What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

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What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Michelle BrownLicensed Counselor/Social Empowerment EducatorOaklandUniv./BreatheAgainCounseling

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Many students ask this question and as a university professor and counselor I often find myself having to address this issue. You don’t want to sit around waiting, especially if you have financial obligations; or if you like having money to spend. The sky is the limit, with a degree on the arts, you can look outside at other opportunities. Never stick yourself in a box. Look online, and in your local newspapers for jobs that ask for similar skills. Check with your college and peers to see if they know of something you have missed. Begin to network with as many people as you can who are in the field you are interested. Never underestimate the power of volunteering your awesome skills and services to nearby elementary, middle and high schools. They are always looking for volunteers. And finally, don’t give up; keep a positive mental attitude no matter what others may say. It will work out!!!

Zahir RobbCollege CounselorThe Right Fit College

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Remember that while you are earning your art degree to most likely satisfy your passion, you will have other options than being an “artist” upon graduation. You have seen advertisements, web pages, clothing, etc. that features artwork. Your education in the arts will most likely assist in you in any of these careers. A good understanding of perspective, color, and other artisitc concepts will play into any of these careers that are doing their best to capture the attention of a consumer. As a performer, you can also move into education or private consulting. Also keep in mind that your education and the attainment of any degree will always put you ahead of other candidates when applying for work.

Benjamin Waldmann

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Coming from an experience of attending foreign educational systems these are the type of area’s which drive the American system as the best formation on the planet. The flexibility of studying within the American educational format means that graduates have an instant advantage over other systems. Graduating from a major in Art’s enables you to express an excellent package of experience due to the general requirement’s which are required to complete most degree’s. There are many career options one can take that can either be associated with a specific degree or not. You will find that many people going into an industry often studied something completely different a college. Of course for specific profession’s such as Lawyer’s, Doctor’s, Dentist etc… there is a specific path one has to take in order to be up to the required “specialist” standard. There are two main option’s that can be taken after receiving a degree, the first is continue studying. if you have received a Bachelor’s degree start thinking about Graduate studies and the possible opportunities available. With the current economic climate, this is often a good option and unless you are certain of what career path your looking to take, think about studying something different to give yourself an even better overall academic base. The second option is to look for employment, obviously easier said than done but a career will only be built based upon the work experience you have behind you. One of the biggest complaints from graduate recruiter’s is that graduates have a lot of experience academically but little commercial awareness or general work experience to bring to a company/organisation. Therefore, put yourself out there!! make sure that your Resume/CV represent’s you to your best ability (make sure you highlight the mix of subjects which you took at university on your resume) and look primarily for experience rather than how much money you can earn. I know for a lot of student’s the need for a decent wage is simply to survive and pay off those debt’s, but if your able to work in a coffee shop part time when volunteering at a local marketing company this will pay off in the long run I guarantee with the essential experience you will earn. If you are unsure as to what career path to take, grasp a little experience in something that initially interest’s you, real work experience is the only way in which you will truly know whether a specific career is right for you or not. If you have been in an American Educational Institute the world is your oyster and the possibilities are endless.

Lina D’OrazioDoctoral Candidate in Clinical PsychologyUniversity of Southern California

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are actually a wide variety of career options for majors in the arts! You could consult on creative project, work for a museum (like a curator), arts-related research, teaching, jobs in the business of art/design, advertising, working for non-profit organizations…really your options are virtually limitless. If you’re creative, you can apply your arts background to just about any job. It’s all in how you link the skills you’ve developed to the needs of the job in questions. That can be done in a cover letter or resume/cv.

Cynthia FergusonIndependent Educational ConsultantIn2College

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

The obvious answers are working at museums, art galleries, theaters etc. However I really believe that Arts majors can work anywhere. This is where it is important that you study all of your core courses and do well in them. Particularly English. Employers are looking for employees who can write articulately and compose articles, newsletters, and other business correspondence. Remember, your creativity is an asset! You just need to make sure that you are well rounded. If you can’t immediately find a job in a field that interests you, ask to meet with an employer and see if they will let you intern to get your foot in the door.

Devon O’Brien

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

While being a performer or artist may be your dream, it is, in most cases, a challenge to get into the ‘big time.’ In the meantime or as an alternative, research meaningful opportunities that use the skills developed to be a performer or artist. You may be surprised to learn about different careers you’d never thought of that may be just the thing to satisfy your creativity. On the artist side, go to the Maryland Institute College of Art website and look under Careers. MICA does an excellent job of providing information translating a love of the arts into ‘getting paid for it.’

Amy Mendelson

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are many options for students who major in the arts. You could find work in the technical field– that is, apply your skills “behind the scenes.” If you are interested in the fine arts, you could work at a museum or at a theater. Most communities offer small playhouses or theaters where you might be able to work, or even volunteer to get your foot in the door if you are a theater arts student. You could work with children to share your passion for the arts– perhaps at a local playhouse, children’s museum or dance studio. One of the most important things you can do is to follow your passion. You have studied and invested in your chosen field, but even so, it may take a little creativity to find work. Useful resources might include: your mentors in your college’s art program; local art houses or theaters, consulting a community’s local family-focused publications, the local library, any people you’ve met along the way who have found work in their field.

Jane Robbins, PhD

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

First, know that a minority of graduates work in the field of their degree, so that in itself is not a barrier to getting a good job. You are actually fortunate, because in this age of attention to “the creative class” as the new driver of the economy, a background in the arts is increasingly seen as an indicator of valued competences such as lateral thinking, flexibility, willingness to engage in trial and error, and precision/attention to detail. Arts graduates work in fields ranging from public/informal education (e.g., museums, historical sites), arts management, arts policy and communication for local, state, and federal government, art teaching, designers and design advisors ( e.g., on product design), as art therapists, and, increasingly, as collaborators/advisors to scientists and engineers. Properly positioned, an arts degree is highly transferable.

Kathleen Regentin

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

.There are many options in the arts field beyond being a performer/artist. Arts management is the business side of the arts and the options in this area are quite bountiful. The non-profit sector has a robust arts area as well; teaching, advocacy, community involvement, etc. Before we jump into the specifics of what you can do, it is important for you to have a sense of what your skills and interests are; a few questions might help you form an answer: what experiences inside and outside the classroom have been most significant and meaningful for you? Where do you excel? How do you like to spend your time?

Kris HintzFounderPosition U 4 College LLC

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Becoming an educator in the performing arts is an obvious choice, particularly Music Education. This is also a demanding career, beginning with the college audition, which is not an “automatic” at an elite music school or conservatory. Performing arts educators have special gifts beyond their arts–think Mr. Holland’s Opus. “Those who can do MORE, teach.” If you would like to inspire young artists and impact their lives forever, become a teacher of the arts.

Angela ConleyCollege Admission ExpertVentureForth

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Artists are typically adaptable and many bring multiple skills to the table. During my tenure at an institution with many arts majors, those who graduated pursued multiple careers while anticipating their “big break.” Some managed theater companies. Others served in administrative positions evenings, so as to leave daytime hours open for auditions. Others managed children’s theaters. Many aspiring performers made commercials for products. The most common pursuit with which I am familiar are those who teach or do “voiceovers” for which they are compensated with residual income.

Ashley BartonSchool Counselor, NCCBig Picture Magnet High School

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

If you are interested in education you might want to look into teaching at the elementary, middle, high school, or even college level…share your knowledge!

Greer BevelUniversity Counselor/IBDP History TeacherInternational School of Latvia

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

One path you could take is the “applied arts” route. Graphic design courses help make yourself more marketable to most companies. If you’re more of the entrepreneurial sort, graphic design skills are in-demand for print as well as online media. A second path is to take courses in Communication and Public Relations. These skills (combined with your artistic sensibility and skill) are be very marketable to an advertising or public relations firm. By learning the skills mentioned above, you wil increase your ability to promote and market your own art.

Janet Kraus

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Well, you can teach of course. You can organize fine arts events. You can become an expert in the local scene and write online (or print) reviews. You can become an agent for performers or an art dealer. You can manage a theatre company or (maybe with a little additional study) curate shows in a museum. And then you can think out of the box and consider careers—sales, marketing, public relations, politics—where being a performer will make you tremendously effective!

Dr. Carol LangloisFounder/CEOHigher Education Specialists

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are many options within the world of art other than being a performer/artist. Upon graduation many artists work for studios, apprentice under choreographers, or decided they’d like to teach art in grammar schools and middle schools. Some take their degree in a different direction and decide to work for art dealers, museums and large ballet companies since they have a deeper understanding for the mechanics within these fields. Lastly, those with a strong business sense sometimes combine their arts degree with a graduate business degree. They open their own dance studios or art studios and oversee the management of these companies.

CollegeCounselor McSellerson

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

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Doug Melody

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Actually, there is a lot you can do with a major in the arts. Employers are searching for prospective employees who are creative and can think “outside the box”. In today’s very competitive global market, it’s essential that businesses solve new problems and issues that are often presented in surprising fashion. So, someone who thinks creatively, who can see the “world” in unique ways (after all, art is really about “seeing” what others may not and then creating the images), is very attractive to a variety of occupations. The Rhode Island School of Design, the Harvard of Art Schools, boasts that its graduates are in demand and recruited for jobs that are not directly related to the arts. Graduates are recruited for the very reasons stated in the previous paragraph. So, what can you do with a major in the arts? What can you “see” yourself doing? Put your training to work by imagining the possibilities. And then, like the artist you are, make your idea become a reality.

Michele Geiger

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

This is a great thing to think about while you are still in college, working toward a degree. Don’t wait until you graduate to think about this. Make yourself versatile. There are a number of degrees that you can work toward as a “double major”, “concentration” or a “minor” if you are set on getting a “performance” art degree that will help make you more versatile when you graduate. Some areas that can be pursued in this manner include art therapy, art education, marketing and public relations to name a few. (Art therapy is something that you typically achieve at the masters level.) Another benefit of pursuing a broader interest while working on the performance/artist degree is that should you become disenchanted with the degree you have something already in place that still addresses your interests and talents that can now become your major focus. Aside from this up-front academic preparation, while you are trying to get full-time work as a performer/artist there are typically positions available at community colleges teaching courses in the arts. Grade schools, high schools and community theaters are typically in need of organizers and directors as well. These positions may offer little or no pay but may get you the exposure and break you are looking for.

Michele Geiger

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

This is a great thing to think about while you are still in college, working toward a degree. Don’t wait until you graduate to think about this. Make yourself versatile. There are a number of degrees that you can work toward as a “double major”, “concentration” or a “minor” if you are set on getting a “performance” art degree that will help make you more versatile when you graduate. Some areas that can be pursued in this manner include art therapy, art education, marketing and public relations to name a few. (Art therapy is something that you typically achieve at the masters level.) Another benefit of pursuing a broader interest while working on the performance/artist degree is that should you become disenchanted with the degree you have something already in place that still addresses your interests and talents that can now become your major focus. Aside from this up-front academic preparation, while you are trying to get full-time work as a performer/artist there are typically positions available at community colleges teaching courses in the arts. Grade schools, high schools and community theaters are typically in need of organizers and directors as well. These positions may offer little or no pay but may get you the exposure and break you are looking for.

Matthew Riehm

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Growing up I loved two things, basketball and drawing cartoons. The first passion ended because of talent and the second ended because of a lack of knowledge about the potential careers and income one can make from this field. Now as a College and Career Adviser for over fifteen years, I have become much more aware of all the different avenues one can pursue to make money, as well as some income to help supplement their salary. Networking and consistency will always be key characteristics to secure employment, especially in today’s market. But you will never get an opportunity if you don’t keep trying to get your name and work out there. In my time as a counselor I have come across many clients who supplement their income by doing part-time work in the following areas: Photographer- Family portraits, youth sports leagues with league permission (not just team pictures, but action shots), wedding photography, events and parties. Even nature photography can peek interest for nature conservatories. Art Design- Logos for skateboard/surf companies- (they are always looking for the newest and coolest looking logos), Design pamphlets for religious organizations, and special events. Even designing T-shirts Mural Painters- I actually did this one summer in college. I did a mural for a pre-school and was paid $2,000. Web Site Design is also a way to generate extra income for businesses that are not tech savvy. Local Magazines need people to do lay-outs and design as well. Caricature Drawings at birthday parties or at events at a downtown event is also a way to generate some revenue. While there are a lot of hidden opportunities out there, they just don’t fall on your lap. Again, it is the two things I mentioned above that better your chances for part-time employment. The networking piece means you must stay engaged and keep dialogue open with people you meet. Having a portfolio ready of what you have done will always peek interest. If that person does not bite, he or she will pass your name on to someone who will. Great quote to remember, “It is better to be prepared and not have an opportunity than to have an opportunity and not be prepared.” The College Coach- Matt Riehm

Inna BeilinaStudent

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

As a musician (singer/ pianist) I understand you perfectly. That’s why I recommend to receive either a double major degree or take some vocational program courses in order to get skilled in other professional area that is close to your interests and would fit your heart as well as an artist work. II understand that a performer/artist job is not stable because it depends on your own luck: you’re either working in the restaurant or at the world stage making huge money as a global superstar. I would recommend to not worry and try to find one more professional niche, which would be more stable, just in case. I hope that helps! P.S.: despite all the text above, I want to advise you, my friend, to believe that you will be lucky enough to get a full-time work as a performer/artist. Believe in it! Positive attitude, confident approach and good luck – that’s all what it takes to be a superstar if you have a real talent and dignified skills, of course! God bless you! Go ahead and let the world know about you! 😉

Inna BeilinaStudent

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

As a musician (singer/ pianist) I understand you perfectly. That’s why I recommend either to receive a double major degree or take some vocational program courses in order to get skilled in other professional area that is close to your interests and would fit your heart as well as an artist work. I understand that a performer/artist job is not stable because it depends on your own luck: you’re either working in the restaurant or at the world stage making huge money as a global superstar. I would recommend to not worry and try to find one more professional niche, which would be more stable, just in case. I hope that helps! P.S.: despite all the text above, I want to advise you, my friend, to believe that you will be lucky enough to get a full-time work as a performer/artist. Believe in it! Positive attitude, confident approach and good luck – that’s all what it takes to be a superstar if you have a real talent and dignified skills, of course! God bless you! Go ahead and let the world know about you! 😉

Inna BeilinaStudent

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Once I applied to one school. After a while I realized I had done a very huge mistake because when I found out I wasn’t accepted, I was so upset and so down in the dumps, so it took me 9 months to get my positive mood back on track. So I kinda “loose” one year, but as a believer that everything is done for the better, I tried to forget about that unpleasant experience and move on preparing my applications for a few (!) colleges the next year. That’s why I definitely recommend you to apply to 4 universities AT LEAST! That way your chances to make your dream happen become higher, which is a good reason for you if you’re one of those who really want your dream to come true as soon as possible! So, make it happen! Best of luck to you! And do not ever forget to BELIEVE in yourself! That helps.

Inna BeilinaStudent

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

At least one year before your college deadlines come.

Inna BeilinaStudent

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

In that case you should look at all available pictures, videos of that school and ask lots of questions to people who’ve ever been there. Then you have to trust your intuition: if you can feel the atmosphere presented in those videos is exactly what you’ve been looking for, go for it. If those pictures, videos and opinions of people are not that good and something feels wrong over there, make the decision based on your feelings inside your heart. I’m sure it will lead to your right place where you’re supposed to be. Good luck!

Inna BeilinaStudent

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Your honesty. Your sense of humor. Your sincere vision of life. You confident and easy-readable style. Be concrete, clear and specific! Write from your heart and you’ll definitely stand out! 😉 Good luck!

Inna BeilinaStudent

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

In that case you should look at all available pictures, videos of that school and ask lots of questions to people who’ve ever been there. Then you have to trust your intuition: if you can feel the atmosphere presented in those videos is exactly what you’ve been looking for, go for it. If those pictures, videos and opinions of people are not that good and something feels wrong over there, make the decision based on your feelings inside your heart. I’m sure it will lead to your right place where you’re supposed to be. Good luck!

Greer BevelUniversity Counselor/IBDP History TeacherInternational School of Latvia

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

One path you could take is the “applied arts” route. Graphic design courses help make yourself more marketable to most companies. If you’re more of the entrepreneurial sort, graphic design skills are in-demand for print as well as online media. A second path is to take courses in Communication and Public Relations. These skills (combined with your artistic sensibilities) are very marketable to an advertising or public relations firm. By learning the skills mentioned above, you wil increase your ability to promote and market your own art.

Inna BeilinaStudent

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

1) Receive another major degree/ take vocational courses in additional professional area; 2) Believe that you will get full-time work as a performer/artist.

Inna BeilinaStudent

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Go to the teacher whom you admire and who admire you. And a perfect letter of recommendation will apear naturally!

Inna BeilinaStudent

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Once I applied to one school. After a while I realized I had done a very huge mistake because when I found out I wasn’t accepted, I was so upset and so down in the dumps, so it took me 9 months to get my positive mood back on track. So I kinda “loose” one year, but as a believer that everything is done for the better, I tried to forget about that unpleasant experience and move on preparing my applications for a few (!) colleges the next year. That’s why I definitely recommend you to apply to 4 universities AT LEAST! That way your chances to make your dream happen become higher, which is a good reason for you if you’re one of those who really want your dream to come true as soon as possible! So, make it happen! Best of luck to you! And do not ever forget to BELIEVE in yourself! That helps.

Inna BeilinaStudent

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

At least one year before your college deadlines come.

Inna BeilinaStudent

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

In that case you should look at all available pictures, videos of that school and ask lots of questions to people who’ve ever been there. Then you have to trust your intuition: if you can feel the atmosphere presented in those videos is exactly what you’ve been looking for, go for it. If those pictures, videos and opinions of people are not that good and something feels wrong over there, make the decision based on your feelings inside your heart. I’m sure it will lead to your right place where you’re supposed to be. Good luck!

Inna BeilinaStudent

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Go to the teacher whom you admire and who admire you. Ask nicely, let the teacher know how bad you want to succeed in your future, and a perfect letter of recommendation will appear naturally!

Lin Johnson III

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Majoring in the arts does not limit you to being only a performer or an artist. Creativity and innovation are needed in every organization. Steve Jobs is the best example of the influence of art with the success of Apple. Art majors are sought after in the following industries: advertising/marketing, technology design, interior design, media, music, product design, innovation, and architecture. Also, art majors are valued in the nonprofit sector where deep knowledge and appreciation of the arts are needed to lead a museum, an orchestra, an opera house, a theatre, and other cultural organizations. Art majors are also using art as a therapy tool to help mentally disable children and adults. Yes, you can become a teacher and help children to develop to an appreciation for the arts too. Hence, art majors are valuable wherever creativity is appreciated.

hossam

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Do as consultant

Joe OraveczSenior Student Affairs OfficerLocated in Nebraska

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You need to consider all the additional skills, beyond performing, that you have as a creative individual and market these transferable skills. Your skills should be articulated in your resume (or interview, cover letter) should be close to: ability to think out-of-the-box attention to detail special project management effective use of limited budget problem-solving ability to relate well with people additional qualities: perseverance, able to design and complete projects with little direction (give concrete examples), resourceful without costing company little to no additional money, etc.

Joe OraveczSenior Student Affairs OfficerLocated in Nebraska

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You need to consider all the additional skills, beyond performing, that you have as a creative individual and market these transferable skills. Your skills should be articulated in your resume (or interview, cover letter) should be close to: ability to think out-of-the-box attention to detail special project management effective use of limited budget problem-solving ability to relate well with people additional qualities: perseverance, able to design and complete projects with little direction (give concrete examples), resourceful without costing company little to no additional money, etc.

Lin Johnson III

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Majoring in the arts does not limit you to being only a performer or an artist. Creativity and innovation are needed in every organization. Steve Jobs is the best example of the influence of art in the success of Apple. Art majors are sought after in the following industries: advertising/marketing, technology design, interior design, media, music, product design, innovation, and architecture. Also, art majors are valued in the nonprofit sector where deep knowledge and appreciation of the arts are needed to lead a museum, an orchestra, an opera house, a theatre, and other cultural organizations. Art majors are also using art as a therapy tool to help mentally disable children and adults. Yes, you can become a teacher and help children to develop to an appreciation for the arts too. Hence, art majors are valuable wherever creativity is appreciated.

CollegeCounselor McSellerson

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

hellol

Eileen Ed.D.Associate DirectorEducational Directions, Inc.

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

It depends upon your interests and what other areas of strength you may have. For example, if you enjoyed history, you might look into museum administration or a curator’s position. Another possibility is working in the entertainment industry behind the scenes, such as for major awards companies (like the Oscars or the Emmy Awards). If you have some experience in design, you might also explore advertising. This could also include working for retailers as a buyer or a consultant for store design. Finally, if you have strong interpersonal skills and enjoy being amidst a throng, PR work might be your forte. In any event, knowing and cultivating your other strengths will be as important as your college major in securing meaningful employment.

Melissa Gygax

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Teach

Fangchen Zhu

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Try other industry like designing

Ralph BeckerOwner & DirectorIvy College Prep LLC

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

With the expansion of the web there is huge demand for graphic artists, writers, video developers, talented actors… and there have never been so many avenues to present your creativity to the public to open up your niche, such as You Tube. In fact the cost of creating your own music and finding channels in which to promote have never been so extensive and so inexpensive. Book publishing through such sites as Create Space is burgeoning. Even if you elect not to to continue in, say, drama, your experience is very useful in sales, teaching…anywhere where presenting ideas clearly with emotional impact is import is needed (and that’s everywhere).

Reecy ArestyCollege Admissions/Financial Aid Expert & AuthorPayless For College, Inc.

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Take a part time or another job if possible and keep looking.

Barbara Elbot

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

work at an art museum

Lucy Smith

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are so many options available for Art majors, which means you don’t have to be a starving artist! You could become a teacher, either at a school or at a studio. There’s the option of staring your own studio or art program. There are options to freelance for companies, like magazines and websites, for visual art. Really, the possibilities are endless…so using your creative strengths are important in your job search.

Lucy Smith

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are so many options available for Art majors, which means you don’t have to be a starving artist! You could become a teacher, either at a school or at a studio. There’s the option of staring your own studio or art program. There are options to freelance for companies, like magazines and websites, for visual art. Really, the possibilities are endless…so using your creative strengths are important in your job search.

Suzanne ShafferOwnerParents Countdown to College Coach

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Consider interning or shadowing someone in the industry to get some experience and make some contacts. It would be a great networking opportunity. Since many internships are unpaid, think about working in any creative capacity such as part of the backstage crew or the communications/PR departments.

Mandy ReillyCounselor

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are many occupations that a person with a degree in the arts can pursue. Since a liberal arts education helps a person to develop many transferrable skills including; communication skills, time management skills, critical thinking, problem solving, and analytical skills, project managements skills, and technological skills, people with backgrounds in the arts often work in communications, marketing, advertising, public relations, fashion, retail management and education. However, since all employers seek employees with the skills listed above, people with degrees in arts work and are successful in just about every industry.

Troy Campbell

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You can work for an art history museum sharing your knowledge about different types of art.

Catherine Finneran

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Majoring in the arts provides you with unlimited possibilities. You aren’t simply training for a career, but developing skills in critical thinking, imagination, observation and reasoning. Having this base allows you to market yourself in various fields actually multiplying your full-time work options.

Todd WeaverSenior AdvisorStrategies for College, Inc.

Art Major opportunities

I’ve worked with students who’ve had a love for drawing and one of the careers a graduate chose, was to become an illustrator for a medical school text book – drawing intricate and detailed muscles, bones, etc. He loves it!

CollegeCounselor McSellerson

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

hello

Geoff BroomeAssistant Director of AdmissionsWidener University

As you look over the menu, I can take your drink order.

Not True!!! This used to be the old paradigm for artists or dancers or theater majors. I am finding that a lot of artists are double majoring and combining their skills in real and unique ways. Sometimes you have to carve your own path and create your own job. You can tutor, teach lessons to younger students, or create classes for the community. There are a lot of opportunities in the industry as well, but sometimes we think that since we have a college degree that we don’t have to start at the bottom. Sometimes you have to be the pleb that is delivering coffee. Get your foot in the door anyway that you can. Then prove your merit once you are there.

peter.yang

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

(Animator) (Fashion Designer) (Product Designer) ……

Belinda Hirsch

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

A major in the Arts, has the opportunity to engage other students in the study of the Arts, from an early age. There are many schools that no longer have arts programs because of the necessity to direct funds towards academic subjects. A major in the Arts could consult and provide independent services to a school district on a contract basis. Another choice could be working to preserve performance history with historical societies, universities, living history organizations.

Molly Culp

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

It is my experience that in business or academic work, it matters less WHICH field you choose than THAT you choose a field that will drive you to excel. High levels of understanding, knowledge, proficiency in any field are surprisingly universal, since the discipline and ambition necessary to achieve these are also comparable. That said, if you wish to be a part of the arts on the production side, your experience as a performer will make you extremely valuable, either while you pursue work as an artist or full-time. Break a leg!

Shereem Herndon-Brown

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You can teach, work for a non-profit in the arts, start your own art studio or patiently hone your craft and simultaneously work outside of your industry.

Cindy ShermanGuidance Counselor/Crisis CounselorBloomfield High School

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You may be able to do research for theatre, movies or television. You might combine this major with a degree in education to be able to teach, you might work in a production company.

Beth Burnham

A college degree is worth a lot.

You can work in a variety of places because you have a college degree. I woud suggest that while you are in college that you minor in something else to allow yourself other options. You can also teach if you prefer to get your teaching certification. You can also try to work for the company’s that higher the performers/artists.

melissa gitlin

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Without a full time performance based job, you can consider teaching as an option to supplement your income. Also, depending on what you want to do (whether it would be fine or performing arts), the answer would vary. For fine arts/graphic design, one could rely on per diem work. Another thing to consider is the idea of art based therapy. It is another way of pursuing your creativity, but adding an additional skill. There are schools with art therapy majors, as well as masters level programs

Ron Brunet

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Students in any major have or develop skills that are not specific to their major. For example a graduate with a degree in the Performing Arts should have developed excellent communications skills, including his/her ability to be an outstanding presenter. This is a valuable skill in many professions. For example, this skill is necessary for someone working in public relations or advertising. Communications is another area that would seem to be a field with great potential for Performing Arts majors. Acting on stage or in front of a camera (stage presence) might make one a natural for a position as a television broadcaster, and if you are well versed and opinionated, perhaps a commentator. In summary, identify the skills sets you have acquired, whether through your major or life experience, and match them with other professions that would benefit from hiring someone with those skills.

Nicole McLarenFounder, Test Prep Instructor, College AdvisorAIM Educational Services

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

It depends your complimentary skill-sets and objectives (long-term and short-term). For example, many kids who have majored in the arts serve as teaching assistants / tutors privately or at local kindergarten, elementary and high schools for a few years before heading to graduate school. Depending on your location and level of interest, a great option is to become an entrepreneur. In many areas there is a dearth of opportunities for kids to pursue their interests in the arts, so graduates with a major in the arts can develop summer camps and programs or after-school / weekend facilities for students interested in the arts. Graduates with a major in the arts may be interested or open to jobs not specifically related to their field – college admission offices recruit smart, talented young alumni for posts in admissions so start by checking with your alma mater for available opportunities. It may also be useful to research opportunities for experience-based internships that can eventually lead to full-time offers.

Cathleen Feeney

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Entrepreneurship is the buzz word heard on many college campuses these days. Think of starting your own cottage industry. As a visual artist you might consider offering graphic design services or designing hip graphic clothing or accessories. Your artistic eye can be valuable as an art director or set stylist. There are many places to use your artistic abilities so don’t limit yourself to one specific outlet for your artistic talent. As a musician, you may want to explore the music industry which includes the production, business and legal representation of musical artists. There are several programs, one of them at NYU in The Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music, where the study of entrepreneurship in also highlighted. A strong musical background and talent needs to be demonstrated to be considered for acceptance into this program. Finally, as many public schools are fighting the good fight to maintain their art and music programs, you may consider acquiring a teacher certification to teach the arts.

Susan Solomon

What can I do with an Arts degree?

If you are lucky enough to have artistic skills, a creative mind and a degree in the Arts, the sky is the limit in terms of career opportunities.There is no doubt that it is extremely competitive to find full time professional opportunities specifically as a performer/artist, but there are many other career paths that would allow you to use your skills and educational background in the arts. Management jobs in theaters, museums music venues etc. require a solid understanding of the arts, in addition to strong organizational skills. Careers in public relations advertising and marketing require people with creative minds and the ability to think outside of the box. A person with a theater degree is can be an ideal candidate for various sales positions. In fact, a theater degree might be seen as an excellent qualification for a position as a college admission counselor because of admissions officers do quite a bit of public speaking. Bottom line is that your creative skills combined with a good attitude will take you far.

Geri Cohen

Plan B

To survive today, you must always have a plan B. There are careers in the arts that you may have never considered. Let’s try to think of some together. Option A: Grad School- continue your education to broaden your skills and become more marketable with a wider variety of choices. Option B: Look at Alternatives- your major is broad and can on many dimensions. Look into museums, libraries, education, research, writing, non-profits, arts councils, government jobs. These may not be your be all and end all jobs but its a start. Most of all, don’t give up- be creative. Take part time gigs that can lead to more permanent full time work. Make a list of your strengths and weaknesses. Practice selling yourself into positions that may get you started.

LaVette Bracey

Broaden Your Horizon

There is always a need for Art majors in the educational field. Drama and Theatre is a critical subject area in the public school system. The benefits to being an educator is this field is that you get to practice your performance skills as you teach students and your student loans can be forgiven if you teach for five years. Other options are working behind the scenes as a designer of the backgrounds, stage props etc.. until you get your big break.

Jessica Rosemberg

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You can be a teacher

John SpearDirector of College GuidanceNorthwood School

When Choosing a Major, Follow you Interests

I recommend that when choosing a major, students should follow their interests. Study what you love to study. Don’t think too much about “what am I going to do with this?” I know that’s hard to do in this economy. I’ve seen many students go into nursing because it’s projected to be a stable, well-paying and in-demand degree; however, after they are done many realize that they don’t like the work. They don’t like it and they end up leaving the career – sometimes involuntarily. Dan Pink, author of Drive and A Whole New Mind addressed this topic quite well: http://youtu.be/S2qc2DcdUL4. So you think you want to study arts, but you’re not sure about performing? I wouldn’t be worried about that at all. Dan Pink also said that the MFA is the new MBA, meaning employers want to hire creative people. What jobs might be out there? It’s hard to say, but I could imagine work in…. * Architecture * Publishing * Graphic Design * Advertising * Teaching * Illustrating * Art Therapy When you get to college find a mentor in your department. Maybe your advisor, maybe not. Ask him or her some of these questions. Your college will have an office of career counseling. Check in their early to inquire about internship opportunities, especially with alumni who shared your major. Good luck!

Brenda Walker

Performing Arts Degree Response

There are many options in fine arts without actually performing. Every person who is on a stage needs people who help them get there. There is always a need for technicians, directors, stage managers, writers, etc. There even possibilities in musical or artistic-related careers such as being a manager at a music store. While still in school, if you are concerned about the potential job market for your field, it may be a good idea to consider widening your degree. For example, instead of a performance degree, you may want to major in music education and minor in performance. This would greatly improve the number of jobs available to you. There are also many jobs that are available that only require a 4-year degree, but don’t specify a specific major. It might help to work a job such as this until your desired position becomes available. Ask questions of your professors, visit job sites that interest you and shadow the employees there, volunteer when possible. No one can help you navigate your chosen field better than someone who’s been there. It will also help build your network, which could make a huge difference in scoring that dream job.

