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Emory University

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What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Finding the right college for you is not about what school is ranked highest or has the best football team, although these are ways to narrow them down, these are not reasons you make your ultimate decision around. To find the place that fits you best, your personal needs should be assessed first. Do you need to be near a city? In which field do you plan to study? Does cold or hot weather suit you? Do you plan on being active in extracirriculars, ndulging in academics, or both? I think these questions can help highlight what you're looking for. I suggest making a priority list and rank these questions about what is most important to you to have in a school. Then, find the school that accomodates these needs. As for making the most of college, I would say meet and learn from people. Whether they are professors, advisors or peers, find ones to challange you: the way you think and act and force you to grow, because thats what college is, a growing experience. Also, study hard so you can use your knowledge towards a career and hey, maybe even kick butt in Jeopardy one day.

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First, take a deep breath…matter of fact take a couple. College is astronomically important absolutely, but it’s just one chapter of life. You have a right to mess up and you have a right to change your mind –you’ll do both. Just enjoy and absorb every moment. Don’t worry so much about the illustrious yet frightening Future; no decision you make right now will plummet you into poverty after graduation or immediately solidify you your dream job. So just try to relax and think clearly. Don’t rush or overdo it. The fun events and social activities aren’t going to evaporate if you don’t soak them all up now. Neither will the classes you want/need for your major. You have an obligation to yourself to enjoy this experience. Which means: get out of your comfort zone, take that class that’s full of upperclassmen, get to really know a professor outside of class, find your go-to study spot (which doesn’t have to be the library), eat dinner alone sometimes, figure out what you’re really passionate about, and mostly, focus on the good and enjoy college to the fullest. Good Luck!

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To find the right college, I believe that the student should visit the campus as soon as possible in order to get a feel for the size and atmosphere of the school. When I was applying for colleges, I thought that I wanted a small liberal arts school, so I applied to mostly schools that fit that description. However, when I ended up visiting the campuses of these colleges, I realized that they were too small for me. So, once my acceptances came in, I really did not have much to choose from for colleges and was left wondering if I could have made a better choice. One of my other deep regrets about college is that I didn't get involved in more extracurricular activities earlier on. There were so many activities that I wanted to do, like research or volunteering, but I often gave excuses not to participate. Now, as a junior, I wish that I had taken advantage of more of these opportunities earlier on. I advise all students to seize the day by taking advantage of the academic, extracurricular and social activities that college has to provide as soon as possible.

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Grab ahold of the concepte that you are fully on your own. Grasp the feeling of exploring and let go of what teachers and parents say. Listen to yourself, but use the tools they have bestowed apon you. Find out your major or calling in life. Research the best school program and what the school cost. Make sure to look into all options. University, Vocational, Community, Institute. After, dive into options In state or out of state and how much the school will coast additional to out of state cost. Do you want hands on or class environments. Then see what your school of choice can offer you as far as programs to help further your education. Also if you have an orientation day, ask as many questions to the people guiding you around the camps. Such as, "Is there a good student to teacher ratio?" and "Is classmate or online help available If I don't understand how to complete a task or a homework site if I miss class?". Make sure to not be too far from home, you still need laundery done, but remain independent and try to do as much while your setting up your future.

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If I could talk to myself as a high school senior, I would tell myself to work on my time-management. This has been my main problem in college. I have this mentality that I will always get my work done, but I might just lose sleep over it sometimes. While many find this acceptable in their academic lives, I know that it is very unwise for many reasons, most importantly because it causes me so much unnecessary stress. By putting off work until the last minute, I am hurting myself not only academically and mentally, but also physically, and not taking proper care of one's own body is simply a sign of immaturity. I would tell myself that being involved on campus and off campus is very important. Spending time with friends, studying with classmates, volunteering, and working are ALL important things to do. Find the time to do these things; work them into a schedule that will still allow time for eating three meals a day, sleeping at least seven hours a night, exercising at least thirty minutes a day, and finishing school-work on time and without unnecessary stress.

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First and foremost, college is not high school. It is an entirely different ball game and doing the best that you can is what really counts. There are going to be young adults from many different parts of the world that are going to challenge you to be your best. Realize that grades do NOT define you. As long as you honestly gave everything you had to give, be happy with yourself. Secondly, get involved! High school often defines a place for all of us, but college is really where you can be independent. Branch out and try things that you would normally be apprehensive towards! The newly found independence can often swallow us whole. Remember that you always have a support system at home, and they are only a phone call away. Not only is it hard for us to adjust, it's hard for parents to let go. Use the campus resources; that's why they are there! Professors are actually human, believe it or not! Usually they have the most experience on campus, and often times have the best remedies to get through the day. Just stay true to yourself, and who you want to become.

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Finding the right college can be a daunting task. When I began my search, I wrote down all of the aspects that I would want my dream college to embody. After I made my list, I started with the most broad trait; I wanted to be close to home. Then I narrowed my search to colleges within 100 miles of my home. Initially, I came across ten colleges that I wanted to attend. From there, I looked at what I could afford to pay for college and how much financial aid I would be receiving. In the end, I chose to attend Emory because of their dedication to the academic success of their students and career success of alumni. At Emory, to welcome freshman students they exposed us to all facets of the extra-curricular community at the University; that program helped me to decide how I could make the most of my experience in college. I also quickly learned that having effective time management can make college much easier so that you can make time for a social life. Being involved in other activities outside of academic leads to a successful college experience.

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My first two years of school were at Berry College. I was very focused on soccer and dedicated myself to playing the game in school. I enjoyed Berry, and I made many close friends. I ended up transferring to Emory because Berry's location was a little remote for me. I wanted to be apart of a college town. Berry and Emory have both shaped me, but in different ways. The key to finding the right school is being able to find the place where you can meet people, enjoy school, and make close friends. These are all essential to a college life, because they are the things that get you through the rough times and help keep you going. Not all times in college are fun and exciting. Yes, college is a great thing. Yes, college is a learning experience. By visiting a campus, you are able to actually see the students interact with eachother. By simply observing you can tell if the students enjoy their time at their school and can see if their happy. Typically, if you join a campus with a lot of happy students who like eachother, you'll be happy, too. Balance is key.

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The first year in college introduced me to the next level in education, a variety of people from different backgrounds, and organizations that became a part of my life. The challenging classes at Emory University taught me a different way of thinking and how to view certain events. It has broadened my perspective greatly and positively. Besides the classes and education that I have gotten out of my college experience, the various people that I have met at college have been the most valuable to me. Not only the friends, but the professors offered themselves to be great help for us. They not only gave advices on our classes but also in our college lives. I moved from South Korea about 5 years ago, and since then, I had no interactions with Koreans. But now in college, I have found a new way of socializing with Koreans, and it has been one of the most interesting events that I have experienced in my life. Emory Univerisity offers so many opportunities to me, both academically ans socially. The first year in college has been the best one year in my life.

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First and foremost I would tell myself how wonderful I was doing and that none of my work was in vain. My genuine interest in the subjects being taught and the extra work I put into classes all had benefits, even if I could not foresee them at the time. For example, my experience with human anatomy classes had me more prepared for my psychobiology course as a freshman undergraduate than other students in the class. Now, I know my struggles in highschool not only revolved around assignments and tests, but also people. I learned immense patience in the presence of biggotry and hate. I learned kindness and calmness in the face of aggression. I learned independence and self-confidence in the midst of a crowd of teenagers, all trying to figure out who they are. I learned value. All of these things have benefited me tremendously at college; have gotten me through the most stressful weeks with ease—I assure you, final's week is no joke—, have given me a positive mindset in an environment full of negativty, and have given me confidence in the face of doubt.

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