How should art students prepare for the college admissions process?

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How should art students prepare for the college admissions process?

Natalie Sanchez CamposOwnerNext Step LLC

How should art students prepare for the college admissions process?

There is a lot to be said on this. First, ensure you have support with developing your portfolio. Also, good, free resources can be found at the National Portfolio Day college fairs.

Natalie Sanchez CamposOwnerNext Step LLC

How should art students prepare for the college admissions process?

There is a lot to be said on this. First, ensure you have support with developing your portfolio. Also, good, free resources can be found at the National Portfolio Day college fairs.

Angela ConleyCollege Admission ExpertVentureForth

How should art students prepare for the college admissions process?

When considering college, do the homework! One does not buy a house or a car, which carry comparable value, without weighing the pros and cons. As much as students and families want to send their progeny to the best school, “best” is a relative concept. If you struggled in the “regular” courses and nose-dived in honors or AP courses, then highly selective college settings may not be your “best” fit. On the other hand, if a student has yet to confront any intellectual challenges which unsettled their “mental mettle” then they may want to consider very selective schools here in the US and abroad. The search hinges on knowing yourself well. Some students are hard workers constantly seeking to best their last showing as evidenced by an exam score. Others know that the last thing they seek is more study and longer study at that. In sum think about how you approach things academic. Secondly, investigate your interests. Shadow someone who is doing professionally a task or work you know, or think you enjoy. I counseled a student who was certain he wanted to be a doctor, until he sat in on a surgery – he fainted at the sight of blood. Often I coach students who are adamant that they are called to engineering, despite failing physics and calculus! Finally, visit campuses, whether virtually online or in the area. Many think their ideal is a gorgeous, leafy setting with beautiful old buildings; until they see contemporary edifices in sunny southern California. Ivy grows beyond the Northeast corridor. The best way to prepare for the admission process is to try it on by applying for summer programs, internships and other opportunities requiring thoughtful renderings of your ideas and in-person interviews. If you hate the dry runs, then tweak your college aims and lists accordingly. Until one has a better sense of self through “testing” the waters in other venues, it’s hard to be absolute about the “ideal” setting. I knew I wanted a venue where I would be successful, enjoy warm weather and have the opportunity to change (my major several times) and my sense of self. As a first-generation student, I also knew I needed a place which would not leave me hugely indebted. Texas worked for me and later that Ivy League setting. Get to know yourself and then find the niche for your “self” to grow and explore and hone your gifts. Visit campuses and apply for other opportunities and experiences beyond your familiarity and comfort zone. Do your homework-first on yourself and then on the setting that best affirms your gifts and interests.

Scott WhiteDirector of GuidanceMontclair High School

How should art students prepare for the college admissions process?

Look at portfolio requirements before your junior year and use junior year to work on your portfolio.

Ellen [email protected]OwnerEllen Richards Admissions Consulting

The most basic (and most important) college admissions advice: be yourself

The sage advice “be yourself” is now being echoed by college admissions officers across the country. Too many formulaic and passionless personal essays are leaving top-tier colleges and universities disappointed. The class of 2009 was expected to be the most highly qualified yet, but the run-of-the-mill “professionalized” applications were viewed as too perfect and robotlike to get to know the students, leading to a difficult admissions year. Admissions officers advise that not allowing a student’s personality to shine through during the application process is making the entire process fall short. They are calling for students to quash the desire to over-polish their applications or allow parents or other admissions consultants to “spin” the application beyond personal recognition, essentially leaving the student and the student’s personality out of the process entirely. Admissions officers cite the lack of authenticity and sincerity to overanxious students and parental meddling that leach the soul out of an application. Also, an over-polished application is not the only problem admissions officers are seeing in the application process this year. Another issue is that students are not taking the time to find the school that best accommodates their needs. The growing number of highly competitive high school students vying for selective early-decision spots is setting aside the idea of a “good fit” and settling for the biggest name school that gives them the fastest decision. Another symptom of the overzealous application includes the actions which some admissions officers are now calling, “admissions stalking,” during which the candidate and/or candidate’s parents barrage offices with calls, letters, and visits. The overbearing student and their parents wear on the nerves of the admissions staff, but to no avail, as many have gone on record as saying no such efforts have any bearing on the applicants’ enrollment status. The best advice admissions officers have to offer applicants looking to move ahead of the pack is for the student to add their personality back into the application process. Picking essay topics that interest the student and not writing an essay based on what parents and counselors think the school wants to hear offers admissions officers a look into who the applicant really is. In addition to picking essay topics that are individually inspiring, advisors encourage prospective students not to be afraid to take risks in their overall applications. At the end of the day, colleges are looking for people that will best enrich the campus community with skills and traits that will set them apart and help develop the school as a whole. Thus, the application process should be one of growth and development, as each student finds their niche university – a place where they can prosper, belong and most importantly, be themselves.

