What do students need to know about transferring?

College Admissions

Our Counselors Answered:

What do students need to know about transferring?

Ed GarciaAssistant Professor/CounselorAustin Community College

5 Steps

STEP 1: Start early and plan ahead-Never to early to considering transferring. Start gathering the basic info such as application deadlines, size, programs of study, location, etc. STEP 2: Choose the right university for you-Location Size Public or private Cost Available majors Special programs unique to the university STEP 3: Investigate your choices-Admission requirements Minimum and maximum credit hours preference for university transfer Campus visits College fairs University open houses STEP 4: Get organized-University admissions deadlines Major specific deadlines Special requirements (i.e., portfolios, auditions, etc.) Financial Aid/Scholarships University contacts STEP 5: Develop a strategy/assess personal readiness to transfer-Course selection Alternative plan Your academic and career goals

Becky Checketts

What do students need to know about transferring?

Chances are that not every single credit that you earn at one institution will be counted towards a major at another institution. If a class cannot transfer over directly, it will be counted as an elective. Almost every major will require some electives, so don’t be disappointed. Another thing is you will need to transfer you current transcript to the school that you are wanting to go to. There is a fee associated with transfering your transcript, and the grades that you got at your current institution will stay on your transcript.

Becky Checketts

What do students need to know about transferring?

Chances are that not every single credit that you earn at one institution will be counted towards a major at another institution. If a class cannot transfer over directly, it will be counted as an elective. Almost every major will require some electives, so don’t be disappointed. Another thing is you will need to transfer you current transcript to the school that you are wanting to go to. There is a fee associated with transfering your transcript, and the grades that you got at your current institution will stay on your transcript.

Bill PrudenHead of Upper School, College CounselorRavenscroft School

Transferring: You Can Always Leave But Not All Welcome Newcomers

Transferring is always an option,. You never have to stay at a particular school, but at the same time, if your desire is to transfer to a place that did not not accept you the first time that may not be realistic. Some schools with hihg retentino rates take virtually no transfers. However for those that do, you often have a clean slate and the mediocre high school record that was problematic previously can be replaced by the record you have achieved at the collegiate level, leaving the new school happy to have you. If you are interested in transferring, you should be sure to check all the various requirements and deadlines as they are often different from the first go around. Too, be sure you know how credits transfer. You may have to take a few steps back in order to go forward.

Wendy KahnPrincipalWendy Kahn College Consulting, LLC

Look for schools that are transfer friendly…..

Check a college’s Common Data Set (Google “Common Data Set” and the school’s name) to find out how “transfer friendly” the school is, i.e., how many transfer students applied and how many were accepted the previous year. If a school accepts only a handful of transfers, you may decide it’s just not worth the effort to apply. Some schools require a minimum GPA of transfer applicants. No sense applying if you don’t meet the minimum. Other questions to ask to assess transfer friendliness: Does the college have housing available for transfers? Is there a special orientation or advising program for transfer students? Will your credits transfer, and if so, how exactly will that work?

Reena Gold KaminsFounderCollege, Career & Life, LLC.

All transfer credits are not created equally.

The most important thing to consider before transferring is how many credits you will receive for the work you’ve already completed. Some colleges will only accept a certain number of transfer credits. You don’t want to have to re-take any courses at your new school. That will cost you both time and money. Some colleges have a feature on their website which allows you to enter the classes you’ve taken to determine if you’d receive credit as a transfer student. Take advantage of this opportunity or arrange an appointment with a transfer counselor so that you know as much as possible about what credit you will receive and how long it will take you to complete your degree.

Patricia KrahnkePresident/PartnerGlobal College Search Associates, LLC

What do students need to know about transferring?

Short Answer: Money+Time+ScrewedUpCredits=Debt+Debt+Debt+Debt+Debt+MaybeNotEvenFinishing. Transferring is potentially (likely) an expensive can of worms. If you open it without being prepared for what comes out, you can’t complain. But if you are utterly, completely, miserably miserable where you are, or you have explored enough of academia to understand the degree program (and career) you want (in other words, it’s no longer a fantasy and you are prepared to do the hard work required of the collegiate upper level), go ahead and transfer. Just understand that there will probably be many roadblocks along the way. Detailed Answer: Here’s a load of info you need to know about transferring… 1. Colleges don’t want any more dings in their grad rate stats than they already have. More than two former colleges listed on your applications to other colleges make you look like a bad bet. If you can’t commit to completing a degree where you’ve been, chances are you won’t finish up at any other college, either. Moving around from college to college makes you appear to be aimless and/or trouble. You make a lot of extra work for the registrar who must try to finesse your messy credit history – and you don’t want to be a pain and make an enemy of the registrar. In addition, admissions staff may think that there are hidden concerns (addictions or illegal activity) you have not dealt with appropriately, issues that may negatively affect the college social community. 2. There is a code of honor among colleges and universities: If you have not settled your entire bill at your previous institution– and I mean “paid in full” — you will not be admitted to another college. In fact, the college from which you trying to transfer will not release your transcript to another college until the bill is paid. And colleges will not admit you without an “official” transcript sent directly from the registrar’s office. Here’s an example: A family I worked with a few years ago was trying to transfer their son from a Midwest institution to a college out East. The son and his roommate had trashed their dorm room, damage to the walls, furniture, etc. Turns out the son had a serous – but previously unrecognized — addiction issue which blossomed fully when he got to campus. The original college would not release the student’s transcript until the cost of the damage had been paid, and the college to which he was applying could not – would not — admit him until they had the official transcript. The other roommate would not accept his part of the blame for the damage, although the son I was working with owned up to his addiction and was already in recovery. It took a year for the student and his family to work out the problem and get his transcript released. In the meantime, the student was in limbo. His freshman college work, not surprisingly, had been poor, so because he had no way to matriculate at another institution, the academic damage lingered, also. The behavior of this student added at least a year of college to his degree-completion time and cost his family dearly — costs they will be paying off for a looooooong time. The great part of this story is that a few years later, out of the blue I received an email from the father telling me that his son had graduated with honors and was accepted to grad school – AND he is still sober. The moral to this story from a college’s point of view is, “If they don’t want you, we don’t want you.” But what a happy ending! He grew up fast and is a huge success story. But there was a lot of pain getting there. 3. Transferring credits is a headache – for everyone, including you. Transferring from college to college costs money and time. The average number of times an undergraduate student changes his/her major is 3-4. The average number of times a college-degree holding individual changes jobs in a lifetime is 10. Unless you are one of those rare individuals who knew at the age of 4 that they want to be an astrophysicist, you need a college that will offer you a solid grounding in the liberal arts combined with enough variety in “majors” to enable you to switch majors and concentrations seamlessly…and you need a guarantee of the “seamless” part. Each academic department believes they are special, therefore they insist you take the fundamental discipline-related courses they offer at their own institution. In some cases, this is understandable, particularly when an upper-level program features a specific approach to research, generation of knowledge, and contribution to the field. But unless you enter a college having a savvy understanding of curriculum and how it relates to your education and career goals, you won’t have a clue. The fact is, curriculums are incredibly complicated things to read and understand. Meet with a registrar sometime and try to get straight talk – despite their best intentions to try to help you, they struggle and often get it wrong, because it’s just too complicated, and often the departments have a completely different idea of what is expected of a student. In all the years I have tried to work with registrars and academic departments and advisers to get a solid answer on what my families can expect when they transfer, it has been a nightmare every time. The general rule is that the catalog is the final word on graduation requirements. The problem is that every department writes their own catalog text and curriculum, and sometimes it’s incomprehensible. Get the registrar and the department to agree on paper to what it is that is required of you if you transfer. And never mind what the academic/transfer adviser says. They try, but often they have the wrong information. You are paying/going to pay a lot of money for this education. They owe it to you to make it clear what you need to do to get their degree. It is heartbreaking when a transfer student (and this can happen even when you remain at an institution) gets to the end of their degree program, is promised a graduation date, then finds out in the middle of their “final” semester that they are missing a mere two credits or they won’t get credit for their internship after all, but “maybe” they will be allowed to walk (which means they can go through the graduation ceremony, but they won’t get their degree until they have completed their credits.) It is shocking the number of students who decide in the middle of their senior year that they can’t complete their degree program, either because they’ve run out of money, or it’s just too frustrating to get it done. Senior year is the second highest dropout rate after freshman year. If you transfer under these circumstances, you will likely be faced with a semester or two – or worse, a year or two – of lost credits, which means astronomical frustration and wasted money. Now, I am of the attitude that there is no such thing as a lost credit. Knowledge and education is useful throughout life. You never know when that Science for Artists class in Dinosaurs is going to matter – such as when you have kids and they think you are the bombdiggity because you know all about dinosaurs. But you need to know that if you decide to transfer, that Dinosaur class might only count as an elective – or nothing. If you have too many electives, they end up being extra courses that are that – just extra. Extra time, extra money. And unless you are in the approximately 18% of the population that can pay out-of-pocket, you will be paying that off for decades. 4. Sometimes transferring is a relief and a joy. I worked with a brilliant student who had attended a major New England research university in the coolest, most happenin’, hippest college town ever. His high school grades had been all AP, all A+, and his SATs were as close to perfect as you can get without being perfect. But he was so shy, he felt completely alone, couldn’t make friends, and failed almost every class because he was so depressed. He transferred to a small college in a rural area and blossomed. He was prepared to take his entire first-year over again, just to be happy. 5. If you decide to attend community college first because at a community college you can get a solid core education without the cost of a major institution, keep in mind that many colleges and universities will accept your Associate’s degree whole, without picking apart your credits. They will accept you as a college Junior. If you go this route, make sure the college you are transferring into tells you exactly what will be expected of you to receive the degree you are seeking. So the bottom line on time and money for transfers is this: Get it in writing. If you are transferring to another institution, and you are transferring a substantial number of credits, get in writing exactly what will be expected of you in order to get your degree. Then determine the long-term cost of transferring. Then decide if it’s better to transfer as an undergrad, or finish up where you are with a solid liberal arts or degree program and save your money and time for a Master’s degree.

