Carnegie Mellon University Campus Life Reviews

On-Campus Housing
Excellent

13%

Very Good

35%

Average

27%

Poor

17%

Terrible

9%

Off-Campus Housing
Excellent

0%

Very Good

49%

Average

30%

Poor

10%

Terrible

11%

Campus Food
Excellent

11%

Very Good

19%

Average

27%

Poor

28%

Terrible

15%

Campus Facilities
Excellent

33%

Very Good

37%

Average

21%

Poor

5%

Terrible

3%

Class Size
Excellent

34%

Very Good

48%

Average

14%

Poor

2%

Terrible

3%

Activities
Excellent

33%

Very Good

34%

Average

18%

Poor

7%

Terrible

8%

Local Services
Excellent

32%

Very Good

33%

Average

22%

Poor

9%

Terrible

4%

Academics
Excellent

42%

Very Good

26%

Average

23%

Poor

4%

Terrible

5%

Overall Review for Carnegie Mellon University

Excellent

35%

Very Good

38%

Average

15%

Poor

5%

Terrible

8%

We Asked Students, What's your overall opinion of this school?

Daniel

Honestly I've stepped foot one campus once in the last two years, and that was during Spring Break to boot. I've essentially spent none of the time necessary to form an educated opinion about any of the questions asked in this review thing, but given that any little bit helps when it comes to funding an education, I'll crank out some words for you guys.

Sofia

One of the most important things that I considered when applying to colleges was the community I would find in each one. I wanted to attend a university where I felt included, respected and cared for. The community at Carnegie Mellon University has given me that and so much more. The people I have met here have been so kind and friendly to me. It warms me up inside everytime one of the workers tells me 'Have a good day' or 'How have you been?' Or when someone I know waves at me in passing or calls my name with a 'Hey' and smiles. They make me feel like I matter, and that I'm not just one of many. Another thing I love is that there is always someone to help when you need it, and you never feel judged. Coming to a 'smart school', you have this notion that everyone is competing with each other and trying to get the best grades, but that just hasn't been the case in my experience. Here we are encouraged to seek help and work with others. Everyone wants you to succeed, and it isn't about being the best in a pack, but the best person you can be. I'm often reminded of when Dumbledore tells Harry "Help will always be given in Hogwarts to those who ask for it" because it is completely true here, and probably one of the best lessons I have learned.

Colleen

I am currently enjoying my experience at Carnegie Mellon. Although there is a lot of work, the community that you are surrounded by (student wise) are very friendly and very open to help. I was worried about having a difficult time making friends, but I have found people who accept me for who I am and are always there to help me when I need it. There are also a lot of dogs on campus, which is always a win.

Anoop

It's great! I love the the many, many hackathons and the variety of clubs. The vegetarian dining options are surprisingly decent. Everyone you talk to is smart, but there's no cutthroat competition either. While classes can be hard, help is definitely available. Also, we have snake robots: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8VLjDjXzTiU.

Rahul

It is an excellent school academically, but it needs to improve student life and health. Although students can join various extracurriculars, creating an organization requires excessive time and energy, which could be used for academics. That said, CMU provides its students with exceptional educations.

Ruel

You do not go to Carnegie Mellon to Party, though you could find some if you really wanted to. You go here to learn, and the instructors will ensure that they stuff gargantuan amounts of class information into your innocent mind. Stress is definitely a issue here, but the University is at least attempting to remedy that, and there are definitely ways in which you can relax, some more healthy than others. CMU is not a traditional college, and that's something I like about it,

Peter

Overall, it all comes down to the student. If you know how to balance your schoolwork and social life, then CMU is a great place to be. The only complain I would make is that it's really a lot of hard work, but you should know that if you're enrolling. The professors are very willing to help and overall, CMU does everything in it's paper to make sure each and every student succeeds not just in the classroom, but in life too. I don't regret my choice to go to this school, no matter how my GPA looks, and if I had to choose again, I would choose CMU.

Erika

I know Carnegie Mellon has a reputation for being very academically rigorous. However, I believe that despite the academic rigor CMU provides a lot of support and assistance for students to handle their workload and stress. For example, just about everyone - professors, Resident Assistants (RAs), deans, alumni - emphasize that asking for help is not a sign of weakness, but a sign of strength. I have found this to be true, as asking for help decreased my anxiety and allowed me to do better in my classes. My professors have really supported me and helped me and other students manage our workload.

alex

Very nice school. It has a rich history. It needs some updating on one hand. The students are very involved in their academics. They have great sports teams. They do have a girls golf team that does very well in their conference. The school is located in a big city but the school provides security.

