New York, NY
Barnard College


38 Ratings

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Recent Reviews

Amelia
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Barnard is inextricably linked to New York City and Columbia--two things you must know and be okay with before coming here. N...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Barnard is inextricably linked to New York City and Columbia--two things you must know and be okay with before coming here. New York City gives us access to absolutely unparalleled learning experiences (and is, in my opinion, the greastest city ever), but having Columbia right across the street gives the neighborhood a bit of the feeling of a more normal college town. As Barnard is pretty small, there's a HUGE amount of school spirit, and the administration is filled with caring people who have devoted their lives to advancing the role of women in society.

Describe the students at your school.

Partially because Barnard is so integrated with the Columbia community, there are student groups of every conceiveable type on campus. Most of the students are very politically aware, and the majority are quite liberal.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

These stereotypes aren't accurate at all! While Barnard girls are pretty much all fashionable, we come from all walks of life. And, our political beliefs are just as diverse. The women at this college are generally very attentive to the situation of women, in the United States and elsewhere, but no one I know allows herself to be pigeon-holed into a certain ideological category.

What are the academics like at your school?

Barnard is for very serious students, who are devoted and passionate enough about their studies to spend all night at the library, if need be. It is not unusual to form friendships with the professors, who are very approachable and committed to teaching. I've found the English department to be especially fabulous.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Typical college institutions, like athletic events and huge frat parties, certainly exist at Barnard, but given our location in New York City, it is more common for students to venture out in the city at all hours of the day and night. And it isn't true that you need loads of money to do anything in the City! There are lots of alternatives for the money-strapped college student. If I'm awake at 2am on Tuesday, I'm probably a.) studying in the huge, Harry Potter-esque Butler libarary, b.) hanging out with friends in someone's room, or c.) at a concert.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

There is an idea that all Barnard girls come from very wealthy families, or else that we are all militantly feminist--so not true!!

Isabelle
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Barnard is great but I would not attend the school if it were not connected to Columbia! Barnard is great because you have al...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Barnard is great but I would not attend the school if it were not connected to Columbia! Barnard is great because you have all of the resources of Barnard and Columbia but you don't have to deal with the core curriculum and arrogance of Columbia. Also, there is NO COMMUNITY here - campus events are very poorly attended. However, there are many smaller communities. If you are looking to attend a college that has a typical, school spirit-filled environment, this is not the school for you - most of the time people aren't even aware when campus-wide events, such as homecoming, are happening. New York is awesome for getting internships and for going to museums.

Describe the students at your school.

There are a mix of students, however, they are predominately wealthy and white with some variations.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

Nothing really to say - however, just because Barnard is a small school doesn't mean that it has an awesome built-in support system. You have to be a pretty independent woman to go here and be happy/feel supported. Also you should probably like New York City as in a way you are giving up the campus feel in order to take advantage of living here.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

Not really, although Barnard students are certainly invested in women's rights as they are all women!

What are the academics like at your school?

Academics here are good and so are academics at Columbia. I spent one year at Tufts university and I can say that the teachers are definitely friendlier and warmer there but with a little effort, professors here are happy to speak with motivated, intelligent students. Furthermore, there is a very pressured academic environment here - there isn't really competition between students, but everyone participates and is looking to get a good grade.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Not much campus life or parties. Also, the dating scene is great! There are guys in NYC as well as at Columbia's campus. All of the stuff that people say about a Barnard/Columbia girl rivalry is stuff that I've never heard - I've also never had guys assume that I was a ho/desperate because I went to Barnard. As a matter of fact, most of the time people don't really know which school you go to. However, if you don't make the effort, it is extremely easy to sit alone in your room on the weekend as, unlike other colleges, parties are generally smaller and invite only.

Reese
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Barnard: a small, prestigious liberal arts college for women in New York City When I tell people I go to Barnard, if they'...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Barnard: a small, prestigious liberal arts college for women in New York City When I tell people I go to Barnard, if they're from the tri-state area they've heard of it and they're impressed. If they haven't heard of Barnard, I have to explain to them that it's one of the Seven Sisters colleges, and it's across the street from Columbia. During the week, most students are in class/the library/their dorm room. On the weekends, if you're not studying, you're probably going somewhere else in NYC to do something fun. There's a subway station 20 feet from the first-year dorms... there's no reason not to explore the city.

Describe the students at your school.