James LundgrenPartnerCollege Planning Solutions

Am I ready for a 4 year college?

Much like when you are a senior in high school transitioning directly to a 4 year college, you want to have a few options when you apply for a transfer. The biggest mistake I find two year students making when transferring to a four year institution is that they only apply to one. Engage in the same preparation, exploration, selection, application, negotiation and acceptance processes adhered to by well-positioned high school students. Make sure you fully exhaust all credits you may take at the community college level. (Usually 70 units are allowed to transfer)

Trevor CreedenDirector of College and Career CounselingDelaware County Christian School

What do students need to know about transferring?

#1 – It’s easier to get admitted to a college as a transfer student than it is as a freshman. Colleges lose students every year so they need to fill those spots or they are losing expenses that are budgeted for. Your chances of admission will depend on the spots that they need to fill but the majority of the time, it is easier. #2 – Early on, it is very difficult socially. Because you are trying to make new freinds and break into social circles that are already formed, the majority of the time it is a lot harder to make friends and get to know people fast. When you come in as a freshman, everyone is in the same boat. They don’t know you but you all do not know anyone so it is easier to make friends. I just warn those that talk abotu tranferring, that they just need to be prepared to do things on their own for a month or two before they start attending more meetings for an organization and get into their classes. #3 – It can save you a lot of money. If the plan was to attend a cheaper school (branch campus, community or junior college), then transfer to a 4 year college, it can really save you big bucks down the road. #4 – Make sure the courses you take at your current college are going to transfer to the college you will be transferring to. I have seen students lose a lot of time and money because they did not do their homework and make sure credits will transfer.

Trevor CreedenDirector of College and Career CounselingDelaware County Christian School

What do students need to know about transferring?

#1 – It’s easier to get admitted to a college as a transfer student than it is as a freshman. Colleges lose students every year so they need to fill those spots or they are losing expenses that are budgeted for. Your chances of admission will depend on the spots that they need to fill but the majority of the time, it is easier. #2 – Early on, it is very difficult socially. Because you are trying to make new freinds and break into social circles that are already formed, the majority of the time it is a lot harder to make friends and get to know people fast. When you come in as a freshman, everyone is in the same boat. They don’t know you but you all do not know anyone so it is easier to make friends. I just warn those that talk abotu tranferring, that they just need to be prepared to do things on their own for a month or two before they start attending more meetings for an organization and get into their classes. #3 – It can save you a lot of money. If the plan was to attend a cheaper school (branch campus, community or junior college), then transfer to a 4 year college, it can really save you big bucks down the road. #4 – Make sure the courses you take at your current college are going to transfer to the college you will be transferring to. I have seen students lose a lot of time and money because they did not do their homework and make sure credits will transfer.