ATHENA

Carnegie Mellon is a very competitive environment and it will take a lot of work to maintain good grades. However, students and faculty are always here to help you and there are many resources such as tutoring, excel sessions, and supplemental instruction. Everyone here is very friendly and they want the best for you.

Lorenzo

For those who have coasted off their memory or intelligence their whole lives, Carnegie will teach you what failure means. It will knock you down, and you have to have it in you to get back up and try twice as hard. I've only been here a year, but its already changed me as a person. I put in more effort, I try harder, and I learn from my mistakes. Carnegie isn't a pleasure cruise, but once you're done you'll look back and you won't regret a thing.

Venkat

Excellent

Jessica

Carnegie Mellon University lives up to its reputation for being a rigorous, challenging institution. The English Program is often overlooked, but is a hidden gem in terms of faculty and curriculum. Courses range from Literary Journalism to Pirates and Prostitutes: The Long Eighteenth Century. Not only is the subject matter diverse, so is the student body. CMU is home to students from various international and financial backgrounds and is an excellent place to be.

Cecelia

I love Carnegie Mellon! The school is very focused on learning, and they support you so that you can absorb as much knowledge as you can. The classes ensure that you achieve mastery of the topics, and they go in depth while covering a lot of different subjects. I am also able to have a life and have fun with friends, which is important for life balance. It's a great school and I would definitely recommend it for students who are excited to learn.

