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Boston College

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What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Having transferred from one university to another in the state, I believe I understand what contributes to running a superior university from a student's perspective. I advise those parents and students seeking a university compatible with their academic and social interests to first decide concretely on what those interests are. I transferred colleges primarily because my own interests changed in the past four years - there is a good chance they will for others. You need to feel comfortable and welcome at college! As a graduating senior, I have also come to appreciate the importance of a strong career services department to the college experience. Although I attend a fairly prestigious college, there is more to finding an entry-level job than the name of your school. I would further recommend that students attend a college or university with a broad spectrum of academic departments. Having changed from seeking a liberal arts degree to graduating with a business degree, I appreciate the diversity of study at my school.

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Find a place that has many opportunities for you to do self-exploration and discover what you love and what you are passionate about. During the next four years you will grow and change and mature in ways that you can't possibly think of when you're a senior in high school, so leave some wiggle room for yourself. If you're choosing between your dream school that's a lot of money and a mediocre school with a full scholarship, go to the dream school. You will never regret waking up every day to a place that you love. You have your whole life to worry about money and responsibility, use your college career to experiment and try new things. Once you're in college, don't ever stop questioning things. Don't settle for a B, but don't spend 36 hours hyped on caffeine. Don't be afraid to make mistakes. If you never try, you'll never learn. You'll never regret making a mistake and learning from it, but you will regret living with the "what if". Spend college finding out who you are, and never stop believing in yourself. Be excellent.

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Firstly, and most importantly, keep an open-mind. You are going to have a ton of information being thrown at you from a thousand different directions. If you pick a "first-choice" too early, you might miss out on a lot of great opportunities. Ultimately, it has to be about what YOU want. Culture at school is a much bigger deal than I thought it would be, and it's different everywhere- so make sure you can really see yourself at the school you're attending. Once you've make a decision- the first few weeks are crucial. Meeting "friends" before-hand is overrated, but go into the first weeks of college extremely friendly and accepting. You'll hear it hundreds of times - but everyone is nervous. So meet everyone, be awkward, and get connected right off the bat. It'll make the next four years all the more worth it. Finally, don't forget why you're there. Everyone loves you while you're the partier, until you find yourself failing. However, don't be married to your books- find a happy medium. You'll feel better about yourself.

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Oh hey, didn't see you there. So you might be wondering what I am doing here, an image of your former self. As a high school senior, you have been anticipating the life changing events to come with your entrance into college, the time for new beginnings. Well hate to break it to you sweetheart, but it isn't the easiest or prettiest time for us. Knowing what I know now, while acknowledging the uncertainty of the future, I have to advise you to disregard the feelings you have inside that make you believe that you are not good enough for your peers, your professors, your school. Your insecurities have caused your to ruin countless of relationships, not to mention your own self-image. Acknowledge and embrace the person you are, rather than trying to become the person you think they want you to be. Trust me when I say that all that anyone will ever want from you is you. Some will prove to be lifelong friends, while others will just be a dim memory in your life. Either way just let yourself go, open up and trust those around you.

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My advice would be to thoroughly research the schools you are applying to. Make a list of the things that are most important to you in choosing a school and narrow your search down that way.I suggest when visiting a campus, take time to walk around alone or with your family after a guided tour and try to get a feel for the vibe or energy of the school. Talk to students, ask for directions, you will get a feel for the campus by how helpful students are around campus. Once you're accepting into schools, make a list of pros and cons to help you decide. Make the campus' energy a category in the 'pro/con' list. To make the most of the college experience, get involved and work hard. Appreciate how much the college experience is broadening your horizons and teaching you to be a unique and independent individual. College is also about finding your best lifelong friends, learning to roll with the punches and finding out what excites you, what you are passionate about. College can only be done once, so make the most of everyday.

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If I had the ability to go back to senior year and talk to myself while I was considering colleges I would have told myself to do more research. And by that I mean research the social life at the schools more, research the major requirements further, research more of the area the schools are located in. Doing all of that would help ensure picking out the right college to go to. I would tell myself to also tour more campuses, talk to current students about their experience at the schools, and I would tell myself to talk to my friends more about what they are looking at in a school to see if they could give some guidance. Furthermore, I would tell myself to let my parents and my high school guidance counselor be more involved in choosing which schools to apply to. The last thing I would tell myself is that once you get to college make sure you keep in touch with friends and family from back home and to also be the outgoing person who goes around the dorm building introducing herself to other people so to make new friends.

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Having only been a full-time student at Boston College for three weeks and four days, I would be entirely too ignorant to even attempt placing a value or worth to my college education and experience thus far. However, though it has been such a short while that this campus has embraced me as one of its own, I find that already I call it my second home. I am able to thrive in whichever way I choose, but also guided and directed to paths I might have missed, had they not been pointed out to me. The best example of this is that I have become a member of the Men's Crew Team, a sport that before coming to Boston College, I would have never had the opportunity to enjoy. Here, I am able to chase my dream of becoming a college English professor while knowing it is a possible reality, more and more each day. In short, I intend to get out of Boston College everything of value it has to offer during my four-year attendance; and as of now, that seems to be absolutely everything I could ever want or need from a college experience.

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Hey high school self, All things considered, you're doing a good job preparing yourself for college. Make sure you keep studying with the same intensity, because it's going to make your classes seem that much easier. Don't forget about time management; that is going to be your most important skill in college. Believe me, sometimes it's worth it to go out instead of studying -- you have to keep yourself sane! -- but other times, you're just going to have to learn to say "no". It's always going to be a judgment call. It'll be hard to be away from home. I know everything will seem shiny and new, but at some point in the middle of freshman year, you're going to feel like you got punched right in the stomach. "Who are these people? Where's my family? Where is the place I know and love, where I know who I am?" Listen, high school self, I've been there. And let me tell you, it gets better. Don't be afraid to open up to your college friends; they're just as scared as you are. And remember, time heals all wounds.

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To my naive high school self,Preparation is key. Upon entering college, I was thrown for a loop as the academic load increased and tests required the application of knowledge. My greatest shortcoming was my level of academic preparation. It is absolutely critical to one’s academic success to be prepared. The senioritis bug tends to creep up on many high school seniors, but thinking about your future college self, don’t let it happen. As an incoming college freshman, understanding the concept of studying is a critical aspect. You need to mentally prepare yourself for the amount of time, effort, and thought put into applying yourself. I would congratulate my college freshman self on how I integrated into school. It is essential to pursue other avenues and passions to round our your education and background. From swimming to student government, I effectively time managed. Beyond being prepared and staying involved, always keep learning and value the education you are blessed to be given. Keep learning.

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As a high school senior student, I was very anxious to begin my college experience. My high school did not prepare students much for what lied ahead of them. Additionally, I had few older friends who could give me advice about the years to come. If I could go back in time, there is much I would tell myself about college life. Firstly, I would tell myself to relax. You do not need to know exactly what you want to do with your life- you have time to figure it out. The rumor is true- you will have much more free time in college than you did in high school. Do your best to make the most of this time. Take advantage of the opportunities at school to get involve . At times your school work will be overwhelming. While it may be tempting to lock yourself away in the library for days- resist. Life is about more than getting a 4.0. You will meet lifelong friends here and make memories that you will carry with you always. Stop and appreciate what is around you- these are the best years of your life so far.

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