Quality Control Systems Managers

What they do:

Plan, direct, or coordinate quality assurance programs. Formulate quality control policies and control quality of laboratory and production efforts.

On the job, you would:

  • Stop production if serious product defects are present.
  • Review and approve quality plans submitted by contractors.
  • Review statistical studies, technological advances, or regulatory standards and trends to stay abreast of issues in the field of quality control.
  • Generate and maintain quality control operating budgets.
  • Evaluate new testing and sampling methodologies or technologies to determine usefulness.
  • Coordinate the selection and implementation of quality control equipment such as inspection gauges.
  • Collect and analyze production samples to evaluate quality.
  • Audit and inspect subcontractor facilities including external laboratories.
  • Verify that raw materials, purchased parts or components, in-process samples, and finished products meet established testing and inspection standards.
  • Review quality documentation necessary for regulatory submissions and inspections.

Knowledge

Skills

Abilities

Work Activities

Interests

  • Enterprising
  • Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Second Interest High-Point
  • Secondary-Cutoff/Rank Descriptiveness
  • Conventional
  • Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
  • First Interest High-Point
  • Primary-Rank Descriptiveness
  • Realistic
  • Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Investigative
  • Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Social
  • Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
  • Artistic
  • Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
  • Third Interest High-Point
  • Tertiary-Cutoff/Rank Descriptiveness

Work Styles