Matthew

I'm extremely happy to be a student at Carnegie Mellon, though I'm probably more pleased about it than most, because I came from a low-income area, unlike most of my classmates, so I take far less for granted. Overall, CMU is full of a diverse group of very intellectual and/or artistic people who work very long hours (to give you some perspective, it's not unusual for me to spend so much time doing nothing but work that I legitimately forget what I do for fun, but I also take one more class per semester than the average person), and if they don't, they probably either are in Dietrich or their grades are in trouble. The people at CMU tend to fall into one of two categories: their work is their life and you probably won't interact with them unless you're one of them, live with one of them, or have to work with them academically, or, the majority, who are at least a little bit quirky in some way, however subtle. Pressure to fit in is very small, and there is very little prejudice on campus, so pretty much everyone is free to be themselves at all times. It is important to note that there is definitely a group of people (a rather vocal one, at that) who are very unhappy at CMU, which almost always stems from the workload. It's huge, especially if you're in architecture, computer science, engineering, or drama. It can be managed, but not everyone can manage it. This group of people often grows rather depressed, and really probably should have gone to a different college that isn't near-Ivy League in terms of academics. If you're a prospective student and you're bound to fall into this group, don't go to CMU or any near-Ivy League school. Plenty of people go to less prestigious colleges and still become successful. If you can potentially go to CMU and you go somewhere less prestigious, you'll probably stand out compared to your peers anyway, which will likely look just as good on your resumé after graduation. You are most at risk of falling into this group of depressed stressheads if you fall into any of the following groups: 1) You have mental health issues (depression, anxiety, etc.). And if you're a parent of a prospective student who says they have one of these issues and you're not keen on taking it seriously, I'd suggest changing your attitude. Plenty of Ivy-League students commit suicide every year, and I'll bet every one of the parents of those students would have previously said that their kid would never do that, just like you. Also, it breaks your kid's trust in you if you don't take what they say seriously, and that does serious psychological damage. If your kid doesn't think they have the mental strength for a place like CMU, let them go somewhere with a smaller workload for a while. If they're fine there and think they can handle more, they'd probably have a strong application as a transfer student or to attend graduate school somewhere like CMU. Just listen to them. 2) You are a heavy procrastinator. Granted, many people at CMU have habits of procrastinating and still do well, but if you are a MAJOR procrastinator, you may be in trouble at CMU. There aren't enough hours in a day to complete many of the assignments you get at CMU the night before the due date. I'm not talking huge projects, I'm talking even some of your average, weekly assignments for some classes, especially for computer science. 3) You aren't sure if what you're studying is right for you. I learned very quickly coming into Mellon College of Science that science was not for me, and since I didn't enjoy my work, it was very difficult for me to stay happy when work was all I did for days at a time. I did find a more appropriate field of study (game design) by my sophomore year, but by then it was too late for me to both change colleges and graduate in four years. I would definitely not have survived if I didn't find another field that I actually enjoyed. That being said, there are some very good things at CMU that a lot of the students tend to take for granted: 1) WE ARE SO INTERDISCIPLINARY. There's this one program called IDeATe that offers eight minors that are available for any student in any college that have both a very technical and a very artistic aspect (e.g. media design, sound design, animation and special effects, game design, intelligent environments, learning media, innovation and entrepreneurship, and physical computing) which is an AMAZING program, and all the IDeATe classes have a great mix of the super-artistic and super-intellectual students working on projects together that make everyone look super impressive. 2) We are very collaborative. I've heard some (but very few, and it always surprises non-engineers to hear them) stories about cutthroat times in engineering, but in general everyone helps each other constantly. For example, there's this one course that's an intro to programming course that ~400 students take every semester that we call 112 (after the course number, 15-112) that is notoriously bonkers stressful. It's very very hard and has a very large workload even by CMU standards, but everyone learns an incredible amount and actually retains that knowledge, even if they do badly. Everyone knows that taking it means a semester of suffering, and anyone who has taken the course and meets someone who is about to take it will immediately offer to help them. I've seen students who are about to enter 112 and have had so many offers to help them that they don't know who to choose to help them. Being a TA for 112 is kind of a status symbol. 3) The students definitely have a sense of humor collectively. Scotch and Soda's comedic shows, whether they're staged or improv, student-written or not are always very well attended and well-liked. It's common to see strange, humorous posters in the halls about lizard people or instructing people not to lick the walls that don't have anything to do with anything, but students enjoy them. CMU has a meme group on Facebook (your kid knows what that means. It's basically an invitation for people to make jokes about CMU), like most colleges do nowadays, and as someone who is in many of those groups for various colleges, I can tell you that CMU's students are much more likely to make their own memes rather than repurposing existing generic memes about nerds or computer science or whatever than students at other colleges. That's most of what I have to say about CMU, but as someone who's spent many time in many different colleges because of my program of study (major in Mellon College of Science, minors in the College of Fine Arts, the School of Computer Science, and Dietrich College of the Humanities), here are some distinctions in the culture of the different colleges as I have seen them: College of Engineering: Don't know much about them to be honest, but they seem a bit scarier than the rest. There's a mutual awe between them and computer science students, since engineering students know a lot about hardware and not as much about software and computer scientists are the other way around, so they're often impressed by each other. College of Fine Arts: Such stylish kids! Very fun and easygoing. Very attractive. Most of them know some computer programming. Architecture students live in the studio. The art they create is generally much more on the experimental side than the traditional. Drama kids tend to stick with their own kind, and many CMU students graduate before ever meeting one. Dietrich College of the Humanities: Probably the lightest workloads, but boy do they have to read a lot of readings. A fun, inviting crowd, though there are also a fair amount of pretentious people. Most summertime cashiers per capita compared to the other colleges. They have a lot of opinions on their books. Mellon College of Science: Most likely to be forgotten in the scope of CMU. I mostly have experience with students in natural sciences, but most homework is done in group study sessions. The chemistry majors are pretty close, but the biologists don't really know each other super well. Physics students generally appear to be very nerdy on the outside but sometimes aren't deep down. Tepper School of Business: There are always a lot of Tepper students dressed in suits. I don't know much about them. Heinz College of Information Systems and Public Policy: Small group of people who everyone thinks are computer science, but aren't. Since there are so few, I can't really speak about them as a whole. Also they're all grad students. School of Computer Science: A very impressive bunch. Some are very full of themselves, but most are geniuses who are in awe of how geniusy their classmates are.

x

one of top Us.

Ryu

Carnegie Mellon is a place where academic inquiry really envelops the student lifestyle. Amazing faculty and ambitious students generate a very positive learning atmosphere which breeds creativity and innovation. Being among others who are so passionate about their work encourages one to consistently strive for excellence.

