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Emory University

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The best thing about Emory is its balance between academics and social life, which seems to fit most people but it really is what you make of it. If you choose to stay in the library until 3am every day of the week, you can do that, and if you want to go out and get wasted every night from Wednesday to Sunday, I guess you could do that too. However, the average Emory student fits neither of these extremes. Most like to go out at least once every weekend, either to a frat party/club/bar or just to spend time with friends. I have yet to figure out whether students have their priorities straight. Many pick "joke" classes so they can go out more often. There are not many overachievers here, and if you choose to take 5 classes instead of the typical 4, most will think you are crazy. It is very easy to get involved in extracurricular activities, and most students are involved in a club or sport. My advice, if you plan on attending, is to surround yourself with the right people early on and definitely keep an open mind about life in general. Also, do not be afraid to make mistakes. In fact, make lots of them. Talk to everyone. Make spontaneous decisions. Plan ahead, but allow yourself to live in the edge as well. Live a balanced life. If you are having a hard time adjusting, ask yourself why. Talk to others about it that might be in the same position as you. ALWAYS leave your room door open if you are just chilling in your room. Most importantly, first impressions mean nothing. Never be too quick to judge people here. What would I change about Emory? Many things. Before ranting, however, I would like to point out that Emory is definitely working towards many improvements, especially in the academic area. First, Emory is currently allocating the majority of its money towards building new "green" residence halls for freshmen. However, not much has been done regarding upperclassmen housing. Off the top of my head, I wish that at least some of this money were invested into more creative classes and major options, better food (this issue seems to be a work in progress), build more cafeterias (there is only one cafeteria!), make the DUC (main cafeteria) more like a student center so students can actually hang out there, improve the gym with better and newer equipment, build better zipcar locations, and make the shuttle system more convenient. I also wish the business school would offer a business minor in order for students to actually have a chance to explore the liberal arts curriculum here and not be confined to the business major. It's also really annoying to see how overpriced things can be around here, given how expensive it is to attend here in the first place (even with financial aid for some people). For example, if you lose your Emory card, they charge $25 for the first time. From what I understand, most schools replace cards for free the first time. The Emory bookstore prices are also ridiculous, but that's common for every school. Doing your laundry costs money. Need passport pictures for your business school application? 12 dollars. Need to print something out in color? 1 dollar per page. I wish some of these things were subsidized instead of overpriced. It really makes me wonder what we're paying for. I would also like to see Emory develop new departments. An architecture school would be great, as well as an Industrial/ product design major. There is no engineering department here, so the only options for a prospective engineer are either (1) go through the 3-2 program with Georgia Tech (a good option, but I have mixed feelings about this program), (2) Study something similar to engineering, such as applied physics, along with liberal arts classes and complete a master’s program in engineering after graduation, or (3) opt out of Emory completely and study engineering in a 4 year engineering program. The math/ CS departments here do not appear to be very good for a top-20 school (no matlab courses? CS170 being taught by grad students? sad for a school of Emory’s reputation.) I guess if you're set on studying math, physics, or CS, the only advantages I can think of are small class sizes (personalized attention from profs) and obtainable research opportunities (but not much variety). Lastly, Emory needs more than 2 career fairs each year and needs to get the attention of more companies to recruit Emory students more heavily. We have a very pre-professional student body, so why not complement it with as many career opportunities as possible? Maybe Emory’s southern location prevents many northeast and west coast companies from heavily recruiting. On the bright side, Emory does a good job of attracting Atlanta-based companies. I believe that in order for Emory to remain competent in the next number of years, it needs to market itself much, MUCH better. However, Emory is not trying to be the next Stanford. As a result, it chooses to advertise itself as a liberal arts school with great business, medical, and health programs, d-3 sports, a beautiful campus, greek life that isn’t too overbearing, and green dorms for freshmen. If this is enough to get you super excited to come here, then this is probably the right school for you. However, for me, Emory is what it is. I think this school needs something unique to make it stand out. At first, the student body as a whole didn't seem very open minded or creative. Getting to know people better helped somewhat, but I am still a bit underwhelmed. I know for sure that 99% of students here are very smart and capable and have something going for them. However, many people conceal their nerdy/ quirky side in an effort to be cool like everyone else, and this can get frustrating. My tip is to get to know people well before making conclusions. As far as school pride, some students are proud of attending here and others are not. In the end, your university career is what you make of it, and Emory is a solid top-20 school with room for improvement. If you seek a very academic-oriented environment, I would say look elsewhere. I recommend visiting the campus during a weekend in the middle of the semester to get a feel for how life is over here. I think this reflects my overall view of Emory. If you have any questions, feel free to e-mail me.