Ed GarciaAssistant Professor/CounselorAustin Community College

The standard process versus the department

Some colleges have unique admissions standards for certain majors. An art student should prepare for the admissions process by first understanding the general admissions process, and then by understanding the departmental admissions process. What is the difference you might ask? The difference is that all students have to go through a standard admissions process, but there are some departments such as art, engineering, business, etc that might have a different process in regards to how they admit students. The best way to find out is by reviewing the online website for the department for the college you are interested in attending. An example might look like the following: 1. Standard admissions-combo of gpa, academic course work, extracurricular activities, SAT/ACT scores, etc 2. Art Department-Student meets all of the standard admissions process, and in addition must submit a portfolio and meet with the department chair. Always take the time to inform yourself of college policies and procedures. The more you know, the better!

Erica WhiteCollege & Career CounselorMiddletown High School

How should art students prepare for the college admissions process?

Most art students will be required to submit a portfolio of their work for acceptance. Art students should look at prospective schools and see what the portfolio requirement entail (how many items, what format, specific types of art, etc). This should be done early on in the process so that they will have enough time to put together all that is required. They should also work with their art teachers who have experience in this area. Many art schools will offer portfolio review days, where a student can bring their materials and get suggestions on what to add or change. I would highly suggest attending one of these local sessions, even if isn’t at school they are considering.

Tam Warner MintonConsultantCollege Adventures

Artistic Students

If you are an artist, a theater major, film maker or a musician chances are you will be required to audition or present a portfolio. You must prepare your portfolio/audition carefully and methodically. Most portfolios are submitted online now, but don’t wait until the last minute to put it together. As soon as you have a college list, read the audition requirements for your major and start preparing EARLY. Chances are you may need to travel to some of the auditions, so save your pennies. Begin during your sophomore/junior year looking at schools so that you will be ready to concentrate on preparation spring of your junior year and the summer before your senior year. The early bird gets the worm!

Mark CorkeryHead College CounselorInternational College Admissions Network (I-CAN)

The Portfolio is Very Important to Art Major Admissions

Art students wishing to attend college and developing their craft need to consider the portfolio from their freshman year of high school if possible. Do NOT throw anything that you have drawn, painted, sculpted, etc away. Your earlier work can provide a great perspective of the progression and sophistication of your work. Taking the highest level art courses in your high school is absolutely critical. So, for example, if you have AP Art at your school, best to take that class without a doubt. Not doing so may put a negative on your application, questioning your seriousness of going into the field. Attend portfolio days offered around the country. You can take a sample of your work which you intend to submit for review to the art departments of the schools you are planning to apply to. Deans and admissions reps are available in this college fair format to critique your work and give you pointers on what else you may want to work on to be competitive to their respective admissions committees.

Erin AveryCertified Educational PlannerAvery Educational Resources, LLC

Portfolio, Check!

Carefully. Arts students will be required to demonstrate their artistic talent which will translate into additional time-consuming work on their part. 

Helen Cella

How should art students prepare for the college admissions process?

They need to prepare a portfolio

王文君 June ScortinoPresidentIVY Counselors Network

Visit schools and submit samples

Art students may apply different type of schools with different requirements. however. they should pay a visit to the schools and speak to current students about academic requriements as well as other experiences. it is suggested that students should prepare art samples and profiles to show strong interests. it will help students to gain perspectives if they are parepared to submit best work.

Heather McCowenPost Secondary CounselorThe Chicago HS for the Arts

Arts Students and the College admissions process

Students in the arts have an extra layer of procedure to go through when they apply for schools. Step one is the application process, and all the different pieces- Transcript, test scores, recommendation letters and essays. Like any student, these must be submitted by the deadline. Step two is the audition/portfolio review. If the student is majoring in the arts, this portion can be as important, if not more important than grades. Colleges state very clearly what the portfolio or audition requirements are. The key is to be prepared for the audition/portfolio review, and to adhere to the requirements.

Mark GathercoleUniversity AdvisorIndependent University Advising

How should art students prepare for the college admissions process?

Portfolio, portfolio, portfolio. Start early and build a good, complete one that represents the artist you are – not one that represents the artist you had to be in the last month when you had to hurry to put the last eight pieces together to finish before the deadline! And don’t neglect your other academic subjects. Conscientiousness in those subjects will reflect well on you. Art schools and departments do care about you as an overall student and person.

Bill PrudenHead of Upper School, College CounselorRavenscroft School

How should art students prepare for the college admissions process?