Hyun

Coming to Carnegie Mellon has been the biggest regret of my life. This institution is utterly miserable and most of the students are miserable here too. Many try to get black out drunk during the weekends because it’s the only way they can forget about school work. If they’re not getting black out drunk, they’re getting high out of their minds or both! Which causes a lot of students to develop depression and/or anxiety. The professors do NOT care for the mental health of their students and same goes for the rest of the people employed by this institution. This school fools minorities into thinking there is diversity here by inviting them all on specific weekends to visit when actually less that 20% of the student population is BLACK HISPANIC or NATIVE AMERICAN. They group together all of the minority students to boost their numbers. Overall, really awful institution that only cares about ranking and money. If you are a minority student I beg you to think twice before coming here. This school brags about their stress culture and students usually brag about how little sleep they got. Very toxic and competitive environment.

Jenna

Despite the challenging academic rigor of Carnegie Mellon, the teachers and students there create a passionate and encouraging community. I feel a strong connection to my fellow students. In addition, when I have time to take a break from academics, there are often activities to attend either on campus or in the city.

Hinna

Carnegie Mellon is a great school, especially in terms of academics. Everyone here is really smart and works very hard to reach their goals. However, with this comes a lot of stress, where students maybe care a little too much about what goes on in the classroom rather than what goes on in the world outside of it. In terms of sports culture and typical expectations of a college campus, you might not find a lot of that here.

Samantha

Overall, I decided to transfer to another school after spending one of the hardest years of my life at Carnegie Mellon. Not only did CMU's workload wear me down to the point where I was consistently sleep-deprived and sick, but it also provides hardly any stress-relieving or extra curricular activities. Carnegie Mellon is not the school for anyone who wants a bonafide, American college experience. Its sports suck. Students don't tailgate for games. Greek life is lame. While people will venture off campus, any effort to maintain an active or consistent social life will be completely quelled by the miserable weather Carnegie Mellon suffers year-round. From October until the time you leave for summer break, the sun will disappear. Rain is constant; the cold unrelenting. If you are from a tropical or Southern area, strongly consider the impact weather has on your feeling of wellbeing. I myself experienced seasonal depression for the first time in my life. While the academics are marvelous and the job opportunities post-graduation are outstanding (or so I've been told), the steep price you will pay for this is a hellish four year career that takes $70k a year to afford. I transferred because changing majors was very difficult and I valued my own mental and physical health more than a semi-prestigious undergraduate degree. Graduate, medical, or law school can always be completed at an Ivy. Carnegie Mellon boasts its interdisciplinary curriculum, but that was not the case for me. I would have never dreamed of pursuing a double major or even a minor with the amount of hours I was REQUIRED to take and all the work that entailed. Yes, this is an academically rigorous school. Yes, I attended a college prep high school and received A's and B's here. However, the competitive sleep deprivation culture, weather, workload, and the lacking student life ultimately drove me away from my dream school.

Eric

Carnegie Mellon University is an amazing school. The visitor center is always stocked with refreshments and friendly faces, the school plans many events for visitors, and all of the students that I've met have been very friendly. Overall, just a perfect school!

Ish

As a visitor was unimpressed by the campus and the attitude at the admissions office...It felt like a snotty and uppity kind of place...

Abigail

As soon as I stepped on this campus I knew it was the place for me. The people here are nerds, yeah - but that's why I love it! CMU students are passionate, brilliant, inspired people, and I'm so very lucky to call myself one of them. Also, CMU truly puts the phrase "work hard, play hard" to good use. If you only want to study - go you! If you want to go out every night - get it! If you're somewhere in that middle ground (as most people are) you will find plenty of people right there with you. CMU is really a hub for creation and innovation - #1 Musical Theater program, #1 Computer Science program, #6 business school (all national rankings) - and there will always be a place to make you feel at home.

Kyle

Carnegie Mellon is a very impressive school with a very impressive pedigree, and it lives up to those expectations. The curriculum is intense in the drama school, but the teachers are readily available at all times and extremely passionate about what they do. Small class sizes and well-maintained facilities only add to the experience. Campus life is relatively quiet, owing to the smaller student body. People join Greek life and there is certainly revelry to be had on a given weekend, but the campus is by no means wild. The real strength of the student body is in its diversity. Students from very disparate backgrounds are able to forge lasting connections through the many extracurricular activities available on campus. Whatever you're into, there's bound to be a club or organization dedicated to it. Dorms are iffy, and depending on where you live you'll either be very comfortable or not at all. The food is good, not spectacular, but it's varied, and the school recently opened a branch of Au Bon Pain on campus if you prefer to eat at a chain. Pittsburgh itself is a fascinating city to live in, and off campus housing and dining can be found for cheap if you don't want to live on campus after freshman year. Overall, CMU is a really great school. It's not perfect, but it does provide a world-class education and amenities far above many other universities.