There's a huge Orthodox Jewish population at Barnard. There's a lot of athiests. There's a lot of girls from poor families, but more from wealthy backgrounds. Some girls are into fashion and others just wear sweats to class. People tend to stick with their own cliques, but have all sorts of friends. A lot of people are from NY/NJ/CT and a lot are from CA.

What are the academics like at your school?

Barnard academics are managable, but most students spend about 75% of their time studying. All first-years have to take 2 seminars with no more than 13 or 14 students to a class, so even if the rest of your classes are huge lectures, you have the chance to get to know a few professors. Also, the Barnard advising system is pretty bitchin'. Most professors take on 4 or 5 students to advise for 2 years, then you pick an advisior in your field of study to help you as a junior and senior. All students have to complete the 9 Ways of Knowing - it covers a wide range of topics like quantitative reasoning and literature, but you have flexibility in picking your classes. For example, for the Historical Studies requirement, you have to take a history class, but it can be an art history course or a US history lecture or almost anything else. You also have to do 2 semesters of a science with a laboratory and 4 semesters of one language. The 2 semesters of Phys Ed also kind of suck, but you can fill that requirement with dance classes.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

All women's housing is nice because it's a quiet atmosphere (and the bathrooms are always clean). First-years live in corridor-style dorms, where they tend to make some really good friends and have some friendly faces at the other end of the hall. Upperclassmen live in apartment-style housing on 116th st, 110th st, and a few other locations. Again, dorms are mostly used for sleeping/studying. If Barnard students are looking for a party, they go across the street to Columbia. Barnard doesn't have any sports teams, but a number of students play for Columbia teams. I don't think anyone ever goes to the games. Women's college = weird dating scene. If you're a lesbian, you could feasably date another Barnard student. Most people, gay or straight, end up dating Columbia students... or getting drunk and hooking up with them.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

Barnard students are less intelligent than Columbia students. Barnard girls are sluttier than Columbia girls. Everyone at Barnard is a lesbian.

Tristan
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Barnard is amazing because it is a small liberal arts college with an abundant of resources, services, and support. It gives ...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Barnard is amazing because it is a small liberal arts college with an abundant of resources, services, and support. It gives students the best of both worlds- a huge research university experience (Columbia) and a small student-centered liberal arts college experience. The community on campus is warm and welcoming, and the intellectual debate and dialogue is rigorous and stimulating. The all-women aspect is empowering and enriching. There is a ton of school pride, and most students are thrilled to be here and love it.

Describe the students at your school.

Barnard is somewhat diverse, although the majority of the students seem to come from the middle- upper class in terms of financial backgrounds. There are many different religious groups, although the majority of students are Jewish or Christian. African American or hispanic student groups are huge minorities. Many communities remain insular although many students make an effort to befriend students who are different to them. Many students are politically aware, and most are left politically.

What are the academics like at your school?

Academics are rigorous, challenging, and wonderful. There are amazing and interesting classes offered, and more than 70% of classes have 20 people or less- meaning that students develop close relationships with professors, and participation in class is incredibly common. Barnard students bring their studies out of class and have intellectual conversations at all hours of the day. There are some students who are majorly competitive, however this is not the general feel. The most unique class I have taken here is Childhood in Wonderland. I really like the general education requirements as they allow students to truly get the "liberal arts" experience, getting a taste for a broad range of fields. Education at Barnard is definitely learning for its own sake as there are no pre-professional programs here.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

The acapella and dance groups are really popular. i'm involved with peace by peace- we teach conflict resolution to students in the neighborhood. Some students leave their doors open, although most do not. Athletic events are not very popular at all. I met my closest friends from Hillel and my hall. People party on weekends. There is so much to do in NYC!

