Retail Loss Prevention Specialists

What they do:

Implement procedures and systems to prevent merchandise loss. Conduct audits and investigations of employee activity. May assist in developing policies, procedures, and systems for safeguarding assets.

On the job, you would:

  • Implement or monitor processes to reduce property or financial losses.
  • Investigate known or suspected internal theft, external theft, or vendor fraud.
  • Collaborate with law enforcement agencies to report or investigate crimes.
  • Conduct store audits to identify problem areas or procedural deficiencies.
  • Direct work of contract security officers or other loss prevention agents.
  • Identify and report merchandise or stock shortages.
  • Inspect buildings, equipment, or access points to determine security risks.
  • Maintain documentation or reports on security-related incidents or investigations.
  • Monitor compliance with standard operating procedures for loss prevention, physical security, or risk management.
  • Perform covert surveillance of areas susceptible to loss, such loading docks, distribution centers, or warehouses.

Knowledge

Skills

Abilities

Work Activities

Interests

  • Enterprising
  • Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Conventional
  • Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
  • Second Interest High-Point
  • Secondary-Cutoff/Rank Descriptiveness
  • First Interest High-Point
  • Primary-Rank Descriptiveness
  • Realistic
  • Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Investigative
  • Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Artistic
  • Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
  • Social
  • Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
  • Third Interest High-Point
  • Tertiary-Cutoff/Rank Descriptiveness

Work Styles