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What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

A year ago you dropped out of high school, walked away from formal education and your own academic potential, and for thirty more years you will not return. And then one far-away day, when you are forty-eight years old, you will experience surprising second-growth. You?ll seek and earn your GED and then walk the halls of your community college, willingly digging into anatomy, English, and anthropology text books, eagerly delving for new knowledge. You will feel secure, supported by advocates, overarching and protective, who believe in you. Safe in their midst you will evolve, at home in your new found forest of learning. You will be a straight-A student confidently facing your studies, reaching upward from within, basking in new experiences and surprising self-development. But for now I'm a forgotten acorn in your pocket, a small, waiting seed of your own courage and potential; I am your future self, dormant but alive and waiting. One far-off day you will reach and find me, realizing I have been here with you all along, just waiting to grow. On that day I will take root and become you, believing in you, in full bloom.

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The very first thing I would tell myself is that comparing high school and college is night and day. Another advice I would give is to tell myself to cherish each day of my senior year. It is a bittersweet experience and the activities that come along with being a senior in high school are unforgettable. Being more open minded will definitely make the transition much smoother. If I came into college with a judgemental attitude, I would certainly feel like an outsider. Academically speaking, I would emphasize on reading the required material in a timely matter. Another thing I would mention is the pace of the classes. If one doesn't keep up with the reading and lectures, that will spell trouble. Furthermore, I would say that making decisions is crutial for success in college. When deciding whether or not to skip class or even a test, one should consider the outcome of what will happen. This could mean getting a zero and not being able to re-take the test. To sum things up, I would tell myself to go out and be involved. Making new friends and trying new things will make challenge yourself and become different.

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I have learned a few guidelines to be a successful student as well as a happy person. First, make friends with everyone. Smile every time you enter a room, say hello, and try to meet everyone on the first day. Remember everyone's name. Don't talk at people, get them to talk about themselves. Listen to them. This is your community, love them. They will love you. Second, everything you do for the first time will suck. Start new things without fear, and keep doing them until you don't suck. This is how you become good. A good motto I've heard: Fail Harder. Third, never apologize or be ashamed of the things you like. Being strange is how new trends are started. Being the same is how old trends die. Fourth, throw great parties. Invite everyone. Be a good host, since you already know everyone, introduce people. Fifth, people will steal ideas from you. Don't be angry, be flattered. It means you have good ideas. Sixth, get things done. Anyone can start a project, but perfectionists and lazy people can never finish. Nothing is perfect, so finish and move on to the next project.

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Well now, that is a very loaded question. To be able to go back into time, and speak to my younger, dumber self.. That's a hell of an opportunity. Firstly, I think I would punch myself in the face. Two years ago I was a different individual, a more dislikable individual. I would tell myself that school isn't just another thing your parents put you through because of their wishes. Back then, I didn't quite grasp the fact that doing well in school was something I wanted to do for myself, not for my parents. In addition to that tid-bit of advice, I would proceed to tell myself to prepare to be immersed in a setting of complete strangers, each having a cornucopia of ideas ranging from common-ground (between he/she and myself), to utter "alien-ness." I would also have to add that the transition into college, for it to be smooth, and painless, is best faced with an open mind. The varying perspectives of the many individuals I have met have helped me to not only learn about my peers, but about myself as well, by comparing those ideas/views against my own.

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I would tell myself to begin filling out college applications as soon as my junior year of high school. Next, I would schedule campus visits to see what campus life was like and how the students are. I would tell my senior self to fill out as many scholarships as I could, making it a full-time job, to take the pressure off myself in paying a full tuition. Encouraging myself to keep good grades will also help with scholarship aid. More advice I would give myself is to work hard all the way up to graduation. The college transition was the hardest part for me. I would engourage myself to build long, lasting friendships and be around the right people. Keep your head straight and let nothing get in the way of your career goals. Study hard and that will lead to success. People will try to bring you down, but it is your job to shove them aside and focus on education. Life doesn't give handouts, you have to earn your way. In conclusion, I would say to be actively involved in college groups and get a campus job because someone could be a reference.

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Dear Me, Please do not even think about packing half the shoes you have in the purple bin in your closet. And when mom says pack extra underwear, DO IT. At the very least, please do not leave our closet a hot mess. When you get to ISU, please try to make friends and make sure you go to the freshman orientation on time. (YOU GET A FREE SHIRT!) And yes, senior year will end like High School Musical did. Knowing you, it's hard enough to give advice without you criticizing every single word. So I'm just going to trust that you will listen, do not go to ISU, it's not for you. Don't listen to what mom wants you to do, listen to what your heart says. Right now, you're sitting at home trying to figure out where your life is headed and I want you to know that it's going to be okay. Mitchell still loves you and you still have your friends and family. Yes, you will still be indecisive, yes, you have more questions, but you will have answers, some, not all. Sincerely, Me. PS: Don't forget your deodorant.

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There are many things I would say to the high school senior version of myself. Among them would be to listen to your parents more and sit back and enjoy things a little bit better. Even more than that I would tell myself not to worry too much about college life. College is important, but there are so many great people from the advisors, to the professors, to those who work in registration who are willing to help you get the most out of your college experience. Don't worry too much about knowing your major the moment you walk into those doors because in my case, a year into studying, you may realize that major won't be what will make you happy. Take a variety of classes so you can get a better understanding of what you may want and always feel free to ask questions of everyone. You don't need to have the answers to all of your life's questions the minute you walk into college, but you will learn many of them during your time at school. Take college seriously, but make sure you enjoy it as well.

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Having a sibling that is in highschool, I find myself telling her the things that I would have told myself. If I could back I would initially say that highschool is important. The grades you make, the sports, and activities you get involved in all play a part in how you interact in college, and sometimes even what school you choose. Most of my issues came around junior year when I became nervous about coming to ''the end''. I would simply tell myself that it is ''the end''of highschool, but the beginning of a new stage of my life, one that will stick with me and really mold me to the person that I want to be. Lastly I would point out that it does not matter whether I decide to go out of state, a junior college first (or only), or a big university. The only thing that matters is if I am happy because I am going to school for me and no one else. I would reiterate that what works for some, may not work for others. I would have set and researched more and mapped out a plan that I was confident with.

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First, I would acknowledge myself for being strong and making it thus far considering the statistics of individuals finishing school in the first place. I would tell myself to keep on my toes about education because it is very important to maintain the highest gpa one can achieve. It makes things so much easier if you?re going attempt to earn grants and scholarships and enter organizations that will help you down the road in life or if you want to go to graduate school. Your school records seem to really follow you in life when I comes to a lot of things. I would also tell myself to become a social sponge and soak up the various cultures that surround the campus and areas around the campus. Having an understanding people of different cultures will really help once you?re out in the real world. Just be an honest and open person while doing your absolute best in college will provide good grades, a great college experience, and a good foundation to build a great successful life off of.

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I went to a small, christian high school. I would say that no matter what you decide, prepare yourself for life outside of a christian community. It is difficult to live out your faith outside of the community of christian students and friends. It is important that we prepare for the differences in lifestyles between believers and nonbelievers, or even people of different beliefs. Also, I would tell myself to do exactly what I did. Go to community college first. You get the chance to go to college but still be at home and transition into life after high school. Next year I will be going to a university farther away and I have had the experience of going to college under the safety of my home life. The fact that my first year only cost $5,000 was a bonus for my parents. I got a good education for a very reasonable amount of money, and, because I stayed at home, also had a year of growing into college life and a year of deciding my future without paying a lot of money.

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