How should I go about studying when it's crunch time?

College Experience

Our counselors answered:

How should I go about studying when it's crunch time?

Dawn Smith

How should I go about studying when it's crunch time?

Creating a study guide will help you. This is your checklist for what you need to know and it will help you gauge your progress over the next week. Write down the important points, terms, formulas and major concepts you know will appear on the test and cross-reference these with where they’re mentioned in your textbook or notes.

Robin Smith

How should I go about studying when it's crunch time?

Study groups can benefit everyone. Get together with other students in your class and talk through the information you don’t understand. Explaining concepts to each other will help the info sink in and it isn’t as intimidating as asking a professor or TA. Be smart when choosing a study group and avoid all-friend study cells. They can easily turn into all-night social sessions.

Laura Smith

How should I go about studying when it's crunch time?

Making flashcards is the best way memorize information. Write terms or questions on one side and an explanation on the other. Then quiz yourself, being sure to occasionally shuffle the cards to make sure you aren’t just memorizing the order. Keep these cards with you all week so you can flick through them during workouts or downtime.

Michael Smith

How should I go about studying when it's crunch time?

Visit your professor. As scary as it seems, professors and TAs are often more approachable than you think. They can answer questions and fill you in on lectures you may have missed (or dozed through). Have your questions prepared before you go so you don’t waste their time.

Susan Smith

How should I go about studying when it's crunch time?

Read through your class notes and summarize them on a separate sheet of paper. Many of us take notes using choppy phrases, which can be easily overlooked while skimming a notebook during a study session.

Diane Smith

How should I go about studying when it's crunch time?

Create spider diagrams of major concepts with lines connecting to related terms or information. You can also make a storyboard or timeline for historical data and scientific processes. Putting the facts in a drawing will help you visualize and retain the information.

Robert Smith

How should I go about studying when it's crunch time?

Read the assigned text and highlight important points. Then summarize the highlighted material in each section on a Post-it note and stick it to the page. Summarizing the information in your own language will help you to understand and remember wordy text.

Philip Ballinger
Director of Admissions & Assistant VP of Enrollment University of Washington

How should I go about studying when it's crunch time?

This answer is easy (if not always popular) -- don't create a 'crunch-time'. More often than not, I hear students comment on the pace of college studies more than the difficulty of content. College courses can move really fast compared to high school. So avoid crunch times by keeping up, by being consistent in doing your reading, studying, and writing. Procrastination can become much more than an irritant in college; it can academically do you in!

Nicole Oringer
Partner Ivy Educational Services

Study Ahead!

If you are studying effectively all along, then you should not feel the pressure of crunch time! Plan your semester out according to the syllabus that is given to you at the beginning of the semester. If you organize your assignments, plan your study time and remain motivated, you should have no worries when exam time arrives!

Nina Berler
Founder unCommon Apps

How should I go about studying when it's crunch time?

Hopefully, you've been studying throughout the semester. If that's the case, your studying is really reviewing class notes, outlines, returned papers and tests. You might spend an evening with a classmate who you really trust and brainstorm questions for that particular midterm or final. Then you can each draft responses and share them. (Keep study groups small to maximize productivity and minimize distractions.) Of course, if a subject that you've learned in class remains unclear, see a professor or teaching assistant.