Patricia KrahnkePresident/PartnerGlobal College Search Associates, LLC

A Can of Worms – and Maybe Relief

Short Answer: Money+Time+ScrewedUpCredits=Debt+Debt+Debt+Debt+Debt+MaybeNotEvenFinishing. Transferring is potentially (likely) an expensive can of worms. If you open it without being prepared for what comes out, you can’t complain. But if you are utterly, completely, miserably miserable where you are, or you have explored enough of academia to understand the degree program and career you want (in other words, it’s no longer a fantasy and you are prepared to do the hard work required of the collegiate upper level), go ahead and transfer. Just understand that there will probably be many roadblocks along the way. Detailed Answer: Here’s a load of info you need to know about transferring… 1. Colleges don’t want any more dings in their grad rate stats than they already have. More than two former colleges listed on your applications to other colleges make you look like a bad bet. If you can’t commit to completing a degree where you’ve been, chances are you won’t finish up at any other college, either. Moving around from college to college makes you appear to be aimless and/or trouble. You make a lot of extra work for the registrar who must try to finesse your messy credit history – and you don’t want to be a pain and make an enemy of the registrar. In addition, admissions staff may think that there are hidden concerns (addictions or illegal activity) you have not dealt with appropriately, issues that may negatively affect the college social community. 2. There is a code of honor among colleges and universities: If you have not settled your entire bill at your previous institution– and I mean “paid in full” — you will not be admitted to another college. In fact, the college from which you trying to transfer will not release your transcript to another college until the bill is paid. And colleges will not admit you without an “official” transcript sent directly from the registrar’s office. Here’s an example: A family I worked with a few years ago was trying to transfer their son from a Midwest institution to a college out East. The son and his roommate had trashed their dorm room – damage to the walls, furniture, etc. The original college would not release the student’s transcript until the cost of the damage had been paid, and the college to which he was applying could not – would not — admit him until they had the official transcript. Each roommate blamed the other for the damage. It took a year for the student and his family to work out the problem and get his transcript released. In the meantime, the student was in limbo. His freshman college work, not surprisingly, had been poor, so because he had no way to matriculate at another institution, the academic damage lingered, also. The behavior of this student added at least a year of college to his degree-completion time and cost his family dearly — costs they will be paying off for a looooooong time. The moral to this story from a college’s point of view is, “If they don’t want you, we don’t want you.” But what a happy ending! He grew up fast and is a huge success story. But there was a lot of pain getting there. 3. Transferring credits is a headache – for everyone. Transferring from college to college costs money and time in “lost credits.” The average number of times an undergraduate student changes his/her major is 3-4. The average number of times a college-degree holding individual changes jobs in a lifetime is 10. Unless you are one of those rare individuals who knew at the age of 4 that they want to be an astrophysicist, you need a college that will offer you a solid grounding in the liberal arts combined with enough variety in “majors” to enable you to switch majors and concentrations seamlessly…and you need a guarantee of the “seamless” part. Each academic department believes they are special, therefore they insist you take the fundamental discipline-related courses they offer at their own institution. In some cases, this is understandable, particularly when an upper-level program features a specific approach to research, generation of knowledge, and contribution to the field. But unless you enter a college having a savvy understanding of curriculum and how it relates to your education and career goals, you won’t have a clue. The fact is, curricula are incredibly complicated things to read and understand. Meet with a registrar sometime and try to get straight talk – despite their best intentions to try to help you, they struggle and often get it wrong, because it’s just too complicated, and often the departments have a completely different idea of what is expected of a student. In all the years I have tried to work with registrars and academic departments and advisers to get a solid answer on what my families can expect when they transfer, it has been a nightmare every time. The general rule is that the catalog is the final word on graduation requirements. The problem is that every department writes their own catalog text and curriculum, and sometimes it’s incomprehensible. Get the registrar and the department to agree on paper to what it is that is required of you if you transfer. And never mind what the academic/transfer adviser says. They try, but often they have the wrong information. You are paying/going to pay a lot of money for this education. They owe it to you to make it clear what you need to do to get their degree and when you will receive the degree. It is heartbreaking when a transfer student (and this can happen even when you remain at an institution) gets to the end of their degree program, is promised a graduation date, then finds out in the middle of their “final” semester that they are missing a mere two credits or they won’t get credit for their internship after all, but “maybe” they will be allowed to walk (which means they can go through the graduation ceremony, but they won’t get their degree until they have completed their credits.) It is shocking the number of students who decide in the middle of their senior year that they can’t complete their degree program, either because they’ve run out of money, or it’s just too frustrating to get it done. Senior year is the second highest dropout rate after freshman year. If you transfer under these circumstances, you will likely be faced with a semester or two – or worse, a year or two – of lost credits, which means astronomical frustration and wasted money. Now, I am of the attitude that there is no such thing as a lost credit. Knowledge and education is useful throughout life. You never know when that Science for Artists class in Dinosaurs is going to matter – such as when you have kids and they think you are the bombdiggity because you know all about dinosaurs. But you need to know that if you decide to transfer, that Dinosaur class might only count as an elective – or nothing. If you have too many electives, they end up being extra courses that are that – just extra. Extra time, extra money. And unless you are in the approximately 1-18% of the population that can pay out-of-pocket, you will be paying that off for decades. 4. Sometimes transferring is a relief and a joy. I worked with a brilliant student who had attended a major New England research university in the coolest, most happenin’, hippest college town ever. His high school grades had been all AP, all A+, and his SATs were as close to perfect as you can get without being perfect. But he was so shy, he felt completely alone, couldn’t make friends, and failed almost every class because he was so depressed. He transferred to a small college in a rural area and blossomed. Big time. He was prepared to take his entire first-year over again, just to be happy. So the bottom line on time and money for transfers is this: Get it in writing. If you are transferring to another institution, and you are transferring a substantial number of credits, get in writing exactly what will be expected of you in order to get your degree. Then determine the long-term cost of transferring. Then decide if it’s better to transfer as an undergrad, or finish up where you are with a solid liberal arts or degree program and save your money and time for a Master’s degree.

Patricia KrahnkePresident/PartnerGlobal College Search Associates, LLC

What do students need to know about transferring?

Short Answer: Money+Time+ScrewedUpCredits=Debt+Debt+Debt+Debt+Debt+MaybeNotEvenFinishing. Transferring is potentially (likely) an expensive can of worms. If you open it without being prepared for what comes out, you can’t complain. But if you are utterly, completely, miserably miserable where you are, or you have explored enough of academia to understand the degree program (and career) you want (in other words, it’s no longer a fantasy and you are prepared to do the hard work required of the collegiate upper level), go ahead and transfer. Just understand that there will probably be many roadblocks along the way. Detailed Answer: Here’s a load of info you need to know about transferring… 1. Colleges don’t want any more dings in their grad rate stats than they already have. More than two former colleges listed on your applications to other colleges make you look like a bad bet. If you can’t commit to completing a degree where you’ve been, chances are you won’t finish up at any other college, either. Moving around from college to college makes you appear to be aimless and/or trouble. You make a lot of extra work for the registrar who must try to finesse your messy credit history – and you don’t want to be a pain and make an enemy of the registrar. In addition, admissions staff may think that there are hidden concerns (addictions or illegal activity) you have not dealt with appropriately, issues that may negatively affect the college social community. 2. There is a code of honor among colleges and universities: If you have not settled your entire bill at your previous institution– and I mean “paid in full” — you will not be admitted to another college. In fact, the college from which you trying to transfer will not release your transcript to another college until the bill is paid. And colleges will not admit you without an “official” transcript sent directly from the registrar’s office. Here’s an example: A family I worked with a few years ago was trying to transfer their son from a Midwest institution to a college out East. The son and his roommate had trashed their dorm room – damage to the walls, furniture, etc. The original college would not release the student’s transcript until the cost of the damage had been paid, and the college to which he was applying could not – would not — admit him until they had the official transcript. Each roommate blamed the other for the damage. It took a year for the student and his family to work out the problem and get his transcript released. In the meantime, the student was in limbo. His freshman college work, not surprisingly, had been poor, so because he had no way to matriculate at another institution, the academic damage lingered, also. The behavior of this student added at least a year of college to his degree-completion time and cost his family dearly — costs they will be paying off for a looooooong time. The moral to this story from a college’s point of view is, “If they don’t want you, we don’t want you.” But what a happy ending! He grew up fast and is a huge success story. But there was a lot of pain getting there. 3. Transferring credits is a headache – for everyone, including you. Transferring from college to college costs money and time. The average number of times an undergraduate student changes his/her major is 3-4. The average number of times a college-degree holding individual changes jobs in a lifetime is 10. Unless you are one of those rare individuals who knew at the age of 4 that they want to be an astrophysicist, you need a college that will offer you a solid grounding in the liberal arts combined with enough variety in “majors” to enable you to switch majors and concentrations seamlessly…and you need a guarantee of the “seamless” part. Each academic department believes they are special, therefore they insist you take the fundamental discipline-related courses they offer at their own institution. In some cases, this is understandable, particularly when an upper-level program features a specific approach to research, generation of knowledge, and contribution to the field. But unless you enter a college having a savvy understanding of curriculum and how it relates to your education and career goals, you won’t have a clue. The fact is, curriculums are incredibly complicated things to read and understand. Meet with a registrar sometime and try to get straight talk – despite their best intentions to try to help you, they struggle and often get it wrong, because it’s just too complicated, and often the departments have a completely different idea of what is expected of a student. In all the years I have tried to work with registrars and academic departments and advisers to get a solid answer on what my families can expect when they transfer, it has been a nightmare every time. The general rule is that the catalog is the final word on graduation requirements. The problem is that every department writes its own catalog text and curriculum. Sometimes it’s incomprehensible. Even more common, the catalog text has not been accurately updated in years, so inaccurate rumors of changes to a department’s curriculum are being presented to you as fact. Get the registrar and the department to agree on paper to what it is that is required of you if you transfer. The burden of clear degree expectations is on the institution; you shouldn’t have to suffer the stress created by their inability to get their information correct. And never mind what the academic/transfer adviser says. They try, but often they have the wrong information. You are paying/going to pay a lot of money for this education. They owe it to you to make it clear what you need to do to get their degree. It is heartbreaking when a transfer student (and this can happen even when you remain at an institution) gets to the end of their degree program, is promised a graduation date, then finds out in the middle of their “final” semester that they are missing a mere two credits or they won’t get credit for their internship after all, but “maybe” they will be allowed to walk (which means they can go through the graduation ceremony, but they won’t get their degree until they have completed their credits.) It is shocking the number of students who decide in the middle of their senior year that they can’t complete their degree program, either because they’ve run out of money, or it’s just too frustrating to get it done. Senior year is the second highest dropout rate after freshman year. If you transfer under these circumstances, you will likely be faced with a semester or two – or worse, a year or two – of lost credits, which means astronomical frustration and wasted money. Now, I am of the attitude that there is no such thing as a lost credit. Knowledge and education is useful throughout life. You never know when that Science for Artists class in Dinosaurs is going to matter – such as when you have kids and they think you are the bombdiggity because you know all about dinosaurs. But you need to know that if you decide to transfer, that Dinosaur class might only count as an elective – or nothing. If you have too many electives, they end up being extra courses that are that – just extra. Extra time, extra money. And unless you are in the approximately 18% of the population that can pay out-of-pocket, you will be paying that off for decades. 4. Sometimes transferring is a relief and a joy. I worked with a brilliant student who had attended a major New England research university in the coolest, most happenin’, hippest college town ever. His high school grades had been all AP, all A+, and his SATs were as close to perfect as you can get without being perfect. But he was so shy, he felt completely alone, couldn’t make friends, and failed almost every class because he was so depressed. He transferred to a small college in a rural area and blossomed. He was prepared to take his entire first-year over again, just to be happy. 5. If you decide to attend community college first because at a community college you can get a solid core education without the cost of a major institution, keep in mind that many colleges and universities will accept your Associate’s degree whole, without picking apart your credits. They will accept you as a college Junior. If you go this route, make sure the college you are transferring into tells you exactly what will be expected of you to receive the degree you are seeking. So the bottom line on time and money for transfers is this: Get it in writing. If you are transferring to another institution, and you are transferring a substantial number of credits, get in writing exactly what will be expected of you in order to get your degree. Then determine the long-term cost of transferring. Then decide if it’s better to transfer as an undergrad, or finish up where you are with a solid liberal arts or degree program and save your money and time for a Master’s degree.

