Chestnut Hill, MA
Boston College


124 Ratings

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Recent Reviews

Abby
What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best thing about BC is the feeling of community within such a large population of students and faculty. Every professor I...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best thing about BC is the feeling of community within such a large population of students and faculty. Every professor I have had so far at BC has been entirely accessible and willing to help every student. If I have a question or concern, I can communicate via e-mail with my professors or meet with them in person during their office hours. I like knowing that help is there when I need it. BC is a good-sized school. It's large enough that you can meet a lot of new, diverse people; but it's small enough that if you mention a classmate's name in a group or ten BC students, one of the ten will also know who your classmate is. The only major problem with the student population is that it seems to be somewhat segregated. White groups of friends, Asian groups of friends, Black groups of friends. I don't in any way want to disregard the great many BC students who have friends of all backgrounds, but I would still like to see a bit more integration among the student body. Often when I say that I go to BC, people are impressed or joke "oh, so you're smart". I feel proud to say that I am a BC student because it attests to the hard work I have done in my academic career. When I'm not in class, I split my time between Hillside cafe, my room, and the library. In the morning before class, I usually do work at Hillside, where I get my daily dose of caffeine. After class, I get lunch and go back to my room to relax and do work. If I have a lot to do or just don't want to run the risk of being distracted, I go to the library to study. There is a crazy amount of school pride at BC. We aren't called superfans for nothing. Being a Division I sports school in the ACC, BC has more than enough school spirit to go around. One of my professors once said that during football season, BC becomes more like a major stadium with an academic institution attached to it.

Describe the students at your school.

On a typical winter day, I wear sweatpants or jeans, a hoodie, Uggs, and my fleece to class. There are always a few girls who have taken the time to style their hair and coordinate their outfits, but they are out-numbered by the basic jeans-and-a-sweater look that most students have going on. Seven of the eight girls in my suite are from the Northeast, six are from New England, and three are a forty-minute drive away from campus. A lot of students are from Mass. and live no more than an hour away. Then again, I have friends who are each from Texas, Hawaii, South Dakota, and Idaho. To my surprise, there are a lot of BC students from Illinois, especially from the greater Chicago area.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

For the most part, the stereotypes are accurate. A friend of mine once said that he hated people-watching at BC because everyone looks like the same person. There plenty of students on campus who own neither Ugg nor Northface apparel and who couldn't care less what the football team's record is. While BC students may initially appear to be materialistic consumers, a major part of the student body is dedicated to community service both in Boston and abroad. Don't let the preppy clothes and wild sports cheers fool you-- most of the students at BC are friendly and caring individuals.

What are the academics like at your school?

Other than in one very large class, every professor I have had at BC has known my name. My favorite class was probably Mass Communication Theory. My professor was extremely interactive with the class, making sure that we all understood new concepts by having us discuss the material and apply it to real-life situation. Rather than simply talk at us in an hour-long lecture, the professor made the class interesting and fun. Students definitely work hard and get their studying done during the week, but they make sure to unwind and have a good time on the weekends. BC is a "work hard, play hard" kind of place. BC students have intellectual conversations outside of the classroom, but they have just as many conversations about celebrity gossip and arguments over what Boston taqueria makes the best burritos. One of my favorite things about the conversation at BC is that I can make an otherwise nerdy reference to biology while telling a story, and my friends will know exactly what I'm talking about. I am a Communications major, which is known to many as "the major of college athletes". Communications is vastly popular at BC, so many of the core requirement classes for the major are large. However, the professors still take these classes seriously and take attendance to make sure that student are not just gliding through the courses. No matter how many students are in a class, the Communications professors are still effective teachers and are still open for extra help and questions from individual students.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