Ankit

Fantastic college. Best environment. CMU is a default choice for top students to get in the programmes. CMU has a wide range of program.

Timothy

Whether you want challenging courses, research experience, top-of-the-line professors or you want to be philanthropically involved, CMU can give you the chance to experience all these things. Carnegie Mellon does not hide from politics or from standing up for what they believe is right and will continue to pursue advancements in science and the humanities. While the direct surroundings may not offer a lot of great weekend getaways, CMU has ample access to downtown Pittsburgh and the University of Pittsburgh campus for exploring. Where else would anyone want to pick up that extra bagpipe major? (Hey at least it might impress your relatives.)

Alison

Carnegie Mellon is a great university, located in a great city, my main complaint is that a lot of funding for the CS and robotics department comes from the US government, and that prevents the school from being bold and politically active. It is oddly neutral.

Ivan

Carnegie Mellon University is probably one of the best educational communities that I have ever been affiliated with. As students we have access to a lot of resources whether physical or faculty wise. Hunt library is probably one of my favorite places on campus. Interdisciplinary studies and extracurricular activities are one of CMU's greatest advantages. Other than just combining electives amongst different schools, you should be able to walk to any faculty member and you will get your answers - whether it is part of your major or not . . . Highly trained and acclaimed faculty is a huge inspiration to all students and therefore, our productivity is positively affected .

Olivia

The school has a really supportive environment where students, faculty, and staff are working to help you succeed. There are a lot of departments that exist solely to help students with anything ranging from financial aid to career and leadership development to tutoring. The school is relatively old, so the campus is built kind of haphazardly; it's quirky but you learn to accept/enjoy it. CMU is primarily asian institution located in a safe, affluent suburb, but that also means that it can be hard to get off campus and explore more of Pittsburgh. It's a city with a lot of culture, a lot of activities and museums, and a lot of growth. A lot of the people here feel that they find a place where they belong because there is so much overlap in communities, and very few people identify themselves with one "group" or "activity." Like many higher ranked universities though, the school has developed a stress culture in which all nighters and excessive stretches of work are considered a norm. The campus and greek life have recently brought attention to mental health issues, and there are support systems in place. CMU is a great fit for a lot of people, and, depending on what you're looking for, it could be a perfect match.

James

I want my money back! Horrible faculty, horrible facilities, and a devastating, useless degree that was a waste of three years and $100,000. Avoid the MFA in Fine Art at all costs- I am an idiot for coming to this college for this type of degree and you would be one too.

Clancy

Carnegie Mellon is a 'world-class university'. We have undeniably great academics, and that alone grants it a decent rating, but the academics are about as far as CMU goes. Do not come to this school looking for the parties, food, or facilities. We lack all of those. Students are generally nice but very introverted and much more concerned with their work then they are with their friends. Your friends at state schools will be eating better food and having more fun than you are, but you can rest assured you are (probably) getting a better education. CMU is a wonderful place to go to learn very interesting things but if you're looking to have some fun in college maybe choose another place.

Dean

Carnegie Mellon University is a unique school, in that it emulates elements of nearly every other kind of school (big state party schools, the Ivy league, research schools, technical schools, etc.). At CMU, if you choose to identify with one of the aforementioned school types more than any other, it's totally possible. We have greeks that go hard, athletes that go harder, and geeks who, obviously, go the hardest. People here are ridiculously smart - going here will make you feel unqualified, but that's fine - the people around you will be your greatest teachers, not your professors. The weather is REALLY bad, like easily the most depressing thing about this school, but if you can get over humidity and constant dreary gray rain, then sure, this school is great for you. Great for computer science, great for architecture, great for drama. For business, the ranking is a bit of an exaggeration on the quality of education here - the classes are disorganized, the kids are disheartened, a noticeable proportion of the class is made up of athletes who don't always qualify for other schools at CMU, so having intellectual conversations with the business kids is pretty difficult. The business program is also poorly organized, at least in the first year, and this leads many students to consider transfer. Other than that, CMU is a great community for innovation, exploration, and conversation.

