Urologists

What they do:

Diagnose, treat, and help prevent benign and malignant medical and surgical disorders of the genitourinary system and the renal glands.

On the job, you would:

  • Teach or train medical and clinical staff.
  • Document or review patients' histories.
  • Provide urology consultation to physicians or other health care professionals.
  • Refer patients to specialists when condition exceeds experience, expertise, or scope of practice.
  • Direct the work of nurses, residents, or other staff to provide patient care.
  • Treat urologic disorders using alternatives to traditional surgery such as extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, laparoscopy, and laser techniques.
  • Treat lower urinary tract dysfunctions using equipment such as diathermy machines, catheters, cystoscopes, and radium emanation tubes.
  • Prescribe or administer antibiotics, antiseptics, or compresses to treat infection or injury.
  • Prescribe medications to treat patients with erectile dysfunction (ED), infertility, or ejaculation problems.
  • Perform abdominal, pelvic, or retroperitoneal surgeries.

Knowledge

Skills

Abilities

Work Activities

Interests

  • Investigative
  • Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Social
  • Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
  • Realistic
  • Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Second Interest High-Point
  • Secondary-Cutoff/Rank Descriptiveness
  • Enterprising
  • Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Conventional
  • Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
  • Artistic
  • Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
  • First Interest High-Point
  • Primary-Rank Descriptiveness
  • Third Interest High-Point
  • Tertiary-Cutoff/Rank Descriptiveness

Work Styles