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

Inferior and stupider than Columbia students, beautiful, easy to get with

Brittany
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Barnard is a small liberal arts college located in the upperwest side in New York City. It is across the street from Columbi...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Barnard is a small liberal arts college located in the upperwest side in New York City. It is across the street from Columbia University, which the school is affiliated with. Initially, Barnard was the sister school to Columbia, with women attending Barnard and men Columbia. Once Columbia went coed though, Barnard has maintained its identity as one of the seven sisters; a prestigious womens college. Now Barnard is completely seperated in terms of admissions process, though Barnard women receive a degree from both Barnard and Columbia University. Since Barnard is relatively small (approximately 2500 students) its a tight knit community where most people know the others in their class, or at least know who you are. There is tons of diversity as well, so there are a number of niches within the larger community. Alot of interest groups and cultural groups work together for a common goal. Overall, the environment is very inclusive. Also, Barnard girls have access to all the facilities and most of the classes at Columbia. So if for some reason Barnard doesn't have what you are looking for, Columbia probably does, and you can access it across the street. This is one of the reasons Barnard is the best of both worlds; it has a small college feeling, but is also within a large university. Since Barnard is all-girl, the dorms are all single-sex. This is nice because it eliminates the whole hooking up with floormates that occurs in coed dorms...which can get very awkward. Also, Barnard and Columbia people can room together, but they have to choose the dorm depending on the ratio of Barnard students to Columbia students. The system would be better if all the students had access to both Columbia and Barnard dorms, but this would integrate the schools more than Barnard would like. Since Barnard is in the city, where there are endless oppertunities and distractions, most students use the surrounding neighborhoods as places to socialize and hang out. Campus life is definitly not as big as it would be in a college town. There are still all types of events and parties on campus though, for those people who don't want to stray away from campus for the night. There is also a pretty active Greek life. In terms of the administration, most of the deans and advisors are really helpful and there to help you make descions etc. You can usually always get in to see a dean, or they always are prompt regarding emails. Also, if you are struggling academically, the deans make an effort to reach out and help you to do better. My only qualm with the school is the price. The school is extremely expensive...more than 40,000 a year, and is always looking for ways to charge its students extra fees. There is a fee for almost everything: not registering in a specific time, changing your meal plan, leaving housing, its outrageous! This past semester I took leave from Barnard, and housing charged me $1000 for breaking my one year contract, even though they quickly moved someone else into my room, then charged them more for the single. Also, if you plan on studying abroad and your program is much cheaper than Barnard, you still have to pay the entire semester's price, which I don't think is fair. Overall, Barnard women have alot of pride in our school. We are getting the best education money can offer, and even though it is really expensive, I would not have been happier anywhere else. You really come into your own here, and gain skills necessary to make a difference in the world.

Describe the students at your school.

In terms of students and diversity, most people are friendly with oneanother, though there will always be groups or cliques: African Americans, multiethnic, Asian Americans, Eastern Europeans, Latin Americans, the athletes, the dancers, the trust-fund kids, the Orthodox Jews, the pre-med kids...there will always be groups people migrate in, but this is because they identify with oneanother, and thus spend time together. Its not exclusive, and people often have friends from all different groups. Thats what I love about Barnard; the diversity and the friendliness. You can be yourself and others will also embrace that, whatever you choose. There are Barnard women from all over the country and the world. I have friends from the city(Staten Island, Brooklyn, the Bronx), New Jersey, California, Georgia, Indiana, Illinois, Maine, Tokyo, India, Spain, Miami, etc. Most of them come from more liberal areas, because it is a very left wing school. Students are very politically aware and active, and take part in rally's/protests...speak their minds to make change. Last semester, there was a racial incident on campus where a noose was hung on an African American teacher's door. There was alot of protest and rally from the college/university, as well as the surrounding neighborhood to let everyone know that intolerance and hate is not tolerated...thats pretty much the only thing that is not tolerated. In terms of groups to join, there are so many. I am African American, so I attended a few BOSS(Black Organization of Soul Sisters)meetings. I was not an active member though, because my life primarily revolved around dance, both academically and extracurricularly. There is a student group for almost every racial, ethnic, religious, special interest group. There will be a niche for you, I promise. And if for some reason you feel that there is an area lacking, you can always start up your own group and get funding from the college. In terms of socio-economic status, there are people from all classes as well, because even though its expensive, there is alot of assistance given/financial aid. I want to say that no one would feel out of place at Barnard. I think there is a place for everyone. Obviously though, if you didn't like the city, didn't want a small school, didn't want all girls(though thats not as big a deal as you would think) and didn't want a liberal, opinated environment full of diversity, where everyone is different and special, then you might feel a little out of place. But only a little, because you would quickly find out that Barnard is like no other, and would be fun years of trying something new.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

Barnard is awesome...there was no better place for me. No regrets in the least. The most important thing is to find a place that fits with you...and you'll know it when you find it. Best of luck with your college search!!