Laura O’Brien GatzionisFounderEducational Advisory Services

Why?

First of all, this is a big decision and it is not one to take lightly. Let’s start with why someone might think about transferring. A student might find it financially smart to spend the first two years of post-secondary education at a community college and then transfer to another four-year institution. This requires shrewd choices, hard work and guidance from advisors, but the combination can save you a bundle on the tuition bill. A student might simply be unhappy at their first university. A student’s desired major might not be available at his first school. In all cases, you should research the new target school’s website carefully–there should be a page outlining the requirements for a transfer application. Also, do not be shy to contact the admission officer responsible for transfers in order to ask specific questions. Be aware that all of your classes might not be accepted by the transfer school, that financial aid might be limited and that there may be limited orientation opportunities for transfer students.

Tyler BurtonPresident Burton College Tours

You are wiser and will still need to cover all the bases.

This time around make sure that you are considering all of the elements of a good fit. Each school that you apply to will need to be a good academic, social and financial fit. The biggest challenge that students face when transferring is having their hard earned credits transfer. Be certain that your credits will transfer and cross check your plan with the Dean and registrar. If you are currently receiving institutional aid you will leave that behind. Contact the financial aid office of the school that you are transferring to to review your current aid package and get a solid estimate to learn how the packages will compare.

Nancy MilneOwnerMilne Collegiate Consulting

Transferring

When it comes to switching schools, each one is different. Some may require a certain number of credits already earned, others may be concerned about minimum gpa. Some colleges will admit you directly, while others will only offer you conditional acceptance based on your academic performance after your first year there. Some colleges have a separate office for transfer students, others include them under the admissions umbrella. It is important to check with each school and learn their transfer policy.

MacKenzie LeFort

Transferring

Go to the transfer college website and find program requirements for the school that you plan on transferring to. Then use that school requirements to take classes at the school you currently want to go to. If you have any other question feel free to email [email protected] I just recently transferred to a college from an online and community college and I lost no credites because I picked really wisely.

Nicholas Umphrey

Transferring?

I transferred in school, and unfortunately you are left to your own devices in this process since you don’t get a lot of support. First off, make sure any credits you have earned to date can transfer. In a lot of cases they do, especially between public institutions, but rarely among private ones. The best way you can work with this is to save every syllabus you had from every class that you took. This way you can show your new advisor what you have taken and hope they will honor the credits. There is also an adjustment socially since everyone around you have already been there a few years and bonded. It’s kind of like being the new kid in school again. Getting involved is always a good way to meet new people.

Nicholas Umphrey

Transferring?

I transferred in school, and unfortunately you are left to your own devices in this process since you don’t get a lot of support. First off, make sure any credits you have earned to date can transfer. In a lot of cases they do, especially between public institutions, but rarely among private ones. The best way you can work with this is to save every syllabus you had from every class that you took. This way you can show your new advisor what you have taken and hope they will honor the credits. There is also an adjustment socially since everyone around you have already been there a few years and bonded. It’s kind of like being the new kid in school again. Getting involved is always a good way to meet new people.

Mandy ReillyCounselor

What do students need to know about transferring?

There are several important things that a student needs to know in order to make the most of a transfer from one school to another. First, most colleges and universities will only accept credits from other fully accredited colleges. Always check for regional accreditation before you decide to take classes at a college. Second, it is helpful to know if the two colleges have course equivelencies or transfer advising guides to help determine the transferability of courses. Additionally many colleges have transfer agreements with other colleges. For example community colleges have transfer agreements with 4 year colleges and universities to help their students make the most of the credits and or courses they take during their first years in college. Most colleges and universities have transfer advisors who can help with the process. In order to know for certain if a particular course will transfer from one school to another, you need to have your official transcript evaluated by the institution that you will be transferring into.

Kristina DooleyIndependent Educational ConsultantEstrela Consulting

What do students need to know about transferring?

Students who are considering transferring from one college to another should first get in touch with the Transfer Student Coordinator at the school to which they’d like to transfer. This person will be instrumental in not only making sure you have all of the materials required to apply as a transfer student, but they will most likely play a key role in deciding whether or not you will be admitted. It’s important to know that many schools require students to complete one-half of their credits at their particular university in order to graduate. This means if you transfer after your junior year, you may find yourself needing to stay in school an additional year. Another great piece of advice is to get a copy of the new school’s course catalog to make sure that the school offers similar courses to those you have already taken so that you can transfer in most of your credits. For example, if you are transferring from a nursing program to a journalism school, you may not be able to transfer many of your previous course credits.

Josh Juedes

What do students need to know about transferring?

We know the transfer process is highly personal and certain pathways can be very varied in transfer. As a expert in transfer admissions and transfer admissions counselor, my understanding is both personal and professional. I was a former transfer student to a large, selective public institution and now serve as a transfer admissions counselor. The largest aspect to know that there is no one “right” way to transfer. Some of the largest factors to think about when you decide or think you might be ready to transfer is to understand: 1) The institutional admissions requirements 2) whether or not articulation or transfer credit agreements exist 3) What credit polices exist and 4) know how to leverage “your own transfer story” as a compelling fit for the school you are looking to transfer to.