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Emory is a small, private school with about 7500 undergrads, which makes it easy for students to get to know at least half if not more of their own class. When I tell people I go to Emory, half of them say they have never heard of it, and the other half is usually impressed and comments on how smart I must be to go to a school like Emory. Emory is unique in that it has its own version of school spirit. Many people accuse Emory of lacking in school spirit because we're not a sports school, and they're right. We compete in the NCAA division III level and there is no amazing team we can rally around. Most students are apathetic to sporting events on campus unless they have specific ties or their friends are on a sports team. Emory's school spirit mostly comes from the smaller group of students who are involved on campus and participate in many extracurricular activities. Aside from our official mascot, the Emory Eagle, we also have an unofficial and unusual mascot named Lord James W. Dooley, a mischievous skeleton who roams around campus throughout the school year. The traditional is unique to Emory and is the source of much of Emory's school spirit. Dooley dates back to the early 1900s when he first appeared in a school publication. Since then, he's come to life on campus each year through an anonymous student who dresses up as him. He also has a spirit week dedicated to him in the spring semester called Dooley's Week, where he lets out students from their classes if they write a clever limerick to him. Emory has had quite a lot of big name artists perform on campus, including Wiz Khalifa, B.O.B., Girl Talk, Third Eye Blind, T.I., One Republic and Big Boi since I've been at Emory. We've also had comedians, like Daniel Tosh, Tracy Morgan and Kevin Nealon, come to campus, all through the planning of the Student Programming Council. Third Eye Blind is my favorite band of all time, so getting to see them live and front row for FREE at Emory was probably the best experience I've had up to date at this school. Emory delivers in terms of offering the most and best out of your student activity fee. The most populated spots on campus are the Dobbs University Center, or the DUC, where the main dining hall is located and where most student organizations meet; Cox Hall, the main food court, ballroom space and computer lab; and the library, which is more of a social scene than a study space save for those designated quiet area. I spend most of my time in the DUC or Cox. As an involved student, I'm at the DUC at least once a day, and for lunch or a place to study in between classes, I go to Cox. The most recent and biggest controversy on campus in my three and a half years occurred last spring when seven students, who call themselves the Emory 7, were arrested after occupying the quad in front of the administration building for several days to protest Emory support of our food company, Sodexo, whom they claim have human rights abuses. There was local coverage and widespread gossip about the event to which the Emory's president, James Wagner, responded saying that those seven students were misinformed. Most other students heard or read about the matter and either didn't care or thought that these students were protesting for the sake of protesting or influenced by the same kind of protests on different college campuses. In the end, the commotion died down and the administration handled it well. Regarding administration, that's one area I feel where Emory gets to strict on its students, especially in the area of student enjoyment. Emory administrators seem to be tough on Greek life and on campus programming, but many student leaders have forged relationships with administrators to reach compromise between both viewpoints.