BC men's football, hockey, and basketball are by far the most popular sports teams. BC student football tickets sell out every year, and a lottery is held for men's hockey and basketball to ensure that everyone has a fair chance to get tickets. UGBC is the undergraduate student government organization at BC. Elections are always crazy and the campaigning is really intense. UGBC's job is to work with the administration to improve the quality of student life. I'm a member of the BC Sharps, the only all-female a cappella group on campus. We sometimes joke that we're as close to a sorority as BC will ever get because we get together socially as well as sing together. Outside of class and schoolwork, the Sharps are the most important part of my college experience. We are all very close friends. During my freshman year, I was usually up socializing with people from my dorm at 2am on a typical Tuesday night. I was more than willing to replace sleep with opportunities to get to know new people. But now as a sophomore living in a suite with friends, I am up at 2am on a Tuesday night only when I have work due the next morning. I usually go to bed around 12:30 or 1am on weekdays.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

The biggest stereotype about BC is that everyone looks like they just walked off the pages of a J.Crew magazine. The "typical BC girl" wears Ugg boots, leggings, and a Northface fleece; accessorizes with a Vineyard Vines or Longchamp bag; and tops off her look with a pair of chicly over-sized sunglasses. Another prevalent stereotype is that BC students live and die by their sports teams-- just look for the gold superfan shirts.

Tim
What is your overall opinion of this school?

BC is a great size - not too big, not too small. as for the demographics and integration, i'd give it a lesser mark, knowing ...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

BC is a great size - not too big, not too small. as for the demographics and integration, i'd give it a lesser mark, knowing well that most of my friends are white and i am not often in a place where "branching out" would be an option. and i think i try without trying too hard, mostly because i am interested in many different people and love to be around them (though my occasional disinterest at parties would suggest otherwise). we've had a few incidents with race issues on campus, but mostly people here are addicted to facebook and will stop at nothing to have the most "official" friends, with crippling social awkwardness to match. if you have a good sense of humor and are inclined to laugh more at people than with people, BC may in fact be a good fit - there's a lot of fodder for material here, you just have to look for it!

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

for the most part, they are. BC tends to be a little homogeneous, like most private Northeastern universities, but there is an innocence here that somehow makes it charming to be sheltered. many are involved in at least one activity on campus since its perhaps the best way to network among classes, disciplines, socioeconomics, etc. additionally, there is a bipolar culture here of trying to uphold the above mentioned traits while still maintaining an active college experience. this translates to a lot of drinking with/hooking up within service groups, a pseudo-frat culture among the performance groups, and a scene of social hierarchy in the more social-networking based activities (student government, orientation leaders, spiritual groups). in short, BC is a place where it is part of the "scene" to go to Church, where it is considered cool to appear flawless, and where frowns are rewarded genuine concerns for one's wellbeing.

What are the academics like at your school?

for the most part classes/learning can be bullshitted away or taken seriously. if the former is the case, you're likely to play into a lot of stupid shit that goes on here, eating up some if not all the delusions of college and of BC culture. if the latter, then you're like to feel alienated from everybody and have a tough time coping with the reality of things. i think a healthy number of people try to achieve a happy medium, but it's the extreme cases that produce more interesting life events, so try it all out! the theology, philosophy, and literary courses offer a fair amount of self-questioning (we'll say continental rather than analytical) and lend themselves to good conversations, sometimes. many at BC come from high-achieving backgrounds, so most are inclined to be somewhat competitive. fortunately, there's a fair amount of denial that goes on at this school, so if you try to balance and try to think for yourself, life will be a lot simpler.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

when one thinks BC, one thinks "affluent, catholic, and beautiful." when one thinks of BC students, one thinks "affluent, catholic, beautiful, and hungover." moreover, everyone is considered to be a "good, smart kid that really cares," probably because everybody also happens to come from a privileged-but-not-regal household (it's not Georgetown!).

Meg
What is your overall opinion of this school?