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

Yes, there are lesbians and feminists, but like any population, there are people who are not. Barnard is about empowering women and preparing them for leadership and success, so outsiders might see it as fostering feminism. But it is a girls school, and by not allowing men it is a feminist school that caters to women over men. I guess it depends on your own personal definition of feminist, and whether or not you agree with it. I consider myself relatively feminist because I believe that women can do just as well as men and should have equal rights completely, but I don't advocate that any one person elevate themselves over another, and disagree when "feminists" degrade men. In terms of the "Barnyard," girls at Barnard tend to be a little more relaxed than those at Columbia. This is just my opinon, and depends on who you interact with, but typically I notice that girls who go to Barnard are more real and open to discovering themselves. If you choose Columbia over Barnard as a woman, it sometimes seems like a sell-out, because Barnard is just as great if not better. As a woman, I think the smarter choice is to go to Barnard where the classes are excellent and we are given the oppertunity to grow intellectually as women. But Barnard is not for everyone, and if you don't want to challenge your own views/opinons and be open to change, then its not for you...You might be happier at Columbia. And does everyone dance at Barnard...pretty much. As a dancer myself, the oppertunities are endless and I love being able to dance everyday. Finally, in terms of "Barnard to bed, Columbia to wed" I know that alot of Columbia guys date Barnard women...sometimes that creates tension with the Columbia women. But in terms of Columbia men ultimately choosing Columbia girls over Barnard women, I don't know if that has merit. If the man is afraid of marrying an opinonated woman who is bound to be successful, then he might not want to marry a Barnard woman. No trophy wives here

What are the academics like at your school?

Classes are relatively small, ranging from 15(seminars) to 70(larger lectures). Since the classes are small, you can get to know your professor, especially if you make use of office hours. For larger classes, there are usually TA sessions, which can be beneficial if you do not undertand the material. I would definitly recommend getting to know your professors because as you go on further into college, and start applying for internships, jobs, grants, scholarships etc. you usually need letters of recommendation from some of your academic professors. If you already have established a relationship with them, its not as awkward asking them for a recommendation. Barnard is all women, but at least half of the classes are integrated with Columbia guys. The only ones that are all women are the freshman english and some of the upper level seminars, because they are only for Barnard students. And Columbia people are always on Barnard's campus/taking Barnard classes because they are so good. So in no way do we feel excluded from men. After a while its just matter of fact. Barnard is challenging academically, so alot of time is devoted to homework, papers and tests, especially around midterms and finals. Those times, you do not have a life. Most of your time will be spent in the library, and sleeping sometimes. Since there are so many libraries and study areas between Barnard and Columbia, I advise that you find a few that work for you and then rotate between those during peak study times. That way you can spend 8 or 9 hours studying, but you also get a change of environment, which helps me to stay focused more. Barnard's requirements are called the nine ways of knowing, I believe. These are the general requirements, plus any other requirements for your specific major. The gen ed requirements were great, because they force you to try out different types of classes. Basically you have to take a year of science with lab, some sort of math or reasoning, freshman english, critical analysis, history, language and gym. Most of the intro level classes satisfy the requirements, so its easy to fufill most of the requirements in the first few years when you are taking the lower level classes. Since two years of language is required, I recommend that you take the placement exam first semester of freshman year to try and place out of some of the language requirement. And if you want to start another language, make sure you start freshman year. I started Spanish, but waited too long, and now I will have to take a year of Spanish my senior year, which just sucks. In terms of Barnard preparing you for a job, it is definitly geared towards learning for learnings sake. You learn how to be an intellectual, how to question and reason, to problem solve, to succeed, good work ethics, etc. But you do not get any sort of specific training, and most people will need to go on for further schooling or training in the field of their choice. For example, I want to go into buying, and even though my psychology classes have all been interesting, there are no classes at Barnard geared towards entering the fashion industry. I will have to enter a training program after I graduate. Even if I had decided to go into psychology, I still would have to get at least my masters to make any real money. So Barnard is definitly just a stop on the way to getting a job, but what you learn here is so helpful socially...especially in networking in certain social circles, its necessary to have a good edcuational background, especially a liberal arts background where you learn the basics in most subjects.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