Mary Hilles

Artists in education

Take additional credits in education. You could teach until you establish yourself as an artist or performer. Remember, you have summers to pursue your artistic interests.

frank garza

Other Options or Carrer Interests

Remember, having an arts major includes various avenues for careers. 1. You can always get your teaching degree and become a teacher. 2. You could look for work as a writer. 3. Become a public speaker, you are used to talking to audiences. 4. Work for a Private company promoting services or products. 5. Look for work as a Radio Annnouncer. I could go on and on. Tip of the day-Follow your heart, remember you are an artist and you are a very sought for commodity. Not being shy!

Lorraine SerraPresident/FounderPortfolioPrep

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Studying visual or performing arts at college prepares you for many types of employment scenarios, and depending on what your specialty is (and there are over 100 art-related majors and interdisciplinary areas of study). Of course, if full-time employment in a 9-5 job is your goal, then you have to market yourself appropriately to make that happen. Have an updated resume, portfolio and references always ready. Network, network, network – talk to everyone you know and tell them what you’re looking for. Promote yourself via social media. If you can be somewhat more flexible in your employment aspirations, at least initially, volunteer or intern (many of these opportunities are paid) to gain work experience AND build a credible portfolio. If you’re a fine artist, continue to work on your own to build your skills and personal style and consider partnering with a gallery or other exhibit venue. The point is, you need to be proactive. Work, even on a freelance basis, will not come to you automatically. You have to put yourself out there one way or another. It can be a challenging lifestyle, but the personal and artistic rewards will more than make up for it. Good luck — it will happen for you!

Natalie Witucki

Career/ Related occupations in Art/ Performing Arts

Commercial and Industrial Designers Fashion Designers Floral Designers Interior Designers Landscape Architects Public Relations Specialists Set and Exhibit Designers Art Education Actors Choreographers Etchers and Engravers Fashion Models Makeup Artists, Theatrical and Performance Photographers Precious Metal Workers Set and Exhibit Designers

Barbara Gong

Career choices for art majors

Depending on what focus of arts (Fine, Visual, Theatre) a student majors, the student can get work in various settings, such as teaching or designing.

Christine ChapmanDirectorChapman Educational Services

There are opportunities for artists out there!

There are any number of things someone with a major in the arts can do: teach, consult, design, coach. I often think it’s funny how much we focus on an undergraduate degree when rarely do people end up with undergraduate degrees that they actually “put to obvious use” in a professional career. I was an English major with a concentration in creative writing and I have my own business and counsel students and families about the college process. The writing I do is business-related writing but I do believe that some of the skills I learned as a creative writing major have helped me as I help students brainstorm ideas, workshop their essays, etc. Don’t give up on an arts major because you believe there’s no future in it–there’s plenty of room in the professional world for creative, artistic types!

Donovan BlakeLead ConsultantGriffin Blake Educational Consulting

Options

A great use of your education in the arts would be to become a teacher. This is a great option beacuse it will provide you with steady incoming, while you are still working in your field. If you teach for a few years you may qualify for loan forgiveness programs; which could clear out your debt from undergrad.

Erin BentleyFounder & CEOEmpowered College Consulting, LLC

Designing a Back-up Plan

If you choose to major in the arts, or really any major, it’s always best to have a back-up plan. That back-up plan protects you in case your dream job does not immediately materialize after graduation, or worse, if you change your mind about your desired occupation (e.g., if you find yourself saying, “What in the world was I thinking when I thought I wanted to do lighting design 24/7?!” Such a back-up plan is best created as soon as you start college, if not before. Even if you are absolutely convinced that music performance (as one example) is what you want to do for the rest of your life, or even if there are currently thousands of unfilled jobs in graphic design, four years is plenty long enough for you to change your mind and or the economy to shift. There are several things a student wanting to major in the arts should consider as part of their back-up planning: First, students who major in the arts should strongly consider attending a liberal arts college or, at minimum, a college with strong and broad general studies curriculum. While this can be a turn-off to some, these institutions are purposed with graduating students who have excellent critical thinking and communication skills (among other goals) who are prepared to tackle the trials and diversity experienced in living life. Clearly, these are skills that are beneficial, no matter what you do, but in more practical terms, at these types of school, helping students to acquire and refine “transferable skills” is often emphasized as well. Transferable skills are not industry-specific or even work-based. Rather, they benefit us throughout all situations in life. From creativity to research, to speaking and writing, to task-coordination and decision-making, these are skills that are going to make you a valuable employee in any field. If you have developed them and can demonstrate experience on your resume and in an interview, you increase your chances for being hired for a position, even if it is not in your major area. Keep in mind that demonstrating experience in these areas can include in-class work, like research papers and class projects (you just need to know how to appropriately include it on your resume and talk about it in an interview). As a second component of back-up planning, students majoring in the arts should not pigeon-hole themselves into one narrow area. While focusing on your craft may be important, and perhaps even required, seize all opportunities to diversify your artistic experiences. This doesn’t mean you need to major in multiple art fields, but gain exposure to as much as you can while you have the opportunity. Also, try to be creative with applied experiences within your coursework or on your own time. For example, perhaps you are required to do an internship or two before graduation. If you are a photography major, don’t just assume working alongside a professional photographer or at a gallery are the only options–maybe you could intern at an advertising agency, where you would undoubtedly learn a lot and gain some skills beyond strict photography. Or, if you are a technical theater major, don’t just look for internships focusing only on technical theater; maybe there is an opportunity to work in set design as well as in the box office at a community theater. Having related knowledge and skills can help increase your attractiveness as a job candidate, because you never know what type of job openings will pop up when it is your time to be searching. Finally, considering double-majoring or at least minoring in one or more other areas. The answer to “Why?” is, simply, “Because you make yourself more marketable.” If you have knowledge and skill in multiple areas, that just means there are more jobs are you are potentially qualified for and can apply to with a relative degree of confidence. The answer to “In what?” (meaning, “What other field of study should I pursue?”) is, “It depends.” It depends, most importantly, on your interests. Never major (even second-major or minor) in something that makes you absolutely miserable. There’s no point, unless you enjoy inflicting pain on yourself. Pick something that does–at least in a tiny little way–spark some excitement in your soul. That said, also pick something that is practical in terms of career paths. Ask faculty what their recent graduates are doing. If they can list off a number of different types of positions or can say that many of their graduates have jobs, that is a good sign. Double-majoring or minoring in education (elementary, secondary, or just educational studies), business (whether management, marketing, etc.), communication (organizational, public relations, etc.), or even psychology (ever hear of drama- or art-therapists?) can set the stage for some unique career opportunities, or, perhaps, serve as a fall-back area for a completely different, non-arts career or graduate school placement.

Michelle Parizeau

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You will have to get creative and network, network, network. You can look for internships in your field, join professional organizations, volunteer, dialogue with past and current professors. You can submit your work to appropriate venues for submission both online and and real sites. You can create your own work and begin as a side job as you build your career. Continue to take classes and workshops to keep yourself up-to-date in your field. Be sure to become part of professional groups that can offer encouragement and it would be wonderful if you could find yourself a mentor. Think of your career as a process, it will take time and be filled with ups and downs. Good luck, stay positive and remember you have chosen an exciting career, but one that is comes with a lot of rejection, so stay positive, keep and open mind to any and all opportunities and enjoy the journey!

Tracey EcholsCounselor

Major in Arts

With pretty much any degree, you could become a teacher. With a background in arts and depending on what the specifics are, many schools are in need of those with fine arts degrees.

Samantha Dzirko

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You can always work backstage. A great thing about working backstage is that you can talk to people in your field and make connections that could lead to an audition or performance opportunity. Even if you haven’t worked backstage before, most jobs will be more than willing to help you learn the ins and outs. For example, this past summer I worked as a carpenter for a theater. I had little to no experience with that position at the start, but my boss and co-workers were more than willing to answer my questions. From that job, I gained a lot of connections and a lot of useful skills. You should check out www.backstagejobs.com. Employers post backstage job openings for different positions all over the country. An important thing to remember is that there is work everywhere, not just in the big cities! Lastly, talk to your professors, even after you’ve graduated. Professors are a great resource for jobs. They have already worked in the field and have connections meaning that they can point you in the right direction.

Jolei HigginsGuidance CounselorWalker High School

Job opportunities in the arts

You can certainly do contract or freelance work while gaining experience and building your vita. It would be wise to select a school with a location near a heavily populated area for job opportunities in that field of the arts. “The arts” is a wide field. You need to do your research carefully about your particular field of study to ensure WHERE job opportunities are going to be best in the country for your specific field whether it be graphic design, acting, vocal performance, dance, photography or other areas.

Joyce Hampton

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Teach, start your own business, dance studio, drama, offer services to the community in an effort to build your resume and network.

Tom ShumskiCounselorAnaheim Union High School District

Careers for Art Majors

As a graduate from a University with a BA in Art there are many avenues for career choices with an Art background.Students that enjoy working with others sharing their Art interests may pursue a teaching career in various education arenas. Art majors are also qualified to work in fields including music, various media professions, cinematography, directing, and entertainmnent fields.

Lynette MathewsDirectorThe College Planning Center

There’s always “Plan B”.

There are lots of opportunities in the arts that can land you with gainful employment. Consider careers such as an artist agent, gallery director, or advertising executive. If you are into music or drama, you can consider composing music or writing scripts. Artists and performers all need attorneys, accountants, managers, and more. Many professionals simply enjoy being around creativity and creative people – consider careers that will surround you with an environment in which you will thrive!

Ms. RobinsonHead CounselorCedar Grove High School

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are several occupations that art majors can gain entrance into. The education profession welcomes art majors to teach art, drama or music courses. Advertising agencies are also a very popular place for art majors. They tend to appreciate the creative direction an art major can provide. A job in retail can be an option as well. Employees that work behind make-up counters, setup store displays, or dress manequins tend to have an art background.

Larry HochmanCollege and Career CounselorBristol Eastern High School

The Wide World of Performing Arts

For every person you see on stage or in a gallery, it takes many more to make the performing and visual arts come to life. There are many different specialties involved in the performing and visual arts. People have created satisfying and prosperous careers in technical production, marketing and management. Many will choose to be teachers in their field, either in an actual school setting or privately. It’s also very common to see people work part-time in some aspect of performance or art while working in another area, sometimes related and sometimes different. In the artistic and performing arts field, those who make it long term have both terrific talent and a strong commitment. For those who love the energy and environment of the arts, there are many ways to develop skills that will keep you involved in your passion for a lifetime.

Adrienne DillardCareer CoachAdrienne Dillard Career Coaching

A major in the Performing Arts opens you up to a variety of career choices.

Because this is your major, you are likely a very creative person. Your creativity presents itself in many areas, including that of finding employment. Allow your creativity to shine here. Some suggestions I have for alternative job opportunities are: 1. Hire yourself out as entertainment for parties. 2. Select a topic that really interests you and hire yourself out as a motivational speaker on that topic. 3. Start a drama/dance/art program for homeschoolers, who might not otherwise have an opportunity to take drama/dance/art classes from a professional. These are but a few ideas to get your brain working. I am sure once you really start thinking, the possibilities will be almost endless. Good luck on whatever you finally decide to do with your passion, just ensure you find the right fit for you.

Carrie Egan

Arts Majors Need To Market Themselves Well!

I would recommend that ANY Arts major attempt a double-major or a minor in something that will make them even more marketable, such as a foreign language, business, communications, education, or the “therapy” for their discipline, for example, music therapy or art therapy or dance therapy. While still in school, try for a job or an internship in either your intended field or your backup field. Make good contacts and upon graduation this becomes your starting list. Join LinkedIn, post your resume and profile, and hit the pavement. If you are in the performing arts, arts management would be a great place for a job. Dancers always need dance teacher and choreographers. Theatre majors are known for their ability to get ideas across, a skill important in many areas including law, advertising, business, teaching and politics. If your major is in the visual arts, your skills will transfer well to jobs in interior design, fashion design, graphic design, photography, web design, and multimedia.

Mary Mariani

Performing/Arts Majors

A major in the arts can be beneficial in a number of career areas: advertising, community recreation, and school programs with music and drama departments are a few possibilities. A masters degree can also be obtained which would make the junior college and college level teaching positions available to the individual. The performing art world provides jobs and careers in not only performing but also as support services for the performers. Frequently, people will work in any aspect of the performing/art industry in order to obtain access to the “opportunity.” I have also found that people with an art background can go into different aspects of interior design and decorating because the individual has the flair or “eye” for beauty.

Alexandra YoungGuidance CounselorBrookline High School

Lots!

Just because you major in something specific like Dance or Modern Art, don’t think that you have to get a job that requires a degree from those fields. There are so many jobs for people who are creative. This is just a sampling of what you can do: Advertising Executive Art Curator Art Director Audio and Video Equipment Technician Camera Operators, Television, Video, and Motion Picture Choreographer Commercial and Industrial Designer Craft Artist Educator Fashion Designer Film and Video Editor Floral Designer Graphic Designer Interior Designer Merchandise Displayers and Window Trimmer Multi-Media Artists and Animator Music Composers and Arranger Music Director Music Directors and Composer Photographer Poets, Lyricists and Creative Writer Producer Producers and Director Program Director Public Relations Specialist Radio and Television Announcer Set and Exhibit Designer Sound Engineering Technician Stage, Motion Pictures, Television, and Radio Director Talent Director Technical Directors/Manager Technical Writer Writers and Authors *List generated with the help of Naviance

Klarissa KitchenFinancial Aid Advisor

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

A degree in the arts will allow you to have the step up in the workforce. If you do not acquire a full time position as a performer/artist you still have several options on your career path. You can use your creativity as a graphic designer or become an independent entrepreneur. If those options do not suit you and you prefer to be in the presence of art you can work at an art gallery, art supplies store, museum, or as an art consultant.

Linda Videll

Performer/Artist

I believe that the fact that you would have a BA could allow you the opportunity to apply for a variety of positions. Your creativity could allow you to work in department stores; working with their displays. You could assist with a variety of marketing strategies in businesses and work in customer service roles. If you’ve got an entrepreneur’s spirit, you could market your talents hosting unique parties for all ages! What fun to attend a child’s party as a princess or Buzz Lightyear or organize a group of women with a painting or scrap booking party!

Christine MacInnisCounselorNorth High School

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are a number of careers looking for artist people. For example, sales, education, media, interior design, advertising all come to mind as potential careers for someone who has artistic talents. Remember not everyone goes on to a career based on their college major. There are many different types of jobs that cater to a degree in the arts other than just being an artist.

Scott MaciagGuidance counselorNew Providence High School

Many opportunities ahead

With a degree in music or arts you stil have plenty of opportunities if that full time job of your dreams doesn’t show up. You can be a teacher, or go into art or music therapy in a rehab center, hospital or nursing home. You can work in a museum as a curator if you are the art person. Depending on your background you may also be able to get into other aspects of performance such as marketing, or the production aspect of a musical or play. As a art person you can into illustration for books or magazines. There are a multitude of choices depending on your interest and skill set.

Henry DelAngeloHigh School Counselor 20 + yearsYour Key to College

What to do with my art degee

While there is no guarantee that any major will secure you a job right out of college, in the new economy that we are living in there many opportunities out there to be creative. In fact creativity is something many employers look for in an applicant. Widening your scope and being flexible will help. Look to related fields such teaching/ training. You can look for work in advertising, marketing, promotion and use your knowledge and training to bring unique perspectives. Also, architectural firms, galleries, museums, or theaters could benefit from your experience. If you are creative and disciplined you can succeed.

Karen CurreriPresident and FounderCurreriCollege Counseling, Inc.

Creative and talented people have many options

Teaching and management are two options for those who are not able to secure a job as a performer/artist. Remember, it is the skills you have acquired through your training that will help you to land a great job and expand your career options. For example, you have learned how to think analytically, get your ideas across in creative ways and make information comprehensible. Don’t forget that we live in a media driven world, so if you are a digital “techie” you may want to think about how to apply computer technology to the visual and performing arts.

Melanie RomeCollege Admissions CounselorMelanie Rome, College Admissions Counselor

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Fortunately, a person can usually be happy in more than one career. In my experience, the most helpful tool in helping you decide what career to pursue is knowing yourself, most specifically your personality. Beliefs, values and interests can change throughout one’s life time, but personality remains constant. So I recommend finding out what your personality type is. There are many different tests you can take, but the one I recommend is FREE and has four questions, takes just a few minutes and can be done on-line. Go to www.personalitytype.com and take their free test, learn your personality type and the site then suggests possible career options for you. OR you can even then Google your personality type and you will find many sources that provide career information just for you.,

Debra

Arts Majors in the Business World

EVERY MAJOR COMPANY AND MID SIZED COMPANIES HAVE GRAPHIC DESIGN ARTISTS IN THEIR ADVERTISING DEPARTMENTS. BEING CREATIVE IS A PLUS WHEN LOOKING FOR ANY TYPE OF WORK.

Eric ChancySchool CounselorApex High School – 9-12

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Advertising, marketing, web design, teaching, special effects, museum curator, art librarian, art historian, appraiser – firts it depends on your art and what you do. Secondly, it depends on what else you might be able to marry into your passion for art. If you love music, but think you might struggle as a recording artist, consider learning to operate digital recording equipment and produce music. There are many, many jobs that surround the entertainment industry, many of them in direct support of entertainers and artists. In fact, some famous people have gotten their big breaks by providing that support. Harrison Ford was actually working on the set of Star Wars as a carpenter when he got his chance to read for Han Solo, and the rest is history! So, if you are an aspiring entertainer, think about expanding your horizons a little and participating in set design, or some trade-oriented work that is useful in the industry. You can find a rolling list of jobs that are on the market right now here: http://www.entertainmentcareers.net/week/

Matthew Castriotta

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Due to tough economic times, most students are heading toward the more technical fields of study. Economics, Finance, Engineering are all good choices. College is all about the experience though; and sometimes it’s not what you know, but who you know. Pick a college where you feel you can make the most impact for yourself. If you’re unsure it might be a good idea to stick with a local college. Most performers/ artists are Entrepreneurs… This may be something you should consider before commiting to this road.

Carrie Gibbs

Interested in a degree in the arts?

Careers in the arts require courses and activities that challenge students’ creative talents and allow them to gain experience and aquire skills that are transferrable to a variety of fields. While many students interested in this major apsire to work as a performer/artist, graduates will be marketable for related careers depending on their level of post-graduate study and interests. For the enterprising student that would like to remain front and center they can consider Directing. For those who are more conventional and play close attention to detail may pursue behind the scenes work in the industry such as stage management, sound, costume, or lighting design. There are also opportunities in the business sector and in education. It is important for any art student to consider pursuing an internship to put them in the best possible place for employment and also network with people in the field to learn the extent of job possibilities.

Nina ScullerDirectorCollege Prep

Arts are valuable in many different areas

As a performer, you could get involved in a performing arts school. Several of the dance schools in your area may be looking to expand into the performing arts. Many summer camps look for people to expand their art electives, you might try to work at one, or develop programming for camps. As an artist, you might consider a career in visual arts; designing brochures and literature. Many of the small companies that produce the coupon books need artists everyday to layout their publications. There are art schools that look for teachers for aspiring artists, as well. Many private schools do not require teachers to have a teaching certificate to teach art, so that may be an area to explore. Many artists look into working in art therapy, so you might consider expanding your education to work in that field.

Edward LaMeireCEOLaMeire College Consulting (lameirecollegeconsulting.com)

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

In the cases that I have worked on, the students that have been the most successful “professionally” are the students that have the most objective view of the situation: It’s hard to make a go of it in the arts. What these students have done is to develop a professional insurance policy, by combining dance with finance, visual arts with public relations, and music with marketing. Clearly, these aren’t fixed pairs, but they’re instructive: pair up an interest in the arts with an interest in a more “practical” field. You’ll notice that the “practical” majors I’ve cited all have some relation to business. Here’s why: 1. Business programs are eclectic, and it’s not a stretch to find most majors with a potential relation to some area of business. 2. In the event that the student develops her own dance company/opens his own gallery/signs a recording contract, she’ll have some understanding of business to fall back on; successful artists are typically at the mercy of “manager” types to dictate the business side of things. An understanding of business neutralizes this imbalance. But, to answer your question more directly, I think that the best strategy is to broach this issue before entering undergrad. Pair you degree up with a practical major, or at least a minor: accounting; biology/chemistry (for pharmaceutical sales or biotech); and engineering field; a business major. The work will clearly be intense, but it will be a far easier task to tackle this issue in undergrad than, say, after graduation.

Samantha Dzirko

Working backstage is a great start!

You can always work backstage. A great thing about working backstage is that you can talk to people in your field and make connections that could lead to an audition or performance opportunity. Even if you haven’t worked backstage before, most jobs will be more than willing to help you learn the ins and outs. For example, this past summer I worked as a carpenter for a theater. I had little to no experience with that position at the start, but my boss and co-workers were more than willing to answer my questions. From that job, I gained a lot of connections and a lot of useful skills. You should check out www.backstagejobs.com. Employers post backstage job openings for different positions all over the country. An important thing to remember is that there is work everywhere, not just in the big cities! Lastly, talk to your professors, even after you’ve graduated. Professors are a great resource for jobs. They have already worked in the field and have connections meaning that they can point you in the right direction.

Margaret TungStrategistYale University

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

I have tons of friends who majored in theater, photography, history, or english/creative writing–fear not, it has no REAL bearing on what you do when you graduate. College is the time for you to explore and really experience your intellectual passions. If you want to continue exploring those same avenues, by all means, keep it going! For those of you who either can’t get full-time work in a creative field or those of you who don’t necessarily want full-time work as a performer or artist and you want to know what else you can do with your degree–well, there’s a lot! The standard financial support for part-time creative work is bartending, tutoring high school students or becoming a day-time caretaker. You can also supplement with related freelance work if you’re concerned about building up your resume for future full-time positions in your creative field of choice. I have plenty of writer friends who work for online publications so they can “survive” and work on their portfolios at the same time. If you don’t want to go int oa full-time perfomance/artist role, don’t worry. Most liberal arts and arts degrees require you to have the same analytical and basic modes of thinking as people who majored in business or economics, for example. It’s just a matter of framing your past work experiences and stressing the modes of thinking that you excel at. For example, I’m a history major who is working in innovative marketing–I didn’t learn anything about that in college, but I developed strong, succinct writing skills in college and learned how to make convincing arguments. Without a doubt, you’ll learn how to do that in college as well. The world is yours–don’t be afraid to go out there and get what you want!!!

Sharon Rikli

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

As an artist, there may be opportunities for you in the commercial art business. And performers often do well in careers that require the ability to interact well with people, such as sales or public relations. While this may not be the work you want to do, it’s a way to support yourself while you pursue what you love to do.

Chris PowersCollege Counselor and Philosophy TeacherPowers College Counseling

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

One of my favorite suggestions is to look into media studies. School like Columbia College, Emerson, or Loyola New Orleans all have interesting programs in this area. Students with a passion for the arts might not end up on stage, but it is still really awesome to be a part of a production. Media studies can also lead towards advertising and marketing opportunities at small and large businesses.

Nina BerlerFounderunCommon Apps

Thinking of Majoring in the Arts?

As you go on in life, you’ll continue to meet people who didn’t necessarily major in a subject related to their careers. It’s true of all sorts of people with all sorts of majors. When I went to college many students who wanted to be doctors didn’t major in the sciences! So there are many things you can do with a major in the arts. You have the critical thinking skills for a number of professions. You can teach middle school or high school, instilling a love of performance in the next generation of actors. You can put your skills to work as a critic or blogger. You can open a retail store featuring theater-items or perhaps consider a career in arts management or stage management. The possibilities are wide open!

Charlotte Kaplan

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Teach, work or open an art, dance, music, acting studio, work at a museum or gallery. Look into event planning to help decorate, join a DJ.

Lydia Nava-Cordova

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are so many options open to you with a degree in the Arts. One thing you could definitely do is teach. Depending what ages/groups you like to work with, you can look for positions in Elementary, Middle or High school. Of course you would need to make sure you have your education license as well. Perhaps working in the community, directing plays could be an option. Also there are non-profit organizations that need artist to work with their programs. The most important thing is that you have a degree and have more options open to you.

Katherine CraneCounselor

A Major in the Arts. What now?

The skills you learn as a major in the arts can cross boundaries into other areas where you can be highly employable. Being able to make commitments and carry through on projects/assignments will help you succeed not matter what the profession. Sometimes artists that do not gain immediate full-time employment will freelance in their field, teach others or consult until something more permanent comes along. Also, being open to internship/apprentice opportunities may open up avenues into full-time employment.

Sandy Austin

Art as a Lifestyle

There are plenty of ways you can use your art interests/talents even if you don’t work full-time in the arts. Communities are always offering you opportunities. For example if your interests are in the performing arts, explore opportunities in local choirs or theater in civic/community organizations or religious entities. During the holidays there are always events in these areas and performers are needed to put on those events. If you are a visual artist, volunteer your expertise in photography or other forms of art in volunteer organizations. Look for a cause that you are passionate about and offer your time and expertise. If you are a writer, write editorials or you can even do part-time work for local papers. Offer to cover community events of interest to you. If you volunteer your time and get experience, that can help you build up your resume and put you in contact with influential people in the industry that can open up doors for you in the future.

Sam Ahn

Can work as a freelancer

You can always work as a freelancer to build up your portfolio/resume. There are many opportunities out there especially in graphic arts as many companies are going digital and looking for design differentiation.

Barbara LeWinter

A Diverse and Creative Way to view the world for life

Whether your studies and hard work in earning your B.A. or BFA in the arts lead directly to a job as a performer/artist, your studies will always have value. Learning about the arts, especially hands-on through acting, dance, music, and art will help you see the world through new eyes and expand your horizons and world vision. Even if your initial employment after college is not as a performer/artist, the arts can always serve as an avocation, providing you with a lifetime avenue to be creative and fulfilled–be it on a large stage or in your local community. The discipline gained from learning your craft transfers well and is helpful in a variety of professions. Whether you decide to teach, go into arts management, arts writing and criticism, design, art/dance/music therapy, motivational speaking, sales, consultant work, community service, non-profit work, marketing, writing/composing/creating or into a completely different area, the skills and self-confidence you have gained as a performer, being in front of the public will serve you well.

deanna hartel

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

As a major in the arts you you have many choices which are related to literary,art, music and entertainment. These include literary: communications, creative writing, editing translating; art: architecture, commercial art, studio art, teaching and museum curator; music: choreographer, dancing instructor, music teacher and instrumental musician; entertainment: broadcast news analyst, disc jockey, radio/tv announcer, director or producer of stage movies, television and radio,modeling performing as an actor / actress; and finally advertising manager or public relations specialist. Most artists have a great need for independence and self-expression. These are just some ideas for you to be able to meet your needs and and your wishes for the future. A

Megan DorseySAT Prep & College AdvisorCollege Prep LLC

Learn To Think And You Can Work In Any Field

Your college education is more than basic training in a particular major; it is the opportunity to learn how to think critically and effectively express yourself. Students who major in the arts may aspire to professional work in their field, but we’ve all heard of starving artists or actors waiting tables. If you can’t find full-time work in the arts, your degree, more than your major, can help you find work. Most employers are looking for educated people who can think and perform in the workplace. They are less concerned with your major than your ability to get the job done. Personally, I’ve found people less interested in the fact that I majored in Art & Art History than the fact that I have a degree from Rice University.

Megan DorseySAT Prep & College AdvisorCollege Prep LLC

Learn To Think And You Can Work In Any Field

Your college education is more than basic training in a particular major; it is the opportunity to learn how to think critically and effectively express yourself. Students who major in the arts may aspire to professional work in their field, but we’ve all heard of starving artists or actors waiting tables. If you can’t find full-time work in the arts, your degree, more than your major, can help you find work. Most employers are looking for educated people who can think and perform in the workplace. They are less concerned with your major than your ability to get the job done. Personally, I’ve found people less interested in the fact that I majored in Art & Art History than the fact that I have a degree from Rice University.

Chasity Lansdell

Alternative Options for Art Majors

Take the opportunity to teach others your craft. You may choose to teach at the elementary or secondary level in public or private education. You may also work part-time or full-time at the collegiate level. Use your free time to participate in local community or city activities–local art shows/galleries, community theater, etc. You may also consider a side job or contract work in painting murals for companies, schools, or individuals. While you may not begin working in your chosen field exactly the way you want to, put yourself out there in your free time in hopes that something will open up. You will continue growing your skills and experiences which is always a good thing.

Kathleen Boyd

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

A major in Art can lead in so many directions. When you start taking classes under a general art major, you can specifiy later down the road another area in the arts that interests you like: Creative Writing, Dance, Drawing, Graphic Design, Illustration, Music, Theater, Painting or Photography. Those are just a few examples.

Joseph Merlino

Options for Art Majors

The arts is a vast and layered industry. When I refer to layers, I mean there are different fields within the industry which can enhance your resume and experience. By working in some capacity within a theater or production, be it technical or administrative, you are still gaining invaluable experience in the industry. At the same, working for independent/local theaters enables you to see the industry firsthand and gain knowledge while going on interviews and also building a network of references. The art major is adaptable enough to pursue opportunities in the school setting also. Schools are always looking for teachers/coaches to work in their productions. So, the bottom line is stay involved in the industry until you are able to gain full-time work. If you are patient enough, you will be building your resume while you are awaiting your opportunity to start your career. Best of luck.

Steve Boyd

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You can become a high school art teacher, go into design (fashion, auto, landscape, etc), or go into field of business with an emphasis in advertising and/or marketing.

Kathryn Lento

Take a different view

There are many jobs that value artistic skills. Rather than think of yourself as an artist, focus on your innate skills and traits that can be migrated to other fields. Art education (school/community programs)art therapy, media/ television, public relations, advertising, retail display and design, art sales, auction houses. If you studied more performance based fine arts such as theater, consider a talent agency, casting company, communications or sales.

Joseph FreemanDean and College CounselorRandolph School

Useful jobs for arts majors:

Not all artists are able to work professionally. Students who major in fine or performing arts can market their diplomas in a variety of ways, including education, professional school, and creative fields like advertising, design, film and television production, and throughout the entertainment industry. Minoring or taking courses in more practical departments might also make an arts major more marketable in other professions.

Rhonda Manns

Finding a job with my college degree

First of all, remain open minded and reflect on your positive accomplishments. Keep looking for employment and building your network. Consider volunteering with local company which would, if they could, hire you. Many times when employers have positions, they are willing to consider their volunteers first. If finances are pressing and bills are piling up, consider unrelated job which will not only help with finances but also allow you to gain transferrable work skills. In addition, you might discover a new career interest. Finally, remember that this is a temporary situation and as long as you keep focused, keep appyling for jobs and remain positive an opportunity will open up.

Ed GarciaAssistant Professor/CounselorAustin Community College

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

All lot of times students are under the impression if they major in something they will have to do it for the rest of their lives. I know many history majors who end up selling real estate. I know business majors who end up teaching in the K-12 setting. Often times I believe students feel the major they select will define them for the rest of their lives. A four-year degree is often required for many jobs and it is just the starting point. A lot of times networking, work experience, etc will help you land the ideal position. If a student is an art major other possible careers could possibly be something in the field of education, non profit sector, or independent teacher. Utilize the skills you have. Maybe there are recreation departments in your city that have a need for instructors. The better you network and stay connected, the better for your career. Make sure you also take advantage of internships and your work experience when you can!