BC is the perfect middle ground. It's not urban or rural. Boston is right there but you're not in the midst of a sprawling ...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

BC is the perfect middle ground. It's not urban or rural. Boston is right there but you're not in the midst of a sprawling urban campus. At 9,000 undergrads it is a medium sized school. Not a large state university or a small Christian school in the mid-west. Academics are strong, but the library is empty on Fridays and Saturdays. People have lives. We are athletic and most students go to parties on the weekends. We're a Catholic school but not everyone is Catholic and there is no converting or pressure to be Christian. The Catholic spirit is seen in the ideals by which we approach our lives - caring for others, living a socially conscious life, etc. "Pray hard, Play hard." There is a ton of school spirit - football games and tailgating are some of my greatest memories. (Hockey and Basketball are pretty awesome too).

Describe the students at your school.

Diversity is definitely increasing. There have been some racial tensions over then past couple of years, but I think that is a sign of change. The university and students have been addressing these tensions. Race, diversity, and being welcoming are openly discussed. Courses are being created that focus on different cultures' histories etc. As far as the whole LGBT thing goes, this is a Catholic school so unfortunately the administration can be a little conservative at times. They canceled their big dance a year or two ago, but students made a big to-do about it and got some media coverage. Most students are open to the LGBT community, even those who may really be homophobic or excessively conservative rarely open their mouthes to their closest friends because that mindset is not socially accepted here.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

We are BC. Boston College is awesome and I absolutely love it. The perfect school for me. I will be sad to leave this May, but look forward to returning for football games and reunions for the rest of my life!!!

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

While there are a fair number of well-dressed students, BC students are not spoiled rich kids. As a campus, we are well aware of serving others and the importance of humility. People come from very different backgrounds and while many students may dress the part once you actually speak with them you quickly realize we are not cookie-cutters of each other and many of us have experienced hard times both before and during college. We are passionate about our causes and vocations. I would argue that there is no such thing as the stereotypical BC kid - I have yet to meet one in my four years.

What are the academics like at your school?

Students can be competitive in CSOM, but I've never heard of people giving the wrong answers to classmates or ripping pages out of books in the library. (which I have heard of from friends at other schools) There is competition to do well but it is based on individual achievement and doing the best you can. Professors know your name if you want them to. Obviously if you sit in the back and never speak you will be invisible. This is college, theoretically you are here because you want to learn, some self-motivation will be required. Students study very different amounts, I probably spend 1-2 hours a week per class unless there's a big project, paper, or test. It depends on the individual and how efficiently you spend your time. The work load is definitely manageable if you stay on top of it and make sure you don't have all hard classes in one semester. Right now I'm taking a class (new this semester) called Economic Development: The El Salvador Experience. Only 10 students are in the class and we had to apply and interview, but it is amazing. We study development and El Salvador with Fr. McGowan who is great in and of himself. Then for spring break the university pays for all of us to go down to El Salvador. I'm a double major and a minor, in three schools at once. Human Development from school of ed, Economics from A&S and then a minor in Organizational Studies from CSOM. It is the perfect combination of subjects for my future plans. The univeristy has been flexible in allowing me to create this rather unique combination. I wish that I had been required to become fluent in a language - one regret about core requirements. Other than that I think it's great to experience different subjects and learn about things you wouldn't otherwise even try. People have found majors that way.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Service, Service, Service. Although also sports - most students workout and many play a sport even if just intramural. But not sports are not intimidating - I hated gym class in HS but feel totally comfortable here. The arts are growing on campus - there are a lot of dance groups and the theater program is outstanding. Most weekends there seems to be a least a small performance by theater, certainly multiple arts performances every week. Dating is not a great scene, although I feel like this is true of many colleges. There are a fair number of serious relationships especially by senior year. And awkward serial hook-ups but "we're not a couple" kinda situations are very common. So are random hook-ups - though let's clarify here that hook-up for most people I know does not mean sex. People definitely go out on the weekends, and seniors go out a lot during the week too. There is always something going on. We have no Greek life - the Jesuits are not a fan. I think this allows for a very open social scene which is easy to migrate between groups and show up at a party and at least know a couple of people. While there are a lot of parties and a fair amount of drinking, it is acceptable to not drink. People who don't drink still go out to parties and no one judges, at least no one I know. There is always non-drinking stuff going on on campus too and hello the city of Boston provides endless entertainment. Also, quick note on drugs - it's there if you want it but not very popular and one could easily go through four years and never see any of it.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

Like most Northeastern schools the stereotype would be spoiled rich white kid. A lot of J.Crew and Northface.