There are so many organizations on campus, and they are all very popular. Obviously the big ones are the racial/ethnic groups, but dance groups are huge as well. Orchesis, the one I am involved with, is campus' largest dance group and we put on a show every semester. Its student choreographed, produced and run, and is really fun. We do modern, jazz, ballet, lyrical, hip-hop, tap...whatever the choreographer wants to do. We accept all levels of dancers, so anyone who is interested can join. I have been a part of orchesis for three years, and was a board member for two years, so it really was a huge part of my college experience. Most of my friends are dancers, since I spend alot of time dancing. But there are other dance groups as well, like Indian dance, hip hop, danceteam, ballroom dance, swing etc. Athletic events are surprisingly popular, considering Columbia's athletics are not very good. But people get excited about games and good out to support the teams, which is nice. These are often followed by parties, usually whether the teams win or lose. Guest speakers are very popular, and tickets usually sell out. Especially if they are controversial. Theater is pretty big too, with the Varsity show being the main theatrical attraction of the year. Literally hundreds of thousands of dollars goes to fund the show, which has been a tradition at Columbia for over a hundred years. There is a good amount of dating...most of my friends though don't date Columbia men, or college guys in general. We use the New York, ny network, which is fabulous because there are sooo many people to meet, but also harder because alot of guys aren't necessarily in for a relationship, so it gets hard sometimes. But dating is fun, definitly, and you can never get bored. Each area of the city has a different type of person, and so you can taste each flavor. In terms of gay and lesbian dating, I don't know the scene personally, but there are endless oppertunities as well, and since the city is so liberal, its one of the best places to be out. Off campus activities are endless...museums, gallery showings, music events/concerts, bars everwhere, clubs, lounges, restaurants, parks etc...its NYC, we have everything!!

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

The biggest stereotype is that we are all lesbians and feminists because we go to an all girls school. Before I even started at Barnard, my friends from home joked about me becoming a lesbian, just because I would be surrounded by girls all the time. Another stereotype is that Barnard girls are more wild as compared to our Columbia counterparts, with Barnard being called the "Barnyard". There is also a saying among Columbia men regarding dating Barnard and Columbia girls: "Barnard to bed, Columbia to wed." Finally, alot of people assume that you dance if you go to Barnard, because a good part of the population are dancers and the school is known for its dance program.

Sarah
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Okay...so I'll write about my college town, New York City... First of all, you'll never, ever be bored. New York is the mo...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Okay...so I'll write about my college town, New York City... First of all, you'll never, ever be bored. New York is the most incredible and exciting place to be. Morningside Heights, which is the area Barnard's in, is calm and far from the hustle and bustle of midtown. It's a nice area with lots of great restaurants, book stores, and other little fun shops. The campus, however, is right next to the subway, so if you want the fast-paced city experience, in 30 minutes you'll be downtown. I can't even begin to count the amount of incredible experiences I've had in New York...but to name a few: walking across the Brooklyn Bridge at sunset, going swing dancing in a club downtown with my friends, getting orchestra seat tickets to Avenue Q, Phantom of the Opera, and the Drowsy Chaperone through CAO, eating gourmet peanut butter and jelly sandwiches near NYU, exploring the huge number of incredible museums of New York, interning at an art gallery in Chelsea...and so so many more. There's definitely a lot to see and do on both the Columbia and Barnard campuses, but the city also offers incredible experiences that you'll never forget.

Describe the students at your school.

The student body at Barnard is incredible; the women here are smart, gorgeous, articulate, and interesting. Students here are usually political aware and conscious of what's going on in the world.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

Hewitt has the best cookies ever!!!

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

Not at all! After the first year people realize how stupid and completely untrue these stereotypes are.

What are the academics like at your school?

Oh I have so much to say about this... Okay first off, all my professors know my name, except in my lecture classes (1 out of 4 of my classes is a lecture). The relationships among professors and students are very close here, and I've learned so much from one on one meetings and discussions with my teachers. My favorite class would have to be "Spain through its art," which is an upper level spanish course over at Columbia. However, what I found most incredible about Barnard (especially its art history department) is how academics are incorporated into the city. I'll read about a piece in my textbook, take the subway to the Guggenheim and study it in person. For my spanish class, I've been to 4 museums in Manhattan that feature Spanish art. If you want to study art history, this is definitely the place to do it.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

I've made incredible friends here and have had wonderful experiences with extra curriculars, however, I had to put myself out there to make it happen. if a student is shy and doesn't want to put herself out there, it can be a difficult to make friends. The dating scene at Barnard can be pretty difficult, because the girl to guy ratio among the schools is 2:1 and some of the columbia guys can be a little anti-social, high-strung or pretentious. At the same time, it depends on your personality. If you put yourself out there, it's totally possible (I'm dating a wonderful Columbia boy!) to find nice guys.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

Some students over at Columbia think that we're less intelligent and...how do I put this...desperate for men?

Lauren
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Barnard is a womens college, but it's more than that. It is a liberal arts college but because of Columbia across the street...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Barnard is a womens college, but it's more than that. It is a liberal arts college but because of Columbia across the street Barnard students get both a small community and a larger university. And in all honesty, Barnard truly does feel like a little more independent undergraduate college of Columbia University, it's a pretty close relationships. Barnard students are very smart and very passionate. They speak their mind and stand up for what they believe in. It's rare to find a Barnard student who doesn't express what she feels articulately in a class.