Regan Davis

Transfer success depends on several factors

Many universities have agreements with community colleges that make transferring a great option for students (California’s www.ASSIST.org is an example of excellent transfer options). In the absence of such an agreement, transferring can mean that courses you took at one college will not satisfy requirements at another, leading to additional time to complete your degree. Transferring from one university to another university is usually messy. Find out about transferring by searching for details on college web sites and talking to counselors at both your current and prospective colleges. Transferring can mean different things depending on the circumstances. At best, it is: 1) an excellent means of preparing for university academic demands by attending a community college; 2) a economical means of obtaining a bachelor’s degree; 3) a convenient means of satifying non-major requirements; 4) a way to attend college part-time while occupied with work or other responsibilities; 5) a way to explore major and career options before investing in a four year university. At its worst, transferring is: 1) a means of correcting a poor decision; 2) a misguided attempt to do better in college by changing schools; 3) necessary in order to major in a particular academic program not offered at your current college; 4) a choice that adds time and money to the completion of your degree. Keep in mind that transferring is stressful. You will spend time researching options, meeting with counselors, completing applications, adapting to a new college; time that you would otherwise be using to focus on current college demands. As a community college transfer student you will find a lot of assistance in you college’s transfer center. Visit the transfer center before your first semester be sure you are immediately on track!

Michelle GreenAdmissions ConsultantMy College Admissions Coach

Transferring can be a money saver…

for those students not ready to attend a 4 year college. It can also help a student who has decided that their college wasn’t the right fit, after they got there. Perhaps a student has changed majors or decided that there is a school that better offers the academic program they want to study. It’s important before transferring to know what the rules are and follow them. It’s also a good idea to get an academic transfer advisor to sign off on your preliminary transcript before making a change. Nothing worse than transferring and losing a bunch of units or having to retake classes, or make up classes. Make sure you have all the pre-requisites so that you can hit the ground running when you get on your new campus! Also, for transfers, it’s going to be harder to connect on campus with new students. Many of them will have been there for 1 or 2 years. You may have to work a little harder to make friends and connections on campus, go out of your way to get to know professors and instructors and to learn the ins and outs of the campus. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. It will be an adjustment, just as it was for a new freshman on campus!

Ellen [email protected]OwnerEllen Richards Admissions Consulting

Trading places in college admissions… higher education is not exactly basketball

Many students today are presented with the trade-off of seeking admission at a first rate (expensive school) or instead opting (out of choice or coercion) attending a community college. Dreams of transferring from a second choice school to a first choice school begin to fester as soon as reality sets in. Students tell themselves, “If I buckle down in community college then I can prove that I worthy of XYZ college.” But let’s think about this: if a higher number of students seek entry into a college with fewer spots, then what logical explanation explains how more spots for transfers would be available for (many) of the same students who applied the year prior? Added to that, elite colleges tend to have the highest retention rate, so where how could the open spots materialize? This bring us back to basketball – or any other elite sport for which many candidate compete – with one exception: at least in sports one can hope (in a kind way) that a player could get injured. Even then, how many people would vie for that spot? So it goes with the elite colleges in the country. Harvard and Princeton announced that transfers are virtually not accepted. Stanford and Amherst decreased their transfer rate by 50%. The University of Pennsylvania has about a 1% transfer rate, Yale about 4%, and Dartmouth about 7%. Let’s face it, after working so diligently to gain entrance into one of these schools, why would one leave? Hope does loom on the horizon. Some schools believe that transfer students add diversity to the student body, but the essay cannot and should not be the same as a student’s first year essay – otherwise the student sends a message that he or she has not grown or learned from the year off. On a positive note, last year, Cornell, MIT, Georgetown, Notre Dame and Northeastern admitted more transfer students than expected.

Megan DorseySAT Prep & College AdvisorCollege Prep LLC

It’s Not Easy, but Can Be Worth It (I Did it!)

Transferring is like applying to college all over again, and it can be more competitive! Transfer students face challenges: making new friends, learning about campus, and losing academic credits or adding semesters. However, if you are 100% sure you are transferring for valid reasons and know the new school is the right fit, transferring can be worth it. George Washington was a good school and I had made friends there, but it wasn’t a good fit for me. I applied to transfer to Rice University after my sophomore year—it was a much better fit for me, I only lost three credit hours, and I graduated on time.

Wendy Andreen, PhD

Keep Track of Your Hours

Transferring from a community college or a four-year college to another four-year institution can be exciting. Hopefully, you are transferring because the degree you want is at the new college. Keeping track of your hours and how they will transfer is, to me, one of the most important factors to consider. When students transfer to a new college the hours may 1. transfer toward the degree you are seeking or 2. transfer as elective hours or 3. won’t transfer. Your goal is #1. If you know in advance that you will start at a one college and then transfer later, be sure to talk with a college advisor at the final destination college to be sure that the classes you are taking will transfer as hours toward your degree. For example, a physics course may be offered as Physics for non science majors, Physics for Natural Science majors, and Physics for Engineers. Depending on your choice of major, you want to be sure you take the physics class that will ultimately transfer toward your degree.

Suzan ReznickIndependent Educational ConsultantThe College Connection

Deadlines are key!

The deadlines for transferring are different, then for freshman applications, and may vary from college to college. Be aware that not all of your credit will be accepted. No grades below a C- will transfer. And often the requirements of the new schools might be very different then your original schools, so do not be too disappointed if you lose some credit. No college will accept more then 60 credits- the typical equivalent of two years work, since if they will be granting you the diploma- they require that, at the very least, 50% of your class work was completed at their campus. Usually if you do apply after two years of college, they will be only considering your college transcripts and not your high school grades or your SAT scores for admissions. So, if you did not do well in HS, but was very successful at your first college, you would now be in a better position to apply to a more selective school.

王文君 June ScortinoPresidentIVY Counselors Network

the timing and application deadline

if you are planning to do transfer, the best time is right after your freshman. colleges may ask you for high school transcript and the credits from college transcript. for the most part of the transfer, I believe your GPA on your college transcript is the most important part of your admissions.

王文君 June ScortinoPresidentIVY Counselors Network

the timing and application deadline

if you are planning to do transfer, the best time is right after your freshman. colleges may ask you for high school transcript and the credits from college transcript. for the most part of the transfer, I believe your GPA on your college transcript is the most important part of your admissions.

Lynda McGeeCollege CounselorDowntown Magnets High School

What do students need to know about transferring?

Transferring schools can be complicated or easy, depending on what you want. Are you interested in transferring from a community college to your state college? You will proabably find loads of help on your community college campus for this transfer. What matters is whether you are transferring from a CC or a 4 year institution, and whether you are doing it after 1 semester, 1 year, or two years. The fewer college units you have, the more important your high school record and SAT/ACT scores will be. The most important thing you can do to help make this happen is to have the best grades you can possibly have at whatever institution you are now attending. This may be hard, if you are unhappy, but colleges are looking for successful students to take in, not those who did poorly. There is so much more to tell you, but I suggest you meet with a counselor who understands the transfer process to discuss your personal situation. Find help here, or discuss it with a counselor at your school.

Mary Mariani

What do students need to know about transferring?