Stacey
What is your overall opinion of this school?

I think BC is a great sized school--it's spread out just enough to make the scenery on campus quite beautiful, and yet, after...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

I think BC is a great sized school--it's spread out just enough to make the scenery on campus quite beautiful, and yet, after one gets adjusted, you feel like you know a good portion of the students--be it through classes, extracurriculars, or living arrangements, everyone certainly finds their niche. BC isn't plopped right in the heart of Boston, but since the city is so easily accessible I think the location is perfect--located in an upscale area, with only a short T ride into all the student hang-outs. As for school pride, the term "Screaming Eagles" doesn't say enough. BC has by far one of the biggest set of fans, from sports (football becomes a way of life in the fall) to academics to the social scene, we all know that we are truly blessed to be at such a great place.

Describe the students at your school.

Students shouldn't necessarily feel out of place at BC, for there are so many groups on campus to support one's race, ethnicity, sexuality, gender, etc. However, that doesn't mean that everyone is going to be fully accepting. The majority of students here are very tolerant of other people's lifestyles, but acceptance isn't universal. The LGBT crowd here is so small that it is certainly difficult to just casually meet someone of similar orientation, unless GLC is sponsoring an event or holding a meeting. The University canceled a GLC dance a few years back, and there are some big-wigs at BC who fear that by including sexual orientation in the non-discriminatory clause, alumni and donors will stop giving funds to the school. But again, people shouldn't feel totally ostracized, for there are plenty of student-run resources readily available to them.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

BC, like many universities, may take a bit of time getting used to (just the college life in general), but definitely give it time. I was not a huge fan at first, but have since come to meet a vast array of incredible people, and learn so much in fields that are of extreme interest to me that I wouldn't go back and change my decision at all.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

Despite the fact that J. Crew is definitely a popular label seen on campus, the student body definitely is not snobby for the most part. BC really does have a great community of caring people, and its Jesuit roots encourages students to reach out and volunteer, or even go on special weekend retreats to reflect and get to know one another. As for the relationship aspect, it's certainly not impossible to get into a relationship here, but students (girls especially) should not go into things blindly, assuming that Mr. Right will fall in love with you after a drunken hook up...Highly unlikely.

What are the academics like at your school?

I have absolutely loved my academic experiences at BC. But, I must say that my encounters are not the norm--as an English and Studio Art major, I have never had a class with over 25 people (in my majors), and I have become very close with a great deal of professors. Instructors are really here for you, and I'd advise you to make your connections early--asking for letters of recommendation for jobs and grad school came so easily because of the fact that I keep in touch with my professors over the years.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

The social life at BC is go go go! Partying is certainly prevalent, but I wouldn't say it's totally out of control, due to a lack of Greek life on campus. But, there are certain spots that are definitely more party centralized than others. Students certainly have the option to party or to do other fun, perhaps less liver-damaging social events, and the school is really good about putting on various shows and forms of entertainment on the weekends to suit everyone's liking. Athletic events are HUGE, so those generally take up a decent amount of weekend time. Off campus, Boston is brimming with activity. From concerts on Lansdowne Street to bars near Fenway and shopping on Newbury street, one will never be bored in the city!

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

BC students are oftentimes perceived as extremely preppy and snobby, and there is the running joke that relationships don't really exist here.

Madeline
What is your overall opinion of this school?

I love the atmosphere at BC. WIth the sports, the academics, and the town of Boston itself, it's an awesome place to be. Th...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

I love the atmosphere at BC. WIth the sports, the academics, and the town of Boston itself, it's an awesome place to be. The 8,000/9,000 student undergrad population seems perfect to me--it's small enough that you recognize people all around campus and in classes, but not small enough that you know everyone in the first few months. I also love that my class sizes aren't very big, so one-on-one time with the professor is easy to come by. I spend most of my time in my room with my roommates, hanging out with my friends. I have gotten a very positive reaction from people when I tell them I go to BC. They're impressed with the academics, and want to know what it's like to go to the school. I think there's a ton of school pride. There's not a day that goes by that people aren't sporting some sort of BC gear. The amount of students that travelled to Notre Dame this year seems to me to be a great showing of that. I think one of the biggest complaints students have is a lack of communications between the student body and the administration.