Describe the students at your school.

Barnard is pretty diverse. Although there are some who say that Barnard is pretty much a bunch of rich white girls, I would beg to differ. I have met all different types of young women from around the world and who come in all colors, shapes, and sizes. We're a pretty liberal campus so anything that you're into, you'll probably find here.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

For the most part. I would say that not as many are as well off as the stereotype suggests.

What are the academics like at your school?

At Barnard you will never be taught by a TA and that's huge. I have found the teachers to be very accessible and true scholars in their work. When I was sick and was working on a paper, my teacher actually called me and we talked about my paper because we couldn't meet up. Also, at Barnard, the education is about learning and not necessarily about grades. Your teachers want you to come out of class having learned something and not fretting about your grades. As much as the academic requirements can be a bit much, it's flexible enough so you can explore different areas of study, which is essentially about making you a well-rounded person and the core of the Barnard education.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Let's put it this way, a lot of Barnard activities are combine with Columbia activities. It's a really great way to unite the two campuses and to just get to know a lot of new people. Campus unity is better at Barnard than at Columbia, but remember this is New York City. As much as Barnard has wonderful traditions like Midnight Breakfast and spirit day, we're a bunch of independent women who like to do our own thing.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

They're beautiful, well off, very intelligent, and artsy.

Julia
What is your overall opinion of this school?

The great thing about Barnard is that it's a small college in New York City. While most students love to take advantage of t...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

The great thing about Barnard is that it's a small college in New York City. While most students love to take advantage of the city, if it ever gets too overwhelming, we have a cute little campus with a lawn and trees to retreat to. Within the first week it already felt like home. The administration and faculty are great: they encourage us and let us know that we really can do whatever we want, and they are always available to talk one on one. There's an enormous amount of school pride, which is exhibited the most on Spirit Day, where we play music and hang out on the lawn, eat free food, and basically demonstrate why Barnard is great. The size of the school is perfect. I've only gone to Barnard for a year, but already I recognize people wherever I go. Everyone at Barnard is really nice, and it's been a wonderful experience so far.

Describe the students at your school.

At Barnard, there is a club for just about everything, and if there isn't, you can make one. Many students are politically active, mostly on the liberal side. The student body is fairly diverse, and attracts people from many different racial and economic backgrounds. There is a lot of social interaction between different kinds of people on campus, and everyone is generally very friendly. Being in New York, most girls dress very fashionably even for class, but there is no pressure. If you show up in sweats, that's fine too, nobody is going to judge you.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

I'm so glad I applied to Barnard. I love everything about the school and the city. For anyone concerned about safety, the campus is extremely safe, and the city, despite it's bad reputation, is really pretty safe too.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

Not at all! Most of the Barnard students I know didn't apply to Columbia because they wanted a liberal arts education, and loved Barnard for what it is. I applied early decision because it was my first choice. We can cross-register for classes at Columbia, but I like Barnard classes better (Columbia is bigger though, so sometimes they have classes Barnard doesn't). There are some lesbians at Barnard, like any other college, single sex or co-ed. While most Barnard women are feminists, we are in the sense that we beleive in equal rights, and we definitely don't hate men. We just know that we're as good as they are.

What are the academics like at your school?

At Barnard, almost all classes are taught by professors, rather than TAs, who really love teaching. Most classes are small, and participation is huge. The typical seminar has 15 students, and not only do the professors encourage participation, but they even arrange individual meetings with students to discuss papers and the class overall. They really care about their students. Even in lecture classes, which tend to be a lot bigger, if the professor doesn't know your name, they know your face, and will recognize you if you run into them on campus. They are all extremely available, encouraging, and it's obvious that they love what they do.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

While there are a lot of student organizations, the main social environment of Barnard is New York. A lot of student study very hard during the week and then relax on the weekends. There are always events, whether you choose to attend them or not. The greek scene exists, but it really isn't very big. A lot of girls worry about dating when they come to Barnard. Just because it's a women's college doesn't mean we don't meet guys: Columbia is literally right across the street, and New York itself has tons of guys, so don't worry. If you don't like the city, however Barnard might not be the right place for you.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

People think that we all go to Barnard because we couldn't get into Columbia. They also suspect that since it's an all-women's college, we are all lesbians and hate men.

