Compliance Managers

What they do:

Plan, direct, or coordinate activities of an organization to ensure compliance with ethical or regulatory standards.

On the job, you would:

  • Verify that software technology is in place to adequately provide oversight and monitoring in all required areas.
  • Serve as a confidential point of contact for employees to communicate with management, seek clarification on issues or dilemmas, or report irregularities.
  • Maintain documentation of compliance activities, such as complaints received or investigation outcomes.
  • Consult with corporate attorneys as necessary to address difficult legal compliance issues.
  • Discuss emerging compliance issues with management or employees.
  • Collaborate with human resources departments to ensure the implementation of consistent disciplinary action strategies in cases of compliance standard violations.
  • Advise internal management or business partners on the implementation or operation of compliance programs.
  • Review communications such as securities sales advertising to ensure there are no violations of standards or regulations.
  • Provide employee training on compliance related topics, policies, or procedures.
  • Report violations of compliance or regulatory standards to duly authorized enforcement agencies as appropriate or required.




Work Activities


  • First Interest High-Point
  • Primary-Rank Descriptiveness
  • Conventional
  • Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
  • Enterprising
  • Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Second Interest High-Point
  • Secondary-Cutoff/Rank Descriptiveness
  • Realistic
  • Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Investigative
  • Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Social
  • Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
  • Artistic
  • Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
  • Third Interest High-Point
  • Tertiary-Cutoff/Rank Descriptiveness

Work Styles