Counselors are so often buried in paperwork and tasks that they really don’t want to do. Brighten their day by talking about colleges and what is going on with you. It truly is the best part of a counselor’s day.

Michael PuccioPresident/Advisor/Life CoachFuture First Advisors, LLC

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

High school guidance counselors can have close to 300 students assigned to them. That is certainly a lot of students that they must get to know. Taking an active approach in this process will not only help them, but it will also help you considerably. The more that they know about you, the more personalized your letter of recommendation will be. They will also be able to provide you with better advisement about your academic and social development. Try to make an appointment to see your guidance counselor once a month – even if it’s for 10 minutes. Try to bring a question or two with you that they can answer for you. Let them know about your goals and ambitions. Tell them about clubs and activities you might be involved with. Keep them up to date on how you might be doing in a class that can be a little challenging at times. Ask them for advice. Have them go over your transcript. Say “hello” to them in that hallway. And, most importantly, let them know that you appreciate their help. Best of luck!

Mark GathercoleUniversity AdvisorIndependent University Advising

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

Frequent contact. Stop by or write an email (face-to face contact is better) to let him or her know about your latest accomplishment, or to ask questions about colleges, or to talk about your college plans, or just to talk and help him or her get to know you better. Counselors usually have responsibility for so many students that it’s impossible to get to know all of them; so you need to take the initiative to help your counselor know you.

Jessica BrondoFounder and CEOThe Edge in College Prep

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

Keep them involved! It’s tough for a counselor to write a recommendation for a student they’ve never met before until they showed up to ask for a recommendation. Ask them questions, use your counselor’s expertise. They are always happy to help you, since that is why they are there after all! Have a sit down with them periodically and talk to them about where you are in the selection and application process. If you are interested in what they have to say and the advice they can give you, they will be more interested in helping you!

Woodrow DunnAcademic CounselorFreedom High School

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

Begin by setting up an appointment with your high school guidance counselor early in the school year, preferably as a junior. Begin by working on a plan, (including possible universities) and educational goals. Know the testing dates, AP, SAT, or ACT. Do not wait until right before all deadlines are to be met. Invite your parents in to visit your guidance counselor and be honest on what funding is available. (It makes no sense whatsoever to waste time on application processes to universities that your parents cannot afford, or that you have zero possibility on getting scholarships to assist you financially). (For international students the application process and testing dates should be completed as soon as possible, so that you will have adequate time in getting the F-1 visa from the US Consulate in your respected nation). If you cannot make your appointment demonstrate courtesy and tell your guidance counselor prior. Return on a monthly basis and provide the updates the guidance counselor will need to know to assist you. Do not expect the guidance counselor to be your baby sitter. University level study requires self-discipline and motivation. You must begin to demonstrate both with your high school guidance counselor. Do not be afraid to inform your guidance counselor that you feel overwhelmed, but remember he/she cannot assist you if you do not visit them on a timely basis.

Brett RoerCollege 101 Teacher / College AdvisorCollege 101 Consulting, Founder

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

As a college advisor at a fairly large high school, the students who I have gone above and beyond in helping with their college application process were the students who were polite, professional, punctual, and willing to work as hard as they expected me to. Form your relationship with your school’s college counselor or your guidance counselor as early as possible, and make appointments when appropriate in your school to meet with them one-on-one. These counselors may be required to send in a counselor letter on your behalf, but I can tell you, the more I know a student, the stronger that letter will be! Try to bring with you the documents that can help them make college plans with you. This includes your transcript, PSAT/SAT/ACT scores, a copy of your family’s taxes, personal essays you may have written, and a list of schools or majors you may already be interested in. Bring anything with you that allows the counselor to give you advice based on YOU and your situation, so the more personal information you can provide, the more tailored advice you can receive. Also, when you ask your counselor for help, they may give you next steps, such as signing up for websites, conducting research, writing an essay, etc. The students I find myself most likely to help after the initial meeting are the ones who come back having done what I asked, so that our next meeting can move forward, not review again what I’ve already asked you to do. Remember, your counselor has already done all of these steps for themselves, they are trying to help YOU go to college, so be on point! Also, make sure you keep appointments; counselors can be working with hundreds of other students, and their time is valuable. If your counselor has a school email address they are confortable providing, you can also use that to check in with them so they can respond to you on their own time. Finally, I found that students who were able to find out about scholarships, special programs at colleges, or interesting facts and were willing to share them with me to share with my other students was always a plus when it came time to helping them. GOOD LUCK!

Kiersten MurphyExecutive Director and FounderMurphy College Consultants LLC

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

You do this by being proactive. Your guidance counselor is going to write a letter of recommendation on your behalf, therefore, you need to do your very best to let them know you and your goals. Set up an appointment, bring your resume, explain your hopes and share your college choices.

Carita Del ValleFounderAcademic Decisions

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

Guidance counselors truly do enjoy teenagers and they have their best interests in mind, but they are very busy and often have huge caseloads. Be patient with them and ask to chat about issues and concerns you may have when there is not a mad dash during deadlines or schedule making. Give them good news when you get it, ask how their day is going and say thank you every chance you get. Even if you just chat in the halls that is the beginning of a relationship and should be nurtured for the next four years.

Todd WeaverSenior AdvisorStrategies for College, Inc.

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

Short answer: be the squeaky wheel. Don’t be obnoxious, but keep yourself on their radar by saying “hello”; dropping in when possible; taking the initiative to schedule meetings before the counselor prompts you; and offer to give them any information they need to get to know you better when writing a recommendation.