The first thing you need to know is what are the requirements of the school you wish to attend. The majority of the state schools prefer that you have a completed associates degree before you make the transfer. I always recommend that students complete their associates degree; that way you have one degree completed. If for some reason you don’t complete your bachelors, you will have your A.A. or A.S. When you apply for a job, people are not interested in how many years you have been in college. They want to know what have you accomplished. It’s always nice to put down that you have been awarded your degree. Also, find out if the college you want to attend will accept all of your classes to complete the general education requirements. There are some state colleges that will accept a transfer agreement stating that the general education classes that you have taken at the junior college will also fulfill the ones at the school you are transferring to. Find out what requirements are necessary for your major. Universities and colleges typically will not let you take upper division courses in your major until you have completed the lower division requirements. Some colleges will actually require that you apply not only to the school but also to the major department. Make sure you send transcripts from all the community colleges you have attended. Even if you have taken only one class at a community college and the rest at another school, each community college needs to send an official transcript. Again, I would recommend visiting to see if the new campus is a good fit for you.

Steven Millan

What do students need to know about transferring?

This is a very vague question. There are a multitude of things to know about transferring to another school, such as the different requirements that might be pressed upon the transferring student. The different atmosphere of study at the new school, and the difference of student culture that will be present at the new school. The best option for a smooth transfer is too speak to your current consular and the prospective school’s consular as well in order to make sure all in is order when your transfer.

Karen Ekman-BaurDirector of College CounselingLeysin American School

What do students need to know about transferring?

Transfer policies differ from one school to another, a fact which is not always completely transparent from the outset. A school may actually have a policy of admitting transfer students, but in a year with a very high acceptance rate combined with a high retention rate, there would simply not be spaces to admit transfer students. For that reason, some institutions may, in principle, accept transfer students, but in practice, seldom be able to follow through. There are some institutions which know that they will seldom or never be able to accept transfer students and make that clear in their communications. It is not wise, consequently, to plan to “get in through the back door” by applying and being accepted at one institution with the sole goal of transferring to another. You may find your plans stymied. Be sure to check the individual transfer policies of the institutions on your wish list. One of my most recent “success stories” is of a student who did accept one university with the idea of transferring the next year to a nearby institution that had been his “first choice”. I told him that he might very well change his mind, and, in fact, after he got into college, he found that he LOVED the school that he was in, was extremely successful in every way, wouldn’t have dreamed of transferring to the other school, and continued on to do graduate studies at the school in which he started. Having said that, though, sometimes mistakes are made. You may have started college in an environment that is absolutely not right for you and want to find a school where you can realize your goals and find your niche. That’s okay – not every school is right for everyone, but do your research carefully. Consider why you want to transfer and use that as a basis for your search for a transfer destination. Another, less distressing, reason for transferring could be that you have been attending a community college for one or two years and have planned all along to continue your education at a four-year institution. Many states in the U.S. have very efficient procedures for student transfers from community colleges into public universities within the state. Look into this at the beginning of your college journey. Make sure you know what the procedures and expectations are. Transferring to a private institution or a public university in a state other than the one in which you attended community college, however, is likely to present a completely different picture. Find out how credits from your current school will be perceived and accepted by other institutions of interest. It would be a good idea to find out the transfer statistics from the school(s) which you are considering. Do they accept transfers at all? What was the transfer rate last year? What has been the transfer rate over the past five years? What are the admission requirements for transfer students? Are there scholarship options for transfer students? You will want to determine how realistic the possibility of transferring to these institutions is for you. Another point to consider is the acceptability of transfer credits from the institution you are currently attending. Not all schools are created equal, and not all credits can be transferred from one institution to another. If you have not yet entered college at all and are thinking of going to one school before transferring to another, be sure to check that aspect ahead of time. It would be extremely disappointing to study for several years and then find out that none or few of those credits were transferrable. Along this line, make sure that any school you attend before attempting to transfer is properly accredited. The comments above can be applied to transfers to and from international institutions, as well, but the requirements and procedures will undoubtedly differ significantly from one country/school to another. In every case, your best bet is to check directly with each of the institutions you are considering to determine whether a transfer will be a realistic option and what action you will need to take.

Geoff BroomeAssistant Director of AdmissionsWidener University

What do students need to know about transferring?

Make sure that you are paying attention to deadlines. Deadlines are deadlines for a reason. Also, do your homework with the college to determine what credits will transfer. You want to get the most bang for the bucks you have already spent. Make sure that you get the credits you earned.

Dr. Bruce NeimeyerCEO/PartnerGlobal College Search Associates, LLC

What do students need to know about transferring?

There are some critical pieces that every transfer student should understand. First, you should know how your credits will transfer. For example, many schools will transfer English literature and composition courses as electives from another school but will typically be asked to retake them at their new institution. This it typically because the curriculum in those courses are designed by the degree granting school and ensures for them that when they award you the degree they are satisfied that you have the appropriate skills in these areas. There are exceptions to this and typically exists between community colleges and four year institutions with signed transfer articulation agreements. Second, you should understand how your financial aid is impacted by your transfer. If you lose credits or there is a change in how your credits are distributed which results in additional semesters of enrollment at your new college, you may not have the appropriate number or semesters of financial eligibility to complete your degree. It is always wise to consult your current colleges financial aid office or the one at your new college prior to enrolling there about the financial aid consequences for transferring from one school to another. This may be less of an issue if you are not receiving aid or not receiving enough aid to make this a consideration. Finally, you should make sure to investigate all the pieces you wish you had about your college on the first try if indeed you are transferring because you are unhappy at your current institution. Hindsight is 20/20 but regretting a bad decision TWICE is simply poor planning and can be the catalyst for you never completing your undergraduate degree which would truly be a shame. Don’t make those same mistakes twice!

Ken PhamTutor/StudentColumbia Basin College

What do students need to know about transferring?

Here’s a quick check list for you: _The location of the school you transfer to. In state or out of state? _The cost of transferring. Would the school have any transfer scholarship? _The transfer rate of the school the latest year. _How many credits would the school accepted and how long would it take for you to complete your bachelor degree there? _Deadlines for transferring! (it’s different than freshman admission) _SAT/ACT or not? (most of the time colleges don’t require SAT/ACT for transfer)

Erica WhiteCollege & Career CounselorMiddletown High School

What do students need to know about transferring?

It’s really important to look at whether or not your credits are going to transfer. Apply to multiple schools and programs and evaluate which schools will take your transfer credits. For example, if you are applying to 3 schools that all have competitive business programs, but only one school will take the majority of your transfer credits, you may want to strongly consider going to that specific school to avoid losing time and money. Be sure to collect all transcripts and course descriptions when transfering in case there is a question as to whether or not to award credit. Also, some specific programs only take transfer students during the Fall semester. So, be sure to plan out your transfer timeline. There is usually someone at your college or university or the instition to which you are applying who can help you with this process.

Jeana RobbinsCounselor

What do students need to know about transferring?

I consider myself a true expert when it comes to transferring, as I have attended 15 colleges and universities. For some, there are many advantages to transferring schools, and for others, this can be a real nightmare. It’s important to be aware of how the transfer will impact your graduation. For students transferring from a community college with an associate degree to a university to seek a bachelor degree, there are many benefits. Having earned an associate degree, students often have saved time and money. Often junior colleges or community colleges that offer associate degrees have smaller class sizes, and this can be an advantage, especially for a new college student. These colleges may be closer to home, and this can aid in the adjustment to college life. Transferring schools for other reasons requires careful planning, and it is vital that the student knows where they will ultimately seek to earn their degree. Seeking the exact same degree at different schools may require one to take entirely different classes. There will also be other graduation requirements that differ between schools. If a student wants to transfer to a school in another state, they should carefully research the cost of out of state tuition. There are sometimes ways around paying for out of state tuition, and each state varies in how long they will require a student to pay out of state tuition before granting them in state fees.

Jeana RobbinsCounselor

What do students need to know about transferring?