D

I truly do love this school. Although it has rightfully gained its reputation as a pretty intense school academically, the campus is nice, everyone and everything-- especially professors and advisors-- is geared to help you ultimately succeed, grow, and learn. This paired with the unparalleled research and academic opportunities it offers make it worthwhile.

Theodore Jeremy

Carnegie Mellon provides an amazing college experience to the motivated college undergraduate. It is abounding in resources, so I feel like I can achieve any of my aspirations as long as I put in the effort to seek those resources out. There's also a diverse set of people, so it isn't hard to find a place to fit in.

Julianne

CMU is really hard academically for most STEM majors, & there's a pretty serious stress culture. There are very few blacks/latinos, but campus is pretty diverse in many respects. Students are very nice, hard-working, and they actually like to party (on occasion)! CMU is super rough but the degree will be worth it.

Lauren

Steve

I felt like it can be a decent environment for me to pursue my degree in Computer Science. It is ranked number 5 in the nation in some websites, which astonished me since the acceptance rate is bit more lenient than most top schools. It would be a good place to have a nice college life from all the research I have done.

Michael

The school itself is not outstanding. Nothing in particular draws your eye, and the stereotypes - to an extent - are true. Yet there are also plenty of different people from completely different backgrounds so each person is sure to find a group of like-minded friends.

Ruhan

Carnegie Mellon is amazing. But it's certainly not for everyone. CMU's motto is "my heart is in the work" and no college takes their motto more seriously. Be prepared to spend most of your time doing very tough but fun and rewarding work. You will be challenged but you will also learn so much that it's totally worth it. The job placement for STEM is phenomenal (job fairs are huge here) and graduating from CMU is a serious badge of honor. There is a good variety of extracurricular activities to balance out the intense academics as well. CMU doesn't have a huge party scene; there are some parties but most people are here to study. If you're serious about your studies, like being challenged, and receptive to failure, CMU is for you. This is especially true if you wish to study computer science; CMU has an amazing CS department and graduates from SCS are some of the highest paid college grads in America.

Shadi

I'm my opinion, Carnegie Mellon is one of the best colleges in the United States. The thing I like best about this college is that there isn't that cut-throat competition feel to the school that plagues many other top colleges, and the environment is pretty chill and relaxed.

J

I came to Carnegie Mellon not super excited, but hoping to make the most of it. And boy, did I try. I put myself out there, tried to say "yes" to most things (unless it made me actually feel uncomfortable) all with the hopes of making friends and having some fun. My classes are ridiculously easy although I am learning things, so that's not a bad thing. Others are having a harder time with classes. CMU social life is absolutely dead. They do nothing to foster a community here, so unless you're lucky enough to find your people, you won't–you'll be lonely and bored despite making your best effort to be around others and connect with them. People don't care about that here–they care about academics only.

Sarah

I was pretty set on not attending CMU but it ended up being the last school I visited right before the decision deadline and I knew I had to go. It has ended up being the best decision I have ever made. From the size to the people, CMU was everything I could have wanted in a school. One of my major concerns was the social scene because I had heard all the rumors about how CMU is all nerds and there are no parties. This could not be farther from the truth as I have never had trouble finding a party on the weekend and there are plenty of drinking opportunities throughout the week as well (Wine Wednesday lol). The social scene is definitely what you make it out to be. If you are not interested in partying then there will be ample people on your page and if partying is your thing then you will not have trouble finding them (except maybe during finals week but there still tends to be something). The only thing you have to do is make sure to put yourself out there because it would be hard getting invited to parties if you don't know anyone (obviously). Usually the people who complain about the lack of social scene are the ones that don't really put any effort into meeting people and developing their social circle. One huge positive of CMU is that most students are extremely passionate about what they're doing in/out of school. I have had run-ins that have lasted hours because we tend to get very excited about whatever we are talking about. I once ran into a friend while eating with my bf and my friend (an art student) and my bf (comp sci) talked for almost two hours about compression algorithms and the intersection between science and philosophy. People here are very open to talking and love to have mentally challenging (but also silly) discussions. Another example is when my friend group had a two hour discussion at night during midterms about the complexity of mirrors. We then proceeded to challenge each other with riddles and mind games until almost 3 am. If you enjoy kind of goofy mental stimulation then CMU is definitely the place for you because the balance between fun and brains is pretty good and the people here will challenge you to be the best version of yourself as well as support you through difficult times.

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