Ashley Pepsin

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

With a background in school counseling, I can tell you that this is tough. The nature of school counseling right now is grim. Many school counselors report having more than 300 students assigned to work with them, creating a huge caseload of students lost in a crowd. Make yourself known. Be the squeaky wheel. Be organized. I hate to say it, but be proactive in your college search. Seek out your school counselor for advice, yes, but be prepared before you meet with them. Have some starting point. Do what you can to help them help you. Constant contact is always good!

Nicole WeinrichResident Assistan/Student/ Writer Miami University

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

The best way to build a relationship with any professional in your life, is to positively insert yourself. Show your guidance counselor that you care about your future and your success. Counselors want to help you, but the mostly want to teach you to help yourself. Show up to meetings prepared and with questions for them outlined. When you show commitment and organization, it makes their job that much easier.

Tira HarpazFounderCollegeBound Advice

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

Your high school counselor is extremely important. Not only can he or she be your advocate throughout high school, helping you deal with any problems that might arise, but you will need a recommendation from your counselor when it comes time to apply to college. I recommend that you go into your counselor a few times a year, starting in 9th grade, to say hello and mention anything noteworthy that has happened. Keep your counselor updated on awards or accomplishments-send emails if you can’t schedule an appointment. Make sure your counselor knows about your academic expectations and talk to your counselor about college no later than 11th grade. When it comes time for your counselor to write a recommendation, send him or her your resume with a brief summary of activities or attributes you think are particularly important. And remember, counselors have heavy workloads and are often highly stressed. Be pleasant and patient in all your dealings with him or her and say thank you when appropriate.

Karen Ekman-BaurDirector of College CounselingLeysin American School

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

The personalities of high school guidance counselors differ, as does the amount of time they have available to provide individual counseling services to their student load, so the following suggestions are general, rather than specific. Figure out what will work best in your situation. 1. Listen carefully and pay attention to the information which your counselor provides in group sessions. If there are any points for which you need more clarification, ask questions at that time. Show that you are interested. 2. Make an appointment to see your counselor to get specific information relative to your future plans and how to best approach your college preparation, college search, application completion, and so on. Depending on the school situation, you might be able to drop in without an appointment, but in many instances, the counselor is working with a large number of students and will not be available for “drop-in” appointments. If you make an appointment, you can be guaranteed of having the counselor’s undivided attention for that period of time. 3. Think about what you want from your college experience, be prepared when you have appointments with your guidance counselor, and be open about what your college wants, needs, and expectations are. Don’t expect your counselor to be able to read your mind. 4. Be realistic about your own strengths and weaknesses. Discuss them with your counselor and realize that those strengths and weaknesses can and probably will affect the institutions to which it will be appropriate for you to apply. Remember that the goal is to find a college which is a good “fit” for you, and there are undoubtedly many that would meet that criteria. 5. Follow through on suggestions your counselor makes for your college search, preparation, and application processes. Meet deadlines. Don’t put the counselor in the position of having to nag you to get things done. 6. Be friendly. When you see your counselor in the halls, smile and greet them. 7. Thank your counselor for taking the time to see you and for helping you. Of course, that’s his/her job, but it’s always a good idea to thank people when they’ve done something for you.

Karen Ekman-BaurDirector of College CounselingLeysin American School

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

The personalities of high school guidance counselors differ, as does the amount of time they have available to provide individual counseling services to their student load, so the following suggestions are general, rather than specific. Figure out what will work best in your situation. 1. Listen carefully and pay attention to the information which your counselor provides in group sessions. If there are any points for which you need more clarification, ask questions at that time. Be attentive, and show that you are interested. 2. Make an appointment to see your guidance counselor to get specific information relative to your future plans and how to best approach your college preparation, college search, application completion, and so on. Depending on the school situation, you might be able to drop in without an appointment, but in many instances, the counselor is working with a large number of students and will not be available for unplanned visits. If you make an appointment, you can, hopefully, be guaranteed of having the counselor’s undivided attention for that period of time. 3. Think about what you want from your college experience, be prepared when you have appointments with your guidance counselor, and be open about what your college wants, needs, and expectations are. Don’t expect your counselor to be able to read your mind. 4. Be realistic about your own strengths and weaknesses. Discuss them with your counselor and realize that those strengths and weaknesses can and probably will affect the institutions to which it will be appropriate for you to apply. Remember that the goal is to find a college which is a good “fit” for you, and there are undoubtedly many that would meet that criteria. 5. Follow through on suggestions your counselor makes for your college search, preparation, and application processes. Meet deadlines. Don’t put the counselor in the position of having to nag you to get things done. 6. Ask for recommendations from your counselor (and teachers) in plenty of time for the recommendations to be effectively written without putting additional stress and time pressures on the people writing them. 7. Be friendly. When you see your counselor in the halls, smile and greet them. 8. Thank your counselor for taking the time to see you and for helping you. Of course, that’s his/her job, but it’s always a good idea to thank people when they’ve done something for you.

Reecy ArestyCollege Admissions/Financial Aid Expert & AuthorPayless For College, Inc.

How do you build a good relationship with your high school guidance counselor?

Over time w/o “using” them. You have to nurture the relationship like you would in any situation, and that takes time & planning. Again, my old adage: Plan your work, work your plan. Nobody plans to fail, but too many fail to plan.

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