I consider myself a true expert when it comes to transferring, as I have attended 15 colleges and universities. For some, there are many advantages to transferring schools, and for others, this can be a real nightmare. It’s important to be aware of how the transfer will impact your graduation. For students transferring from a community college with an associate degree to a university to seek a bachelor degree, there are many benefits. Having earned an associate degree, students often have saved time and money. Often junior colleges or community colleges that offer associate degrees have smaller class sizes, and this can be an advantage, especially for a new college student. These colleges may be closer to home, and this can aid in the adjustment to college life. Transferring schools for other reasons requires careful planning, and it is vital that the student knows where they will ultimately seek to earn their degree. Seeking the exact same degree at different schools may require one to take entirely different classes. There will also be other graduation requirements that differ between schools. If a student wants to transfer to a school in another state, they should carefully research the cost of out of state tuition. There are sometimes ways around paying for out of state tuition, and each state varies in how long they will require a student to pay out of state tuition before granting them in state fees.

Steven CrispOwner Crisp College Advising

What do students need to know about transferring?

There is a lot to know about transferring. I guess it all depends on where you are in the game. If you are still in high school you want to know that transferring is a viable option for getting to the school of your choice. Just because you are not admitted as a freshman does not mean that you can’t ultimately attend that school. You can attend one of your second choice schools and transfer after proving yourself at the college level. Something else you want to keep in mind is that you need to be sure you are taking classes that will transfer. Compare the course catalogs from both schools in order to be sure you don’t lose courses when you transfer.

Francine SchwartzFounder/ PresidentPathfinder Counseling LLC

Transferring – when your first choice isn’t the right one.

First of all approximately one out of every four students find that their first choice college isn’t right for them. It is okay to recognize this, move on and make another choice. There is not only one right fit for each student. Perhaps the school is too expensive or your family’s financial status changed over the year. The major, school environment or distance from home may be not what you envisioned. It is important to sort out the inevitable adjustment period where enthusiasm wanes and doubts creep in verses needing to transfer. If you do wind up needing to transfer be sure to meet with an academic advisor and the registrar to get a copy of your transcript sent to the new school and to plan how the courses already taken will fit with the new college. Also be aware that you will need to notify lending institutions of changes because loans will begin to come due if lenders are notified that you are no longer enrolled.

Francine SchwartzFounder/ PresidentPathfinder Counseling LLC

Transferring – when your first choice isn’t the right one.

First of all approximately one out of every four students find that their first choice college isn’t right for them. It is okay to recognize this, move on and make another choice. There is not only one right fit for each student. Perhaps the school is too expensive or your family’s financial status changed over the year. The major, school environment or distance from home may be not what you envisioned. It is important to sort out the inevitable adjustment period where enthusiasm wanes and doubts creep in verses needing to transfer. If you do wind up needing to transfer be sure to meet with an academic advisor and the registrar to get a copy of your transcript sent to the new school and to plan how the courses already taken will fit with the new college. Also be aware that you will need to notify lending institutions of changes because loans will begin to come due if lenders are notified that you are no longer enrolled.

Rebecca JosephExecutive Director & Foundergetmetocollege.org

A true second chance: Becoming a strong transfer applicant

If you plan to transfer from a community college or four year college, you need to view your freshman and sophomore years of college as your junior year of high school. You need to have your highest grades ever. You need to work, be active on campus, or volunteer. You need to do something each summer. Then you need to make sure you are fulfilling each school’s academic requirements. Then you must connect with a professor for recommendations and make sure you complete the paperwork for each college. Unfortunately, the Common Application still requires you to use paper recommendations and forms. So keep a chart of all requirements, including which transcripts and test scores you need to send. Deadlines different for each school, and some allow winter and spring transfers.

Rebecca JosephExecutive Director & Foundergetmetocollege.org

What do students need to know about transferring?

If you plan to transfer from a community college or four year college, you need to view your freshman and sophomore years of college as your junior year of high school. You need to have your highest grades ever. You need to work, be active on campus, or volunteer. You need to do something each summer. Then you need to make sure you are fulfilling each school’s academic requirements. Then you must connect with a professor for recommendations and make sure you complete the paperwork for each college. Unfortunately, the Common Application still requires you to use paper recommendations and forms. So keep a chart of all requirements, including which transcripts and test scores you need to send. Deadlines differ for each school, and some allow winter and spring transfers. Let me know if I can help with applications as I help many kids with transfer readiness and applications.

Francine SchwartzFounder/ PresidentPathfinder Counseling LLC

Transferring – when your first choice isn’t the right one.

First of all approximately one out of every four students find that their first choice college isn’t right for them. It is okay to recognize this, move on and make another choice. There is not only one right fit for each student. Perhaps the school is too expensive or your family’s financial status changed over the year. The major, school environment or distance from home may be not what you envisioned. It is important to sort out the inevitable adjustment period where enthusiasm wanes and doubts creep in verses needing to transfer. If you do wind up needing to transfer be sure to meet with an academic advisor and the registrar to get a copy of your transcript sent to the new school and to plan how the courses already taken will fit with the new college. Also be aware that you will need to notify lending institutions of changes because loans will begin to come due if lenders are notified that you are no longer enrolled. Francine Schwartz M.A., LPC, NCC Founder and President Pathfinder Counseling LLC

Lora LewisEducational ConsultantLora Lewis Consulting

What do students need to know about transferring?

It’s important to be aware that the transfer process can be complicated and variable. It you are transferring between four-year colleges, be sure to explore whether or not your credits will transfer and what additional coursework you might need to complete toward your major or general education requirements. Be sure to take care of as many prerequisites as possible before you apply. If you are transferring from a community or 2-year college to a four-year school, it’s very helpful to use the guidance of a transfer counselor. If you are planning to apply to colleges within your state system, there are likely specific coursework patterns you can follow to facilitate or guarantee your transfer. Again, you’ll want to be sure that you’ve completed the necessary prerequisites for your intended major (and these may vary by campus). Transferring can be a great step in your education and an exciting opportunity, but it has its challenges. If you aren’t on top of requirements, you can end up taking the wrong classes or classes that aren’t transferrable or necessary for your major. The best way to avoid missteps is to meet with your counselor several times to develop a transfer plan and track your progress as you move toward the big move.

Kathleen HarringtonOwnerNew Jersey College Consulting

What do students need to know about transferring?

The transfer process is much different than that of the undergraduate application process. A student considering transferring should be mindful of the courses they have taken at their current college and see if their potential transfer college will accept any or all the courses. The transfer application is different and will pose different questions to its transfer applicants. Also, the materials required to be sent to a schools of interest are much different than what was required when you were in high school. For example, if you have been attending a college for over a year, the application may not require that you send your SAT scores. Most if not all colleges will require a high school transcript and your college transcript. Be mindful of deadline dates for transfer applications for both the fall and spring semester. It is always best advised to contact a transfer admission counselor to assist with your application and to pose your questions regarding the transfer process.

Angela ConleyCollege Admission ExpertVentureForth

What do students need to know about transferring?

Transferring is not for fun. If you are absolutely convinced that you would be happier somewhere else, do not move lightly. As a transfer, unless an articulation agreement ?exisits one risks losing credit – thus extending your undergraduate process. There is also the risk of your financial aid package not traveling from one institution to another. Most importantly, do your research! Is a specific GPA required for admission consideration? Are there comparable communities with which one can connect? Do not use transferring as a way to lobby for greater funds. Rather choose the transfer option only after deliberate thinking about the costs.

Lin Johnson III

What do students need to know about transferring?