Kathryn FavaroCollege admissions consultantCalifornia College Prep

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are a range of careers available to students majoring in the arts. I would look in to art therapy, teaching, and design.

Allie MendelsohnFounderAM Educational Consulting

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are a myriad of ways in which studying the arts can inform your life and work. Think broadly. An artistic background can contribute meaningfully to work in everything from graphic design to architecture. In almost everything we do, aesthetics are a factor and as someone who has studied lay-out, balanced design concepts, and other areas of creating and understanding art, your background is an advantage you bring to any line of work. The issue is making sure you sell the value of your art education in whatever field you are interested in pursuing.

Jennifer CounselorMilpitas High School

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You can become a graphic designer, cartoonist, art director, illustrator, art therapist, art educator, art appraiser or painter.

Daniel KramerCollege AdvisorThe Wight Foundation

Consider your degree choice

There are many types of jobs that a performing or studio arts major off the stage or out of the studio could look into in education, museums, community outreach programs, and more. But this does not mean that there WILL be those jobs with openings. I would give serious thought to your actual degree choice before you consider what you might do with it upon graduation. Should you choose a prestigious art school to pursue a BFA in your field, you might be immersed in that program with little time for other academic pursuits. If you choose to earn a BA, however, your academic options open up somewhat and you can take more courses across disciplines which could possibly lead you to the meshing of two passions. Let’s say you are seeking a BA in Dance and you find that you have a real interest in biology after taking anatomy and physiology, a class you took to fulfill a science requirement along with your dance concentration. Now Dance or Movement Therapy enters into the picture as a future graduate or career focus, or even medical school. Having a really specific degree might limit your options after graduation. Being open to fields related to your passion and degree may give you more opportunities.

Julie ManhanFounderCollege Navigation

It’s all about being creative and resourceful.

Of course, one option would be to teach in an academic setting or even offer private instruction in your area of expertise. However, there are many other possibilities. You could become an art or music therapist; work in advertising, do landscape, clothing, or interior design; hold a position in an arts-related non-profit or even become a radio or TV personality. However, since so many of the options involve being self-employed, a wise student of the arts will minor in business to gain the skills he/she needs to also be a successful small business owner. With the combination of your artistry, determination, and some business savvy, the possibilities open to you will only be limited by your imagination.

Woodrow DunnAcademic CounselorFreedom High School

Arts as A Major

I would leave that open for anything. Are you interested in education? Are you interested in volunteering in your community to support the arts? Remember to work on building your resume. What about talking to other art majors or volunteering at the local high school and/or university. Talk to counselors as SCAD to listen to their opinions.

Sandy AustinProfessional School CounselorGreen Mountain High School

Art as a Lifestyle

There are plenty of ways you can use your art interests/talents even if you don’t find full-time work in the arts. Communities are always offering you opportunities so keep your eyes open to what’s around you. For example if your interests are in the performing arts, explore opportunities in local choirs or theater in civic/community organizations or religious entities. During the holidays, performers are always needed to put on various events of the season. If you are an visual artist, volunteer your expertise in photography or other forms of art in volunteer organizations. Look for a cause that you are passionate about and offer your time and expertise. If you are a writer, write editorials for local papers or you can even do part-time work for local papers. Offer to cover communitiy events of interest to you. Look for local schools. Offer to do an after school class in your area of expertise. If you volunteer your time and get experience, that can help you build up your resume and put you in contact with influential people in the industry that can open up doors for you in the future.

Bridget HotrumPresidentCollege Bound Admissions Academy

Occupations in the arts

If you are a struggling artist and cannot find full time work, there are many ways to fulfill your desire to be a performer and build your resume at the same time. Consider volunteering in a local theater group, job shadow seasoned artists and performers to develop relationships or use your creative juices to start your own company. Whether your an aspiring musician, designer, photographer or a cinematographer ~ it is important to build skills that will overlap into other job areas so that you will become marketable.

Deborah HellerDirector of College CounselingBeacon School

Additional Careers For the Arts

Well one thing you may want to consider is being an Art teacher. It is a very rewarding career and you get to do what you love all day. A few other thoughts are an Art Therapist, which might be a good option if you enjoy working with kids as well, or something in graphic design which typically pays quite well.

adam baerWriter and Editor for Top National Magazines, Websites, and Newspapers

What Can’t You Do With an Arts Degree?

You can teach in private or public schools. You can work as an arts administrator at a museum, cultural center, symphony orchestra. Or you can work in the entertainment business, as a financial and/or creative executive. You can also become entrepreneurial and start your own business focused on your expertise–say, helping artists with their personal branding and social media presence.

Brooke SeifertAcademic CounselorFountain Hills High School

So many choices!

I think that at one point in time, many considered a major in art to be what one did when they were still undecided or very creative, but sometimes directionless. Not so anymore! Even if you don’t make it big in Hollywood or on Broadway, you can pursue a variety of careers with an art major, depending on what your other passions and talents are. If you love working with children, or love helping others, you can use your art major to go into fields such as education and therapy. Many companies are recognizing the benefits of hiring employees with art backgrounds; these people tend to be creative, think outside the box, have strong communication skills and tend to respond positively to constructive criticism. Huge companies such as Google would not be where they are today without the creative input of hugely artistic people. There are also opportunities within publishing, graphic design and marketing, museum curating, and more. The opportunities are limited by your imagination (and if you’re considering art as a major, I’m sure you’ve no shortage of that). If you are considering one of the above mentioned careers as a “fall back plan” in case you don’t make it big, I would encourage you to research the additional certification requirements of the careers, which vary by state. For some careers, there won’t be any. However, others, such as teaching or therapy, may require additional schooling. Break a leg! 🙂

Lynda McGeeCollege CounselorDowntown Magnets High School

Not Everyone in the Arts is an Artist

There are many careers that involve the arts that do more than create objects or beautiful music. Opera houses need directors, concert halls need people to schedule them and raise funds for their events, and they are myriad jobs in managing artists. Someone with a background in the arts will have a better understanding of an artist’s needs. But one does not need to limit themselves to the arts! There are plenty of leaders in business that have college degrees in unexpected subjects. A college degree means that you are trainable, and you were able to handle the general requirements as well as your major. Follow your interests, wherever they may lead you.

Donna DondoGuidance CounselorDOE

Not the job I thought…

Drama teacher/ Tour guide/ a job that involves public speaking

Maura McCulloughClinical Career CounselorMaura McCullough Consulting

Career paths for artists

Every artist needs to consider what other skills they possess or could develop in order to survive while pursuing full-time work in their field. Fluency in a high need language such as Spanish or Arabic is very marketable. Consider teacher certification or translator certification and evaluate options for a minor in graphic design, web design, marketing, business, math or any other area that appeals to you. An artist should always develop additional skills in a secondary area to support their primary area in art. A palette of skills can help you survive without becoming famished and allow you to seek work in what you really want. So ask yourself what kind of minor should I consider?

Maura McCulloughClinical Career CounselorMaura McCullough Consulting

Career paths for artists

Every artist needs to consider what other skills they possess or could develop in order to survive while pursuing full-time work in their field. Fluency in a high need language such as Spanish or Arabic is very marketable. Consider teacher certification or translator certification and evaluate options for a minor in graphic design, web design, marketing, business, math or any other area that appeals to you. An artist should always develop additional skills in a secondary area to support their primary area in art. A palette of skills can help you survive without becoming famished and allow you to seek work in what you really want. So ask yourself what kind of minor should I consider?

Kim RomanPresidentCustom College Planning, LLC

Think Outside the Box

If you majored in the arts, which I consider music, dance, theater, art, etc., chances are you are very creative person. Think of all of the talents and skills you have and how you can use them in the business world. An artist might network with other artists in an art cooperative, work at a museum, get a job at an advertising agency or work in film. A dancer might become an artist’s model, teach children ballet at the local community center or open a dance studio. An actor might teach drama, work on political campaigns, get involved with fundraising or start an event planning business. There are lots of ways to make a living in the arts, if you just network and think outside of the box.

Kim RomanPresidentCustom College Planning, LLC

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

First, don’t worry. Colleges and universities understand that not everyone can afford to visit. Knowing that, many schools provide virtual tours of their campuses on their own websites. Another helpful site is http://www.campustours.com. They offer virtual tours of hundreds of college campuses. You can also visit with college admission representatives at local college fairs or when they come to your high school. Let them know that you are interested in attending their college, even if you won’t be able to visit in person. Keep in mind though that nothing can really replace an actual college tour, so try to visit at least your top three college choices. If you can’t visit for monetary reasons, let the admissions office know why, so they won’t assume that you just weren’t interested enough.

Kim RomanPresidentCustom College Planning, LLC

Hitting the Road…or Not?

First, don’t worry. Colleges and universities understand that not everyone can afford to visit. Knowing that, many schools provide virtual tours of their campuses on their own websites. Another helpful site is http://www.campustours.com. They offer virtual tours of hundreds of college campuses. You can also visit with college admission representatives at local college fairs or when they come to your high school. Let them know that you are interested in attending their college, even if you won’t be able to visit in person. Keep in mind though that nothing can really replace an actual college tour, so try to visit at least your top three college choices. If you can’t visit for monetary reasons, let the admissions office know why, so they won’t assume that you just weren’t interested enough.

michael haleguidance counselorWhiddon-Rogers

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Great question! First, congratulate yourself for completing something you started. If you majored in the arts and hold a 4 year degree, take pride in knowing that you have more formal education than nearly 70% of all Americans. Second, there are a number of fields outside of you regardless of your major. For example, you can work in the field of education, teaching art to elementary and middle school students. You can work for, in some states, the Dept. of Children and Familes as a case manager (they require a bachelor’s degree, but the major is of no factor in terms of hiring, simply that you’ve completed 4 years of college). You can also use that degree to get your foot in the door as far as interships, either paid or unpaid, to move you one step closer to a career that you love. You can also consult, and get paid to advise others, and finally, you can join the military with a much higher rank/benefits than others without a degree. I hope you find this information helpful.

Will GoodmanPresidentGuidance Associates

A student with an art major can work in many fields. Clearly they would have skills that would trans

A student with an art major can work in many fields. Clearly they would have skills that would translate to the publishing industry as well as working on the business side of an arts organization. Another option might be the graphic arts profession which is a nice blend of artistry and practical application to business needs.

Stephanie Cruz

The Creative Ones

With a major in the arts there is a variety of things you can accomplish. First of all it depends on what area of the arts you are planning to major in. There are several different realms. Performing arts, visual arts etc…Are you interested in pursuing a credential in the arts that might afford you the opportunity to be a teacher at some point in your future. If you are not able to get work full time as a performer it is always a good idea to have something to fall back on. This allows you to still be in the field that you are passionate about while you wait for your big break!

Kathleen GriffinOwnerAmerican College Strategies

The Sky’s the Limit!

There are so many things you can do with a degree in the arts. Think out of the box. Don’t think of yourself as a performer/artist who just performs on a stage. As a performer you have developed self-confidence standing up in front of people. You have the ability to speak, project emotion and capture the attention of an audience. This ability will take you far in any industry. Most industries have a need for that “artistic person”. Think advertising, web design, teaching, creating your own film/play, window display artist, cake design, event planning, interior design, landscape design, wedding planner, theater manager……the skye’s the limit.

Tricia HowardDirector of College CounselingSt. Ursula Academy

Lots of things!

There are lots of things (besides waiting tables) that you can do with a degree in the arts. You can teach classes in your craft at various places. You can work in a museum or science center. Depending on your craft, you can work in business using your creativity in other manners than performing. Thinking outside the box just a little can pay off. Play up your strengths and don’t limit yourself!

Corey FischerPresidentCollegeClarity

Many things

That depends on your training and your interersts. I have known students with arts majors go into informal art therapy (music therapy, art therapy, acting therapy), a student with an interest in biology who illustrated biology text books, working in art galleries and museums, etc. It is helpful to continue to try keep your foot in the door by staying as active in your area as possible and to make connections in the arts world.

Robert McClorySchool Counseling Dept. HeadKetchikan High School

Career Opportunities for art majors: How to find them

It’s important to remember that not everyone is going to college for the sole purposes of launching a career. Young people may enter college to become better rounded or better informed. They may go as a personal growth experience. College life may be the appeal. Artists are often particularly interested in furthering their education and developing their creative skills because of their passion for the arts. If that is the case, the list of jobs awaiting them upon graduating college may be of secondary importance when students seek the art program of their dreams. Nonetheless, opportunities to apply those skills and repay any student loans will eventually become an expectation. One of the important aspects of exploring careers for emerging artists is to seek programs with solid placement services. Don’t be afraid to ask what percentage of graduating seniors find careers in related areas within one year of graduation. Next, ask if they have internships with local businesses that would allow students to work there while in school since many of those businesses may actually hire students upon graduation if they are impressed with the quality and breadth of their work while interning. Lastly, remember many artists have an entrepreneurial spirit and like the creativity with running their own business emphasizing their passion. Taking a business or marketing class while in college may be a great opportunity to develop the skills to effectively manage your own business upon graduation. Just remember that schools can provide lists of jobs, but the most effective way to secure an opening is having a chance to connect with local employers. That’s where a college program may be of particular help.

Jay Gopal

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

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Sommer LangSchool Counselor

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

If you major in the Arts, there are many opportunities you have to share your knowledge with others. Many art majors find it practical to teach school-aged students or college students, others find work in art museums or theaters. Large companies staff artists to design and market products and to advertise. One could also find employment at hospitals or treatment centers that offer art programs as therapy. Depending on your business knowledge you might be able to start a photography business, dance studio, or your own jewelry store.

CollegeCounselor McSellerson

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

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Joan Bress Director and Certified Educational PlannerCollege Resource Associates

Your Training In The Arts Can Lead to Exciting Employment Opportunitites

You love to perform or create beautiful works of art, and you dream of life as a visual or performing artist. With talent, determination and lots of luck, you just might realize your dream. In the meantime, you need to pay the rent. Start by assessing your skills. Are you good with numbers? Do you like to write or take photographs? How are your people skills? Are you an organizer? A leader? Can you do research? Arts organizations need people to bring in money and audiences and to allow artists’ work to be seen. There are lots of ways to work in the arts, while waiting for your big break.

Joan Bress Director and Certified Educational PlannerCollege Resource Associates

Your Training In The Arts Can Lead to Exciting Employment Opportunitites

You love to perform or create beautiful works of art, and you dream of life as a visual or performing artist. With talent, determination and lots of luck, you just might realize your dream. In the meantime, you need to pay the rent. Start by assessing your skills. Are you good with numbers? Do you like to write or take photographs? How are your people skills? Are you an organizer? A leader? Can you do research? Arts organizations need people to bring in money and audiences and to allow artists’ work to be seen. There are lots of ways to work in the arts, while waiting for your big break.

Toni Diaz

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You can be use your degree to teach or find another field in which your degree can be utilized.

Steven CrispOwner Crisp College Advising

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

With more education you can teach art at a high school, middle school, or elementary school. Art is one of those majors that does not give you many options. You might consider minoring or double majoring in another area that you could fall back on if your goal of becoming a performer or artist does not work out.

Janet. Kempf

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There will be a variety of careers that can use someone with a major in arts/theater, such as: working for a non-profit organization to publicize their projects and creating advertising for numerous companies. A person could also use their creative, artistic abilities to work in museums, store displays, theater, and amusement park displays/performances.

Ellen [email protected]OwnerEllen Richards Admissions Consulting

Not all art school students are starving upon graduation

Technology has ushered in countless opportunities for artists. Depending on a student’s passion, many can earn a substantial living if they acquire some of the necessary skills to do what so many other cannot. For example, website design, creating website graphics, matching the colors with business brands and creating an overall style for companies are all challenging for business owners who lack the time or interest to delve into this realm of their business. Instead they hire artists who have technological skills the elevates their art and manipulates it in ways they may not have otherwise considered. Learning Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, Fireworks and some html will ultimately keep artists employed consistently – at least for the foreseeable future.

Carita Del ValleFounderAcademic Decisions

Teaching, music therapy, working with the elderly

There are many options for those who did not find work as a performer right after graduation. Never overlook the value of teaching both within a formal classroom setting or after school program. You can also design your own creative program and provide it through any parks and recreation program, community extension or boys and girls club. What about art or music therapy working rehabilitation programs? What about a senior center? For those willing to think outside of the box there certainly is work that includes your craft within the arts.

Melissa Vion

A CREATIVE MIND…

If you are looking to major in the Arts, my hunch is that you are a creative individual who possess an appreciation of flexibility, pushing the limit past boundaries; two characteristics that can transcend any degree that you will earn! If your hope of performance is not meant to be, you can rest assured that there is something out there for you. With imagination, an inherited trait that can’t be taught, there are many small businesses and large scale companies looking for individuals with innovation like yours. The time you spend earning your degree in any field will help you to learn critical skills such as collaboration, organization, time management, and even service & leadership. No degree will ever go unnoticed or unused!

Natalie Minchew

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

This really depends on the type of art about which one is passionate and if there is compromise for creativity in said passion. Teach, either K-12 or post-secondary. Although, post-secondary will most likely require a Master’s degree or higher. Teach privately which also lends to working for oneself as an artist and selling one’s work privately. Curator, reviewer, etc. Also consider other areas of interest and decide if combining the two could lead to a lucrative career choice. Check out http://www.ehow.com/about_4623003_best-careers-art-majors.html. It offers some tips and options for such a dilemma. Get creative, after all, that’s what your degree is in…Creativity!

Lisa BlakeHead School CounselorPhoenix Christian Unified Sch

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Teaching or perhaps working/consulting for a museum, theater, or another fine arts organization. There are certainly plenty of options!

Lisa CarltonOwnerwww.collegematchpoint.com

Use Your Creativity For Profit

I love this question! Some might disagree with me on this, but I believe all degrees can be employable. It is critical that you begin to think about employment options starting in your freshman year. As an artist, think about your specific creative skill set and consider how you could use those skills to make money. You have to think outside the box. There are the obvious ways like becoming a teacher. What might be less obvious options? Take your art talent and learn graphic design at the same time. Use your talent in film to create corporate videos. I highly recommend getting internships while you are in college. These internships can give you valuable experience that will help you find employment after college. Consider art museums, radio stations, video developers, game development, or graphic design. The list can be as long as your imagination.

王文君 June ScortinoPresidentIVY Counselors Network

there are many options out there for you!

in today’s comptitive enviorment, students shall consider major and minor to equipe themselves for work place. the quality of the individual and the skills that needed for many jobs are the same which apply to specific jobs. if you would like to explore minors such as computer, communication, marketing, etc you will find jobs with your skills.

Diane Coburn Bruningchoreographer/counselor in performing artsCollege Match, Inc, Performing Arts Specialist

Dance Majors

I touch upon this subject in relation to dance at http://collegematchus.blogspot.com/

Laura Owen

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

A college major doesn’t necessarily impose a certain career. Your experiences (internship, work experience, classroom, etc) and skills and knowledge (analytical and critical thinking, communication, creativity, oral and written expression, technical skills, etc.) are what make you employable. There are many different career pathways for students who graduate with a major in art including: education, design, freelance work, art history, production, consultation, journalism, etc.

Laura O’Brien GatzionisFounderEducational Advisory Services

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

The Strategic National Arts Alumni Project (SNAAP) published a study this year entitled “Forks in the Road: The Many Paths of Arts Alumni”. This is highly recommended reading for students considering studying either performing or visual arts at the post-secondary level who are wondering about their career options. Definitely, arts students need to be pro-active and take courses in business and management skills in order to prepare for an entrepreneurial and enterprising career. Some occupations for performing artists might be actors, dancers, choreographers, directors, producers or managers in theater and stage, film, TV or video artists, musicians, teachers, arts administrators and arts educators. Training in the arts is also valuable to a range of other careers because it teaches skills that are highly regarded in the workplace such as writing persuasively, thinking critically, working well with groups, and speaking effectively and clearly.

Laura O’Brien GatzionisFounderEducational Advisory Services

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

The Strategic National Arts Alumni Project (SNAAP) published a study this year entitled “Forks in the Road: The Many Paths of Arts Alumni”. This is highly recommended reading for students considering studying either performing or visual arts at the post-secondary level who are wondering about their career options. Definitely, arts students need to be pro-active and take courses in business and management skills in order to prepare for an entrepreneurial and enterprising career. Some occupations for performing artists might be actors, dancers, choreographers, directors, producers or managers in theater and stage, film, TV or video artists, musicians, teachers, arts administrators and arts educators. Training in the arts is also valuable to a range of other careers because it teaches skills that are highly regarded in the workplace such as writing persuasively, thinking critically, working well with groups, and speaking effectively and clearly.

Annie ReznikCounselor/CEOCollege Guidance Coach

5 Possible Paths for Fine Arts Majors

1. Teach While you may not want to perform or work as an artist; fuel your passion by sharing it with others. Teaching can also be an ideal way to supplement a career in performance or visual art. 2. Facilitate Enjoyment of the Arts Advocates of the arts are ideal employees for theaters, galleries, studios, and other arts outlets. You may find yourself planning fundraisers, courting donors, building community partnerships with local schools, soliciting advertisements for printed programs, or managing the back of the house of a major venue. 3. Write If you enjoy writing about the arts, start a blog while you are in college to gain some credentials for establishing a more permanent home for your artistic musings. Sharing your passion with others through writing is a welcome outlet for lovers of the arts. 4. Counsel Recent studies have suggested that the arts can be used therapeutically. Art may be an ideal outlet for someone that is grief-stricken. Or, perhaps music will enable a troubled child to find an outlet for expression. Therapies centered on the arts are emerging as a valuable resource. 5. Service In the US, limited funding for arts programs has created a void in deteriorating school districts. Lending your expertise to projects focused on increasing exposure to the arts may be a fulfilling career path.

Laura O’Brien GatzionisFounderEducational Advisory Services

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

The Strategic National Arts Alumni Project (SNAAP) published a study this year entitled “Forks in the Road: The Many Paths of Arts Alumni”. This is highly recommended reading for students considering studying either performing or visual arts at the post-secondary level who are wondering about their career options. Definitely, arts students need to be pro-active and take courses in business and management skills in order to prepare for an entrepreneurial and enterprising career. Some occupations for performing artists might be actors, dancers, choreographers, directors, producers or managers in theater and stage, film, TV or video artists, musicians, teachers, arts administrators and arts educators. Training in the arts is also valuable to a range of other careers because it teaches skills that are highly regarded in the workplace such as writing persuasively, thinking critically, working well with groups, and speaking effectively and clearly.

Santhe Niedner

Jobs for performer/artists

There are many things you can do until you get that break into the movie/play world. One is in the area of teaching. Schools need enthusiastic people who are interested in the arts and want to share that enthusiasm with the students. Students who are involved in the arts tend to be very good in other areas in school also. Another option would be to go to the business end and be a business manager of artists and performers. People who have actually been involved in the arts themselves understand the profession and can be better at advising than if they have not been in the field. Multimedia artists/animators and graphic design can also be an area to investigate if you want to stay in the field but can’t find a job right off in acting.

Rob CowdenCounselor and Career Pathways CoordinatorEagle Point High School

Those w/ a Degree in the Arts are not limited to working on a canvas, stage or behind a camera lense

Students that earn a degree within the Arts are obviously able to pursue careers within the performing or visual arts; dancer, actor, painter, artist, writer, etc. However, some career fields that aspiring art majors or artists may forget about or not even realize they may be employable with in are those such as; education, an individual or private instructor or tutor for a specific performing or visual art, agent for those interested in pursuing a career within the arts, employee within a museum, gallery, library or park and even an owner of or employee in a gallery, photography studio, bookstore and performing or visual arts studios, just to name a few. However, what many entering college forget to realize or even be told is that any form of post high school education; a two year, four year degree or even certifications is going to open career doors and make you that much more emplyable in the eyes of many. Fair or unfair the reality is post high school education opens doors and allows one to pursue professional careers in a variety of fields and many some would think are completely unrelated to the degree or certification within a specific area. There are a number of employers and many of them within professional fields that are looking to higher college graduates period; they may prefer to higher an employee with a degree specifically related to the job but many will higher individuals simply because they’ve earned their college degree. I know of many former students that have earned degrees in Business that have secured jobs and careers within law enforcement, education and social service professions to name a few. I’m also aware of individuals and former students that have earned degrees in Social Sciences that are now employed within the preofessional career fields of business, counseling and web page design.

Barbara Cohen

All the world is a stage…

and a performer or artist can bring that creativity and performance to any career. If you opt to move into the business world; theater, creative publications, music and art all have business support systems. Knowing the creative part of the business will just make you better at selling, producing, creating or working with all of those individuals who do those things. A Fine Arts degree will cement your ability to create and will allow you the latitude to take that creativity into any business or career.

Amber GrohAssistant Director of Student LifeUniversity of South Dakota

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

One of the best things you can do with your arts degree is assist in an arts therapy program. Another option would be to work at a youth center helping children practice the arts. Being an art major can make you very well rounded and creative you could highlight those skills in a job interview.

Helen H. ChoiOwnerAdmissions Mavens

So Many Transferable Skills!

Obtaining work as a full-time performer or artist can be very difficult — even in robust economic times. Luckily, arts majors have many transferable skills that can be used in many industries. Art majors have strong creativity skills, analytical reasoning skills, multitasking skills, and communication skills. Be sure to emphasize these valuable traits on your resume! Art majors can also find work in arts-related fields as designers, consultants, and instructors. Find out more about career options for art majors here: http://www.scrippscollege.edu/students/career/planning/art.php

Helen H. ChoiOwnerAdmissions Mavens

So Many Transferable Skills!

Obtaining work as a full-time performer or artist can be very difficult — even in robust economic times. Luckily, arts majors have many transferable skills that can be used in many industries. Art majors have strong creativity skills, analytical reasoning abilities, multitasking talents, and sophisticated communication skills. Be sure to emphasize these valuable traits on your resume! All of these qualities are important in the workplace. Art majors can also find work in arts-related fields as designers, consultants, and instructors. Find out more about career options for art majors here: http://www.scrippscollege.edu/students/career/planning/art.php

Melanie HayesEducational ConsultantGifted/Talented

Private arts teacher for homeschoolers

Homeschooling is growing exponentially and many of those students are gifted and talented. Parents of these students are looking for people who can mentor their child in their area of giftedness. You can develop a lucrative business teaching the arts to homeschoolers. Many of them utilize public charter schools, because the students get around $150/month to pay for private lessons. You can sign up as a “vendor” with those charters and find clients through their lists. These homeschooling families are looking for someone who can present both private lessons and units of study. Growing your own business will allow you to set your own schedule and leave time for your own studio work, auditions, performances, etc. I taught an integrated art and writing class for a few years before I started my consulting business and I can tell you from first hand experience, you can make a living as an artist.

Virginia Sanseau

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Those who study the arts often have part-time work to subsidize their work as a performer/artist. For example, someone might work as a server in a restaurant and also be an artist. One artist I know works as a PE teacher in elementary schools, and is also a painter.

CollegeCounselor McSellerson

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

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John DeLorey

From Shakespeare to Sales

I have had experience with such a situation recently, a graduate from an arts college was having trouble finding a job in her major. She was able to find work for a company that leases out AV equipment and provides support services to major hotels in Boston. She used her arts and perfomance talents in a sales capacity, a position that required her to think quickly on her feet and deal with many types of people and personalities. She enjoyed a seemless transition from an out of work performing artist to a commission-based sales person.

Kate BurkartSchool Counselor

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are many options if you aren’t employed full-time as a performer or artist. Some of the many options include: becoming a teacher of art or performing arts, becoming an art director, working in a museum or art gallery, or becoming an architect. You may consider broadening your scope by consdiering careers in the fashion industry, graphic design, interior design, floral design, computer graphics, or illustrating for authors, magazines, or newspapers. You will graduate with many trasferrable skills that future employers will seek, such as: creativity, ability to manage large projects, strong skills in oral and written expression, ability to take constructive criticism, and many others.

Rebecca JosephExecutive Director & Foundergetmetocollege.org

Keep the faith: It often takes time.

Music, art, dance, theater majors keep the faith. You can learn so much in college that will benefit you throughout your life. After graduating, many artists go and get MFAs to further advance their art, while others get full time jobs while doing their art on the side. I take stand-up comedy classes with many actors, who are working one to three part-time jobs or a full-time job while taking classes and performing. I did the same in my 20s. Then I found my passion teaching. So whether you use your art professionally or as a hobby, majoring in the arts will only make you and the world around you stronger.

kathy hicks-freemanGuidance CounselorGreensboro High School

Not a Full-Time Performer/Artist

If you majored in arts but are not working full-time as a performer or artist, there are options for you. You can teach others the knowledge and skills that you’ve learned in a classroom or a training studio. You can become an advisor for others who are interested in the field, work for a recuiting company, or fulfill some type of administrative duty in the field.

Lauren CarterDirector of College CounselingLouisville Collegiate School

There are many career paths for the “art” student!

Maximize your college experience and you maximize your options once you graduate. A good exercise to do is to identify 3-5 areas of strength that you possess. In doing this you will begin to move in a direction that “fits” who you are and what you do well. Make sure you diversify your time in college and all the while support your interests and talents. For example, if you consider yourself a strong writer, a good organizer, and have an interest in technology then begin to work on a plan to support these attributes. That could include writing movie reviews for the school newspaper, beginning an online blog for artists, or interning for a theater management company. Also make sure you utilize your network. You may not even know it yet but you have a group of experts at your fingertips. This could include your college academic advisor, a faculty member whom you admire, or the career and internship office at the college you attend. Through these people, you can easily be connected to opportunities to help you gain full time employment in your area of choice while also opening up the possibilities for other positions where you could also be happy and fulfilled.

Erica WhiteCollege & Career CounselorMiddletown High School

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

I always recommend double majoring when you are talking “arts.” Let’s face it, its hard to “get discovered” as an artist. So, its always nice to have a back up plan and income while you are picking up part time work or building your artistic resume post graduation. If you can take classes, minor, or double major in any of the following areas you will have more options upon graduation: website development, graphic design, animation, advertising, multi-media design, interior desgin, journalism, fashion, marketing, video production, museum studies, architecture, etc. All of these will allow you to combine your artistic ability with other skills. If you stick with a degree in strickly art, I would look into the following careers: museum curator, gallery preparator, art editor, art teacher, art therapy. The only catch is that many of these careers require a Master of Fine Arts.

Jonathan DunnDirectorCreative College Counseling, LLC

What can I do with a major in the arts if I am not working as a performer and artist?

People with majors in the arts end up doing all kinds of things besides performing or working as an artist. Students with visual art majors have graduated to get jobs in galleries, law firms, and in teaching. Recent dance majors landed jobs with EuroDisney, chiropractic offices, physical therapy offices, as dance company administrators, and in teaching. Film majors were able to find jobs at TV stations, Apple Inc, as free lance songwriters, and as teaching fellows. Music majors found employment at Hugo Boss, Pricewaterhouse Coopers, as music therapists, and in a global economics firm. Theater majors found jobs in the management of theater houses such as Ford’s Theater, the administrative track at Enterprise Rent a Car, at an oncology office, at Elizabeh Arden, and in teaching.

Laura O’Brien GatzionisFounderEducational Advisory Services

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

The Strategic National Arts Alumni Project (SNAAP) published a study this year entitled “Forks in the Road: The Many Paths of Arts Alumni”. This is highly recommended reading for students considering studying either performing or visual arts at the post-secondary level who are wondering about their career options. Definitely, arts students need to be pro-active and take courses in business and management skills in order to prepare for an entrepreneurial and enterprising career. Some occupations for performing artists might be actors, dancers, choreographers, directors, producers or managers in theater and stage, film, TV or video artists, musicians, teachers, arts administrators and arts educators. Training in the arts is also valuable to a range of other careers because it teaches skills that are highly regarded in the workplace such as writing persuasively, thinking critically, working well with groups, and speaking effectively and clearly.