Describe the students at your school.

I really think BC is doing themselves a disservice by not recognizing the LGBT group on campus, and accepting sexual tolerance into the non-discrimination clause. I think BC is wrong in that there's no way to promote unity without encouraging gay behavior, if that's the stance the Catholic Church wants to take. I would think there are some students that would feel uncomfortable here, just because BC is the type of school that pulls in a certain individual. The alternative/social-progress individuals I have met here seem to hold a grudge that the campus is not that diverse. Yet I find this is something that they should have expected, and cannot hold against the school once they are here. I would say that most students are from the east coast, but there has definitely been a move towards recruiting students from more areas of the country. Students here are politically minded, even if it's just an echo of their parents' own beliefs. To me, BC is predominantly right, but as a Catholic private institution, I think that's expected. I don't think students talk about how much they'll earn one day, but students are definitely aware that CSOM is where the money is. As the financial school, their concentration on money will usually correspond to a strong job out of college.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

I think BC is an excellent school, and I could not picture myself anywhere else. That being said, I know BC has some problems that I would like to see improved. But I would challenge anyone to find a school where students or faculty members aren't upset about something.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

I think anywhere you go you can find people that are scared of change, or more so diversity. People that don't know something often fear it out of ignorance. BC does have programs to change peoples minds, and those who are open-minded enough will come out with a different perspective. It's also true that a few people can ruin the reputation of an entire area. I think, without a doubt, that a few students/professors/administers have skewed the public's perception of BC.

What are the academics like at your school?

As an English major, I've had the privilege of having much smaller classes. While some of my core classes are 80+ students, none of my major classes have been more than 35 people. My English professors get to know all of us, especially through our writing. I love my writing classes. I get a chance to get to know the other people in the class in a way I wouldn't normally. I think the relationship with a professor is what a student makes it. There are some teachers I have put in the effort to get to know on a personal level, and those are the people I will stay in touch with once I graduate. Yet I also have professors that I've never had a personal conversation with, and don't know anything about me. But that doesn't mean that the professor never made him/herself available for me to start that conversation. I think what the classes are geared to depends on your major. CSOM's classes advance in a specific way, and are geared towards job experience. My classes, on the other hand, are more for all around development. English majors are helpful in so many fields that the experience is how you apply it in a job situation.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

I think the spring break service trip, Appalachia, is one of the most popular organizations. It's one of the largest Habitat for Humanity trips in America. I went on that trip my sophomore year, and it is one of my favorite memories from BC. The dance groups at BC are also a huge draw, with the theater packed for all of the shows. THe plays and music shows aren't as big of a draw for the rest of BC. Athletic events are very popular, with the emphasis on Football. Students are also partial to the big basketball and hockey games, but there are definitely fans who won't go see smaller contests. I met my closes friends through mutual friends that I had made freshman year. If I'm awake on a Tuesday, I'm either studying for a test, or on my way back from Mary Anns, and hanging out with all my friends. Some of the traditions that are held each year are: The Middle March costume ball, homecoming, the senior week events, pep rally before the Notre Dame football game, etc. The party scene depends on your year. Freshman and sophomore year it's normal to go out on Friday and Saturday nights, and by junior year you go out on Thursday too. By senior year people go out Tuesday through Saturday, with specific bars each night. We don't have fraternities or sororities, something I consider one of BC's best aspects.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

BC students are seen as upper middle class children from suburbia. It's not a very diverse campus, so many people are pretty close-minded. BC itself is scene as a somewhat homophobic, or more so stuck in the past of a Catholic tradition.

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