Hannah
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Barnard occupies a really unique place in the world of American colleges. On one hand, it's a small, private liberal arts sc...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Barnard occupies a really unique place in the world of American colleges. On one hand, it's a small, private liberal arts school for women but on the other hand we have access to all the resources of a large Ivy League school - namely Columbia. So it is both a small school and a large one, both single-sex and co-ed. We have complete cross-registration privileges, which is amazing, but Barnard professors really are more approachable. And Barnard is full of amazing traditions. Possibly the best is the Midnight Breakfast: at midnight before exams begin, the entire school crowds into the gym and professors and deans and famous alumnae serve us breakfast. Similarly, each spring we have a Spirit Day which shows just how phenomenal Barnard spirit is and how proud we are of where we go to school. And being in New York City can only be considered a plus. We're on the Upper West Side, and the neighborhood - Morningside Heights - almost feels like a mini college town. But a ten minute ride on the 1 train brings you full stop into the middle of the city. So you can get away from all that insanity when it's just too much, but it's also amazing to be so close to everything that New York offers.

Describe the students at your school.

Barnard is made up of every type of person imaginable except for, of course, males. There are numerous vocal groups for every race and religion as well as LGBT groups. Personally, I have experienced the Hillel, the Jewish students group that is joint with Columbia. It's full of events but not precisely the most welcoming organization. Hillel students seem to expect their fellow students to fall neatly into one of Judaism's three or so denominations - Reform, Conservative or Orthodox. It's tricky to be a Conservative Jew who doesn't keep kosher. It's also tricky to be Conservative because many Conservative students on campus are in a joint program with the Jewish Theological Seminary. As a result, they all know each other and have a common background. This isn't to say it isn't impossible to get involved, it just takes some action on your part. Most students come from the New York/New Jersey area, but there are also lots of students from across the country and indeed across the world. It's predominately white, in terms of race, but I understand that the administration is trying to change that. It's about 40% Jewish, too. It's also mostly liberal, but there is a College Republicans Club on campus. Students, for some reason, tend to dress well - heels and skirts, for example, even just for class. It can be a bit disconcerting at first and it isn't the entire population at all, but perhaps it stems from living in New York; many Barnard women like to keep up with fashions.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

Barnard is an amazing school. It gets a lot of flak because it's part of Columbia and so is uniquely placed among schools in this country. But we aren't viewed as "secondary citizens" when we go across the street to the Columbia campus. Plus, the food here is better so Columbia students often come over to Barnard to eat. Many students are interested in studying English here, especially Creative Writing, perhaps because Barnard has put out so many amazing novelists over the years. The Dance program also gets a lot of attention.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

Of course not! Barnard is made up of every kind of girl on the planet, so of course there are a few who fit the stereotypes but the majority of students can't be classified in any particular way. And as for using Barnard as a "back door," it might be true that some girls originally look at Columbia, but most end up choosing Barnard for its own unique qualities, for the fact that it's a smaller, tighter school with a better support system.

What are the academics like at your school?

Academics is really important at Barnard. Because we have complete cross-registration privileges with Columbia, there are an incredible number of classes to choose from and the faculty are amazing. It's a smaller school, so teachers are very available and happy to speak with students. Students definitely have intellectual discussions outside of class. Every first-year is required to take an English and a Seminar and if you have the opportunity, the most amazing Seminar is one called Reacting to the Past. It's run as a series of games (three) over the course of the semester, in which students act out periods in history. For example, the first game took place in Athens in 403 BCE. We were all members of the Athenian assembly. As Athens had just suffered a crushing defeat to Sparta, it was our job to make laws and determine how bring Athens back to glory. We each had roles and positions and we spent our classes arguing about who should be allowed to vote, about whether we should send military expeditions off to raise money, about what to do concerning education. It was amazing how seriously everyone took their roles. The game is fascinating because you really get to experience periods and time and interact with texts (like Plato's Republic) as if they're real things, not just classic books that some professor forces you to read.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Theater groups are really big on campus. There are seemingly dozens of them, all for different purposes (straight theater, Shakespeare, student-written, musical). And so there are a lot of performances as well, which appear to be a bit more popular than athletic events. Because it's a big city and the dorm rooms aren't very exciting, campus empties out on the weekends which is fine because New York City is amazing! There are frats and sororities on campus and plenty of people join them but it isn't a big deal. Many Barnard students also babysit on weekends. There is a Barnard Babysitting Agency that allows parents to post jobs and students to call about them. So often my friends and I don't begin to hang out on a weekend night until midnight when we're all back uptown. If you're looking for something on-campus to do that doesn't involve drinking on the weekend you'll be hard-pressed to find something interesting, but if you're willing to go somewhere, New York is full of options. There are so many amazing spots; I know two friends that went to the top of the Empire State Building at midnight a few weeks ago.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

Because Barnard is a woman's college, it has the same stereotypes that chase all single-sex schools: People claim that Barnard students are either all gay or extremely easy to get into bed. Or because it's connected to Columbia, some people assume that Barnard students all wanted to go to Columbia originally and used Barnard as a "back door" to an Ivy League school.