First you need to consider whether you want to major in the arts or go to an art school. Whether you choose an art school or a college art major depends largely on your goals and what you are really looking for in your education. If you go to the art school you can focus on your art work to the exclusion of pretty much everything else while an art major at a university will only be a part of the overall program and you will still be required to fulfill other academic requirements. But you will also have greater access to the other things that can characterize the college experience. You can find the appropriate career preparation through either approach. In either case you will need to have a fully developed portfolio of your work to show the admissions office. That wil be a critical part of their selection process.

Karen Ekman-BaurDirector of College CounselingLeysin American School

How should art students prepare for the college admissions process?

Most art schools require a portfolio with a representative sample of a student’s prior work in the field of art. Some schools will ask for a portfolio which demonstrates a particular spectrum of skills, themes, or styles, but in other cases, there will be no specific requirements, and students may submit whatever of their past work resonates with them. There may be a request for a minimum/maximum number of samples or a very specific number. Look on the websites of the institutions in which you’re interested to determine their individual requirements. Also note how various schools would like to receive the portfolio – CD, etc. As with all parts of the application, a student should be aware of and meet deadlines for submission. Some art schools or art departments within colleges/universities offer Foundation courses for students who have had little or no prior demonstrable experience in the field of art. In these cases, students will not be asked to submit a portfolio, but there might (or might not) be additional requirements ascertaining a student’s understanding and existing knowledge of the field. Portfolio Days are offered at various times of the year in the U.S. and abroad. Representatives from a selection of art schools are available on these Portfolio Days to provide guidance to students in effectively assembling their portfolios for art school/college admissions. Students may bring their existing portfolios to these sessions and receive individual constructive critiques from the art professionals participating. More information about “where” and “when” can be found by googling “Portfolio Days”.

Katherine CraneCounselor

Preparing for a Major in Art

Going through the admission process for a major in art is a little different than applying for other majors. A potential art student should be continually working on their portfolio and constantly seeking critiques. An artist should not only have a hard copy of their portfolio, but also be able to present it through an online portfolio platform. Typically students that want to major in art have probably taken Advanced Placement classes in art and are used to the rigor of portfolio review for potential college credit. They should be prepared for the admission interview but also for an interview with an art department representative whereby they can speak eloquently about art in general and be able to defend their ideas. They should also be open to constructive criticism and open-minded to all forms of art and opinion.

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How should art students prepare for the college admissions process?

Portfolio…portfolio…portfolio… Be sure to be keeping on top of making sure your portfolio is up-to-date and organized. Also, another thing you can do is to take art classes. Some students who are interested in art might think that they will impress a college admissions committee if they take AP Biology instead of AP Studio Art. If you can take both, great, but if you can only choose one, take the AP Studio Art. That is what you are interested in, after all.

Geoff BroomeAssistant Director of AdmissionsWidener University

Portfolio

Start working on your portfolio and get it in front as many people as you can so that they can review it and give you feedback so that you can improve it. Check out the dates for the National Portfolio Days. This event gives you an opportunity to take your portfolio around to a bunch of different colleges who happen to be in once place for the day and will review your portfolio. Make sure that you use a lot of different mediums.

Nancy MilneOwnerMilne Collegiate Consulting

How should art students prepare for the college admissions process?

Start creating a portfolio, NOW. Ask your art teacher for guidance and assistance with this. When visiting schools with art programs, ask for feedback on you portfolio BEFORE you have to submit it for application. It is also important to have studied the various mediums. Even if your portfolio is primarily of one technique, your transcript should show that you stretched yourself and have some experience with photography, ceramics, wood, paint, metal, etc.

Aurora BonnerEducational ConsultantBonner Educational Consultants

How should art students prepare for the college admissions process?

Students interested in the arts must prepare for the college admissions process just as every other college-bound student with one exception. Students interested in the arts must begin compiling works for a professional art portfolio. The art portfolio requirements vary at each college and so it is essential to contact your college admissions counselor or Art department for these specifications. However, some general tips are as follows: -Have your artwork photographed, videotaped, scanned or graphically converted to display in a professional manner. -Show a range of techniques and mastery in the works you choose -Choose works that show creative thinking and a unique perspective -Begin developing your portfolio during your Junior year so that you may evaluate what works you already have and plan to create works in areas that you are lacking. -Take your works to a professional for critiquing! An art teacher, local artist, art professor or a current art student may be good sources to give your portfolio a trial run. -Look online at the college’s art department site to see what their current students are doing. They usually have current student’s works available to preview.

Kris HintzFounderPosition U 4 College LLC

How should art students prepare for the college admissions process?