Lora LewisEducational ConsultantLora Lewis Consulting

Use Your Creative Degree Creatively

Most students who major in the arts know that it’s unlikely they will work full-time in their field. For every one dancer or artist who makes a name for him or herself, there are tens of thousands more who will never gain public attention. This doesn’t mean, however, that if you want to get a degree in a creative field, you have to resign yourself to a lifetime of slinging lattes or delivering pizzas. Teaching has long been an option for artists and performers, as it provides a way to earn a living while also enabling you to nurture your craft. While teaching at public schools will require additional training, it’s sometimes possible to teach at private schools with only an undergraduate degree. Teaching jobs at community centers and for-profit organizations are other options. Of course, teaching is an art in itself, and it’s not for everyone. It shouldn’t be considered a “fall back” job, but if you feel that helping others to learn about the art that inspires you in turn feeds you own creativity, the classroom might be a great place for you. There are job opportunities in the corporate world for people with arts backgrounds. Creative people have a great deal to offer. They are an asset in fields like advertising, corporate training, education and multimedia. Supplement your art major with a minor in another field that will enhance your marketability. Be willing to take internships or start out in clerical positions and, in time, find ways to match your skills with the companies needs. Non-profit work is a wonderful way to build a career that revolves around your creative passion. Explore options on both the local and national level. Many working artists have very rewarding careers in the non-profit arts community and find that their jobs enable them to earn a living while remaining connected to their values and the work they love. Have more of an entrepreneurial spirit? Students pursuing arts majors often overlook their greatest asset when it comes to building a career: Their own creativity. If you’re a dancer, painting or drama major, you’re not going to walk into a ready-made job like some of your peers in the business or nursing school. That just means you have to create your own. Offer classes to others who want to learn your craft. Start a collective that sells local art. Put together a dance troupe that offers educational performances for schools. Look for ways to bring what inspires you out into the world, and in time, you’re likely to find you’ve “created” a full-time job.

Lora LewisEducational ConsultantLora Lewis Consulting

Use Your Creative Degree Creatively

Most students who major in the arts know that it’s unlikely they will work full-time in their field. For every one dancer or artist who makes a name for him or herself, there are tens of thousands more who will never gain public attention. This doesn’t mean, however, that if you want to get a degree in a creative field, you have to resign yourself to a lifetime of slinging lattes or delivering pizzas. Teaching has long been an option for artists and performers, as it provides a way to earn a living while also enabling you to nurture your craft. While teaching at public schools will require additional training, it’s sometimes possible to teach at private schools with only an undergraduate degree. Teaching jobs at community centers and for-profit organizations are other options. Of course, teaching is an art in itself, and it’s not for everyone. It shouldn’t be considered a “fall back” job, but if you feel that helping others to learn about the art that inspires you in turn feeds you own creativity, the classroom might be a great place for you. There are job opportunities in the corporate world for people with arts backgrounds. Creative people have a great deal to offer. They are an asset in fields like advertising, corporate training, education and multimedia. Supplement your art major with a minor in another field that will enhance your marketability. Be willing to take internships or start out in clerical positions and, in time, find ways to match your skills with the companies needs. Non-profit work is a wonderful way to build a career that revolves around your creative passion. Explore options on both the local and national level. Many working artists have very rewarding careers in the non-profit arts community and find that their jobs enable them to earn a living while remaining connected to their values and the work they love. Have more of an entrepreneurial spirit? Students pursuing arts majors often overlook their greatest asset when it comes to building a career: Their own creativity. If you’re a dancer, painting or drama major, you’re not going to walk into a ready-made job like some of your peers in the business or nursing school. That just means you have to create your own. Offer classes to others who want to learn your craft. Start a collective that sells local art. Put together a dance troupe that offers educational performances for schools. Look for ways to bring what inspires you out into the world, and in time, you’re likely to find you’ve “created” a full-time job.

Lora LewisEducational ConsultantLora Lewis Consulting

Use Your Creative Degree Creatively

Most students who major in the arts know that it’s unlikely they will work full-time in their field. For every one dancer or artist who makes a name for him or herself, there are tens of thousands more who will never gain public attention. This doesn’t mean, however, that if you want to get a degree in a creative field, you have to resign yourself to a lifetime of slinging lattes or delivering pizzas. Teaching has long been an option for artists and performers, as it provides a way to earn a living while also enabling you to nurture your craft. While teaching at public schools will require additional training, it’s sometimes possible to teach at private schools with only an undergraduate degree. Teaching jobs at community centers and for-profit organizations are other options. Of course, teaching is an art in itself, and it’s not for everyone. It shouldn’t be considered a “fall back” job, but if you feel that helping others to learn about the art that inspires you in turn feeds you own creativity, the classroom might be a great place for you. There are job opportunities in the corporate world for people with arts backgrounds. Creative people have a great deal to offer. They are an asset in fields like advertising, corporate training, education and multimedia. Supplement your art major with a minor in another field that will enhance your marketability. Be willing to take internships or start out in clerical positions and, in time, find ways to match your skills with the companies needs. Non-profit work is a wonderful way to build a career that revolves around your creative passion. Explore options on both the local and national level. Many working artists have very rewarding careers in the non-profit arts community and find that their jobs enable them to earn a living while remaining connected to their values and the work they love. Have more of an entrepreneurial spirit? Students pursuing arts majors often overlook their greatest asset when it comes to building a career: Their own creativity. If you’re a dancer, painting or drama major, you’re not going to walk into a ready-made job like some of your peers in the business or nursing school. That just means you have to create your own. Offer classes to others who want to learn your craft. Start a collective that sells local art. Put together a dance troupe that offers educational performances for schools. Look for ways to bring what inspires you out into the world, and in time, you’re likely to find you’ve “created” a full-time job.

Marie Bigham

Lots of things!

There are so many great jobs available to students who study the performing and visual arts! Many of the art-focused colleges and conservatories have fantastic job placement records, even in this difficult economy. Beyond working in those specific fields, you can also teach, work as an arts administrator for a museum or theater, consult, or critique. This is also a great question to ask the colleges you are considering as well.

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Occupational Outlook Handbook – Bureau of Labor Statistics

Great question. It depends on what area of the arts you are involved with. For instance, if you are into digital media and graphics, working as a graphic designer or website developer would be an option. If you are interested in either the performing arts or visual arts, art therapy would be an option. Another option would be teaching, whether it be at the high school or college level. Granted, a teaching position may require more training related to teaching. A few other industries to consider would be working in a museum, or, working as an activities director in a retirement home. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics: http://www.bls.gov/oco/ American Art Therapy Association: http://www.arttherapy.org/ Good luck! Mike Chapman, Owner Chapman College Admission Consulting www.chapmancac.com

Jill Stephenson

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

As you try to establish yourself as an artist or a performer, it may be a reality of life that you will need to find other employment. You may want to find a minor that would be marketable and combine well with your fine arts major. For example, look to the businesses that support the arts. A symphony isn’t just the players. It’s also marketing, promotions, graphic artists, stage managers, accountants, etc. Build on your unique combination of skills. Wouldn’t an art gallery love to have someone who both understands art, but also understands the business behind selling art?

Lora LewisEducational ConsultantLora Lewis Consulting

Use Your Creative Degree Creatively

Most students who major in the arts know that it’s unlikely they will work full-time in their field. For every one dancer or artist who makes a name for him or herself, there are tens of thousands more who will never gain public attention. This doesn’t mean, however, that if you want to get a degree in a creative field, you have to resign yourself to a lifetime of slinging lattes or delivering pizzas. Teaching has long been an option for artists and performers, as it provides a way to earn a living while also enabling you to nurture your craft. While teaching at public schools will require additional training, it’s sometimes possible to teach at private schools with only an undergraduate degree. Teaching jobs at community centers and for-profit organizations are other options. Of course, teaching is an art in itself, and it’s not for everyone. It shouldn’t be considered a “fall back” job, but if you feel that helping others to learn about the art that inspires you in turn feeds you own creativity, the classroom might be a great place for you. There are job opportunities in the corporate world for people with arts backgrounds. Creative people have a great deal to offer. They are an asset in fields like advertising, corporate training, education and multimedia. Supplement your art major with a minor in another field that will enhance your marketability. Be willing to take internships or start out in clerical positions and, in time, find ways to match your skills with the companies needs. Non-profit work is a wonderful way to build a career that revolves around your creative passion. Explore options on both the local and national level. Many working artists have very rewarding careers in the non-profit arts community and find that their jobs enable them to earn a living while remaining connected to their values and the work they love. Have more of an entrepreneurial spirit? Students pursuing arts majors often overlook their greatest asset when it comes to building a career: Their own creativity. If you’re a dancer, painting or drama major, you’re not going to walk into a ready-made job like some of your peers in the business or nursing school. That just means you have to create your own. Offer classes to others who want to learn your craft. Start a collective that sells local art. Put together a dance troupe that offers educational performances for schools. Look for ways to bring what inspires you out into the world, and in time, you’re likely to find you’ve “created” a full-time job.

JoAnne Ellsworth

Dream maker, not dream taker

The great thing about majoring in the arts is that you are probably a creative type person. Literally, the sky is the limit as you plan for full-time, part-time, or volunteer work. My first suggestion is to keep your skills sharp and build your resume. At the very least you would be able to volunteer your services in local schools or community activity centers. This is also an opportunity for you to get current letters of recommendation from your supervisors who would by over-seeing these projects.Secondly, don’t sell your creative spirit short. Many industries need a creative perspective in solving business problems. You can provide a different view in problem solving that could be reflective of your excellent critical thinking skills.

Suzan ReznickIndependent Educational ConsultantThe College Connection

BFA versus BA

Your career opportunities may depend in part on what type of degree that you would receive as an undergraduate. If you apply to a conservatory program, whether in Acting, Dance, Music or Film that would mean that two thirds of your college career would be spent studying in that discipline. Those programs generally require auditions or portfolios in order to be accepted and you would NOT be receiving a liberal arts education. However, if you attend a BA program in any of the arts, only one third of your time would be spent studying that major. Hence you would graduate with the many skills that a liberal arts education does afford- such as communication ( speech/writing), computation, research language etc and could easily work in many fields. A BFA would afford you less alternative options, if you decide to change directions and you might be in greater need of further education, whether for a post-bac or grad school.

Karen Ekman-BaurDirector of College CounselingLeysin American School

Other Careers in the Arts

You may often hear the question, “What are you going to do with a major in ________?” (Just fill in the blank with the name of a major.) Well, there are a lot of things that can be done with any degree. Let’s consider a few options in the arts area, other than working full-time as a performer or artist. This list is not definitive, and it should be kept in mind that, for some of these suggestions, further training or an advanced degree may be required. The creativity that is developed through working toward a degree in the arts is applicable in many fields that are not mentioned in detail below – business, government, and so on. Art – Elementary, high school, art school, or community art center teacher, curriculum specialist, art administrator, museum or gallery curator or archivist (public, private, governmental, corporate), various positions in publishing . . . Teaching at the college or university level will require an advanced degree. Dance – Dance teacher for public or private schools, community organizations, or dance studios; choreographer; dance research in areas such as history and kinesiology, dance therapist . . . Advanced degrees can lead to college/university teaching opportunities. Music – Music teacher privately or in various schools or organizations, music librarian, music therapist, computer software developer, music instrument manufacturer, music critic or journalist . . . College/university teaching will require an advanced degree. Drama/Theater – Drama teacher for schools or community organizations, director, set designer, playwright, stage manager, technical director, drama specialist for a corporation (Many corporations present drama techniques through their Human Resources departments as a form of personal development.) For college/university teaching, an advanced degree will usually be required. I hope this gives you an idea of the many possibilities which may be open to you through a major in the arts. In any of the areas, you might discover that you’re interested in the business management aspects of the field. Teaching has been mentioned in all of the areas above. Although this may be not your original goal, something to keep in mind is that “Those who can, do; but those who REALLY can, teach!”

Tim Haley

Majoring in the Arts but no full time work as a performer/artist

Using the faculty in my high school as examples, our theater person does alot of performing in regional theater and summer stock while maintaining a full time teaching job. Our visual arts instructor has exhibits in many area art shows while also teaching full time. They are able to keep their major vibrant while still paying the bills. Do not loose your passion or talent just for economic means.

Patricia AviezerPresidentInside Track To College, Inc.

Creative Thinkers Are In High Demand

“You will work all of your life, it shoud be doing something you enjoy,” was what I said to both of my children when they told me they wanted to be artists. Some of my husband’s friends said, “they’ll never be able to make a living and will be sitting on your couch forever!” They followed and are living their dreams sucessfully. Creatives think differently and have a unique perspective on situations. Any position that requires a “fresh look at problems” and “thinking out of the box” would be delighted to employ an artist. I like to remind my students that life happens whether you have a plan or not and that every situation is a learning experience. The work you do, whether in your artistic zone or not, adds to what you bring to your performances in the future. So why not use your unique perspective to create options for yourself that allow you use your creative thinking to earn a living that brings meaning to your life and serves others.

Allen HillSchool CounselorAntelope Union High School

Art Major Pathways

There are 3 pathways open to art majors. First is commercial art where you work on projects related to advertising, entertainment, apparel and graphic design. The second is fine art, which is the design/production of objects for aesthetics rather than usefulness such as paintings, sculputres and performing arts. The third option is education where you teach art classes or lecuture on specific artists and periods.

Caitlin Durham

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You can teach! Or you can work for performing arts organizations such as theaters or museums! You can do research, outreach, curating, development, and the list goes on and on… Becoming an expert in the area you are most passionate can and will lead you down a road in life that will be fulfilling and rewarding. You may not have the most financially lucrative career, but life is about much more than that.

Chip LawCo-founder Managing Director Educational Avenues

Believe it or not you can do ANYTHING you want!

Read Daniel Pink’s A Whole New Mind. He talks of the near-term future as being the world of those with right-brain thinking (RBT). As opposed to left-brain thinkers (logic, analysis, precision etc.) RBT’s, are, in general, creative out of the box thinkers. They innovate spontaneously, they solve problems with ingenuity and originality. These traits will be what future employers will want and are the absolute strength of entrepreneurs. Real world example: my daughter just completed her MFA in dance at Smith College. She knows she has to make her way in the world and she LOVES dance. What is she doing now? She is teaching dance at a university and knows that her salary is not enough to live on. So what does she do? She formed a dance company on her own. She gives workshops and lectures on dance and movement. Due to her visibility in these areas she travels across the country doing unique projects that she has originated by seeing possibilities beyond her stated degree. For instance: as result of her efforts she has been asked to choreograph for new dance genres and she excels because she is willing try new things and apply her own way of creating something pleasing and unexpected. Bottom line: she is doing what she loves, is fully immersed in her passion AND is earning a nice living as well. You can a apply a similar plan whether it be dance, music, performance, or fine arts. Use that RBT to the max and you’ll be open to many opportunities that your left-brain peers will not have a prayer of grasping. Just DON’T get stuck on what you see as the ONLY way to use your degree.

Chip LawCo-founder Managing Director Educational Avenues

Believe it or not you can do ANYTHING you want!

Read Daniel Pink’s A Whole New Mind. He talks of the near-term future as being the world of those with right-brain thinking (RBT). As opposed to left-brain thinkers (logic, analysis, precision etc.) RBT’s, are, in general, creative out of the box thinkers. They innovate spontaneously, they solve problems with ingenuity and originality. These traits will be what future employers will want and are the absolute strength of entrepreneurs. Real world example: my daughter just completed her MFA in dance at Smith College. She knows she has to make her way in the world and she LOVES dance. What is she doing now? She is teaching dance at a university and knows that her salary is not enough to live on. So what does she do? She formed a dance company on her own. She gives workshops and lectures on dance and movement. Due to her visibility in these areas she travels across the country doing unique projects that she has originated by seeing possibilities beyond her stated degree. For instance: as result of her efforts she has been asked to choreograph for new dance genres and she excels because she is willing try new things and apply her own way of creating something pleasing and unexpected. Bottom line: she is doing what she loves, is fully immersed in her passion AND is earning a nice living as well. You can a apply a similar plan whether it be dance, music, performance, or fine arts. Use that RBT to the max and you’ll be open to many opportunities that your left-brain peers will not have a prayer of grasping. Just DON’T get stuck on what you see as the ONLY way to use your degree.

Chip LawCo-founder Managing Director Educational Avenues

Believe it or not you can do ANYTHING you want!

Read Daniel Pink’s A Whole New Mind. He talks of the near-term future as being the world of those with right-brain thinking (RBT). As opposed to left-brain thinkers (logic, analysis, precision etc.) RBT’s, are, in general, creative out of the box thinkers. They innovate spontaneously, they solve problems with ingenuity and originality. These traits will be what future employers will want and are the absolute strength of entrepreneurs. Real world example: my daughter just completed her MFA in dance at Smith College. She knows she has to make her way in the world and she LOVES dance. What is she doing now? She is teaching dance at a university and knows that her salary is not enough to live on. So what does she do? She formed a dance company on her own. She gives workshops and lectures on dance and movement. Due to her visibility in these areas she travels across the country doing unique projects that she has originated by seeing possibilities beyond her stated degree. For instance: as result of her efforts she has been asked to choreograph for new dance genres and she excels because she is willing try new things and apply her own way of creating something pleasing and unexpected. Bottom line: she is doing what she loves, is fully immersed in her passion AND is earning a nice living as well. You can a apply a similar plan whether it be dance, music, performance, or fine arts. Use that RBT to the max and you’ll be open to many opportunities that your left-brain peers will not have a prayer of grasping. Just DON’T get stuck on what you see as the ONLY way to use your degree.

Chip LawCo-founder Managing Director Educational Avenues

Believe it or not you can do ANYTHING you want!

Read Daniel Pink’s A Whole New Mind. He talks of the near-term future as being the world of those with right-brain thinking (RBT). As opposed to left-brain thinkers (logic, analysis, precision etc.) RBT’s, are, in general, creative out of the box thinkers. They innovate spontaneously, they solve problems with ingenuity and originality. These traits will be what future employers will want and are the absolute strength of entrepreneurs. Real world example: my daughter just completed her MFA in dance at Smith College. She knows she has to make her way in the world and she LOVES dance. What is she doing now? She is teaching dance at a university and knows that her salary is not enough to live on. So what does she do? She formed a dance company on her own. She gives workshops and lectures on dance and movement. Due to her visibility in these areas she travels across the country doing unique projects that she has originated by seeing possibilities beyond her stated degree. For instance: as result of her efforts she has been asked to choreograph for new dance genres and she excels because she is willing try new things and apply her own way of creating something pleasing and unexpected. Bottom line: she is doing what she loves, is fully immersed in her passion AND is earning a nice living as well. You can a apply a similar plan whether it be dance, music, performance, or fine arts. Use that RBT to the max and you’ll be open to many opportunities that your left-brain peers will not have a prayer of grasping. Just DON’T get stuck on what you see as the ONLY way to use your degree.

James LundgrenPartnerCollege Planning Solutions

Not Lady Gaga?

Good Question! Actually there are many more opportunities behind the camera/curtain than there are in front. Depending on your preference; theater, music, radio, television, movies, etc., you may use your specialty/major to define yourself. By your Junior year in college you should have investigated classes other than your own and options your upperclassmen friends are taking advantage of and figure out what is your niche. Versus just the arts as an educational direction, let’s evolve to film editing, set design, sound and lighting operations, camera work, etc. Once you decide what you want to specialize in, aggressively pursue internships (both paid and unpaid) which will give you industry exposure and the potential to find your first job before you graduate! You may also follow-up your 4-year arts degree with a Master’s in Business and represent performers with finding work, managing their affairs, conducting contract negotiations on their behalf, etc.

James LundgrenPartnerCollege Planning Solutions

Not Lady Gaga or Denzel Washington?

Good Question! Actually there are many more opportunities behind the camera/curtain than there are in front. Think of how many performers are in most bands and how many roadies, drivers, managers, sound techs, instrument techs, booking agents, accountants, attorneys, etc. are necessary to help them with their careers. Depending on your preference; theater, music, radio, television, movies, etc., you may use your specialty/major to define yourself. By your Junior year in college you should have investigated classes other than your own and options your upperclassmen friends are taking advantage of and figure out what is your niche. Versus just the arts as an educational direction, let’s evolve to film editing, set design, sound and lighting operations, camera work, etc. Once you decide what you want to specialize in, aggressively pursue internships (both paid and unpaid) which will give you industry exposure and the potential to find your first job before you graduate! You may also follow-up your 4-year arts degree with a Master’s in Business and represent performers with finding work, managing their affairs, conducting contract negotiations on their behalf, etc.

Karen Ekman-BaurDirector of College CounselingLeysin American School

Other Careers in the Arts

You may often hear the question, “What are you going to do with a major in ________?” (Just fill in the blank with the name of a major.) Well, there are a lot of things that can be done with any degree. Let’s consider a few options in the arts area, other than working full-time as a performer or artist. This list is not definitive, and it should be kept in mind that, for some of these suggestions, further training or an advanced degree may be required. The creativity that is developed through working toward a degree in the arts is applicable in many fields that are not mentioned in detail below – business, government, and so on. Art – Elementary, high school, art school, or community art center teacher, curriculum specialist, art administrator, museum or gallery curator or archivist (public, private, governmental, corporate), various positions in publishing . . . Teaching at the college or university level will require an advanced degree. Dance – Dance teacher for public or private schools, community organizations, or dance studios; choreographer; dance research in areas such as history and kinesiology, dance therapist . . . Advanced degrees can lead to college/university teaching opportunities. Music – Music teacher privately or in various schools or organizations, music librarian, music therapist, computer software developer, music instrument manufacturer, music critic or journalist . . . College/university teaching will require an advanced degree. Drama/Theater – Drama teacher for schools or community organizations, director, set designer, playwright, stage manager, technical director, drama specialist for a corporation (Many corporations present drama techniques through their Human Resources departments as a form of personal development.) For college/university teaching, an advanced degree will usually be required. I hope this gives you an idea of the many possibilities which may be open to you through a major in the arts. In any of the areas, you might discover that you’re interested in the business management aspects of the field. Teaching has been mentioned in all of the areas above. Although this may be not your original goal, something to keep in mind is that “Those who can, do; but those who REALLY can, teach!”

Carrie Morris

What can I do with an arts major?

A major in the arts, like many college majors, can prepare you for a variety of positions and career opportunities beyond the performing or fine arts. Depending on which art major you’re considering, there are a variety of “transferable skills” that are valued by employers. Creative problem solving, communication (both verbal and nonverbal), technical skill (for example, photography or other fine arts might involve heavy computer use for editing or creation), teamwork, analytical skills, and multitasking are just a few of any number of skills that would be part of an arts major and highly coveted by a range of employers. If you don’t want to go into the arts directly, you might choose to pursue graphic design, marketing, teaching, law, or sales as potential career paths. Ultimately, which career will be based on a total package of what your skills and interests are–your major is just one piece of that larger picture. The arts encompass so many different forms, from theatre (so, perhaps future careers might draw heavily from verbal communication, persuasive techniques, or captivating crowds) to photography (so, perhaps advertising, sales, or web design), so thinking about what art form(s) you enjoy, the skills you’re using, and other jobs that might use those transferable skills will help you find other potential sources of employment outside the traditional performer/artist role.

William PepinDirector of GuidanceNorth Smithfield High School

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You have many options to explore as a graduate with an Arts degree. Would you like to go to work or graduate school? Would you like to be involved in a different capacity in your chosen field? You could work part time building your resume and supplement that with work in a related or unrelated area. The key is to believe in yourself, network, and figure out how to make your dreams come true.

Zulema WascherCounselorRio Rico High School

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Many students wonder, how will getting an education in the arts provide me with an income? My answer is always the same, as long as you have an education, in any area, you will find a job easier than if you had no education. With a major in the arts, you can search any area that interests you. If you want to become a teacher you can, you would need additional certification, which would require around a year of additional classes and an exam to become certified as such, and become a fine arts teacher. You can go into law enforcement, where many agencies are looking for people with a degree, it wouldn’t matter in what area. As such, there are many options, as long as you have an education, and work towards reaching a certain goal. In the meantime, there are other options for jobs.

Ryan JohnSchool CounselorBethlehem High School

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Students majoring in the visual/fine arts etc. can pursue internships with advertising companies or museums for example or can pursue higher education to further their marketability and breadth of knowledge. Some students may want to pursue a teaching degree in the arts to vary the opportunities that are available to them also. Students studying the performing arts can reach out and make connections with national and local productions to inquire about any volunteer opportunities available that will add experience to a resume.

Tracy JacksonCoordinatorVirginia Beach City Public Schools

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Well, there are a couple of different options you can think about. If you still want to stay in the performing arts industry and are OK with not being a performer/artist right now, then think about the other aspects of the PA industry. Perhaps the technical part of the field (costumes, make-up, stage hand) or the business end (scheduling, sales, printing). If you feel that you really want to perform, then look to your local or neighborhood theaters. You can also teach and/or perform for elderly and children.That way you still are able to continue with your craft.

Patrick O’ConnorDirector of College CounselingRoeper School

Teaching, Technology, Managing and More

It isn’t uncommon for artists with college degrees to find full-time jobs in their field to be few and far between– then again, that’s true for almost every degree in this tight economy! Graduates in every field seem to be caught in the circle of “we can’t use you, get more experience”, since you can’t get experience until someone can use you. Your best bet is to use your college experience to keep your options open in four important ways: 1. Avoid the experience trap in the first place. You don’t need a degree to start your career as a performer or to sell your first painting. From coffee houses to open mike nights to local orchestras to travelling productions that need extras, all kinds of opportunities await you on stage while you’re still in college– and the same is true for art fairs and competitions. Talk to your professors, advisors, and local artists to get your name in circulation– networking is the key in these professions. 2. Take a class or two in teaching. Even established artists get a special thrill– and some extra money– taking on private students or teaching small group classes through continuing education programs or in their homes. It’s worth the time to take a class or two in college that gives you the basics in how to pass your love of the arts on to others. 3. How are your computer skills? A theater, studio, or music company may not need a full-time artist, but they may need someone to answer the phones and promote upcoming events through social media. If your writing skills are sharp and your communication skills are very 21st century, you may find the best way to get a job onstage is to work hard offstage. 4. Start your own venue. A number of artists find the best way to break into the business is to produce their own plays, records, and videos, and many colleges offer courses in arts management to support these entrepreneurs. If you have a nose for talent and a head for numbers, this could be a great way to get started in the field you love.

Joseph Tavares

Keeping an open mind when you’re an arts major

Many students are surprised when I tell them their major in college might not correlate with the job they have after they graduate. They think that because they have invested so much time and energy into something like the visual or performing arts, including convincing their mother or father that they should be able to study one of them as their academic concentration in college (oftentimes no easy task), that it would be fruitless or worse – a step in the wrong direction – to find a job that is in a totally different career sector. They are often surprised when I tell them that some of the most successful people in business, politics, and education majored in the arts before they found themselves where they are today. For example, Michael Eisner, former Disney CEO, studied theater at Denison. The iconic ‘Hope’ campaign poster which came to symbolize the presidential campaign message of Brack Obama was done by Shepard Fairey, a RISD graduate. And lastly, former art historian Dr. Betsy Flemming is today President of Converse College, an all-women’s school in South Carolina. So yes, it’s true. The skills and abilities you develop as a student of the arts will transfer to many other careers. I’m sure those 3 successful people I mentioned above didn’t expect the jobs they have today when they were in college. You might not very well either. The key is to have an open mind and to realize that what you learn in the classroom as an arts major has significant value — especially when it’s time for you to enter the workforce.

Joshua EarsleyStudent Assistance CoordinatorReach Out

Possibilities with a Degree in Fine Arts

The world of performing is a very competitive one. This is a risk one takes in focusing on such a major. However there are risks in many educational courses when regarding work immediately upon graduation. If you have a passion for the Arts and you know that it is something that you will pursue and explore further, then you will find a wide array of occupations surrounding performers and artists. Such opportunities include private one-on-one coaching, teaching in a class room, freelance screenplay writing and also personally assisting other performers. Learn as you go. Develop a network. Meet as many people as possible. Ask lots of questions. This is usually how performers and artists like yourself begin their careers. By continually gaining as much experience and education as you can, It ensures a well thought out and illustrious journey towards the occupation of your dreams.

Reena Gold KaminsFounderCollege, Career & Life, LLC.

You don’t need to be a starving artist!

Creative individuals are always in demand! With a background in the arts, particularly performance (either acting, singing, dancing) you can always earn money providing lessons. You can offer group or individual lessons. Parents of elementary school students now hire artists for birthday parts. Older students are looking to perfect their abilities as a means to set themselves apart. If you don’t want to teach or provide lessons, and you have a major in fine arts, you can work at design firms or marketing companies. If you like to travel, you might look for work as an admissions counelor at an art school or conservatory.

CollegeCounselor McSellerson

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

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Miladys Penalver-Howard

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are many different things that you can do with a major in the arts. For example, you can look into teaching in the public or private school system in the area you majored in. Many districts will work on getting you in the teaching profession while you are attending school to complete certain course requirements to receive permanent certification. You can also apply to teach as a professor at the local community college or university.

kati swansonCounselorTMCC HS

People with fine Arts degree have many skills

So you have graduated with a degree in Fine Arts, now what? First thing is to realize you have a degree and that alone makes you better candidate for a job than a person without. Steady full time work as a performer or artist does not happen often. During the time you don’t have engagements you can find work in the service industry these kinds of jobs are less demanding and allow you to continue working on your art. If you want or need a more permanent job you can go into teaching, management, media or advertising.

Riche Holmes GrantPresidentInnovative Study Techniques

What to do with a major in the arts if you don’t get full-time work…

If you don’t get full-time work, apply for internships. Even if the internship is unpaid initially, you may be the first to be considered when/if paid opportunities arise. If you like working with students, you can try teaching, either at a school or through a performing arts organization. Finally, as we say in the legal profession, you could “hang up your own shingle.” Instead of waiting for a full-time to fall in your lap, you could create your own opportunities. Before you know it, the money you generate from a series of part-time gigs (that you choose:-) could equate to what you would make as a full-timer.

Judy ZoddaFounder and PresidentZodda College Services

Opportunities in the Arts Beyond Performing or as an Artist

You can work at an auction house as an appraiser of fine art, manage the box office or events of a performing arts theatre, teach in a private boarding school where the arts are very highly regarded and are very high level, (You don’t need a teaching degree in private schools), found and run your own recording studio, start at a lower level job of an already established recording studio and work your way up by proving your skills. (Read Kara DioGuardi’s autobiography, “Ending on a High Note” to find out how this successful singer/songwriter and former American Idol judge got started). The list of careers that you can have as a performer/artist is endless if you don’t land your dream job at first.

Catrina Johnson

Artistic Professional

With a Degree in the Arts, you can create your own future!! How about being a Curator, Graphic Designer, Web Designer, Studio Artist, Photographer and an Art Teacher. All of these options are available for you with a Degree in Art.

Gina Geck

What can I do with an Art Degree?

Many students worry that if they pursue a degree in the Arts their only career option is to be a performer or artist. However, there are many fields to which you can apply your art degree. Artists don’t just use paint and a canvans to showcase their talent, they can help design marketing campaigns for large corporatins or small non profits, they can work behind the scenes in television and film, share their knowlegde working for a museum, become a teacher, or work in the design industry just to name a few. If you are passionate about art, feel free to pursue an art degree and realize that the there is no limit to where you can apply your degree as long as you are open to exploring all possibilities.