Transferring into another college can be tricky academically and emotionally. First, the number of spots available for transfer students tends to be very low, increasing the competitiveness of getting into the school. Hence, it may be critical for you to be a top transfer applicant to illustrate your college readiness and your ability to excel. Second, you should work closely with the college that you plan to attend in order to ensure a smooth transition. You should have a personal contact on the college admission team and continue to keep him abreast of your academic and leadership achievements. Third, your college credits may not be transferrable to every school, which could delay your college completion or overload your semester. Not all courses at different colleges and requirements are created equal, so understand the new graduation requirements and expected academic standard when you transfer into the college. Fourth, you should ask the college about scholarships and/or financial aid grants for transfer students. Some have special funding designated only to transfer students. Last, there is an emotional adjustment period that all transfer students will experience. You will be attending a new school with new classmates who have formed bonds with others in the first year. It is easy to feel like you don’t fit in, but give it time to form your special friendships.

Zahir RobbCollege CounselorThe Right Fit College

What do students need to know about transferring?

Transferring can occur for a number of reasons. The most common ins the community college transfer, but you can also transfer from a traditional 4 year institution. It is important in either case to know the amount of transferable credits that will be accepted by the institution. The process is more clear from a community college program and campus advisors can assist you through the process. However, if you are making a transfer from one 4 year to the other, you typically have not does this as part of a master plan. Really take some time to think about the reasons for your transfer and weight the costs and benefits of such an action and how it can impact your gradation.

Reecy ArestyCollege Admissions/Financial Aid Expert & AuthorPayless For College, Inc.

What do students need to know about transferring?

They need to get all the stats in advance of their chances of getting in, what credits will be transferable, and how much aid might be available.

Lin Johnson III

What do students need to know about transferring?

Transferring into another college can be tricky academically and emotionally. First, the number of spots available for transfer students tends to be very low, increasing the competitiveness of getting into the school. Hence, it may be critical for you to be a top transfer applicant to illustrate your college readiness and your ability to excel. Second, you should work closely with the college that you plan to attend in order to ensure a smooth transition. You should have a personal contact on the college admission team and continue to keep him abreast of your academic and leadership achievements. Third, your college credits may not be transferrable to every school, which could delay your college completion or overload your semester. Not all courses at different colleges and requirements are created equal, so understand the new graduation requirements and expected academic standard when you transfer into the college. Last, there is an emotional adjustment period that all transfer students will experience. You will be attending a new school with new classmates who have formed bonds with others in the first year. It is easy to feel like you don’t fit in, but give it time to form your special friendships.

Thuy TrangCounselor InstructorMission College

What do students need to know about transferring?

Transferring from one college to another requires careful planning and the most helpful tip I can offer is for you to try connecting with a person from the school you hope to transfer to. Having an actual phone number or email address of an admissions adviser will save a lot of grief and stress (especially if you call the admissions line and usually need to press 10 buttons before a live person will pick up)! You can establish a connection when you initially call by asking politely for that person’s direct contact information (if you feel they have been helpful and informative). You may also find this person if they show up at a college fair. Save those business cards! Transferring typically means getting your academic records evaluated by the other institution to ensure you meet minimum requirements to attend their school. I recommend saving all the class outlines (syllabi) and assignments you have done in case you need to challenge any coursework that they may question. With almost every school having a web presence now, pulling up catalog descriptions of courses should not pose a problem. Please work with a counselor from your current college if this service is available because sometimes having a professional adviser call on your behalf to gather answers to the transfer process result in faster responses. An experienced counselor will also be able to pose additional questions for the transfer institution that you may not know to ask.

Bernadina Streeter

What do students need to know about transferring?

When a student is getting ready to transfer from a community college, the student must 1) confirm he/she has meet all the requirements for the college if he/she is seeking an associate degree such as degree hours, required grade point average, and paying any outstanding fines and/or debts to the college 2) confirm he/she has taken all the courses necessary to transfer to the university of his/her choice before transferring. 3) confirm he/she has met all the deadlines for the university of his/her choice for admissions, scholarships, financial aid, et cetera 4) attend the graduation ceremony…you put in the work…you deserve to be celebrated by all who love you and wish you all the best in your future educational journeys.

Eric Beers, Ph.D.College and Career CounselorAir Academy High School

What do students need to know about transferring?

Transferring, I believe is becoming more streamlined and acceptable (than it was 20 years ago), but still, not all credits transfer. It is best to check with the transfer admission counselor at the school you are interested in transferring to. They can tell which of your classes and credit will transfer and which you will have to repeat if you transfer to their college/university.

Alan Duesterhaus

What do students need to know about transferring?

An important issue in transferring is how will your courses and grades be applied. Before you matriculate at another college contact their registrars office and find someone who will do an audit of your transcript. They should be able to tell you what courses will transfer and in what manner (e.g. for your major, elective, etc.) If you are transferring because of finances make sure you speak with someone in your dean of students office and financial aid office to see if there is anything that might be modified due to changes in your family’s finances.

Carita Del ValleFounderAcademic Decisions

What do students need to know about transferring?

First, you need to know where you want to go, what are their requirements for the major and general education core classes and the specific timelines necessary for applying. Remember this applies not only to community college students but for those transferring from one university to another. In California ideas such as articulation agreements and IGETC are also important.

Renee Boone

What do students need to know about transferring?

It is important to identify the college or university you want to transfer to and then review the transfer requirements. For example, you will need to know the minimum and maximum number of college credits you can earn before transfer; you may need to complete all or some of your general education or core requirements and you may need to have completed lower division courses for the intended major. A careful review of the prospective college’s guidelines on transfer is essential to making a smooth transition. As always, heed deadlines and application process!

Ivery McKnight

What do students need to know about transferring?

WHen transferring into a 4 year institution, have a plan. Begin with determining if the school of your choice has an Articulation Agreement with your selected Community College. Work with your college counselor/advisor in selecting coursework that will be transferrable in credit. You will also need to know that you are required to complete a minimum of 60 transferrable units in order to be considered a transfer student.

Scott Herrmann-KeelingCollege Counselor

What do students need to know about transferring?

Start with why you’re unhappy where you are. (You are unhappy, aren’t you? Otherwise you wouldn’t be considering transferring.) What are you hoping will be different at your next school? Then take a good look at what you’ve written and ask yourself the hard question: How much of this is me and how much of this is where I am? Is there any hope of making a fresh start where you are? If you still want to move on, you’ve got a good place to begin: You know what you like and what you don’t. Find schools that match those criteria, then the work begins. Depending on the type of school you’re looking to move to, transferring can be either easier or harder than coming in as a freshman. Factors that can influence transfer admission rates and policies include availability of housing, financial aid, advisors, and classroom space. These are issues over which you have no control so it might make sense to cast a wider net unless you are seeking admission to one or two specific schools (in which case, you should have a very good reason why those are the best places for you). Some schools may have more room for transfer students in the fall semester, while others may have more room in the spring. If you aren’t admitted to your first choice transfer institution the first time you apply, it might make sense to try again the following semester. One way to get a sense of an institution’s patterns is to contact someone in the admissions office – often the best person has a title like Transfer Coordinator or Director of Transfer Admission – and ask for some advice about how best to approach the process. Specific questions you can ask include: How many people typically apply to transfer to your institution in the fall vs. spring? How many transfer students do you typically enroll in the fall vs. spring? What factors influence your ability to admit transfer applicants? Because fewer people in admissions tend to work with potential transfer students than with applicants coming straight from high school, it can be easier to establish a personal relationship with someone who will be involved in making a decision on your candidacy. If that opportunity exists, seize it (but not in a creepy, stalker sort of way). If possible, visit campus and interview directly with that admissions representative. Be polite and honest about your past experiences and hopes for your new institution. Be clear about what you expect will be different from where you are now and, more importantly, what you can contribute to your new community. When that admissions rep reads your application, having met you may make all the difference.

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