For the visual arts, applicants need to be working on portfolios from the beginning of junior year. It is a good idea to take a course in portfolio development, either in your high school or in a summer pre-college program. Check out college counselors who actually specialize in this area, who can help you develop a portfolio and even set up a website. When you visit colleges, meet with the arts department to find out the portfolio requirements. For the performing arts, applicants need to plan on a second application layer beyond just applying to the school academically: the audition process. During junior year, begin to identify (and visit) colleges and develop a “master plan” for applications and auditions. Work with a coach to choose repertoire and prepare for your auditions. Consider developing a personal website to showcase your performances.

Inna BeilinaStudent

How should art students prepare for the college admissions process?

Be creative! Make your art works, application, essays be one of a kind. Be yourself and express your unique talent in it. Act from your heart and you’ll be in. That’s the way it is! Good luck!

Zulema WascherCounselorRio Rico High School

How should art students prepare for the college admissions process?

Have your portfolio ready and available for reps.Make sure your portfolio is up to date and that you have all areas of your expertise, drawing, shadowing, coloring, what types of supplies you know how to use, etc.

Kris HintzFounderPosition U 4 College LLC

How should art students prepare for the college admissions process?

For the visual arts, applicants need to be working on portfolios from the beginning of junior year. It is a good idea to take a course in portfolio development, either in your high school or in a summer pre-college program. Check out college counselors who actually specialize in this area, who can help you develop a portfolio and even set up a website. When you visit colleges, meet with the arts department to find out the portfolio requirements. For the performing arts, applicants need to plan on a second application layer beyond just applying to the school academically: the audition process. During junior year, begin to identify (and visit) colleges and develop a “master plan” for applications and auditions. Work with a coach to choose repertoire and prepare for your auditions. Consider developing a personal website to showcase your performances.

Kris HintzFounderPosition U 4 College LLC

How should art students prepare for the college admissions process?

For the visual arts, applicants need to be working on portfolios from the beginning of junior year. It is a good idea to take a course in portfolio development, either in your high school or in a summer pre-college program. In the NY area, for example, check out portfolio programs at Pratt or FIT. Check out college counselors who actually specialize in this area, who can help you develop a portfolio and even set up a website. When you visit colleges, meet with the arts department to find out the portfolio requirements. For the performing arts, applicants need to plan on a second application layer beyond just applying to the school academically: the audition process. During junior year, begin to identify (and visit) colleges and develop a “master plan” for applications and auditions. Work with a coach to choose repertoire and prepare for your auditions. Consider developing a personal website to showcase your performances.

Carita Del ValleFounderAcademic Decisions

How should art students prepare for the college admissions process?

Get organized! Decide if you are cataloging your work by medium, date, experience level, etc. and then make notes on each project you did. In these notes, have ideas written down about your efforts on this project such as: what it meant for you, what was the inspiration, was it hard or easy for you to complete this project? Why or why not? Have much of it photographed (many angles and videoed if necessary) so if someone across the country wants to see a glimpse of something you are ready to go!

Carita Del ValleFounderAcademic Decisions

How should art students prepare for the college admissions process?

Get organized! Decide if you are cataloging your work by medium, date, experience level, etc. and then make notes on each project you did. In these notes, have ideas written down about your efforts on this project such as: what it meant for you, what was the inspiration, was it hard or easy for you to complete this project? Why or why not? Have much of it photographed (many angles and videoed if necessary) so if someone across the country wants to see a glimpse of something you are ready to go!

Carita Del ValleFounderAcademic Decisions

How should art students prepare for the college admissions process?

Yes it does. Each campus has their own ideas about what makes a high quality freshman class. For some it can mean more men because there are to many women attending, for others it is more minorities and then of course geography plays into this process as well. Why does it all matter? Plain and simply it’s variety that adds to the discussions in class (us West Coast folks see things very differently from those on the South), a different dynamic on campus from a Iowa farmer kid to a city life New Yorker, different types of education experiences from high schools around the country, and new social, political and religious perspectives that brings new life into any college campus.

Reecy ArestyCollege Admissions/Financial Aid Expert & AuthorPayless For College, Inc.

How should art students prepare for the college admissions process?

Well in advance. Here’s an old caveat: Plan your work, work your plan. Nobody plans to fail, but too many fail to plan. Make sure your portfolio is the best it can be, and set up an interview. Having an LOR from a world class person in the field can be worth an admission ticket!

Reecy ArestyCollege Admissions/Financial Aid Expert & AuthorPayless For College, Inc.

How should art students prepare for the college admissions process?

Well in advance. Here’s an old caveat: Plan your work, work your plan. Nobody plans to fail, but too many fail to plan. Start checking out colleges in the 10th grade so as to reject as many as possible. What you’re left with is your choice of schools. Write dozens of practice essays & take SAT/SATII/ACT tests as required. Get a tutor if necessary & seek out a financial aid professional so the college of your choice WILL be affordable!

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