Esther WallingCollege CounselorThomas Jefferson High School

How else do I fulfill my performance dreams?

As a young music major myself, I struggled with the same question. The easy answer is you can teach. However, most public school districts generally cut what we believe to be the most important instruction, the arts, when budgets get tight. I still believe in the “easy” answer, but it might be to teach privately or in a private school. I found that in the school setting I performed (and still do) every day that I work. But again nothing is more fulfilling than receiving accolades from a live audience or an appreciating gallery of admirers. The hours teaching public or private school or private lessons sometimes gives you the freedom to audition or produce your own art. It’s never easy, but if you are determined to achieve your dreams, it is possible.

Chuck SlatePresidentCollege Advisors,LLC

WILL MY KID BECOME A STARVING ARTIST????

Many parents are especially sensitive about their students EVEN SHOWING AN INTEREST in the Arts because they’re often afraid the student will at best be virtually unemployable and at worst don a smock, cut off an ear and become a starving artist. Nothing could be further from the truth. If a family does some advanced planning, they will want to identify their young person’s dominant traits. There are several ways to accomplish this. I would point to the lifetime of work by Dr. John Holland (Making Vocational Choices, 1973, 1984). Holland created the RIASEC Model or what we now call the Holland’s Hexagon. Once assessed, we can identify a student’s dominant trait(s) or typology(s), for example ARTISTIC. My understanding of the ARTISTIC trait is that the student is Creative, and prefer to be Expressive. They like to be Innovative and Imaginative and typically do not like structure or conformity. Ironically, when I think or read about a person like Bill Gates as a young person, I think of someone who is creative and expressive. I think of someone who does not like structure or conformity. Mark Zuckerberg, the billionaire founder of FACEBOOK, was known for going around reciting lines from Homer’s The Iliad. Young people who have a dominant trait of ARTISTIC also have complimentary traits that may determine what majors they could consider in college as well as careers which other people who have similar traits have succeeded at. For example people who have tested high with Holland Codes of ARTISTIC/SOCIAL might be a Foreign Language Teacher or a Communications Arts Professor. ARTISTIC/REALISTIC perhaps an Audio Engineer. ARTISTIC/ENTERPRISER might be a speech writer or website designer. ARTISTIC/INVESTIGATIVE a sports journalist or a news commentator, and so on and so forth. In summary, if our society can take any solace or hope in mankind’s future it has to lie with young men and women who are creative and innovative. Therefore, being ARTISTIC doesn’t doom to failure a sixth of our population, it merely means we as custodians of our young people need to understand how they can contribute best to our society and economy. The best way we can help is to spend a lot of time with our young people in discussion, in helping them research, in exposing them to careers they have NOT seen on television, in providing career days and “shadowings” of various careers, and naturally a plethora of internships.

Chuck SlatePresidentCollege Advisors,LLC

WILL MY KID BECOME A STARVING ARTIST????

Many parents are especially sensitive about their students EVEN SHOWING AN INTEREST in the Arts because they’re often afraid the student will at best be virtually unemployable and at worst don a smock, cut off an ear and become a starving artist. Nothing could be further from the truth. If a family does some advanced planning, they will want to identify their young person’s dominant traits. There are several ways to accomplish this. I would point to the lifetime of work by Dr. John Holland (Making Vocational Choices, 1973, 1984). Holland created the RIASEC Model or what we now call the Holland’s Hexagon. Once assessed, we can identify a student’s dominant trait(s) or typology(s), for example ARTISTIC. My understanding of the ARTISTIC trait is that the student is Creative, and prefer to be Expressive. They like to be Innovative and Imaginative and typically do not like structure or conformity. Ironically, when I think or read about a person like Bill Gates as a young person, I think of someone who is creative and expressive. I think of someone who does not like structure or conformity. Mark Zuckerberg, the billionaire founder of FACEBOOK, was known for going around reciting lines from Homer’s The Iliad. Young people who have a dominant trait of ARTISTIC also have complimentary traits that may determine what majors they could consider in college as well as careers which other people who have similar traits have succeeded at. For example people who have tested high with Holland Codes of ARTISTIC/SOCIAL might be a Foreign Language Teacher or a Communications Arts Professor. ARTISTIC/REALISTIC perhaps an Audio Engineer. ARTISTIC/ENTERPRISER might be a speech writer or website designer. ARTISTIC/INVESTIGATIVE a sports journalist or a news commentator, and so on and so forth. In summary, if our society can take any solace or hope in mankind’s future it has to lie with young men and women who are creative and innovative. Therefore, being ARTISTIC doesn’t doom to failure a sixth of our population, it merely means we as custodians of our young people need to understand how they can contribute best to our society and economy. The best way we can help is to spend a lot of time with our young people in discussion, in helping them research, in exposing them to careers they have NOT seen on television, in providing career days and “shadowings” of various careers, and naturally a plethora of internships.

Chuck SlatePresidentCollege Advisors,LLC

WILL MY KID BECOME A STARVING ARTIST????

Many parents are especially sensitive about their students EVEN SHOWING AN INTEREST in the Arts because they’re often afraid the student will at best be virtually unemployable and at worst don a smock, cut off an ear and become a starving artist. Nothing could be further from the truth. If a family does some advanced planning, they will want to identify their young person’s dominant traits. There are several ways to accomplish this. I would point to the lifetime of work by Dr. John Holland (Making Vocational Choices, 1973, 1984). Holland created the RIASEC Model or what we now call the Holland’s Hexagon. Once assessed, we can identify a student’s dominant trait(s) or typology(s), for example ARTISTIC. My understanding of the ARTISTIC trait is that the student is Creative, and prefer to be Expressive. They like to be Innovative and Imaginative and typically do not like structure or conformity. Ironically, when I think or read about a person like Bill Gates as a young person, I think of someone who is creative and expressive. I think of someone who does not like structure or conformity. Mark Zuckerberg, the billionaire founder of FACEBOOK, was known for going around reciting lines from Homer’s The Iliad. Young people who have a dominant trait of ARTISTIC also have complimentary traits that may determine what majors they could consider in college as well as careers which other people who have similar traits have succeeded at. For example people who have tested high with Holland Codes of ARTISTIC/SOCIAL might be a Foreign Language Teacher or a Communications Arts Professor. ARTISTIC/REALISTIC perhaps an Audio Engineer. ARTISTIC/ENTERPRISER might be a speech writer or website designer. ARTISTIC/INVESTIGATIVE a sports journalist or a news commentator, and so on and so forth. In summary, if our society can take any solace or hope in mankind’s future it has to lie with young men and women who are creative and innovative. Therefore, being ARTISTIC doesn’t doom to failure a sixth of our population, it merely means we as custodians of our young people need to understand how they can contribute best to our society and economy. The best way we can help is to spend a lot of time with our young people in discussion, in helping them research, in exposing them to careers they have NOT seen on television, in providing career days and “shadowings” of various careers, and naturally a plethora of internships. But the first step is to help the student understand through one or more assessments WHO and WHAT they are.

Keith BermanPresidentOptions for College, Inc.

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There is really very little you can’t do with an arts degree. Most people that graduate from a conservatory or arts program are masters of one of the keys to success: the ability to see things through. Arts majors tend to know that practice makes perfect, that sometimes long hours are required to be good at things, and that anything worth doing is worth doing well. If Plan A for you is a major in the arts, stick to Plan A, you are too young and exciting to be working on your backup plan. On a professional/personal note, besides the fact that one of my own college majors was music, I have to be honest that we hire people from Pratt all the time and show some preference to them as applicants because they graduate with so many tools. Arts majors just tend to me much more on top of advents in technology and what is changing in the world. I doubt we are the only employers to feel that way.

Aaron Ashford

Career choices in the arts

There are options available to you if you face this challenge. You could enter into an alternative teacher certification program and earn your certification to teach. You could offer lessons based on your area of artistic expertise. If painting, drawing, art history is your area, you could become employed by a local museum as a Curator, or any number of positions they could have open.

Kristen ShambargerSchool Counselor

Finding related work with a major in the Arts

It can be tough to find full-time work as an artist, whether it’s playing an instrument, dancing, acting, singing, painting, etc. It’s a competitive world out there, and sometimes artists that are fortunate enough to find full-time work in their field may still struggle to make ends meet. The good news is that there IS opportunity, you may just need to get a little creative–good thing that’s your strong point! Try to think about your industry as a whole. For example, the theater industry certainly needs actors, but they need many, many other folks as well. They need energetic and creative people to work in marketing departments. They need people to organize the day-today functions of the theater. Many theaters also need to stay connected to influential people in the community so that they are able to raise funds. There might also be opportunity to work as a tutor or coach for other artists in the field.

Magali TellesOutreach SpecialistSonoma State University

Majoring in Art Options

One option for students with a Bachelor’s degree in Art is always to go into teaching. By pursuing a teaching credential graduates are not only able to practice in their field but to teach others as well.

Keicha BarnesSenior CounselorA. C. Flora High School

Oh the possibilities!

There are several avenues that you can take with a major in the arts. You can obtain work in a retail chain such as Hobby Lobby or Michael’s, you can also go into business for yourself making jewelry or selling paintings, etc. Many others who have majored in this area have gone on to work in body shops detailing cars and motorcycles or may make the signs that we see daily…graphic artists design logos for major businesses and even make marquee signs for many local and national chains. You may also find an interest working in a museum or at a performing arts theater. The possibilities are endless!

Amy Carlson

Major in the Arts

With a major in the arts, you can do freelance work or teach in your field of expertise if you don’t get full time work.

Kat Kadian-BaumeyerVocational Guidance Counselor

Teach/Coach the Arts

If you do not get a job performing, you can use your talent to teach in elemenraty or high school.

Joseph RomanoCollege CounselorBellarmine College Preparatory

You can do lots with an arts degree outside of performing

A student could work on the management side of the arts business. Promotions, marketing, venue management. There is truly lots to do with an arts degree.

Michael SzarekDirector and FounderCollege Counseling for the Rest of Us

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

The major in the arts will also provide you with the opportunity and skill set to succeed as an entrepreneur or within theater or arts management. You can become a talent agency manager, or serve for a non-profit entity. You can also still incorporate your background into part-time opportunities within the arts and combine that with other revenue streams.

Wendy RockSchool CounselorHahnville High School

Arts Major

My first suggestion would be to double major in education or go back and complete the course work required for certification as a teacher. Thre is a demand for teachers. Of course there are others jobs you can find with a major in the arts including arts management or working in a museum or gallery. You may also want to consider pursuing an advanced degree.

Michael PuccioPresident/Advisor/Life CoachFuture First Advisors, LLC

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

This happens a lot – and not to just artists and performers. In fact, in today’s economy there are a lot of college graduates that are having difficulty finding work in their field of study. As a graduate with your major, you have a few different options: 1) Do you have any interest in teaching? I have known many college students (and I have a few colleagues) who study a fine art and have brought that knowledge and passion to the classroom. Not only are you passing on your expertise, you also get to participate! 2) Perhaps you can find a job in the industry doing something else. For instance, if you were a music performance major, you could look for work in the music industry. Promotions and public relations are a pretty popular job in the music industry. If you are an artist, maybe look at being a curator. Universities and museums sometimes have those job opportunities; I’ve seen listings for curators/catalogers at universities and colleges many times in the past couple of years! If you received your degree in drama/theater arts, again promotion, PR, and management are good opportunities. Of course, those types of jobs often require you to be local to a major city. 3) Look for entry level work anywhere. You may find out that you like what your doing and you can use that experience as an opportunity to advance. And don’t forget! You have nights and weekends to practice what you love. And if you do take a job doing “whatever”, always keep looking! Maybe a career opportunity in your art will pop up along the way. Best of luck!!

Mr C CoakleyPresidentAcademic Coaching Services

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Many businesses and organizations employ students who have studied fine and performing arts for an array of tasks and jobs needed. Sales and marketing positions are often available to artists because of the vibrance, poise, and acumen needed to connect with consumers. An engaging smile or ability to build rapport well with clients and customers can’t always come from someone with a business degree; so, actors, dancers, or musicians–those comfortable in public– make great customer relations and outreach representatives. Artists can use their talents to help create marketing materials or light up an office space. So, never listen to people who say artists can’t get work. These people have never owned a business (like I do)!

Veronica Guzman

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You can work at any theater as costume shop, stage set, or even write stories. As long as you have a Bachelor’s Degree, you can work in any field that requires a 4-year degree. Have you thought about doing College Admissions work? During my years as an undergraduate admissions counselor, I worked with several Art degree graduates. Think about it!

ravi balaIndependent8thSquare.org

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Depends on the art major. Art majors are trained in observing details: 1. as an artist, you observe physical details – useful in web design, logo creation, or even observing patterns of information in marketing research if you have a little quantitative bent. 2. You are creative – you can look at and extract possibilities from a group – a brainstorming session leader. 3. You observe human emotions – you can train, teach or even become a sales person ( will have to learn industry). We have to look beyond skills on paper and see what you can DO? The answer lies in yourself and the journey of discovering the answer will make you more confident and bale to find a path and a career.

Leigh MooreCollege CounselorCollege Admissions Planning, LLC

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

My first-impulse answer is to say, “Appreciate your gift–enjoy life more fully than the rest of us are able to.” I suspect you are asking about a way to earn income, though, so I’ll tackle that question. I always tell my young sons, who are baseball enthusiasts, that for every professional athlete, there are a number of non-athletes who make his or her job possible. Agents, owners, umps,…they all are necessary. So it is with the arts. Even if you put down your brush or your tuba, you have an untold number of ways to utilize your degree. Someone has to run the museum or market the upcoming opera season, raise funds for the ballet. Some people might tell you to teach, but I think teaching is a true calling, and I don’t encourage it as a backup position. If the prospect excites you, though, go for it.

Francine SchwartzFounder/ PresidentPathfinder Counseling LLC

Careers for the Arts Major

If you have the foresight to combine your degree with a teaching certificate you could find a job as a teacher. Check with the schools that you are considering to see if you could double major in art/music and education. Many businesses and industries utilize the talents of arts majors. What about doing a minor in business so that you could manage an art gallery or museum. You may need to take specific classes to qualify for this. If you have an entrepreneurial spirit you could open up a business featuring local artists or crafters. Combining art with a minor/major in journalism might lead to a career as an ads critic. The possibilities abound but it may take some foresight and perseverance. It will all be worth it if you can pursue work in a field that you are passionate about even if that means performing part time or as an amateur for a while.

Christine Johnson

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Artists are creative! Many businesses are directly responsible for promoting the arts, whether it is through advertising, fund raising,or marketing. It would be wise to minor in business, marketing, advertising, or graphic arts so that you have marketable skills to help you seek gainful employment as you you “climb your way to stardom.” You don’t have to be a starving waiter or waitress!

Willard DixDirector of ProgrammingChicago Scholars

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You need to think about a “major” more broadly. I tell students that a major is the backbone of their college experience, with the other courses fleshing out your academic life. In a normal curriculum of 32 courses, a major is usually 8-10, perhaps 12. That leaves you with 20 others that can be in any subject (depending on what your school’s core requirements may be). So you have many options: You can take courses related to or totally unrelated to your major; ones that stretch you or ones that let you dig deeper into a topic of interest. That being said, think about the qualities of mind and the habits an arts major would have to have to do well: a keen eye, imagination, dedication to a task, depth of feeling, technical skills (according to which arts are involved), and so on. These are important in many fields and you should emphasize their transferability when you look for jobs that may seem out of line with the major. Ideally, your institution should be impressing on its students that their educations are more than just training for jobs; they are experiences that will unlock many doors in the future.

Claire Law

Careers in the arts are not for the faint at heart!

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ? The answer lies within you! Everyone is different, has different abilities and levels of passion for art. If you wonder what you can do with a degree in the performing or visual art and are really concerned about having a steady job upon graduation you may consider majoring in art and some other field that is more marketable in today’s economy. Take my student Christopher, for example, who has a beautiful baritone voice and an interest in the environment. Chris loves to learn what can be applied immediately to the real world. He sat through Math class in high school and wondered when is it that he would actually apply the domain of a function in real life. He does not care for theory and abstraction. He is concerned about earning a living upon graduation from college. He’s been working with me during his junior year of high school, and he has taken several vocational assessments and figured out that he’s not entrepreneurial in nature, does not like to take chances, and would prefer a “traditional career” with traditional hours, regular hours and increasing responsibilities. He will combine his music major with environmental science. A career in the performing or visual arts is not for the faint at heart. There are many beautiful and talented actors in Hollywood who any are working as waiters and free lancing when the opportunity arises. A fairly successful stage actor said to me: “When I get to work I’m on cloud nine. I consider the earnings remuneration for the times when I did not have work.” On the other hand, my other student Carollyn is a dancer. She’s taken ballet since she was yea high to a grasshopper. She is good at it. I can believe this because she’s already been on the radar of the New York Ballet Company. She cannot envision herself doing anything else. Carollyn may end up working at a dance company upon graduation from high school. The career of a dancer is very short, and if she is invited to dance, she should probably do it, because college will still be there but the chance to dance may not.

Rachael PlantStudentUAB

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are a few different options here, especially in different areas of the arts. In the case of performing arts there are usually local productions put on by colleges and local theater organizations. If you haven’t been able to find steady work, try auditioning locally to build a more appealing portfolio. Some travel may be involved. You can also check websites for films needing extras. When it comes to writing either professionally or creatively, try publishing in smaller local magazines and newspapers or even epublishing. Consider also broadening your options. Have you thought about publishing and editing or medical and technical writing? Again, these options will help you build a more appealing portfolio or resume.

Flora Collett

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You may want to consider starting as a manager or agent to view the complete process that performers/artists deal with. The best way to do this is to network. The best way to network is to attend venues and events that you prefer. Meet the people involved. Exchange names and numbers. Become a regular in their circles. And for the computer savvy, communicate with them via Facebook. As a “starving” artist, perform in your local venues. Volunteer without pay, if necessary. All of these performers/artists travel in the same groups and you will become known to them. They will become contacts for you in spreading the word and sharing the info about how marvelous you are. Be patient and enjoy the moment. These are some fabulous, and quirky, people that you may know for the rest of your career and life. Learn from their experiences. Most of them really do know what they are talking about. Never give up on your dream and your passion. You may just need to modify it along the way.

Cheryl Millington

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Obviously you chose a degree in the performing arts because you want to be a performing artist when you grow up. Congratulations on following your passion! However, like any other degree, you should never feel limited by this major. First and foremost you are going to college to get an education and you will not only graduate with an arts major. Think about the transferable and soft skills you will gain from your degree. I am always impressed with the perseverance, tenacity and passion I see in artists. A smart employer, in any industry, will benefit from your creativity and ability to think outside the box. A great performer is likely to be able to give great presentations and not be afraid to speak in public; a skill that a manger will appreciate. Perhaps your degree shows that you’re adaptable and flexible; which will be important for a number of jobs. This list can go on and on. If plan A doesn’t work out for you, the bottom line is to find ways to use your degree in a different way but still look for a job or career that you enjoy. The career office at your college will be a great asset in helping you define your transferable skills. Depending on your school and program, you may have the chance to do a minor or courses in another area. This could be your plan B or back-up career. However, it’s worth the effort to purse your dream. Think about how you’ll feel later in life if you never took the chance and did an arts degree. Many students don’t have a direct path from their degree to a job, so you’ll not be unique. Just work hard and hope for the best. Good luck!

Dalia Singleton Wimberly, M.Ed.Owner/Educational ConsultantRaeBrown Consulting

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Liberal Arts degrees, including those in the arts, are very versatile. You don’t have to be an artist or performer for find full-time and fulfilling work. The key to finding a job will be focusing on your transferable skills like creativity, innovation, expressive communication, etc. All of these skills would translate will into a career in marketing, communications, advertising, and graphic design. If you also have some leadership experiences, you can also consider pursing a career in the more “behind the scenes” aspects of performing arts such as management, producing, promoting, etc.

Estelle MeskinCertified Educational PlannerEstelleMeskin.com

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You can take your talent and teach it to others! There are many career fields which would embrace your skills and creativity: communications, technology, computer assisted design,graphics, managing art galleries, television. Businesses frequently seek out individuals with creativity. Unfortunately many performers and artists can not get full time jobs in their chosen careers but if you’re willing to work at several jobs you can get career satisfaction.

Tennille RaneyFounderDevelop Your Dreams

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Don’t give up on your dreams!! There are many well known performers that initially struggled to get to where they are. Talent is imperative, but networking and self-promoting are just as important. The key is to identify employment opportunities that continue to propel you forward. If you’re serious about working as a performer/artist, identify a job within your area of interest, which helps you learn more about your craft, and gives you access to important contacts in the field. If you want to be a renowned photographer, work as a studio assistant to one. Think about where you would eventually like to perform or exhibit and see if they’re hiring. The earlier you start looking, the better. There are many internships that have modest salaries, but offer exceptional experiences and opportunities. You never know when you may be called upon to demonstrate your talent, so always be ready. Stay persistent, pleasant, and patient and eventually you will get your time to shine.

Angela HebertDirector of AdmissionsFletcher Technical Community College

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

First and foremost, it depends on the type of degree – bachelors or masters. If you intend to work on higher education as a professor, you will need a masters degree in arts or at least 18 graduate hours in art. However, if you intend only to pursue your masters, you still have many options. If you are unable to obtain employment as a performer/artist, dependant on the area of arts, you can work in a recording studio, museum, performing arts studios, art galleries, or in advertising. Sometimes, employers require that an applicant has a degree but does not require the specific type of degree. They only want to ensure that their employees are educated. This is especially true if you lack a strong work history. Having earned a college degree demonstrates your ability to complete something you started and demonstrates that you likely possess critical thinking skills.

Evelyn M.A.PresidentMagellan College Counseling

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

This is a great question. Many performing and visual artists have “day” jobs to support themselves, while taking side jobs in the arts to fulfill their need to create. A major in the arts will prepare you just as well as most other majors for working in the real world. You should consider whether you want to pursue a full-time career in the arts, or have it as a hobby, avocation or side job, before you choose an arts major. You can learn more about the creative economy in a recent report by Otis College of Art & Design – click here to download it: http://otis.edu/creative_economy/.

John Happs

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are many things that a person with an arts degree can do. Many employers want a person that graduated from college. Many times the degree may not be as important as the fact that you as a student completed a 4 year degree program. These employers will train you to understand their product or service. They want someone that can learn and is willing to put in the effort. The hope is always that you will be able to use your creative talents within the scope of the job you take.

Tony TsoHeadmasterTerasmanna Oikademy

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Only the best in their respective “arts” field get paid to perform their art, the rest are very grateful if they get to participate somehow in another’s performance/act as member of a supporting crew or cast. And “best” is of course a relative term. The best violinist in a smaller city like Toledo simply can’t even begin to hope to compete in a major metropolitan area like Washington DC. When it’s audition time, the jury isn’t interested in your credentials (alma mater/degree/major), they only want to know how good you are. An artist is not seen as providing a service that is deemed a necessity but an optional luxury in modern American society. Usually non-performing artists end up in the educational market, fulfilling the adage, “those who can’t do, teach.” Some college degree programs are simply NOT legitimate, both in the sense that there is no market demand for individuals with such college degrees and in the sense that one does not become “educated” by spending 4 years studying such a “discipline”. Think about it, if the professors are any good at the arts they teach, shouldn’t they be too busy performing somewhere instead of teaching in the middle of nowhere? Yes, there is always room for scholarship in any of the arts, but that’s for aspiring scholars not performers. To put it very bluntly, if you are very good at the art, you don’t need the degree to prove it but can demonstrate it with performance or portfolio. If you can’t get into the most famous schools for such arts and have to settle for the 2nd or 3rd tier or the most accessible schools, it should tell you that either you need to be prepared to get by on very little and hope for a break, a miracle, or pay for a degree in a major that has a reasonable market demand while pursuing your artistic interests on the side. Think like an athlete, or a NFL, NBA hopeful. They don’t pretend that by getting a degree in basketball or football (sorry, can’t resist it) that they might get to play the game for a living. Dwell on that. Four years of college is very expense to squander on a hobby.

ALAN SHEPTIN

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

With a performance major, there are many other careers other than teaching. For instance, a student in Fine Arts may consider working for an auction house, museum curation, or art consulting for a corporation or wealthy family.

Jackson

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

With a major in the arts if you don’t get full-time work as a performer/artist you can teach classes at a local community center. What better way to share your talents and add experience to your resume’!

Arlene RosenthalHS CounselorEdison HS

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You can teach in a private school whether it be dance or performing arts. You can look into graphic arts in the private industry if that may interest you. You may land a job temporarily in the similar field with a company willing to reimburse your tuition while you go back to school for your graduate degree. This may be a great opportunity to see if this is what you will really like to do. You can also think about teaching in the public schools with a graduate degree.

Diana HansonCommon Sense College CounselingCollege Mentors

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are quite a few growing occupations in the visual arts–especially if you combine your study of art with studying communication and/or technology. Careers in the areas of industrial design, packaging/package design, user experience design, and web site development all make use of the arts. Additionally, teaching and art therapy are other applications.

Karen Prince

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

A major in the arts can be the underpinnings of many other majors. A solid background in the performing arts can help in any field that requires expertise in public speaking such as law, teaching or even medicine.

Dr. Smith

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Fine Arts majors generally teach courses in drama, music and the arts including fine and applied art, such as painting and sculpture, or design and crafts. Related occupations include but are not limited to; Chroeographers, Commercial and Industrial Designers, Fashion Designers, Film and Video Editors, Floral designers, KindergartenTeachers, except Special Education Teachers, Musicians, Instrumental and Set and Exhibit Designers.

Penny DeckOwnerChampion College Counseling

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Do What You Love! As a former Human Resources Manager who is currently a College Counselor, I advise my students to follow their passions and to not necessarily select a major just for the income potential or natural fit in the job market. There are plenty of jobs out there that look for talented people with a wide variety of skills. A strong liberal arts background can still prepare you for many different careers. And, as a bonus you were able to study what you love for four years and hopefully continue with your passion even if it is not your full-time job.

Lisa RansdellPresidentPinnacle Education Consulting, LLC

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You can potentially promote yourself as a “creative expert/consultant” in a variety of fields, especially if you have something to showcase: like an event you have coordinated or performed in, a website you designed, a flyer you created, etc. You will be of greater interest to an employer if you have another area of expertise to connect this with: such as computer info systems, nonprofit administration, public relations, etc.

Evan ForsterFounderForster-Thomas, Inc

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

It’s obvi! With a degree in the arts, you will become a creator, performer, and visionary. Tap into that! I never thought I would become an educational consultant with my degree in Theater from Northwestern University. But here I am, a successful business owner and a well-known author. Before that, I had a career as a journalist writing for magazines such as “Details” and “Seventeen”—all thanks to what I learned as a theater major. In fact, I can honestly say that I owe my entire career (including my ability to effectively lead, motivate, and communicate) to the arts, both through my undergraduate degree in Theater and my Master’s degree in Screenwriting from UCLA. In other words, the creative skills you learn while studying the arts are universally applicable to any field, and employers know it. And if you take a couple of math classes while rehearsing Richard III, well then you’re gold! Finally: In my work as an educational consultant, I find that my most successful MBA candidates come from the world of theater and creative writing. Who woulda thunk it? Being an arts major makes you a better candidate for everything in life.

Gregg Murray

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

The reality is that some performing artists may not become gainfully employed after graduating with a degree in the arts. Many programs offer a liberal arts program that will help make you a competitive applicant in many different fields. Should you decide to pursue a performing arts degree, take time to speak with professors and career counselors throughout your program. Be sure to build your resume and hone your craft. Networking is another major aspect of the arts industry and you should actively seek opportunities to connect with other professionals.

Yana Geyfman

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Be as creative as you can with your degree. First, think about the type of skills you have learned during your undergraduate years. For example, if you have taken different courses on public speaking, you can tutor college students and adults or get involved with nonprofit work and offer workshops for actors. You can get involved with marketing/advertisement jobs or if you have strong verbal communication skills become a web writer. You just need to know that most of the undergraduate students don’t end up doing what they studied – its really about exploring your interests and skills and matching them with the demands of the professional world.

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What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

A CREATIVE MIND…. If you are looking to major in the Arts, my hunch is that you are a creative individual who possess an appreciation of flexibility, pushing the limit past boundaries; two characteristics that can transcend any degree that you will earn! If your hope of performance is not meant to be, you can rest assured that there is something out there for you. With imagination, an inherited trait that can’t be taught, there are many small businesses and large scale companies looking for individuals with innovation like yours. The time you spend earning your degree in any field will help you to learn critical skills such as collaboration, organization, time management, and even service & leadership. No degree will ever go unnoticed or unused!

Candyce Simpson

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Many students dream of a career on stage or starring in movies, but there are a multitude of opportunities behind the scenes as well. Using your artistic talents through directing, designing costumes and sets, producing, writing are just a few ways to use a theatre arts major. The Arts is a broad spectrum of opportunities that can include teaching at every academic level to museum curator or creative advisor for a marketing firm. You have to be open to all opportunities and realize your first choice may not always work. Many successful professionals started on one path and ended on another but they are successful and happy.

Eric SchenfieldSchool CounseleorNew Britain High School

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Your major does not always dictate your career. Your major will provide you with invaluable skills and knowledge. However, your major is only part of what makes you employable. Other helpful experiences include internships, hobbies, work experience, and involvement in campus activities. Graduates with a major in Art are attractive to employers due to their abilities in the following areas: · Creativity · Ability to execute creative decisions · Wide ranging curiosity · Ability to manage multiply projects simultaneously · Proficiency in analytical reasoning · Possess a strong grasp of the creative process · Possess unique perspectives on issues · Ability to make critical observations and evaluations · Possess a wide body of general knowledge · Ability to feel comfortable with scrutiny and criticism · Ability to observe and analyze introspectively · Feel at ease in new situations · Strong skills in oral and written expression · Ability to think clearly and form arguments · Ability to teach others using creative methods · Comprehensive command of grammar and vocabulary · Excellent verbal and written communication skills · Ability to create interesting associations between ideas · Excellent verbal and written communication skills · High proficiency in reading, speaking and writing · Knowledgeable of popular culture and artistic events · Ability to execute visual ideas into concrete products · Possess strong technical skills (e.g., painting, writing, computer)

Mitch ClarkExecutive DirectorCollege Sherpa

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are many career opportunities for arts majors that not only pay the bills but allow you to pursue your artistic endeavors, stay tied to the arts community and create connections to other opportunities. Theaters have many positions from the front office to the backstage. Cultural centers, museums and art galleries all need people to manage the space, sell things or provide information. If arts is your passion, find a way to connect to them as your “day job” and you may find an opportunity to your dream!

Mark CorkeryHead College CounselorInternational College Admissions Network (I-CAN)

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Teaching is a good field to go into if you are dead set in staying in a career that is closely related to that college major. I have had students, however, who have become doctors, lawyers and other professions. The undergraduate major does not have to be related to the career. Over 70% of the Fortune 500 CEOs majored in a liberal arts field as an undergraduate. Other careers closely related might be doing promotional videos for major corporations, training videos for human resources departments of corporations or small businesses. Art and performance are communication vehicles. Working as a public relations or communications specialist may be of interest as well.