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Emory's best feature is the people. The student body ranges from students only concerned with what grade they receive to those who legitimately enjoy their classes, from bookworms who are always studying to people who party way too often. Despite their differences though, most people are friendly and accepting, and it's easy to make friends. The size helps make the campus close knit - even on the short walk to classes you're guaranteed to run into at least one person you know - but at the same time, is big enough to constantly be meeting new people. Atlanta is interesting as far as cities go. It has the typical attractions of big cities, from clubs and nightlife to museums and theaters, but the city is very widely spread out. It can take up to an hour to get from one area of the city to another (such as from Emory campus to the airport), and as a result, cab fare or gas money can add up for those who like to spend a lot of time off campus. Emory students have their typical hangouts near campus, and with Cliff shuttles (free transportation offered by the university) and the MARTA system (public transportation), most attractions are accessible. The campus itself is quite active, with things to do on any given night of the week. School pride is often considered non-existent at Emory, but that's only based on one definition of school pride: sports-centered. As a Division III school without a football team, most people ignore athletics. However, school events are widely attended and customs are well-loved, and most students will be willing to gush about the parts of the school they like the most. Food and housing are the most common complaints at Emory. The food is decent, and definitely edible, but gets very repetitive very quickly, and most second semester students try to find ways to avoid the main cafeterias. Housing for freshman, as of the 2010-2011 school year, will have the majority of the class living in one of the four brand new dorms, which are excellent. However, some of the older dorms remain in use for now, and upperclassmen don't have the same benefits. Juniors and seniors have the opportunity to live on Clairmont Campus, which is apartment style living with an outdoor pool, gyms, tennis courts, etc., and is considered very nice. However, Clairmont is about 15 minutes away from main campus by shuttle, and there is little housing offered on main campus past Freshman year. Sophomores have a few opportunities to live on campus, but most students have an extra 5-10 minutes added on to their walk to classes and are separated from the school by a main road.

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I absolutely LOVE Emory. The best thing about this school is the COMMUNITY. There are so many diverse students on campus, and I am proud to say that I am constantly meeting people on a day to day basis. Emory is big enough where you can meet new people, yet still recognize and know people walking to class everyday and/or in your classes or at a party. Every student at Emory is involved with a group whether it'd be community service (which is quite a big deal here), Greek life, religious life, cultural, interest, etc. There are events on and off campus hosted by Emory students, and I think the fact that Emory students are SO passionate about their clubs and extracurriculars shows how fun the Emory student body is in terms of making their college experience a balanced and fun one. I think the only thing I could complain about Emory is the lack of housing organization. The housing office at Emory is not organized and if you are an upperclassman looking for housing through the school, well, good luck. there is a lot of community at Emory but a lot of the upperclassmen live off campus or at Clairmont so it is a bit harder to hang out with your older friends if you have them and don't have a car. Luckily, I have a lot of upperclassmen friends as a transfer and I spend most of my time on campus, but occasionally off (which is nice sometimes). Atlanta is GREAT. There are tons of things to do and tons of people to do them with at Emory. I love it when people ask me where I go to school because I love Emory and I think more people should apply to it and realize how great a school it is! Because there is no football team, it is hard to have Emory pride, but I think that's even better, because all the Emory students unite over others things besides sports! We unite and have pride for our school community and the uniting thread is that majority of us love Emory and are intellectually driven to succeed here regardless of a football team. I would personally say the only thing unusual about this school is the Dooley mascot, the unofficial skeleton mascot with his troupe. It just seems a bit cultish and creepy to me, but that is just a personal opinion. I LOVE Wonderful Wednesdays here, where all the clubs at Emory come together to promote their club activities and reach out to the student body. It is such a great way to unite the community, blasting loud music on the sunny lawn and just bonding with peers and friends in the middle of the week! Emory is the best place for students who are looking for a great college experience that strives to promote the healthy balanced college life.

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I'd say the best thing about Emory is that the school is small enough so that you can get to know a large percentage of the student body, but large enough so that it feels bigger than high school. I do wish the undergrad pop. was a little bigger (maybe 7,500), but it's a pretty decent size and easy to adjust to. A lot of my friends back home don't know too much at all about Emory, but my family friends (my dad is an academic) all think very highly of it and know about its good and improving reputation. So, another thing I'd change is to recruit more on the west coast and outside of the northeast. I never once heard anything about Emory until I received a letter in the mail my junior year of HS. I spend most my time in my room, at the WoodPEC, around the DUC and at the AEPi house. Our only college town is Emory Village. It has some decent places to eat, but it sure as hell isn't a hangout place. I'll be honest...it sucks. Emory administration is a little too hard and unforgiving to many of the school's good fraternities, and not hard enough on ones like APES. The administration should be more flexible in allowing what kind of events fraternities can hold, and when. The policy about not allowing fraternities to hold alcohol-involved philanthropy events is ridiculous. For instance, charging a 21-year-old $5 admission for a specially-themed party, then giving all the proceeds to charity isn't allowed...that is just plain stupid. School pride? People love the school, but pride would be better if the athletics were better. most frequent student complaints: the girls, the school doesn't recruit enough outside of the northeast, and the administration is too hard on the good frats on campus

