Mechanical Engineering Technologists

What they do:

Assist mechanical engineers in such activities as generation, transmission, or use of mechanical or fluid energy. Prepare layouts of machinery or equipment or plan the flow of work. May conduct statistical studies or analyze production costs.

On the job, you would:

  • Prepare equipment inspection schedules, reliability schedules, work plans, or other records.
  • Prepare cost and materials estimates or project schedules.
  • Provide technical support to other employees regarding mechanical design, fabrication, testing, or documentation.
  • Interpret engineering sketches, specifications, or drawings.
  • Perform routine maintenance on equipment, such as leak detectors, glove boxes, or mechanical pumps.
  • Design specialized or customized equipment, machines, or structures.
  • Design molds, tools, dies, jigs, or fixtures for use in manufacturing processes.
  • Conduct failure analyses, document results, and recommend corrective actions.
  • Assist engineers to design, develop, test, or manufacture industrial machinery, consumer products, or other equipment.
  • Analyze or estimate production costs, such as labor, equipment, or plant space.

Knowledge

Skills

Abilities

Work Activities

Interests

  • Realistic
  • Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Third Interest High-Point
  • Tertiary-Cutoff/Rank Descriptiveness
  • Investigative
  • Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Conventional
  • Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
  • Enterprising
  • Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Second Interest High-Point
  • Secondary-Cutoff/Rank Descriptiveness
  • Artistic
  • Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
  • Social
  • Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
  • First Interest High-Point
  • Primary-Rank Descriptiveness

Work Styles