Glenda DuranoOwnerCollege Advising and Planning Services

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are many things a person can do with the arts outside of the realm of performance. Some students who are well-organized may be successful as a manager. Others may prefer to teach either independently or within an organization. One of most “up and coming” ways to utilize the arts is through social justice–changing people’s opinions by using drama, music, or visual arts. I think one of the most valuable things about majoring in the arts is that it opens you up to creativity…and creativity is one of the most sought after characteristics in almost any career.

Steven YehCounselorAmerican Education Foundation

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

In today’s digital environment, creativity and artistic talent are soft skills that can be utilized in many nontraditional ways to benefit companies. For example, performance skills can be utilized to create better media content to drive customers to shop online or establish meaningful interactions via social portals with potential customers. My advice is to think outside the box as to how your skills can be applied outside of the arts. Look for companies that are expanding their web presence or trying to use media to drive sales and focus on the soft skills you can offer to make their message more appealing or better manage their interactions with customers by adding more exciting elements that incorporate performance arts. With YouTube now more focused on professional content, there should also be more opportunities to employ your talents to upgrade the content that is currently available. Take a look at which companies are using social media and target them with an offer of improving what they have by hiring you. You can also offer to do work initially as a contractor to give potential employers a way to try your talents on a temporary basis that will give you an opportunity to shine.

Steven YehCounselorAmerican Education Foundation

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

In today’s digital environment, creativity and artistic talent are soft skills that can be utilized in many nontraditional ways to benefit companies. For example, performance skills can be utilized to create better media content to drive customers to shop online or establish meaningful interactions via social portals with potential customers. My advice is to think outside the box as to how your skills can be applied outside of the arts. Look for companies that are expanding their web presence or trying to use media to drive sales and focus on the soft skills you can offer to make their message more appealing or better manage their interactions with customers by adding more exciting elements that incorporate performance arts. With YouTube now more focused on professional content, there should also be more opportunities to employ your talents to upgrade the content that is currently available. Take a look at which companies are using social media and target them with an offer of improving what they have by hiring you. You can also offer to do work initially as a contractor to give potential employers a way to try your talents on a temporary basis that will give you an opportunity to shine.

Allen Regar

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

This is a common concern of both students interested in pursuing a major in the arts, as well as their parents. If you are an artist, whether a musician, a visual artist, a poet, or other, it is important to keep an open perspective about career opportunities. Even if you do get full-time work as a performer/artist, you don’t know whether this will be the ultimate goal for you in the future. As a personal example, my wife studied opera during her undergraduate degree, but as time progressed, she became more interested in the education side of the arts, rather than performance. The arts is a broad field, encompassing not only performance, but education, business/production, technology, construction, and many other “behind the scenes” career opportunities. Many of these positions are fascinating, highly artistic, and thrilling for the people who are in them. In addition to staying within the realm of arts, you could look to shift your trajectory altogether and pursue a professional degree. As one instructor of medical students has told me, her favorite medical students were those who had majored in the arts, because they were very holistic and were able to utilize both reason and creativity. As a major in the arts, it is important not to consider just careers, but also the skill set that you possess. Are you enterprising? Investigative? Outgoing? Technologically adept? Once you identify your core skills and strengths, you can better align yourself with potential careers that would be rewarding for you. Even if you are not in the limelight, you can very easily satisfy your need to be artistic, regardless of what career hat you wear. More than ever before, the world needs creative people to find the solutions to some of the most pressing challenges that we all face. An arts major not only prepares performers, but critical and creative thinkers who have the potential to advance humanity.

Raolat RajiSchool Counselor/ OwnerOHHS/Good Counsel College and Career Services

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You would be very surprised what you use degrees for in these times. Most of the times isn’t really not as much about what you major in as it is about how you position yourself for different career. You can enter fields in Education, Business, the choices really are numerous. I honestly believe it’s important to first understand what it is that you expect from the profession you enter and also what types of things you absolutely can not do. Maybe you want to go to law school or medical school! Trust me the options are there for you , you just need to know what door to open, who to talk to , and where to research.

Mo NolanOwnerChris Counseling Services

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

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Brad Jackson

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CollegeCounselor McSellerson

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

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Mark GathercoleUniversity AdvisorIndependent University Advising

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Good news! The creative thinking skills, inventiveness, and general right-brain abilities that you have developed in the arts will give you an edge in the job market of tomorrow. It might be easy right out of college, but more and more, employers in all fields are looking for people who can think, communicate, create, and collaborate with others. Add to that the fact that fewer and fewer graduates work in the field of their college major, and the world is pretty open to you. It’s becoming about your personal skills than your training. Just recently, I know of a political science major who is working in finance at a major bank, a computer science major who is working for a business consultancy, and a liberal arts major who is now in medical school. Check out https://career.berkeley.edu/major/major.stm and uncw.edu/career/WhatCanIDoWithaMajorIn.html to get some more ideas. If you stay positive and look for opportunities, you will find them.

Lynn Janov

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Employers seek candidates with strong liberal arts backgrounds, people who can relate information to various disciplines and situations. With a degree in the arts, you have had such an education. Since your first choice is to work “as a performer/artist” I assume that you are creative, and that is another asset to offer to employers. What would be helpful to me to advise you further is what type of performer/artist are you? Music? Drama? Fine arts? Career avenues you might explore are: museums, public/private schools looking for teachers and/or club advisers, after-school enrichment programs, or possibly starting your own school or offering private lessons.

Joyce Vining MorganFounder and college counselorEducational Transitions

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Many if not most artists do not immediately get full-time work as a performer/artist. “Arts” is, of course, a very broad term – graphic designers find work in their field much more readily than independent visual artists who paint, or sculpt, … So some of the answer depends on your field. If you design the visual or musical elements of electronic games, you may well find work relatively quickly. If you are an independent ceramicist, it is likely to take time before you have a large enough clientele to pay the bills. So let’s say that your field is not one that is currently in demand by companies that seek specific creative skills. As a performer, you would seek venues to perform: coffee houses, small regional theaters, local orchestras and bands. You may form your own group whether musical or dramatic, and perform as often and broadly as possible. Artists may band together to arrange shared studio space. To pay the bills, you will need to find other work that fits into your artistic life: one musician I know is also a very fine carpenter – he can take on work that fits within his performance schedule. Since most performance takes place in the evening or weekend, day jobs are an option – preferably in an area connected to your art: in music stores, book . stores, doing the support work in theaters and concert venues. Artists might seek steady work in galleries, museums. Working in a related area keeps you in touch with the arts world in which you hope to work full-time. And don’t overlook teaching: private lessons in any of the arts has not only supported artists for centuries, but can afford a schedule flexible enough that you can arrange your time to keep your own artistic work central. And look around broadly to see whether a career outside the arts has appeal; a surprising number of entrepreneurs and executives have an arts background. What has made them successful is the ability, learned from their arts experience, to think creatively and problem solve “outside the box.” Some of these people perform on the weekends or keep up their studio work, but have found satisfaction in business and manufacturing as well. The bottom line: investigate the possibilities as broadly as possible, so that you choose with “full malice of forethought.” Make a long-term plan and have the patience and faith in yourself to follow it. Know that most successful artists have begun with a period of struggle – and some remember it as the most creative period in their lives.

Mrs. Pinkston

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You can use that degree to get into a masters program or to do a non traditional path to teaching. Some even open there own dance, art or other talent studio for adults or children.

Deanna Kubit

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You can always work behind the scenes, you may have to start as a production assistant and serve coffee to the crew, but a foot in the door, is what you are looking for to move up the ladder. A positive attitude and willingness to help in any capacity is always rewarded. If working behind the scenes in not for you, having an art major can open doors to a teaching career not only in the public school system, but also in a number of corporate settings such as cruise ships, museums, private companies and even within your own business. You may also find your expertise requested by travel companies as they assemble cultural tours across the globe, within design departments such as magazines, websites and retail chains. Bottom line is, having a specialized degree is not a limitation – only you can place that on yourself. If you have enjoyed what you studied in college, have a helpful and diligent attitude – no one will be able to hold you from your dreams and capitalizing on opportunities not even multiple rejections. Head up – move on – to the next amazing opportunity awaiting your expertise!

Aaron Ragon

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

At this time, there are hundreds of thousands of students being trained for careers that don’t exist yet. Many experts agree that employers of the future will need people who possess the following characteristics creativity, effective communication skills (verbal and written), and the ability to think critically. These “soft” skills tend to be cultivated through art majors where there might be as strong an emphasis in other majors. In fact, in the most recent edition of ASCA school counselor, Kwok-Sze Richard Wong ASCA executive director when quoting a manager of admissions for a major university said, “When you think about it, acting at its core is communication and collaboration.” “Those skills are at the heart of any job, from sales to management to teaching.” Therefore, students majoring in the arts do have fantastic skills to offer potential employers but they will need to learn to market their skill sets to potential employers.

Arond Schonberg

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You could go into marketing and advertising, as well as becoming a teacher.

Shannon O’BrienCounselorPalatine High School

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

This type of degree is Liberal Arts so there are a variety of jobs that may or may not relate to your major; for example a family friend of mine is a manager of a retail store and her degree was in Art History. She says it’s not the ideal job that she wants, but it definitely pays the bills for now.

William Yarwood

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are many possibilities for graduates with a major in the arts, if they do not get full-time work as a performer or artist. In the visual arts, individuals with an art background will often find work in advertising, publications, communications, graphic arts, or public relations. Those with an education in the performing arts are always in need in the entertainment industry and in hospitality management in the areas of directing and managing programs and events involving music, dance, theatre, etc. Of course, many arts graduates will remain strongly connected to their field by sharing their expertise through teaching at the elementary, secondary, college levels. If you are interested in a major in the arts, you can be sure that there will be meaningful work for you in the future. Of course, many will continue to pursue their love for the arts as an avocation, while enjoying successful careers in other fields.

Darrell EdmondsDIrectorOakcrest Teen Center

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are lots of opportunities to work for arts organizations that work with youth and non profits. You can also use your talents to teach at community /afterschool arts programs like the YMCA, PAL, or others.

Ellen Fitzkee

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

With a major in the arts you can try any number of different occupations. You could be a person who works in a museum and talk about the pieces of art work to pewople that ask for a tour. You could work in the advertising field and use your talent to create adds for the prospective client. If you have a computer background using DATA, you could become a graphic designer. Literally, you could pursue any number of fields using your creativity and imagination. When you have a brain like yours, many employers would be interested in your unique talents.

John FrahlichCounseling Department ChairHudson High School

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Students I have worked with in the past who pursued arts related majors often double majored, or majored minored in related fields that expanded their opportunities after graduation. For example, visual arts students might also pursue art therapy or design. Music performance students might also pursue a degree in education. Some students address their passion for art or music by minoring in these areas and use college as a way to quench their thirst, but major in something not directly related such as business. Upon graduation they continue their involvement in their area of passion avocationally, but pursue employment in a more traditional field. Perhaps the business major, music minor could gain employment as a music store manager. Following one’s passions is admirable, but so is paying the bills. It’s good to have options and back up plans.

Shelley KrauseCo-Director of College CounselingRutgers Preparatory School

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Most arts-intensive schools and programs are faced with this question on a regular basis. Check out the Career Services section of the website, or ask someone in admissions if they could access information about the career choices of recent graduates for you.

Tana Taylor-JukoEnglish Instructor

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

More often than not, arts majors (like myself) are criticized by their peers, parents, and community. Questions frequently asked by them usually dance around: “What can you become with that?” My answer is always: probably a lot more than anyone would ever expect or recognize. Arts majors — dancers, artists, actors, creative writers, and the like — have numerous opportunities to commit their skills to fields outside of performance; however, the most fulfilling career path that is applicable to any arts major is teaching. One can choose to instruct children or adults to dance, paint/draw, act, or write. Primary, secondary, and collegiate levels of education look for people who have a passion for their skills and can enhance the skills of others through teaching. In addition to those venues, there are special institutions which seek out those who have received a B.A., M.A., and/or Ph.D. in specified fields in the arts in order to teach in their schools. What better way to use your major than to assist someone in further developing the skills you enjoy most?

CollegeCounselor McSellerson

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Mary Hilles

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You may want to take enough education credits to apply for a teaching certificate. Teaching music or art in a school can be an awarding experience. You have the summers to pursue your drama or art career. Many areas have summer theatre and arts programs. You may be able to get involved in a travelling group and explore the arts in different parts of the country or even the world.

Bill PrudenHead of Upper School, College CounselorRavenscroft School

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Teaching is probably the most obvious answer, but in fact, the question raises a fundamental issue about the very nature and purpose of a college education. While there is no denying that college offer direct career preparation, it also can be something bigger, teaching about things that while not directly preparatory to a specific career can be applied to many. The liberal arts teach students how to think critically and analyze, how to express themselves and to solve problems, skills that can be applied to countless jobs not directly related to the major that the student chooses. The enhanced esthetic appreciation that comes from an art can be an important component of any number of careers that are not directly art related. Ultimately, while it can be a forum for career training, for most, college is about getting a broader education.

gail meyerEducational ConsultantIndpendent

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Students who major in the arts are wll prepared for many careers. Art majors bring a unique and creative perspective to their work.Students who major in art develop analytical skills, critical thinking and communication skills; abilities in high demand for all employers.As an artist you have the ability to: make creative decisions, to manage multiply projects simultaneously and demonstrate a proficiency in analytical reasoning. Careers for art majors include: advertising, public relations, education, graphic design, museum work, gallery management, auction house evaluators and many other fields. In addition, many art majors ultimately become psychologist, lawyers, medical professionals,etc.

Patricia KrahnkePresident/PartnerGlobal College Search Associates, LLC

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Short Answer: Anything and everything. Just be smart about your electives and your minor. Detailed Answer: Arts majors – dance, theater, music, visual arts – can provide some of the best overall education and preparation for life and other professions. The arts teach you: 1. How to follow directions, which is necessary in business; it helps you understand how to complete complex tasks that are assigned to you 2. How to think creatively, which is necessary in business and in life to make you able to think around obstacles and boundaries; it helps you to find solutions where others see brick walls 3. How to work in a team towards a goal, which is critical for understanding how to work collectively toward success in any business environment 4. How to communicate, which is necessary in all professional environments; it teaches you how to convey ideas and express difficulties 5. Dexterity and flexibility, both physical and mental, which are a requirement of many, many professions, in labor-oriented positions and conceptually oriented professional positions 6. Literature, which provides you with basic knowledge about the human condition and history, which helps you to help businesses and people (and yourself) not make the same mistakes that have been made throughout history 7. Languages and cultures, which are required for anyone working in any profession related to the global economy 8. Passion, drive, and commitment, which will help to propel you and your colleagues in any area of work And many more… What most businesses bemoan today is the lack of potential employees who can do much of the above. If you have all of this on your resume, and you add to it the following, you will be in great shape to enter the job market in either the arts or something else (while you polish your star!): 1. Business courses: Be prepared to enter any business environment (including your own non-profit arts entity!) by taking fundamental business classes, such as Business Technology, accounting, Intro to Business, finance, etc. These skills will help you no matter what you do or where you go. Even if you end up a star in your area of creative expression, you will understand the fundamentals of what it takes to run the business that surrounds you, and you will be able to participate intelligently in the business decisions that are being made on your behalf 2. Logic and Reasoning: Employers (in fact any business entity, including, again, your non-profit) want employees that can think clearly and critically; courses in Philosophy enable you to think through problems and conflicts (of which there are a plethora in the arts communities) 3. English Literature: The arts are, in many ways, about story telling; English literature provides an abundance of information about history, costume, language, culture, social strategies that fail and succeed, the human condition (which exists in the world today much the same as it did in the time of Dickens and Trollope, Van Gogh and Caravaggio, Verdi and Mahler, etc.), poverty, wealth, love and passion and pain and joy. 4. If you have all of this, in addition to your major, you will own the world. You will be able to support yourself while you pursue your artistic passion, and you will be well-prepared to succeed in and contribute to the “work” and “prosperity” aspect of your art. Very few people graduate from arts programs and find success right away. In fact, most people don’t. They work hard for years. Those individuals who appear to be an overnight success are truly not that at all – they have been working very, very hard for years. And that is the true test of your commitment to your art form. Are you willing to work hard at it for years, knowing that it may take that long to find success? Will it fulfill you while you live your life and work in a more traditional setting (or in a business aspect of the arts) to keep a roof over your head? I have an MFA in playwriting. I work very, very, VERY hard at my craft and struggle to keep going against all obstacles – for years. I’ve placed in competitions and had prominent readings in London and New York. I’ve met movie stars and playwrights whose work you perform onstage. I’ve had a top agent and fired her. I’ve met famous visual artists and musicans. I applaud their success from hard work, and soldier on toward my own. College admissions is simply what I do to keep a roof over my head. Why college admissions advising? Meeting with and talking to students and parents just like you is an important education for me – and a great joy — every day. You are how I keep in touch with the “real” world. Your life touches mine and enriches me in the most important way: As a human being. And that’s what the arts are about, touching people and enriching their lives as human beings — whether it’s on a stage, in a studio, or in an office.

Lorraine Casanova

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

If you are still in school, give serious thought into a minor or double major that would expand your options. A minor in Business, Psychology, or Digital Design could open many doors that will help you develop a career as a performer or artist. If you are nearly finished with college, though, and exploring available career options, you may need to consider broadening your horizons a litte bit if you’re having trouble starting your career with a major in the arts. Many students of the arts find that they need to intially find other ways to support themselves as they develop their careers, so you are not alone! You could consider teaching within a college or high school setting (in a high school setting, that will mean returning to school to earn a teaching certificate). Other options might include acting or directing in a local theater company (if you are in the performing arts) or “coaching” young performers, or providing private lessons. Many performers will supplement their income with a “peripheral” job, such as dinner theater, or fundraising for a theater company. If you are a visual artist and you are having trouble finding full-time work, take a look at teaching and private art lessons, but also consider a less conventional approach. Many museums and retailers look for artistic people, for example. If you are a talented artist, you have a variety of options that range from working within the advertising or publishing industry (illustration) to sales in an art gallery, or even working as a tatoo artist or sketch artist at an amusement park! It is important that you have a clear grasp of your strengths. As a student of the creative or performing arts, you are most likely creative and self-disciplined. You probably know a thing or two about computers, and it may not be a stretch to take a look at graphic arts or animation. There are some excellent options that might require a little extra education or training, such as Art Therapy (in the Psychology field), or Web Page Design. With some creative thought, good research skills, persistance, and a little flexibility, you will find a career that utilizes your talents and creative process, while you continue to build your credentials as a Performer or Artist!

William Chichester

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Your major doesn’t matter as along as you develop transferrable skills (i.e. analytical skills, project management skills, quantitative skills, language skills, etc). You can do this by double majoring or minoring in something more practical like Business, Math, Economics, Engineering, or any language. Also, make sure you get involved with clubs and secure internships in the Arts. Last but not least, make sure you work with your career center, professors and your parents to identify potential employment opportunities long before you graduate. I always say to start the career search your freshmen year by visiting your career center and setting up an appointment to do self-assessments and talk about what kinds of things you like to do and don’t like to do. This will help your career counselor to narrow your focus. Also, talk with alumni from your school by setting up informational overviews to learn about your career of interest. They can also give you leads on externships, internships and full-time opportunities.

Cathy McMeekan

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Lots of employers value creativity – so you could use your artistic talents in numerous ways. You could work for a company doing design work – websites, videos, newletters, publications, marketing, etc. Depending on your background you could work in product design, advertising or a host of other jobs that require creative thinking. Look around you and see that just about every product you use has been “designed” by someone! If you are a performer, think about those skills that make you a great performer – you can stand up in front of an audience without getting tongue-tied – so jobs that require you to interact with the public or speak to groups could be just your thing.

Patricia YoungIndependent CounselorCollege Advising Services

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Don’t give up your dream! Continue to seek employment as you work in a related field; i.e., office work for people in the field you desire. If no work is available , volunteer everywhere and anywhere that will give you hands-on experience.. Get to meet people who work in your chosen area. Ask for an informational interview. Pick their brains for suggestions. Keep at it!

chet everett

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Starve?

Yana Geyfman

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Be as creative as you can with your degree. First, think about the type of skills you have learned during your undergraduate years. For example, if you have taken different courses on public speaking, you can tutor college students and adults or get involved with nonprofit work and offer workshops for actors. You can get involved with marketing/advertisement jobs or if you have strong verbal communication skills become a web writer. You just need to know that most of the undergraduate students don’t end up doing what they studied – its really about exploring your interests and skills and matching them with the demands of the professional world.

Dr. Bruce NeimeyerCEO/PartnerGlobal College Search Associates, LLC

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Many students today become very focused on a specific role within an area such as performer/artist and fail to see the larger picture about other roles that must be accomplished around the performer/artists that make the “arts” in this instance happen. I try to get students to think about everything that goes into the industry that surrounds these roles to help the begin to explore how they can still be involved in the industry but in different ways other than their one-role-dream job. In this question you clearly want to be a performer/artist which is great! But, until you get that break there are many other ways you can work in the performing arts industry while waiting for that big chance! There are theater managers, development jobs, sales and promotions, etc etc. All of these roles help to make the acting jobs possible. I suggest thinking about this as you pursue your degree and then taking relevant courses that help to give you some insight as to how to do the job or even an internship. You may find that your special talent really is in these roles. Or you may be of more value to a company if you can act AND do one of these functions. Especially in smaller theater groups, they are looking for multi-tasking folks and you might just fit the bill and gets your foot in the door. I would also suggest that you keep an open mind about your long term prospects. A friend of mine initially started off as a dancer. She went on to get her MFA and realized that teaching in the arts at the college level was of interest to her and so she began to pursue that, wrote a few books, taught, developed her craft in acting further, had a few successful roles, etc. She then got involved in yoga for her acting and dance, got hooked and opened up her own yoga/Pilates business. She got more involved in that business developed her own well being concepts, wrote a book and now travels the globe promoting it and opening up new studios dedicated to it. As you can see, her life and background gave her the skills and background to be very successful in related but very different ways. You too can always be thinking about how your skills will lead you to you next career adventure as long as you are open to it. So don’t be too narrow in your vision. Just be focused, strategic and open to being challenged about how you use your knowledge, background and experience to do the next interesting thing that comes your way. Enjoy your journey through life!

Tana Taylor-JukoEnglish Instructor

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

More often than not, arts majors (like myself) are criticized by their peers, parents, and community. Questions frequently asked by them usually dances around: “What can you become with that?” My answer is always: probably a lot more than anyone would ever expect or recognize. Arts majors — dancers, artists, actors, creative writers, and the like — have numerous opportunities to commit their skills to fields outside of performance; however, the most fulfilling career path that is applicable to any arts major is teaching. One can choose to instruct children or adults to dance, paint/draw, act, or write. Primary, secondary, and collegiate levels of education look for people who have a passion for their skills and can enhance the skills of others through teaching. In addition to those venues, there are special institutions which seek out those who have received a B.A., M.A., and/or Ph.D. in specified fields in the arts in order to teach in their schools. What better way to use your major than to assist someone in further developing the skills you enjoy most?

Jason LumPresidentwww.scholaredge.com

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Keep in mind that very few students get a job in their major field of study – and that is not a bad thing. Think of natural connections between the arts and allied fields, such as backstage work, gallery exhibits, art studios, online teaching in the arts, etc. There are many students who are thriving with arts majors are not necessarily on Broadway or in Hollywood. Good luck!

Ken PhamTutor/StudentColumbia Basin College

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Arts major are very heard to get a full time job. Specific majors that are quite demanding right now would be graphic designers. Teaching arts would be a safe choice. You need to have alternatives just in case. Artists learn from many aspects of life. It’s just about being at the right place at the right time. Dream high but also make some backups. 🙂

Calli ChristensonDirector CLC College Prep Services

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Consider a field in teaching! There is very little that is more fulfilling than sharing your knowledge and passion with others who are eager to learn. If teaching in a traditional school setting isn’t appealing, consider private instructor/tutoring or opening your own studio and offering lessons for students to participate in. Young and energetic teachers, who are also very talented in the arts, can be very appealing to families who are looking for good instruction for their children. Calli

Renee Boone

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You can seek and create opportunities in teaching, coaching, arts administration, directing and writing. Your streak of talent might lend itself nicely to a career in marketing, advertising or visual design. You might also find yourself at home in front of groups, so look working in organizational behavior, corporate training and industrial education might also be interesting to you.

Thuy TrangCounselor InstructorMission College

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

The cliche of “starving artist” remains strong in some people’s minds but rest assured that you can utilize your arts background! While waiting for your big break as a performer/artist, you may utilize your major in a variety of settings depending on your other interests and skills set. Someone who majored in the arts have developed creativity, appreciation of aesthetics and if your institution has a sound general education curriculum, you would also have picked up transferable skills in written communication and critical thinking that are essential to anyone seeking employment. This will make you qualify to pursue entry-level work in related fields. Ideally, I’m assuming, you would want to find work that can build your network and help you build experience towards your ultimate line of work as a performer so these entry level positions may be in the music recording industry or at an art studio for example. If you have an entrepreneurial spirit, you may want to start your own business depending on the type of artist you are aspiring to become. In addition, posting your talent on YouTube and similar social networking sites may help you get the praise and attention required to eventually land full-time work. This is a broad question that I’m presenting a broad answer to. I would be asking you, as an individual, many follow-up questions to better understand what you are passionate about in the field of art and how to use your major and apply it to other lines of work.

Roland Allen

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Some students skilled in the arts apply their skill to therapeutic settings, particularly in schools and rehabilitation settings. While finding employment in this area requires some legwork, doing so is a great way to combine artistic talent with personal compassion in a way that can improve someone’s life.

Roland Allen

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Some students skilled in the arts apply their skill to therapeutic settings, particularly in schools and rehabilitation settings. While finding employment in this area requires some legwork, doing so is a great way to combine artistic talent with personal compassion in a way that can improve someone’s life.

Kathleen HarringtonOwnerNew Jersey College Consulting

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

On the road to your “big break in Hollywood” you may not land a full-time job right out of college. Now, needing a full-time job with a major in the arts may have you scratching your head as to what employment opportunities you can pursue. Some options to consider: 1. Teaching: Fine and Performing Arts Programs throughout the country are being supported by local government officials and parent groups more so now than ever before. Educational research has continuously shown the importance of these programs in schools and although funding may not be at a all time high, the voices to support these school programs are. 2. Children’s Parties: It may sound silly, but we all remember the birthday parties that we went to when we were younger that had performers, clowns, musicians, or the popular pony rides. Think about advertising and charging a fee to do performances at children’s birthday parties to showcase your performance talents. You never know a parent at the party may be a Hollywood Agent who may be blown away by your talent. 3. Consider going back to school: You hopefully graduated from a college that allowed you to form positive relationships with professors and department chairs. Consider applying for a position as a Graduate Assistant. Graduate Assistants can sometimes have their entire graduate program paid for by working for the college and a particular school program. For your graduate program, you may want to continue your study in the arts or you may wish to explore a new area of interest. Be open minded!

Ryan AldrichDirector of College CounselingThe White Mountain School

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

A common preconception exists that students majoring in the arts are not competitive for other careers or jobs if they don’t get a full-time work as an artist. This is simply not true. The education students receive from their respective college awarding the arts degree most likely has core graduation requirements and prepares students for life after college in many aspects, not just to be successful as an artist. Graduates with art degrees can go on to become successul in many related areas. In fact, author Daniel Pink, of A Whole New Mind, argues more right-brained, artistic people will be needed to be competitive in the rapidly changing world of automative production. These artists can help develop more creative design’s for merchandise, clothes, tools, and nearly anything else. Creative, right-brained artists will undeniably be needed in nearly every economic sector.

Kimberly Shepherd

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You can do an unlimited number of things, depending on what you’re most comfortable with. You can market/sell your work independently, (either from a brick and mortar or virtual storefront) you can apply your artistic skills to areas like marketing, graphic design, broadcasting, etc., or you can teach others how to use their artistic gifts by being a teacher/instructor, whether in public/private K-12 schools or at the college level or for community based programs or non-profits or in senior centers or independent living communities. You can work for a museum or art gallery or theater company or production venue. You just have to be willing to think in broader terms than “I’m an artist so there are no other types of jobs I can do.”

Ivery McKnight

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Dependent upon the full scope of your studies, you could potentially have options to work in any aspect of staging, Production Assistant, a creative contributor, i.e. coach or writer. You could also consider, working within the school system in some capacity. The second option would require additional coursework, credentialing, or testing, depending upon your short/long term direction. There are also opportunities in working within a Museum or Art Gallery.

Allison Riggle

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

I would first ask, what specific art degree are you seeking? I would also ask, what types of jobs do you find interesting? Individuals majoring in the arts often end up in fields outside of performance. By earning an arts degree, you will most likely be exposed to a strong liberal arts program that will provide you with critical thinking, oral and written communication skills, and creative problem solving among other necessary job skills. There are numerous job titles that align with an art major background (e.g. graphic designer, art director, teacher, designer, art administrator).

Susan Belangee

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Many companies want students with arts and humanities degrees because they are typically better at expressing themselves both orally and in written form. In addition, arts students tend to be more creative thinkers and may therefore be able to provide innovative ways of approaching situations or solving problems. Some possible options include working in human resources, marketing, advertising, consulting businesses, and similar jobs.

John CarpenterFounderAskJohnAboutCollege.com

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Anything you want as long as it doesn’t require more schooling (ie, engineering, medicine, law, etc–and you can even go to grad school in those areas with an arts degree.) The skills you’ll learn with an arts major are easily transferable to hundreds of careers, and if you’re willing to think creatively–and you probably are since you chose the arts to begin with, you’ll find opportunities to work in many areas. Expression and communication are very highly sought after skills. You’ll be fine.

Janet Elfers

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

More opportunities than you (or your college-paying parents) might think! Museums are full of arts majors, as are art galleries, retail art businesses, and artist supply businesses. Artists are in demand by residential and commercial builders, furnishings suppliers, and window treatment companies. Artists work for greeting card companies, magazines, and adversiting agencies. You can teach independently, too. Take some business and entrepreneurship classes so you’ll have the tools to be successful in the business of the arts.

Jill SchontagCollege CounselorLearning Pathways

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You can do almost anything with a degree in the arts. Unless you want to go into the sciences or engineering an arts degree can provide a strong foundation for many different careers. Many employers are less worried about what a student studied during their undergraduate years as they are that the student graduated. Bachelors degrees are increasingly becoming more of a gateway to further education than an end in its self. Most importantly, find a major that you’re fascinated by and get that degree.

Emily Minty

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Art is a very broad field and many people make a successful living as graphic artists for companies, freelance, or in illustration, to name just a few possibilities. Artists and performers often supplement their incomes through teaching, either in schools colleges, or their own studios. Also remember that, with a bachelor degree from a liberal arts program, your college major is less important to employers than the fact that you have learned to think critically. I would encourage you to major in what you most enjoy.