Marissa
What is your overall opinion of this school?

I absolutely love Barnard! It is an environment where I have thrived and grown to call my home over the past three years. One...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

I absolutely love Barnard! It is an environment where I have thrived and grown to call my home over the past three years. One of my favorite things about it is the overflow of support and nurture within this amazing group of bright women, inspiring faculty, and caring staff. Someone is pretty much always here for you at Barnard, whether it's your friendly RA, your warm advisor, or one of our many great deans. It's also a community in the truest sense of the term; it's a place where one can feel comfortable and secure while challenged to think outside of the box in and out of the classroom. It's a little gem that will expose you to some of the most phenomenal opportunities, professors, and even peers, whom are all incredibly diverse. But this diverse population is united by one thing: we are all "strong, beautiful Barnard women"!

Describe the students at your school.

Students at Barnard are very diverse! You can pretty much find any type of person at Barnard, and there is definitely no typical Barnard student. However, Barnard women are generally strikingly intelligent, motivated, and independent. We are also usually friendly and very personable. I feel like most students are upper middle class, however there are many students from each end of the spectrum. Different types of students definitely interact. Girls here can seem snobbish sometimes and only hang out with their established networks, but there are still a multitude of really friendly students that are always open to being friends with anyone! Cliques are also not a pervasive part of campus life. Students all seem politically left! Over my entire time here at college, I have met a total of two right wing students (and they are both from across the street at Columbia College). Nonetheless, I don't think students would be be treated differently if they were very conservative.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

Going to Barnard does not automatically mean that you are a lesbian (or thinking about becoming one)! Whereas there are definitely a significant number of students that are (and are definitely welcomed as such), most students are (seemingly) straight. This school absolutely rocks! Come visit & you may just fall in love with the intimate classes, access to a big research university, caring staff, intelligent thinkers, homy NYC location (where you'll never be bored), and close-knit community of "strong, beautiful Barnard women" - go Barnard!

What are the academics like at your school?

Academics are superb! Barnard professors TRULY CARE about their students! They really are interested in each of their student's emotional, social, and academic well-being. I have never been in any class at Barnard where I didn't feel like my professor wanted each of us to succeed. I love how every one of my professors has always known my name and a bunch of tidbits about my peers and I. Class participation is pretty much the norm. It's wonderful because it adds so much to our overall learning experiences while fostering our public speaking skills and even confidence. I unfortunately don't spend a lot of time with my professors outside of the classroom, but that was my personal decision (due to being so busy with other things on campus). If I every want to, the option is alwayts here, as each of my professors has been incredibly accessible and welcoming. I LOVE Barnard's academic requirements. We have a distribution consiting of our 9 ways of knowing, which are broad categories in which we must take a course in before we graduate. As dull as this may sound, all of the categories have a huge range of interesting courses to choose from, and it's very easy to fulfill the requirements without even trying to! In fulfilling my requirements, I have taken some of my favorite courses so far at Barnard, such as Reacting to the Past II, The Novel and Psychoanalysis, and Dance in New York City. I also feel like our requirements really foster an education of the whole person while allowing each of us to graduate with a great range of knowledge outside of our major areas.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

I'm ironically awake at 2am on this Tuesday night, and guess what I'm doing? Hanging out with my friends! & no, I do not just spend my time hanging out with my friends! For instance, today I went to my long day of classes, did some homework, grabbed some dinner, and of course did some more homework. Then, I knocked on some friends doors on my hall, grabbed some tea and cookies at the dining hall, and sat chatting with a bunch of them for hours. We talk about everything from discrimination to fashion. In the late hours of the (week)night, many (but not all) Barnard students congregate with each other and have conservations about life and occasionally academics, depending on the group of friends. Students can also be found sleeping soundly or studying over in Butler Library across the street.

Details

  • Enrollment
  • 2,510
  • Tuition & Fees
  • $50,394
  • Acceptance rate
  • 17%

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