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As a memember of a fraternity, I have to say that Greek life is the best thing about Emory. It make social networking a hell of a lot easier and it's fun to be around a huge group of cool guys that have similar tastes and ambitions, but who are still diverse in personality. Emory often feels a little bit too small in terms of its student body. At times it seems that everyone knows everyone through Greek life, classes, etc. However, most of the time, it seems just right. It can often feel like a cozy little community. The Emory Administration seems to be a bit greedy. Students who are not on financial aid pay about 45,000 dollars to go here, and yet we are still over-charged on parking, books, printing, food, etc... Sometimes Emory feels like a money-hungry corporation. There's not much school pride at Emory, but it's definitely growing. Emory students know how to party. If there was a way to calculate the ratio between partying and studying, one would discover that Emory students somehow find a way to do a lot of both. I suppose Emory students are pretty intense in both social and academic activity.

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The best thing about Emory is the fact that it is social and also academically challenging with great rankings. I would change cafeteria food- it is pretty repetitive and boring. The size of the school is just right- you see people you know when you walk around. People are impressed when I say I go to Emory. I spend most of my time on campus between the dorm, the gym and fraternities. Emory's administration does a good job of presenting Emory in a positive way- I do not think they are always correct on their political stance. The biggest recent controversy on campus is the Apes fraternity getting in trouble / rushing. There is a decent amount of school pride- however the school could use some more school spirit at sports games. Emory is its own bubble in Atlanta where people from all different backgrounds learn and share experiences. One experience I will always remember is song-fest the inter Freshman dorm song competition. The most frequent student complaints are probably about the food at the DUC and that it is not very political or opinionated.

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The best thing about Emory is how willing the faculty is to work with you if you have a problem or a question. So far, my teachers have been incredibly helpful during class as well as after class. One thing that I would change about Emory is that I wish the students had more school spirit. The size is just right. When I tell people I go to Emory, the usual response is "Oh, what a GREAT school, and isn't it nice down there in Atlanta?" I spend most of my time on campus in my room or at the gym. Emory is a pretty small college town. The administration does a great job making sure their students are happy and safe. Recently, the biggest controversy on campus has been how the administration has dealt with the off-campus fraternity APES. There is not a lot of school pride. One thing about Emory that is unusual is that while there are many new beautiful buildings, the gym is not that nice. One experience that I will always remember is "running the row" at the end of rush. The most frequent student complaints are probably about the lack of food choice on campus.

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Best thing? Emory is beautiful and the resources are amazing. One thing I'd change? People are far too rude. Emory is just the right size. Most people that I've encountered in Ohio have not heard of Emory. I spent most of my time in my dorm room. What college town? They are working on Emory village which is outside of college, but it could be a lot better. The administration does not follow through with what they say they will do. The waste a lot of money and don't have their priorities straight. The RAs don't care if freshmen drink, which is really sad. There is a lot of school pride but not as much as many other colleges because Emory lacks a football team. Something that is sort of unusual is that they have their own museum. Most frequent student complaints are about the dining hall and how depressing Emory is. Many students become depressed while at Emory.

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when i first came, i really did not know about this school. i applied only becasue my guidance counselor suggested me to. i wasn't too excited to come as wasn't my first choice at all. however, my first semester at emory was such a blast. i met a lot of cool kids and professors. i started liking the school. i liked how it's located in near atlanta where people just go and chill when they get bored and how it's not right in the city where people can just relax if they are willing to unlike NYU. weather's relatively nicer than new england region yet i wouldn't say its the best. it's just so mad random. only drawback of the school is that emory doesnt' have a football team. how lame. and food sucks. seriously, emory needs to do something with food. its worse than my highschool.

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