Mary Askew

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

People with Art degrees are Complicated, Original, Impulsive, Independent, Expressive, and Creative. These students use their imagination and feelings in creative expression. The art major prepares students for a variety of careers including but not limited to: Advertising Artist Architect Archivist Art Appraiser Art History Instructor Art Museums/Galleries – Administration Art Museums/Galleries – Archivist Art Museums/Galleries – Buying Art Museums/Galleries – Collections Management Art Museums/Galleries – Conservation Art Museums/Galleries – Curator Art Museums/Galleries – Custom Framing Art Museums/Galleries – Development Art Museums/Galleries – Display Design Art Museums/Galleries – Education Art Museums/Galleries – Exhibit Design/Preparation Art Museums/Galleries – Fashion Coordination Art Museums/Galleries – Public Relations Art Museums/Galleries – Publications Art Museums/Galleries – Registrar Art Museums/Galleries – Retail Art Museums/Galleries – Sales Art Museums/Galleries – Store Management Art Museums/Galleries – Tour Guides/Docent Art Therapist Art Therapist Cartographer Commercial Artist Computer Animator Computer Graphic Artists Critic Curator Designer Educator Fashion Illustrator Fashion, Textile, Interior Designer Fine Arts Instructor Florist Graphic Artist Graphic Designer Illustrator Interior Decorator Jeweler Media – Animator/Cartoonist Media – Art Critic Media – Art Journalist Media – Designer Media – Editor Media – Illustrator Media – Production Media – Programmer Media – Sales Person Media – Video Operator Painter Photographer Photojournalist Retail – Buyer Retail – Custom Framer Retail – Display Designer Retail – Fashion Coordinator Retail – Store Manager Sculptor Sign Painter Studio Art Instructor Read about these careers at the ONET web site – http://www.onetonline.org/

Karen O’NeillStudent Affairs Professional and College Counselor.College Counseling Today

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are many avenues to explore for theater and performing arts majors! If you want to stay in the theater arts field, look at non-profit organizations that promote the arts. Also, many corporate hiring managers may regard your theatrical experience as valuable experience developing self-confidence, communication skills, poise, and the ability to fit yourself into a sales role. If you enjoy working with students, perhaps you might want to explore teaching theater arts. In this case, you might need to return to school to acquire teaching certification, depending upon the requirements of your state.

Patty Finer

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

The first thing to do is back up the student and find out as much as you can about their background. Ask questions. and then I put together an a few exercises for them to do over the course of a week…and then I sit down and review it with them. Usually this will give the student some type of direction that they can use so that we can come up with a list of possible professions that can use their talents, skills, and Artistic gifts.. It might also involve going back to school for an advanced degree…. such as Law or Medicine is they are inclining.. or maybe architecture. Other areas one might look at are marketing, communications, the fashion design or hair styling industries… it is wide open with a major like this because art is EVERYWHERE…

Melanie Hmada

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

According to the nonprofit organization Americans for the Arts, the arts and culture industry creates about 5.7 million full-time jobs every year, nationwide! A major in the arts will provide you with invaluable skills including creativity, flexibility, and the ability to think outside of the box. There are numerous opportunities available including positions in nonprofits, nursing homes, agencies dedicated to advocacy, and neighborhood organizations just to name a few.

Evelyn Reid

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are a number of positions for those seeking performing arts related positions: • Teaching • Private dance studios • Neighborhood Centers (After school enrichment programs, etc.) • Consulting for special events, Women’s History, African American History Month, Cinco De Mayo, and other celebrations held annually to celebrate groups) • Consult for performances at various festivals, perform at festivals • Workshops for students, community • Provide technical support for various groups

Sarah ContomichalosManagerEducational Advisory Services, LLC

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

From the question, I assume the the student is asking about majoring in art at a liberal arts college rather than attending an art school such as RISD or Parsons. Given that very few artists are able to support themselves by selling their work, I would urge a student/artist to consider a double major in an academic area of interest. Many colleges offer dual degree programs in several areas including art. For example, art therapy is a growing field. The world of work is everchanging and offers opportunities to those who can evolve with the changes and apply their learning. Steve Job credited a caligraphy class with the strong design element of Apple’s products.

Suzanne GottschangProfessorSmith College

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Students who major in the arts may find careers in arts education – from teaching in schools, developing educational programming in museums and other arts organizations, to providing outreach to teachers and schools in the arts. They may also find a career in emerging fields such as art therapy where art is used as a therapeutic tool for psychological issues, neurological and cognitive conditions, among others. Others with performance/artistic majors may find work in non-profit organizations associated with the arts, including community music and theatre programs, local museums, and advocacy groups. Some artists or performers also work part time in other fields while pursuing their artistic careers. Finally, you may find yourself on a career trajectory that is unrelated to your major but one where the skills necessary to be an artist or performer are useful and relevant. Arts majors may find themselves working in web design, advertising, communications or even veterinary medicine. One way to learn more is to visit college art/music/theatre department websites to learn more about internships students have gotten and what alumnae are doing after graduation.

Martin Rogers

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Consider that most industries rely on innovation and successfully bringing a product or service from conception to execution in a way that connects with a market (or increases shareholder value). A major in the arts means that you have extensive background in solving problems: how to best apply my skills/media to the assigned parameters? where is there room for innovation in an existing process or form? how best can i connect and communicate with my audience, and what is should they take away from my performance? When you think about your education in the arts this way –and if you can effectively communicate this vision through your resume & covers letters– your major in the arts turns into a widely applicable set of skills. One way to communicate this vision is to keep a portfolio of your student work that explains the challenges & assignments rather than simply exhibits them. For instance, if you are a music student, you could film your performances and upload them onto sites like Vimeo or YouTube with explanations of the performance’s parameters, rehearsal schedule, and individual challenges. Students in the visual arts can take a similar approach, showing not only the works they have created but concentrating on the challenges presented by the works from conception to execution. If you do not find your way into performance or exhibition of your medium, you may still find yourself in any of the numerous administrative or managerial aspects related to that field (e.g. managing a gallery, raising money for a performance group, promoting and marketing other artists in your field, etc). You can also try to pick up other widely required skills while you are in college, so that your major in the arts is seen as a compliment to training on other versatile skills: writing skills, web design, math skills, fluency in spreadsheets & data analysis, etc. That way, the questions is not “what can i do with this major” but “how can i successfully adapt the skills required by major to serve a variety of career options?” Concentrate on keeping a detailed portfolio of your projects; cultivate relationships with faculty for detailed letters of recommendation; and make sure you earn high marks in all of your courses. Then you will be ready to adapt to any employment environment that helps you achieve your goals.

Emilie Mendillo

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You can do lots of great things. Working in a talent agency can be interesting and put you in touch with some great people. Working in a profit or non-profit gallery can do the same. In addition, working with others and teaching them is a satisfying way to share your talent! Networking as your involve yourself with these types of things will help you achieve your status as a performer.

LLC LLC

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

That is a frequently asked question by many college students and it is legitimately question. Making a decent living as a performer or an artist isn’t the easiest career route. What many people don’t realize is that it’s not unusual for theater majors to work in business as a marketing manager or start up an art-related business. People who are inclined to major in arts tend to be creative and there are roles in business that you could utilize your strength. Remember that being creative is also a key to become a successful entrepreneur. However, creativity itself will not give you a job or a successful startup company. Being creative is not the same thing as having actual business skill sets. The only way to build up those skills is on the job. The problem is, if you don’t appear to have those skills on your resume, recruiters will likely toss your resume away. It is like a catch 22. What can you do? Start preparing for a Plan B as early as in your freshman year in college. Supplement your studies with a few business courses (e.g. Accounting 101, Marketing 101 courses etc) list them on your resume. This could be your one elective course that you take each semester so that you’ll have a Plan B by the end of senior year. The best thing about taking these courses is that you could be equipped with knowledge that can help you start your own business later on, even if you land at a full-time job as a performer and artist right away after graduating from college. It is always good to have as many options as possible when it comes to career.

Liz Myers-Chamberlin

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

That’s very interesting that you would ask me that question, because I graduated from college as a Theatre major, but look at me now! I’ve been an academic counselor helping college students for many years! (And truly love it.) BUT, that’s not to say the YOU won’t be the next successful/famous artist – SOMEBODY’S got to be! In general though, not many people end up doing EXACTLY what they major in in college, and most people change their career direction many times in their lives, so the idea is to major in something you can excel in, and that you think is the absolute coolest thing to study! That’s what everyone is looking for – something to study that they really have a lot of passion for. You know, so you really have a reason for getting out of bed in the morning. There’s nothing so invigorating and empowering as doing what you love! Lots of your friends (and your parents possibly) might tell you you’ll end up working at Jack in the Box or the like if you don’t major in something that is directly career-oriented like Engineering. But if you don’t like math and science, or you’re not good at it, you’re not likely to be happy or successful pursuing a major such as this, if your heart is in the arts. There are LOTS of options we can explore. As far as employment goes, many employers require a college degree (in any major) as the first level of screening for their applicants. They can assume, just by virtue of having a college degree, that you are educated in certain areas, and can therefore have the potential to be trained on the job. They know a college degree involves a lot more that just your major. The first two years will involve a lot of general education classes that will refine your writing skills, your ability to think analytically, will expand your world through the study of different ways of thinking, new cultures, languages including the language of mathematics, and science. These are skills and knowledge that employers value! Along with your general education classes in the first 2 years, you’ll also take classes that are prerequisite to your major, so you can see if it’s right for you. And remember that lots of students change their major, once they see what it really involves. That’s normal. Also, employers know they can assume certain attributes about you just by the fact that you have a college degree (in any major). Like, you can follow through with a project, you can manage your time, you can deal with a system that has certain rules and requirements, etc. etc. I know a lot of students who start out majoring in an area that they THINK they should like, or that they read is going to be a good area for future employment, or that their parents think they should major in. And then sometimes they plan to do a minor in an Arts area. That’s sometimes is a good option, if they also have some interest/ability in the other major. Also, some students do a double major – two majors, say in Music and Math. You can always take classes at first AS IF you were doing a major and minor, or a double major, and arrange your classes toward that goal, and then see how it goes. There are lots of options. Everything doesn’t have to be set in stone at the beginning – plans can be adjustable, that’s completely OK, and it’s best to be flexible at first. College is a lot different than high school, so it’s best to plan for possible options and then see how you like and do in your classes. Sometimes, what you THINK you like turns out to be just ho-hum, while some GE class you took just to meet a requirement turns out to be the coolest thing ever, so you just never know sometimes. I can help you design a class schedule first to explore possible majors, then we can talk about how you feel about these classes, and then when you decide what direction to go, we can make a definite class plan for future semesters, so you can graduate on time with all requirements met in the major of your choice. There are also things you can do along the way to check out different career directions, like volunteering, internships, research, TAing classes, etc. We can talk about those possibilities later too. Hope this gives you some food for thought. What questions do you have?

Eliza Hoyos

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Many people assume that as an Art major you have to be a performer or artist, however there are many more options out there. First of, you can teach to others your passion. If you are interested in art, there are various nonprofits that promote the arts as a way to keep children off the streets, help them deal with issues at home or simply want to expose children to a different form of expression. If your passion is music, how about being a band instructor? That is another way that you can continue your passion and sharing it with others. If you are interested in the arts major, let’s chat to search and discuss other opportunities!

Eliza Hoyos

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Many people assume that as an Art major you have to be a performer or artist, however there are many more options out there. First of, you can teach to others your passion. If you are interested in art, there are various nonprofits that promote the arts as a way to keep children off the streets, help them deal with issues at home or simply want to expose children to a different form of expression. If your passion is music, how about being a band instructor? That is another way that you can continue your passion and sharing it with others. If you are interested in the arts major, let’s chat to search and discuss other opportunities!

Deborah SlocumSchool CounselorCollege Counseling from a Caring Perspective

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

The creative skills you gain with a major in the arts can help you get positions in other fields. For example, a student I counseled majored in fine arts and when she graduated she worked with disabled adults offering art as a form of expression and therapy. Other fine art majors have gone into marketing. Inevitably, performing art majors have strong communication skills and cona consider positions that capitalize on these skills. Art/Performing art majors can also consider opting to have a minor which will broaden their skill base. For example, music majors can minor in business or education so they are qualified for other jobs while pursuing their passions. The key is to focus on the creativity and skills that are developed as well as to seize the opportunity,when possible, to broaden one’s skill base or gain outside experience through jobs and internships.

Deborah SlocumSchool CounselorCollege Counseling from a Caring Perspective

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

The creative skills you gain with a major in the arts can help you get positions in other fields. For example, a student I counseled majored in fine arts and when she graduated she worked with disabled adults offering art as a form of expression and therapy. Other fine art majors have gone into marketing. Inevitably, performing art majors have strong communication skills and cona consider positions that capitalize on these skills. Art/Performing art majors can also consider opting to have a minor which will broaden their skill base. For example, music majors can minor in business or education so they are qualified for other jobs while pursuing their passions. The key is to focus on the creativity and skills that are developed as well as to seize the opportunity,when possible, to broaden one’s skill base or gain outside experience through jobs and internships.

Michael AlepreteAssistant ProfessorWestminster College

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

In some cases you can teach. You will likely need to get certified in your state if you want to teach in public schools. You may or may not need to do this if you want to work at private institutions. You might also think about how your skills might be transferable to other fields. For example, if you are in the visual arts you could seek employment in advertising or related fields. Finally, if you have been participating in the arts, think about how you might move to the business end of things. Do you have contacts at galleries, theaters, or music venues. Can you use contacts there to get your foot in the door. Even if the initial job is not ideal you will still maintain connection to those in your field.

Justin LewisChemistry FacultyWest Monroe High SChool

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

The job opportunities for performing arts majors tend to be somewhat limited, especially in Northern Louisiana, where I am from. One of the major accomplishments and facets of colleges that employers look at is the ability to attain a college degree, any college degree. With that said, one who has a performing arts degree may be able to get jobs in various jobs that require the completion of a college degree. Some examples include customer service call center managers, free lance artist, retail management, food service industry management, insurance, and banking. (Local banks in Louisiana often do not require specific degrees in finance or insurance to get these jobs, but do require on the job professional development and certifications once you have started the job. In fact, our university has closed our Bachelor of Business Administration in Insurance program.)

Aurora BonnerEducational ConsultantBonner Educational Consultants

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

First of all, if you are interested in a major in the arts, chances are you are a creative person who thinks outside of the box. As an artist, you have been building jobs skills you may not know you even had! Many artists are creative thinkers, have great attention to detail and are terrific problem solvers. Your unique perspective can help you find work in a number of art-related industries, from advertising to teaching to management and media. Just because you may not land that dream job at Alexander Wang immediately, doesn’t mean you can’t do anything with an art degree. Just as a business major may take years to rise to the top of their profession, an art major must be willing to devote time to rise to the top of their career. This may mean you start small, working an entry-level position at a gallery, theater or design group and working your way up. Or, this might mean devoting yourself to building your reputation as an artist by seeking out opportunities to exhibit your work. In other words, you have to put time in to establish yourself as an artist or build your portfolio. Also, if you are creating art, you must understand that a regular 9-5 job is not typical for emerging college graduates (and what artist wants it to be tied down by those restraints?). Self-employment, residencies and commissions are much more typical for the emerging artist. Because of this, branding and marketing your work will be just as important as time in the studio. Jobs in the arts are as varied as they come. Web design jobs are completely different from those of a Fine Artist. Fashion jobs are nothing like Teaching jobs and a Goldsmith and a Writing may have little in common. Just as the skills needed to succeed in these fields vary, so do the job opportunities and work environments. Make sure you research the art field you are interested in thoroughly. As an artist, an entrepreneurial spirit or a desire to work in an enlightening environment may be all you need to project yourself into the arts world. As you gain experience and connections, opportunities will begin present themselves more and more. Your biggest motivation through your first years will be the end reward: doing what you love and are passionate about.

John Lee

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are many options to pursue such as continuing to find opportunities that may lead to jobs, using your art skills to leverage for other opportunities where your talents may be transferable, and there is always grad school to further gain experience and education.

Shimrit Paley

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Depending on what type of school you go to, the curriculum established and courses you choose to take will provide you with skills and abilities to succeed in the the workplace. For instance, a music major at a liberal arts college will enroll in courses that will teach them to perform critical analysis, write persuasively, work in a team, and communicate effectively. Additionally, you may choose to minor in another subject area or pursue an internship or extracurricular activity that will allow you to hone skills to supplement your major in the arts. These transferable skills will allow you to thrive in a wide variety of work settings, from arts non-profits to corporate businesses.

Richard Hazeltoncollege advisorConnecticut

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are many different avenues to take. Students with degrees in the fine and performing arts have vibrant careers beyond the stage and studio. For example, students with degrees n the visual arts often develop enriching careers as museum curators, auction house professionals, and as teachers and educators. In addition, many students with art degrees get involved in the “business” of art and work as agents and managers for artists or lawyers focused on the art and entertainment industry. Students with degrees in acting or theater work as producers, directors or in the business end of that industry– advertising, promotion or representing actors or theater companies as attorneys or business men or women.

Angelita Figueroa SalasCounselorCommunity College

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

First, please note that your major is not always your career. While working on your passion in college, you also gained the following skills as a student: you learned how to think critically and analytically, worked in teams or alone, conducted research, wrote papers as well as used a computer. Thus, while looking for employment in the area that you enjoy, you have the transferable skills an employer may be looking for to help support yourself in reaching for your goals. You may also look for positions in your field that could help lead you to that objective of full-time work as a performer or artist.

Danny EllisonCareer CoachELI 360

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Landing a full-time job as an artist of any kind is very competitive and difficult. if you believe you have what it takes, it still may take a long period of financial sacrifice to get to the point of making a full-time salary. Freelancing for multiple venues/organizations may help you get properly networked. Remember to be as flexible as your career path demands you to be, meaning don’t overload yourself with car/credit payments and other things that will tie you down. Allow your career to gradually develop. Arts education is one way to go, but you will have to prepare for that route with a teaching certificate suitable for what you would want to do. Artistic personality types are creators, and they sometimes struggle to be social or enterprising, so before settling on a teaching track, first make sure you are made for the classroom, band hall or art room. A great way to do this is by meeting with a counselor and/or taking an assessment based on Holland’s RIASEC Hexagon.

Bernadina Streeter

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are many, many opportunities to use your artistic talents on-line with websites and through any visual marketing aspect. Magazines, newspapers, brochures, and every company (for profit and not-for-profit), entrepreneur, former students, current friends can always use art in some form or fashion. Think outside of the box…if it’s a visual, then someone created that image…go out and ask them who does their artwork. By the way, performers are wonderful personalities for higher education with many opportunities to perform artistically through the college/university productions.

Leigh Ball

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Depending on the type of arts program you pursue, you have a number of different paths available. You could explore a career with: – Museums & libraries – Non-profits which recognize the arts – Collaborating with different forms of art therapy providers – Arts administration – Education Your passion for the arts – together with your other skills, talents and interests – can lead to diverse career paths.

Katherine Moyses

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are lots of different options available. You could work in art galleries, concert halls, and performing arts centers in various capacities. Some students choose to go on to get their masters or doctoral degree. Depending upon your level of education, you may be eligible to teach. Check with your professors in college to see if they know students who may need private lessons.

Kimberly ReyesFormer Admissions OfficerDuke University

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are lots of different things you might be able to pursue with a major in the arts, but it will depend on the other natural competencies and interests that you have. For instance, let’s say you are the type of student that really find fulfillment out of community service. Then you might find work in a community-based organization (some of which are small, local outfits, and some of which are major non-profits) which employ the arts as a vehicle for community-building, youth education and empowerment, or a therapeutic outlet for medical patients. Aside from employees who can actually run their arts programs, these arts organizations may also need grantwriters who can help them convinced various funders that they work they are doing is an important dissemination of arts appreciation and is worthy of the donor’s philanthropy. Another related line of work could be as a program officer with arts foundations, that look to fund many of these types of arts-based community organizations. This would still require a knowledge of the arts that the foundation is particularly concerned with as well as excellent interpersonal skills. There are still more possibilities, but again, it all depends on not only what you’re good at, but what you’re actually interested in.

Ben Schwartz

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Art majors have a range of career options and potential employers will look at your degree but also the institution the degree is from and the other experiences you have that will prepare you for specific jobs. Possible alternatives may include work in communications, sales, or marketing. Graduates with art degrees need to market the skills they gained beyond simply their degree.

Samantha GreenwoodUndergraduate Admissions CounselorChatham University

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are lots of career paths you can take if you major in the Arts, but don’t get work as a full time performer/artist. I have had several friends and colleagues who have majored in Visual Arts or Art History who have chosen to work in galleries. If you are a visual artist, working in an art gallery giving tours or working in the education sector can be a great way to use your knowledge and skills, and still receive a steady paycheck. If you are interested in Performing Arts or Theater, theaters are often looking for knowledgeable people to help with ticket sales, outreach and advertising. Again, a great way to stick with your passion, but have a backup plan in case you don’t get full time performing work. A major in the Arts also teaches valuable skills, like consistency, work ethic, dedication, and on-the-spot performance. Music majors often do very well in business because of these traits.

Joan DeSalvatoreOwner/DirectorCollege Bound Advising Today

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are many options for someone with a major in the arts. If you wish to use your art skills, you can pursue teacher certification, work with children’s programs, or gain employment with any number of community arts organizations. If you decide to emphasize other aspects of your degree, you can highlight the creative problem-solving skills you acquired in both the art and non-art portions of your degree, as well as your communication abilities. Often, students who have completed a major in the arts, have also gained a large number of other skills along the way. Did you need to learn how to work with computers? Did your college experience require that you learn project management skills? Did you find yourself in a counseling or mentoring role with your fellow students. Any of these things can be translated into excellent qualifications for many different jobs both in industry and in academia.

Kathleen GriffinOwnerAmerican College Strategies

The Sky’s the Limit!

There are so many things you can do with a degree in the arts. Think out of the box. Don’t think of yourself as a performer/artist who just performs on a stage. As a performer you have developed self-confidence standing up in front of people. You have the ability to speak, project emotion and capture the attention of an audience. This ability will take you far in any industry. Most industries have a need for that “artistic person”. Think advertising, web design, teaching, creating your own film/play, window display artist, cake design, event planning, interior design, landscape design, wedding planner, theater manager……the sky’s the limit.

Amberley WolfCollege ConsultantWolf College Consulting

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

When you have a major in the arts you are given excellent preparation for not only art related positions, but also positions that require careful thinking, accurate observation and expression. Some alternative jobs for an artist include interior design, photography and graphic design. Theatre students learn the ability to communicate their ideas and are acquire skills that would do well in many professional careers including advertising, business and teaching.

Lee BiererPresidentCollege Admissions Strategies

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You can get involved in the business side of the arts either through a box-office positon or publications or marketing. Additionally, if you can swing it to intern or volunteer, there are probably great opportunities to work with community theatre groups or assist in teaching at children’s theatres. Summer camps are also probably a great option.

Kamal Johl

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

First of all don’t give up on your dreams. Its always great to have a back up career in mind until you make it full time as a Performer or Artist. Also, if your a performer or artist I’m sure you already have a creative edge to you. Many companies do look for someone with creativity. As an artist you can look for careers in marketing or as a performer you can look for part time theatre work or commerical acting. It all really depends on your interests and the job market. It depends on what type of performer or artist you are ? How about graphic artist or making music CD’s and marketing yourself on the side. For commerical zingles or Phone Apps, games, there are endless possibilities out there. How about blogging part time and sharing your work online ? Lets brainstorm your ideas !

Dana WaldropSchool CounselorOak Grove High School

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

If you have a music or art performance major, there are several ways you can go. If you want to get a teaching certificate, it will take approximately one additional year to complete that degree. However, without that certificate there are many paid positions in church and community performing arts centers. Taking on private students and working in community theater also provide small salaries. Many musical performance majors have paid positions in local churches, orchestras and even as consultants to local schools through instrumental and theater productions. Visual art majors can supplement income through private instruction and providing set design.

christina mangano

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are many options for art majors. There are even more possibilities if there the student plans ahead and thinks of options while still studying. Depending on the specific art medium, options can include but are not limited to art teacher, art therapy, music therapy, critic, reporter, photographer, graphic designer, publishing, advertising, animation, web designer, set designer, packaging, auction house, art investor, art law, writer (creative or reporting), announcers, lighting designers, makeup arts, media planners, entertainment managers, agents, choreographer, or press agent.

Nancy Evans

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are many directions that you can go with a major in the arts as long as you select a minor in an area that compliments your art major. The list is endless when it comes to careers in the arts. Consider working as an art or music therapist, an animator or art administrator, a curator or graphic designer, a television director or an exhibit designer. You can use your creativity to design your own niche within this unlimited field. Of course, you can always get a teaching credential and teach.

Elysa StahlPresidentAdmissions Avenue

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You can get a job as an art teacher or theater teacher in any level of school and perform in community plays while you continue to tryout for full time performing work. Also, you can set up your own art school at home or work for religious agencies teaching art on a part time basis- they often have programs on weekends. Once you get your foot in the door you can sometimes work into a full time position.

Nicholas Umphrey

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Really it depends on where you live or where you are willing to live. If you wish to live in a more urban area, there will be many opportunities, but you have to be willing to start at the ground level. Most artists, reagrdless of where they live, have a “day job” and then they have a freelance/part time career with their art. This is really where most artists, thespians, and musicians start. Another thought is teaching art or music. Most artists like this don’t like this idea initially, but it is a steady job with benefits, and due to an educator’s calendar, there is always the summer to practice your art. Also, most of the typical art students in secondary and post-secondary levels are there because they want to be there and they chose your class. As the person scheduling students from the other end, I can tell you that you rarely have classroom control issues or the strain of trying to motivate kids.

Richard NaporaCollege ConsultantClarus

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Many college graduates are happily engaged in careers that have very little to do with the major they pursued in college. Art majors are eligble to apply for many occupations simply because they have earned a college degree (an achievement that demonstrates dedication and focus to many potential employers). Many art classes require subsets of skills that are transferable into numerous occupations…including such fields as advertising, communications, fashion, education, marketing, sales, journalism, public relations, and hundreds of others. The founder of Apple once took a calligraphy class as an elective…a class he considered pivotal in Apple’s success (because Apple used the most creative and innovative fonts…thanks to that calligraphy class). Former art students (both fine and peforming arts) are and will continue to be happily employed in many occupations that have everything, nothing, and all things in-between to do with their undergaduate course sequences. Other opportunities include graduate studies, including law, business, and medicine.

Richard NaporaCollege ConsultantClarus

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Many college graduates are happily engaged in careers that have very little to do with the major they pursued in college. Art majors are eligble to apply for many occupations simply because they have earned a college degree (an achievement that demonstrates dedication and focus to many potential employers). Many art classes require subsets of skills that are transferable into numerous occupations…including such fields as advertising, communications, fashion, education, marketing, sales, journalism, public relations, and hundreds of others. The founder of Apple once took a calligraphy class as an elective…a class he considered pivotal in Apple’s success (because Apple used the most creative and innovative fonts…thanks to that calligraphy class). Former art students (both fine and peforming arts) are and will continue to be happily employed in many occupations that have everything, nothing, and all things in-between to do with their undergaduate course sequences.

Richard NaporaCollege ConsultantClarus

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Many college graduates are happily engaged in careers that have very little to do with the major they pursued in college. Art majors are eligble to apply for many occupations simply because they have earned a college degree (an achievement that demonstrates dedication and focus to many potential employers). Many art classes require subsets of skills that are transferable into numerous occupations…including advertising, communications, fashion, education, marketing, sales, journalism, and public relations. The founder of Apple once took a calligraphy class as an elective…a class he considered pivotal in making Apple computers a success (because Apple used the most creative and innovative fonts…thanks to calligraphy). Former art students (both fine and peforming arts) are and will continue to be happily employed in many occupations that have everything, nothing, and everything in-between to do with their undergaduate course sequences. Other opportunities include graduate studies, including law, business, and medicine.

Allison MatlackEducational ConsultantAHP Educational Consulting

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Often it is the case that students wishing to major it the arts can only imagine themselves as practicing artists when, in fact, a degree in the arts opens up a world of possibilities. In this emerging “creative economy” many artists can find gainful and rewarding employment in a wide variety of fields as companies seek thoughtful, innovative thinkers who will bring a creative perspective to their work. When Steve Jobs was creating the first MacIntosh computers, he worked with an industrial designer to make it look attractive – something people would enjoy looking at – and the rest is, as they say, history. So, for the arts major who is unable to find full-time employment as a performer/artist, tremendous opportunities exist in the workforce for the right-brained thinker. Here’s a link to an article from the Harvard Business Review that discusses 4 things an MBA could learn from an MFA http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2008/04/the_mfa_is_the_new_mba.html

Sarah Moon

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

This is a great question and one I asked myself many times during my major in arts. The CBC addressed this question in September 2010 in a very interesting article about the jobs you don’t hear about: HTTP://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/2010/09/07/f-vp-handler.html Most artists have to make ends meet with day jobs while they wait for the big break and there are many ways to do this. I, myself, am an arts major and have had varied experiences from working in West Africa as a Foreign Aid intern to working for a major Bank as a Strategist. How? What many people will not tell you is that most of the training required for any job will happen on the job itself. The key is your aptitude to learn and adapt to new situations. This is your most valuable asset when looking for temporary work. Do not undersell yourself because you do not have a specialized degree/diploma; most graduates are not specialists. Remember: Van Morrison was a window cleaner (check out the 1982 song Cleaning Windows) and composer Philip Glass was a plumber until the age of 41. Before undertaking any job, ask yourself this: is becoming an artist more important to you than a comfortable standard of living? If so, you may want to stick to shift work which can be more accommodating when arranging for auditions, etc… whereas a 9 to 5 job may provide little to no flexibility meaning you will miss out on auditions or risk losing your income. If not, there are many long-term opportunities for an Arts Major and the key is to be open to them and not pigeon-hole yourself into what you think you can do because you will surprise yourself!

Sarah Moon

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

This is a great question and one I asked myself many times during my major in arts. The CBC addressed this question in September 2010 in a very interesting article about the jobs you don’t hear about: HTTP://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/2010/09/07/f-vp-handler.html Most artists have to make ends meet with day jobs while they wait for the big break and there are many ways to do this. I, myself, am an arts major and have had varied experiences from working in West Africa as a Foreign Aid intern to working for a major Bank as a Strategist. How? What many people will not tell you is that most of the training required for any job will happen on the job itself. The key is your aptitude to learn and adapt to new situations. This is your most valuable asset when looking for temporary work. Do not undersell yourself because you do not have a specialized degree/diploma; most graduates are not specialists. Remember: Van Morrison was a window cleaner (check out the 1982 song Cleaning Windows) and composer Philip Glass was a plumber until the age of 41. Before undertaking any job, ask yourself this: is becoming an artist more important to you than a comfortable standard of living? If so, you may want to stick to shift work which can be more accommodating when arranging for auditions, etc… whereas a 9 to 5 job may provide little to no flexibility meaning you will miss out on auditions or risk losing your income. If not, there are many long-term opportunities for an Arts Major and the key is to be open to them and not pigeon-hole yourself into what you think you can do because you will surprise yourself!

Bill McMurrayPresidentW.C. McMurray& Associates

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Would-be artists, musicians, dancers, and actors have been supporting themselves financially through other kinds of work throughout history. Many find work in fields unrelated to the arts, often part-time or temporary, where the time commitment enables continued pursuit of their artistic craft during non-work hours. Armed with a college degree however, others choose to seek more career-oriented work in areas aligned with the arts, but in non-performing capacities. Interesting opportunities are available as teachers, arts/music librarians, exhibition curators, and as administrators/fund raisers for museums, theaters, and orchestras. In these positions, an academic background in visual/performing arts can be highly valuable. While pursuing an undergraduate degree in the visual or performing arts, you may want to consider a minor or other course combinations that might broaden and enhance your education – and employability – in another area(s) of interest: e.g., business administration, art/music history, technical theater, etc.

Dr. FisherCollege CounselorFisher Educational Consultants

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

True, there is competition in the arts. However, skills are transferable. One may want to be in a professional dance group but that same person can teach dance. An actor has communication skills that can be used in many careers in addition to acting. Those who are in the fine arts have visual and design skills that can be used in the now popular graphic design and web page design fields. Some in the art field find jobs in museums or arts management. There are options if one looks at their skills and use those skills in a related area.

Emily Bloom

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Work for a non profit theatre company, volunteer as a director for a children’s theatre company

Timothy LLaw ClerkDuke University School of Law

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

An extremely important point to remember is that if you have a bachelor’s degree in the arts, you are a college grad. This means that you can qualify for any job in which a college degree is a requirement. That being said, there are a number of things people with arts degrees can do: teach elementary, junior high, high school, private school, tutor. If you’ve graduated from a top arts program, e.g., North Carolina School of the Arts, you can make $50-$100/hour tutoring other students. A degree in the arts also helps if you’re looking to apply to competitive graduate programs. Because many programs (e.g., law, business, etc.) are looking to diversify their student body, tie a nice story around your degree and you’ll stand out like a diamond in the rough!

Halley Shefler

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You can do just about anything. An education in the arts allows you to do three things: 1. When you major in the arts you put yourself “out there” — you get rejected, accepted, evaluated, and you build a layer which allows you to do anything 2. You can work part-time as a performer — life is about following a passion and doing whatever you have to do to get that “fix” 3. Go to medical school, law school or anything else that you feel passionate about. Majoring in the arts is very difficult — and if you can do this — you can do anything.

Dr. Spiva

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You can also consider a work within a non-profit organization or a governmental entity which supports the arts. The arts are typically funded through public-private partnerships within a ciy or other locale, and are in need of practitioners who understand the aesthetic value of the various art genres, as well as the cultural value to the public. Many former performers and artists find quite fulfilling work in non-profit arts organizations or city departments such as ‘cultural affairs’ or ‘arts and letters’.

Luisa RabeCEOPruett Rabe Associates

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

In college, arts majors hone wonderfully creative approaches to problem-solving. These skills are keys to success in education, retail sales, hospitality, consulting… While it is tempting for arts alums to single-mindedly focus on launching full-time careers in the arts, to do so often means overlooking wonderful opportunities. Think about this – a graphic designer while working on his fabric prints, takes time to teach art to schoolchildren and in the process gets a better sense of preteen fashion, the demands active youngsters make on their clothing… What about the digital composer who takes her ability to think across time and space to an accounting firm at tax time? Of course as a dancer, I’d rather be in the studio than wait tables, yet both occupations, artist and server, can feed the other literally and metaphorically. The fact of the matter is that emerging artists need time to develop their crafts and to find opportunities to showcase their work. Like all of us, artists need to pay the rent/mortgage, purchase groceries, take care of bills. Finding ways to weave one’s art through one’s life and work is the art major’s real challenge. Thanks to great undergraduate career guidance offices at institutions like Emerson, Lehigh, Smith, Temple and the University of the Arts, more arts alums than ever are crafting multi-layered careers that will, in time, make it possible for talented graduates to build substantial bodies of work while simultaneously avoiding debt.

Yolanda SpivaExecutive DirectorProject GRAD Atlanta, Inc.

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You should always consider work in organizations which support or fund the arts. There are a number of non-profit organizations and publicly-funded (city, county, or other municipal government) departments with very gratifying and fulfilling professional opportunities where expertise and/or experience in the arts is not only requested, but required. For many performers/artists who also have strong fundraising, people management, and leadership capabilities, professional opportunities within professional arts organizations, have been a great match.

Wendell Spiva

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

You could enter a career in education, seek employment in the arts community working at museums, libraries, or visual art galleries. If your degree is in the area of the arts that involve music, instrumentation or visual performances, such as acting, be sure to hone your craft and remain committed to performing at local playhouses and performing troops. Most successful artist achieve notoriety and recognition after enduring a substantial amount of set backs, trials and tribulations that often test their committment to their chosen craft. Be prepared to work hard and focus on what you are out to accomplish.

Joan CaseyPresidentEducational Advocates College Consulting Corp.

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Art majors are well positioned to work in a variety of fields particularly if their major is grounded with a strong liberal arts education. Art majors can find work in managing arts organizations, being part of an art acquisition team in a corporation or working in areas such as design and facilities/space planning. Other natural fits include working in a museum or art gallery. An art major might make a wonderful admissions counselor at an art college or pursue a career as an art therapist or art teacher. What is key is identifying overall skills and strengths. I know artists who are also good writers who find work in marketing and public relations or publishing. The possibilities are limitless.

Jeannie Beierle

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Depending on the type of art you have studied, you may be able to get into advertising, creating eye-catching posters. You may find a fit in the retail industry if you create eye-catching displays in store windows. Another option might be to work for a high end jewelry distributor if you are interested in creating unique pieces to market. There really are countless possibilities if you think broadly about different aspects of all careers.

Barbara StewartCollege CounselorBishop Gorman High School

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

As a performer/artist you have developed an amazing set of transferrable skills. You have not only developed your creativity, you have learned to think outside of the box. You know that there is usually more than one way to solve a problem and your education has taught you how to think critically as well as creatively. You have a unique perspective on issues, have developed strong communication skills, can create interesting associations between ideas and are knowledgeable about popular culture. All of these skills are valuable in wide variety of settings. You may want to consider looking into positions in sales or marketing, advertising, public relations, human resources, art or performing art thearapy. Exhibit designers, tour guides, archivists and buyers all use the very skills that you have developed. As you start to explore options outside of the traditional “performer/artist” box you will want to take a closer look at the transferrable skills that you have developed and give future employers concrete examples of how these skills may be applied to the position you are seeking. You may also want to continue to develop your artist/performer talent by joining a professional organization, volunteering with fundraising efforts for the arts and looking for additional internships. All of these activities will enhance your resume should you decide to continue to pursue full-time work as a performer/artist.

Alicia Hicks

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Teaching is always the best alternative for majors such as the arts. Whether in the private or public school system, there are many opportunities for after school programs. Also, you can start your own business teaching your choreography to other aspiring students or even try your luck with celebrities. The key is to create a brand for your style and market yourself to the right audience and making a good living will follow.

Mary Askew

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

People with Art degrees are Complicated, Original, Impulsive, Independent, Expressive, and Creative. These students use their imagination and feelings in creative expression. The art major prepares students for a variety of careers including but not limited to: Advertising Artist Architect Archivist Art Appraiser Art History Instructor Art Museums/Galleries – Administration Art Museums/Galleries – Archivist Art Museums/Galleries – Buying Art Museums/Galleries – Collections Management Art Museums/Galleries – Conservation Art Museums/Galleries – Curator Art Museums/Galleries – Custom Framing Art Museums/Galleries – Development Art Museums/Galleries – Display Design Art Museums/Galleries – Education Art Museums/Galleries – Exhibit Design/Preparation Art Museums/Galleries – Fashion Coordination Art Museums/Galleries – Public Relations Art Museums/Galleries – Publications Art Museums/Galleries – Registrar Art Museums/Galleries – Retail Art Museums/Galleries – Sales Art Museums/Galleries – Store Management Art Museums/Galleries – Tour Guides/Docent Art Therapist Art Therapist Cartographer Commercial Artist Computer Animator Computer Graphic Artists Critic Curator Designer Educator Fashion Illustrator Fashion, Textile, Interior Designer Fine Arts Instructor Florist Graphic Artist Graphic Designer Illustrator Interior Decorator Jeweler Media – Animator/Cartoonist Media – Art Critic Media – Art Journalist Media – Designer Media – Editor Media – Illustrator Media – Production Media – Programmer Media – Sales Person Media – Video Operator Painter Photographer Photojournalist Retail – Buyer Retail – Custom Framer Retail – Display Designer Retail – Fashion Coordinator Retail – Store Manager Sculptor Sign Painter Studio Art Instructor Read about these careers at the ONET web site – http://www.onetonline.org/

Shari Colonel

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

The most obvious answer would be to teach or to be a tutor in your particular area. There are many opportunities available that need teaching or tutoring. Parents tend to think that their children are extremely talented and are the next American Idol, so it is very common for tutoring to be a sought out avenue for their “talented” children.

Shari Colonel

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

The most obvious answer would be to teach or to be a tutor in your particular area. There are many opportunities available that need teaching or tutoring. Parents tend to think that their children are extremely talented and are the next American Idol, so it is very common for tutoring to be a sought out avenue for their “talented” children.

IRMA TORRES

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

LOOK FOR LOCAL ART GALLERIES, THEATERS AND MUSEUMS WHERE YOUR KNOWLEDGE CAN BE PUT INTO USE. YOU CAN ALSO GO TO YOUR LOCAL EMPLOYMENT OFFICE THEY USUALLY HAVE LIST OF INTERESTED EMPLOYERS THAT WILL GIVE YOU A HEADS UP ON HWERE TO LOOK FOR A JOB.

Drew D’AmbrosioConsultantIndependent

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Museums, galleries, art promotion, art based charities, foundations for the arts, design (wed, graphic, game, advertising, etc.), and teaching are all viable routes to pursue outside of actual performing. I’ve had a lot of friends pursue the arts in school and wind up not being able to make ends meet as a full time artist (it takes time, Picasso didn’t create masterpieces overnight). Think of your personal art as a hobby as you graduate, unless you can afford to dive in, and you’ll probably avoid a lot of stress in the long run. I would argue that working for a gallery or museum or art foundation could provide a budding new artist with some useful perspective about the art world. It will hopefully add some business sense to the artists’ skill set. There is also opportunity to network more working in the arts vs painting at home for example. A lot of influential people are very passionately involved in the arts, you never know who you may meet. Those are just a few ideas and perks, obviously there are millions of other things that may be better suited for your specific situation, my advice is to find something you can tolerate until you find something you love.

Drew D’AmbrosioConsultantIndependent

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Museums, galleries, art promotion, art based charities, foundations for the arts, design (wed, graphic, game, advertising, etc.), and teaching are all viable routes to pursue outside of actual performing. I’ve had a lot of friends pursue the arts in school and wind up not being able to make ends meet as a full time artist (it takes time, Picasso didn’t create masterpieces overnight). Think of your personal art as a hobby as you graduate, unless you can afford to dive in, and you’ll probably avoid a lot of stress in the long run. I would argue that working for a gallery or museum or art foundation could provide a budding new artist with some useful perspective about the art world. It will hopefully add some business sense to the artists’ skill set. There is also opportunity to network more working in the arts vs painting at home for example. A lot of influential people are very passionately involved in the arts, you never know who you may meet. Those are just a few ideas and perks, obviously there are millions of other things that may be better suited for your specific situation, my advice is to find something you can tolerate until you find something you love.

Joseph II

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Going to school to get a degree in arts is one of those subjects that we dont like to talk about to much around the dinner table these days. I personally think that the preforming arts world still needs young, fresh minded individuals to go forth into the world. The funny things is there are plenty of jobs that you can get working in the performing arts field, provided you have done enough work to find those opportunitites. Television and radio stations are always looking for people to help build the creative brand of thier companies as well as other media and entertainment related business. I recieved my degree in Film Studies from the UNiversity of Missouri and find myself working in my field but more on the music side than actually working film. Although, my minor is in music. However, if you plan on seriously considering a career of uncertainity at times but the chacnes of great income incites then a major in arts is for you. But condisering the safe choice like med or law school is always an option when considering the monies paid out during college versus the monies recieved after.

Lillian BernalCounselor

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

As a theatre arts major, you can always teach full time. High schools typically have a theatre arts department. Also, if you were to be a work as an artist, the school calendar could be beneficial because you would have evenings and weekends free to rehearse and/or perform.

Erin Corso

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

if pursuing a career as a full time perfomer or artist is your passion, and you have already completed your undergraduate degree in the arts field, go for it! While it is a competitive industry, there are many different outlets for all kinds of talented individuals. If at some point you decide performing is not “in your stars” and its time to use the degree you earned for a different type of job, there are still many options availabe to you. There are theater jobs from local theater companies to touring productions to Broadway itself that range from costume and set design, to musical directors and perfomers themselves. You can work in museums, as curators or guides, in the TV or movie industry, writing, costuming, directing, etc.. You can teach in the private sector or go back to school to earn your licensure to teach in the public schools. A degree in the arts will also allow you to go to graduate school in just about any field. In fact, many graduate schools and programs try to diversy their candidate pool with many diffferent undergraduate degrees and majors. A degree in the arts can open the door to many different opportunities.

Erin Corso

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

if pursuing a career as a full time perfomer or artist is your passion, and you have already completed your undergraduate degree in the arts field, go for it! While it is a competitive industry, there are many different outlets for all kinds of talented individuals. If at some point you decide performing is not “in your stars” and its time to use the degree you earned for a different type of job, there are still many options availabe to you. There are theater jobs from local theater companies to touring productions to Broadway itself that range from costume and set design, to musical directors and perfomers themselves. You can work in museums, as curators or guides, in the TV or movie industry, writing, costuming, directing, etc.. You can teach in the private sector or go back to school to earn your licensure to teach in the public schools. A degree in the arts will also allow you to go to graduate school in just about any field. In fact, many graduate schools and programs try to diversy their candidate pool with many diffferent undergraduate degrees and majors. A degree in the arts can open the door to many different opportunities.

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What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

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Chengxi Tang

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Let’s be clear here. Are you referring to the performing arts/ theater? There are plenty of jobs available outside of the performing arts industry … but if you wish to remain in the industry, try the following sites: ArtSEARCH: The National Employment Bulletin for the Arts Find positions in universities, colleges and schools; museums; arts councils; and more — including full-time, part-time, seasonal, year-round and internship opportunities, from entry level to upper management. American Association of Community Theatre Artslynx Americans for the Arts Job Bank Backstage Jobs Educational Theatre Association PropPeople Screen Actors Guild Showbiz Jobs.com Stage Managers Association The Art and Science of Theater The Shakespeare Theatre American Theater Web Broadway Stars CT Opera Lyrical Line Musical Theatre International Music Publishers’ Association National Alliance for Musical Theatre New York Musical Theatre Festival Actor’s Equity Association: Casting Calls Children’s Theater Links Mandy.Com Playbill.com

Ethan SawyerCounselor, Essay SpecialistLos Angeles Leadership Academy & Elite Educational Institute

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Students who receive a critique-based arts education, in which they are constantly critiquing and evaluating one another (and their own) work, giving and receiving feedback, learning interpersonal skills are being recognized more and more as great leaders by major companies NOT directly involved in the arts. ” Steve Jobs, who was neither a computer programmer nor a hardware engineer, famously told graduates of Stanford University in 2005 that one of the most influential and lasting experiences in his brief tenure at Reed College was his dabbling in calligraphy.” (http://www.pbs.org/wnet/need-to-know/the-daily-need/is-a-liberal-arts-degree-worth-it/12107/) I attended a panel last October at the Performing & Visual Arts College Fair at UCLA and took GREAT notes. Here’s what an admissions counselor for CalArts said (sorry, didn’t write down her name): “Arts can teach you entrepreneurship skills: you audition, receive critiques, focus on doing and even marketing something you love. These are transferable skills that work across disciplines. Many have gone on to medical school and law and they become more attractive to medical/law admissions committees because they have studied something interesting/unconventional.” There’s data on this from the Strategic National Arts Alumni Project (SNAAP) out of Indiana, which reports that over eighty percent who get arts degree are happy. About twenty percent did it with no intention of studying that on the other side. And about 40 percent go on to be educators. (http://snaap.indiana.edu/) And here’s something else to think about: many students who want to study art in college already know what they’re passionate about, which puts them way ahead of a lot of students. (Don’t underestimate that–and remind your parents of this!) On that same panel, an admissions officer from UCLA said: “Students need to know that there’s more than one way to get to what you want to do.” She asked the room how many parents in the audience were currently working in the field they got their degree in. In a room full of maybe two hundred parents and students, maybe 5 parents raised their hands. And an admissions counselor from SMU said: “[At SMU] We’re gonna drop you in a place where you are gonna “cook”–you’re going to marinate, learning a lot about a lot of different things… But I don’t know what you are going to be or do. It could be something totally new–a profession that hasn’t been invented yet: a hologram designer?! Who knows?” I think this final part is the most important part: you never know where you’ll end up. But if you LOVE art–if you MUST create art to be happy–then getting an arts degree is most definitely a valuable way to spend a few years of your life. This from a guy with two arts degrees: Bachelors of Speech from Northwestern (Performance Studies) and an MFA in Acting from UC Irvine. Now I’m working (very happily) as a teacher and college counselor. Rilke put it best: “Now (since you have said you want my advice) I beg you to stop doing that sort of thing. You are looking outside, and that is what you should most avoid right now. No one can advise or help you – no one. There is only one thing you should do. Go into yourself. Find out the reason that commands you to write; see whether it has spread its roots into the very depths of your heart; confess to yourself whether you would have to die if you were forbidden to write. “This most of all: ask yourself in the most silent hour of your night: must I write? Dig into yourself for a deep answer. This most of all: ask yourself in the most silent hour of your night: must I write? Dig into yourself for a deep answer. And if this answer rings out in assent, if you meet this solemn question with a strong, simple “I must,” then build your life in accordance with this necessity; your while life, even into its humblest and most indifferent hour, must become a sign and witness to this impulse.” Got other questions about arts degrees/getting into college? Feel free to post here or email me directly: [email protected] Peace, Ethan

CollegeCounselor McSellerson

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

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Ethan SawyerCounselor, Essay SpecialistLos Angeles Leadership Academy & Elite Educational Institute

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Students who receive a critique-based arts education, in which they are constantly critiquing and evaluating one another (and their own) work, giving and receiving feedback, learning interpersonal skills are being recognized more and more as great leaders by major companies NOT directly involved in the arts. ” Steve Jobs, who was neither a computer programmer nor a hardware engineer, famously told graduates of Stanford University in 2005 that one of the most influential and lasting experiences in his brief tenure at Reed College was his dabbling in calligraphy.” (http://www.pbs.org/wnet/need-to-know/the-daily-need/is-a-liberal-arts-degree-worth-it/12107/) I attended a panel last October at the Performing & Visual Arts College Fair at UCLA and took GREAT notes. Here’s what an admissions counselor for CalArts said (sorry, didn’t write down her name): “Arts can teach you entrepreneurship skills: you audition, receive critiques, focus on doing and even marketing something you love. These are transferable skills that work across disciplines. Many have gone on to medical school and law and they become more attractive to medical/law admissions committees because they have studied something interesting/unconventional.” There’s data on this from the Strategic National Arts Alumni Project (SNAAP) out of Indiana, which reports that over eighty percent who get arts degree are happy. About twenty percent did it with no intention of studying that on the other side. And about 40 percent go on to be educators. (http://snaap.indiana.edu/) And here’s something else to think about: many students who want to study art in college already know what they’re passionate about, which puts them way ahead of a lot of students. (Don’t underestimate that–and remind your parents of this!) On that same panel, an admissions officer from UCLA said: “Students need to know that there’s more than one way to get to what you want to do.” She asked the room how many parents in the audience were currently working in the field they got their degree in. In a room full of maybe two hundred parents and students, maybe 5 parents raised their hands. And an admissions counselor from SMU said: “[At SMU] We’re gonna drop you in a place where you are gonna “cook”–you’re going to marinate, learning a lot about a lot of different things… But I don’t know what you are going to be or do. It could be something totally new–a profession that hasn’t been invented yet: a hologram designer?! Who knows?” I think this final part is the most important part: you never know where you’ll end up. But if you LOVE art–if you MUST create art to be happy–then getting an arts degree is most definitely a valuable way to spend a few years of your life. This from a guy with two arts degrees: Bachelors of Speech from Northwestern (Performance Studies) and an MFA in Acting from UC Irvine. Now I’m working (very happily) as a teacher and college counselor. Rilke put it best: “Now (since you have said you want my advice) I beg you to stop doing that sort of thing. You are looking outside, and that is what you should most avoid right now. No one can advise or help you – no one. There is only one thing you should do. Go into yourself. Find out the reason that commands you to write; see whether it has spread its roots into the very depths of your heart; confess to yourself whether you would have to die if you were forbidden to write. “This most of all: ask yourself in the most silent hour of your night: must I write? Dig into yourself for a deep answer. This most of all: ask yourself in the most silent hour of your night: must I write? Dig into yourself for a deep answer. And if this answer rings out in assent, if you meet this solemn question with a strong, simple “I must,” then build your life in accordance with this necessity; your while life, even into its humblest and most indifferent hour, must become a sign and witness to this impulse.” Got other questions about arts degrees/getting into college? Feel free to post here or email me directly: [email protected] Peace, Ethan

Rachel Marx

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

There are many options for arts majors. Many non-profit organizations center on fundraising and increasing exposure for the arts, and would love to have on their staff a college graduate with a demonstrated passion for their mission. You could also teach art, although depending on your state, you may need to be certified as well.

Jenn CohenOwnerJenn Cohen Tutoring

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Definitely. The College Board offers students with documented learning disabilities/ADHD several helpful accommodations, including extended time, more frequent breaks and longer breaks. Students with a writing disability may also ask for use of a computer to type responses on essays. The application process can take several months to be approved, so get started well before you plan to take the test. In most cases, your school counselor will complete and submit the application for you, so make an appointment to talk with him/her as soon as possible. It’s also very important to carefully consider which accommodations will work best for you. While extended time on the SAT can be a good thing, it can also be completely exhausting! Consider getting advice from a tutor who specializes in students with disabilities. In many cases, I encourage my students to try the ACT instead.

Jenn CohenOwnerJenn Cohen Tutoring

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Try being an instructor, tutor or work “behind the scenes” at theaters, galleries or museums.

Mildred PlanasSupervisor of Student Support ServicesBarringer High School

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

If you cannot get full-time work as a performer/artist, there are a few things you can do: – If you’re interested at all in teaching, you can go through the Alternate Route program and get certified for teaching while you are getting paid to teach (this applies to NJ; I am not sure which other states have similar programs). – If you’re not sure you can commit to teaching, apply for your Substitute certification so that you have a paying job and still have the flexibility of looking for permanent work. – Freelance work. It is not always easy to come by, but if you are a photographer, videographer, audio engineer, etc. you can apply for “gigs,” while you continue to look for work. – Continue to reach out to galleries, theaters, tv stations, etc (depending on your expertise), to network and make connections that can help.

Ms. Marytherese RyanNational Certified Counselor/Independent ContractorRyan Consulting

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Many people will advise you that you can go into teaching. Some people will say you should go into or continue as an actor/waiter or actress/waitress, patiently awaiting your “big break” while working night and day in one of the big cities. Dig a little deeper, is my recommendation. Perhaps try a self-assessment survey, like the Strong Interest Inventory, and determine what related fields you may be interested in. Then use the skills you already have to find full-time work, while pursuing your passion for the Arts in your spare time. Use your other skills to pay the bills, but don’t lose sight or hope for your dream job. It may take some time to get there, factoring in the current economy and whatnot, but the beauty of being an artist is that you are a beautiful dreamer as well. You can do anything you set your heart, mind and hands to. For example, I myself have a love of the Arts. So in recent years, I landed myself a position at a charter school whose mission was to infuse the Visual and Performing Arts into the Curriculum. This way I was able to use my skills as a counselor and educator and meeting my needs for artistic expression at the school’s various art openings, dance events, chorus concerts, etc. And remember, any degree can be viewed as a positive skill set to a potential employer. It is all in the presentation of how your skills can meet the employer’s needs. So do your homework, research your related talents and abilities, use those skills to pay the bills, ever mindful of the artistic opportunities that may crop up along the way.

Pamela Hampton-GarlandOwnerScholar Bound

“Major in the Arts”

I must ask a clarifying question in order to effectively answer this question. When you say you will major in the “arts” that leaves me with a broad brush and the world as my canvas “pun intended”. Do you mean literally you want to major in the visual arts i.e. painting, drawing, or computer graphics, or do you me the performing arts i.e. dance, acting, music, etc., or do you mean take a major in a college of the liberal arts which all can lead to a Bachelor of Arts degree however now you are talking about fields that are not a part of the STEM (science, technology, engineering, or math) sectors like psychology, philosophy, sociology soocial work, biology, education, etc. Regarding obtaining full-time work as a performer/artist is more about being in the right place at the right time, and having your talent displayed for an audience seeking what you offer. College can only enhance the fundementals of the performing and visual arts, the talent typically is not taught but natural talent that with or without college an individual will have.

Kathryn MarchEducational and Career ConsultantKathryn March, M.S., CEP

Careers for students who have majored in the Arts

Obtaining an education in the arts will provide you with many desirable skills that are transferable to several career areas. If you major in performing arts, or theater, you will gain competency in public speaking, creative expression and critical analysis. Although these skills would be beneficial in many careers, some specific ones to consider might be in advertising and promotions, teaching, broadcasting, news correspondence, and the writing of film or theater reviews for publication. If your major is in the area of visual arts you will have developed an eye for color, balance, and design and also the skill of creating what is appealing to a viewer. You may consider work in such fields as advertising, exhibit,stage or window design, as an art director in publishing, or as a museum interpreter.

Kathryn MarchEducational and Career ConsultantKathryn March, M.S., CEP

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Obtaining an education in the arts will provide you many desirable skills that are transferable to several career areas. If you major in performing arts, or theater, you will gain competency in public speaking, creative expression and critical analysis. Although these skills would be beneficial in many careers, some specific ones to consider might be in advertising and promotions, teaching, broadcasting, news correspondence, and the writing of film or theater reviews for publication. If your major is in the area of visual arts you have developed an eye for color, balance, and design and also the skill of creating what is appealing to a viewer. You may consider work in such fields as advertising, exhibit,stage or window design, as an art director in publishing, or as a museum interpreter.

Kathryn MarchEducational and Career ConsultantKathryn March, M.S., CEP

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Obtaining an education in the arts will provide you many desirable skills that are transferable to several career areas. If you major in performing arts, or theater, you will gain competency in public speaking, creative expression and critical analysis. Although these skills would be beneficial in many careers, some specific ones to consider might be in advertising and promotions, teaching, broadcasting, news correspondence, and the writing of film or theater reviews for publication. If your major is in the area of visual arts you have developed an eye for color, balance, and design and also the skill of creating what is appealing to a viewer. You may consider work in such fields as advertising, exhibit,stage or window design, as an art director in publishing, or as a museum interpreter.

Jeana RobbinsCounselor

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Have you considered teaching?

Kathryn MarchEducational and Career ConsultantKathryn March, M.S., CEP

Career options for students who have majored in the Arts

Obtaining an education in the arts will provide you with many desirable skills that are transferable to several career areas. If you major in performing arts, or theater, you will gain competency in public speaking, creative expression and critical analysis. Although these skills would be beneficial in many careers, some specific ones to consider might be in advertising and promotions, teaching, broadcasting, news correspondence, and the writing of film or theater reviews for publication. If your major is in the area of visual arts you will have developed an eye for color, balance, and design and also the skill of creating what is appealing to a viewer. You may consider work in such fields as advertising, exhibit,stage or window design, as an art director in publishing, or as a museum interpreter.

Kathryn MarchEducational and Career ConsultantKathryn March, M.S., CEP

Careers for students who have majored in the arts

Obtaining an education in the arts will provide you with many desirable skills that are transferable to several career areas. If you major in performing arts, or theater, you will gain competency in public speaking, creative expression and critical analysis. Although these skills would be beneficial in many careers, some specific ones to consider might be in advertising and promotions, teaching, broadcasting, news correspondence, and the writing of film or theater reviews for publication. If your major is in the area of visual arts you will have developed an eye for color, balance, and design and also the skill of creating what is appealing to a viewer. You may consider work in such fields as advertising, exhibit,stage or window design, as an art director in publishing, or as a museum interpreter.

Kathryn MarchEducational and Career ConsultantKathryn March, M.S., CEP

Careers for students who have majored in the Arts

Obtaining an education in the arts will provide you with many desirable skills that are transferable to several career areas. If you major in performing arts, or theater, you will gain competency in public speaking, creative expression and critical analysis. Although these skills would be beneficial in many careers, some specific ones to consider might be in advertising and promotions, teaching, broadcasting, news correspondence, and the writing of film or theater reviews for publication. If your major is in the area of visual arts you will have developed an eye for color, balance, and design and also the skill of creating what is appealing to a viewer. You may consider work in such fields as advertising, exhibit,stage or window design, as an art director in publishing, or as a museum interpreter.

Tam Warner MintonConsultantCollege Adventures

Majoring in the arts

Many students who major in the arts also receive a teaching certificate so they always have a fall back job position. Until one is established other jobs will probably be necessary at times. I would also suggest a double major, perhaps an entertainment business management or communications degree. In the current job market it is difficult to get a job even if one has a college degree. Plan on working in another field while pursuing your art career.

CollegeCounselor McSellerson

Lots of things!

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

Tyler BurtonPresident Burton College Tours

Tap into your other talents.

While you are waiting to land your dream job you can build your arts resume and develop professional skills in an area that you are skilled in. You will have to be committed to planning your weeks around 12+ hour days. Here is a list of suggestions: 1. Take a look at your living expenses including student loans so you have a realistic idea as to how much income you need to support yourself. 2. Find a paying or volunteer job in a related field that will keep you close to the connections that may land you the big break. Can you work as an arts columnist for the local paper? 3. Volunteer to network, usher at the theater and teach art/ performing art classes to young people in your community. The idea is to stay close to the arts that you love and to keep yourself exposed in the community. 3. If you are young enough, see if you can stay on your parent’s health plan. 4. Be open minded about your future career, you went to college to major in what you love to do. You also went to college to become an educated person. You are not failing your dream if you land a job in a different industry.

Frank DonPartnerEast West College Counseling LLP

The World is Your Oyster

We live in a specialized world, even an over-specialized world. The humanities, the arts, philosophy and the qualitative aspects of living have become lost to the quantitative aspect of living and its concentration on specialization and a trade school mentality of training for a particular profession. A major in the arts is not limited to a life on stage or as an artist, unless you take the broadest definition of an artist as being one engaged in the art of truly living. Through developing the creativity, allowing the imagination to roam and explore, a major in the arts instills a fuller and broader sense of life and living. In so doing, the world becomes the student’s oyster, for all avenues are then open to the major in the arts. Even the professional realm of law, medicine, architecture, and others can be more fully encompassed by the major in the arts, for instead of being focused solely on the rote and regurgitation of book learning, the major in the arts has concentrated on the free flow of ideas, thoughts, feelings and sensations. The great organic chemist Kekule von Stradonitz, while working on a chemistry textbook, conceived of the benzene ring when he fell half asleep and saw a row of atoms wriggling and turning like snakes with one of the snakes seizing its own tail. In affirmation of his discovery, Kekule urged his fellow scientists: ‘Let us learn to dream gentlemen’. Some of humankind’s greatest discoveries have come from the imagination, the entrepreneur as artist creating and devising something that had never been before.

Joseph FrickCollege Guidance Counselor

What can I do with a major in the arts if I don’t get full-time work as a performer /artist ?

It’s true that not everybody who majors in the arts ends up supporting themselves full-time as an artist or a performer. However, there is more to working in the arts than just being a performer or an artist. In cities like New York and Los Angeles, there are thousands upon thousands of people who majored in the arts who work in publicity, administration, management, accounting, advertising, marketing, and so on for non-profits, theaters, galleries, schools, and museums (to name a few). If you major in the arts, be smart about what you minor in so that you come out of college with a skillset that you can fall back on should things not work out for you; think about communications, business, advertising, or marketing as potential minors, and be sure that your writing skills are strong. Also, remember this: if you truly love being a performer/artist, you will always be able to find a way to be involved with that passion, even if it is only on the side. Just make sure you have a way to pay the rent!

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