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Georgetown University

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Describe the students at your school.

There are a bevy of racial, religious, LGBT, socio-economic, etc. groups on campus, they're always welcoming to new members and there is never any hostility. I myself have never had any interest. The diversity of the student body means that no matter your race, religion, sexual preference, socio-economic status, or anything will isolate you, and the administration works to ensure everyone feels welcome on campus. Granted, an Irish Catholic attending a Jesuit university is a comfort, but I can't think of anyone who feels any prejudice towards he or she. Students' class (and social) attire ranges broadly, although there certainly is a preppy vibe at times. students make friends across any and all cultural distinctions. financial security is most common, although everyone is respectful of people regardless of their financial backgrounds and cognizant that their situation is not the only one. 4 tables of friends. varsity athletes, general population, guys, girls, students from all 4 years. the student body mixes very well. I have friends on the football, soccer, women's lacrosse, track, and crew teams, and probably more. I have friends who are in all 4 years of college here, study many different things, and have very different backgrounds. Most students are from East or West coast states, there's a lot of Jersey kids. I could never pin down the bulk of the student body to one particular place though, unless you want to go by hemisphere. There are a lot of Americans, but I'm friends with several who are not. Being in DC, there are a lot of politically active students, as well as students interested in politics. And a lot who are not. I'd guess there is a liberal majority. It varies how much kids discuss how much $$$ the might end up earning one day, some kids do, many kids don't.

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I have addressed some of these questions in earlier prompts. Students dress nicely for class. Girls often wear high heels and fancy jewelery, and do their hair and make up. Boys also wear nice clothes, like polo shirts and khakis. There is a large body of international students at Georgetown as well, that tend to be fairly exclusive. They generally have more (even) more money than Georgetown students and take their studies less seriously, and so it sort of makes sense that they do their own thing. They go out to clubs in designer outfits and sit in the VIP lounge. They have fake IDs and go to Panama for Spring break. Students joke that most people at Georgetown are from New Jersey. There is a large contingent of students from New England, although California and the South are also well represented. Most students are quite well-off, but also financially responsible. Students are generally politically aware and politically active. Georgetown is a leading school in International Politics, and its location in Washington, D.C. also calls attention to these subjects. Students watch the debates, work on campaigns and play drinking games to the State of the Union address. Internet home pages are often set to the New York Times web site. For a college campus, Georgetown is quite conservative, although most of my friends are liberal and, although this was not true when I was a freshman at Georgetown, it is now commonly accepted that George W. Bush is not a good president (although still not accepted that he's all around bad). Students do not talk about how much money they earn in a day, or what grades they get. They are not secretive about this sort of information, but they are modest and socially graceful.

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I think the student that would feel most out of place at Georgetown would be the very alternative and gothic-y type person. Like I mentioned before a lot of people at Gtown are relatively nice dressers and to see someone with nails and chains all over there body would be a bit outlandish for Gtown. I don't think that means that they won't enjoy Gtown - I just think that on a very superficial level they might have a harder time fitting in than most. Most Gtown students come from Jersey and California - but you also have people from Bulgaria, Nepal, Malaysia, England, etc. It's a pretty great mix. A lot of the kids at Georgetown come from sound economic backgrounds (hence the nice dress) but I don't think there's an overwhelming presence of money on campus at all. Nor do I think that kids talk about money all the time - a lot of us, especially those of us in the business school, are competing for the most lucrative jobs in investment banking...but that's not the only thing we talk about. As for the activism, this is the SFS's area of expertise. Most of the SFS's I know are incredibly involved and active politically - or at least very knowledgable on the subject. I myself am not that politically adept but that just goes to show you that Georgetown provides the means and environment to be as involved/aware as you want without overpowering you with influence.

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Student groups on campus have a loud but respectful voice. Everyone can be heard, especially in Red Square, the outdoor free-speech forum. Someone who's unlikely to take initiative and get involved in things may feel that their classmates are doing so much more and find that their social circle is limited. Most Georgetown students tend to be involved in multiple extracurriculars and have wide/overlapping circles of friends. Most students wear jeans in the colder months with a long sleeve T, polo, or sweater. When it gets warmer, khaki shorts for the guys with t shirts or polos and skirts for many girs with any sort of top, but usually on the somewhat conservative side. Different types of students definitely interact. Dining Hall Tables: Jocks, Socializers, Studyers, the Average Student. Most students are from New Jersey, seriously. Lot of California too. Realistically, mostly east coast, but the whole country is definitely represented. Politically aware would be the understatement of the century. People run the gamut on the political spectrum, but everyone knows at least something about what's going on; and if they don't, they will by the time 1st semester freshman year is over. People do talk about how much they'll earn one day but more in the cotext of being relieved of financial burden than how insanely rich they'll be.

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Students who didn't want to ever do work and party all the time would feel out of place at Georgetown. Even those people who love to go out on the weekends, or weeknights, know when they have to buckle down and do work. Everybody wants to succeed. Students wear a variety of things to class. There are those that are trendy and dress up, others in their pajamas, then teh odd mix of sweatpants on bottom and polo shirt and pearls on top. Different types of students do interect. In the business school especially group projects are demanded in almost every class. It allows you to meet new people who you wouldn't ordinarily befriend. Lots of Georgetowners are from the North East. Most prevalent background is probably pretty well off, however that is not exclusive or flaunted. Many students are politically aware (government is one of the number 1 majors). Groups for the College Dems, and College Republicans, and everythign inbetween exist on campus and are extremely popular. Most students don't see a firm career path upon graduation, therefore people are talking about more what they are going to do with their lives rather than how much they will be making.

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Honestly, there are so many different kinds of people at Georgetown. There are preppy kids, athletic people, really really smart people, stoners, hippies, environmental lovers, LGBTQ groups, etc. You will definitely meet some very interesting people here, but the majority of everyone is pretty normal. You'll find a group of friends that is right for you, but there's also a lot of opportunity to branch out and meet new people. Everyone is pretty driven and it's clear that we're all here to one day have a great paying job and/or make a difference in the world. We dream big here. Unfortunately, that means there can be overly aggressive people in classes sometimes - those kids that actually do all the readings and talk all the time and occasionally even question what the teacher is saying. Those kids are annoying, but they can also be entertaining. Just remember that the world would be a boring place if everyone was the same.

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Many students are politically aware and active only insofar as they aspire to be politicians someday, which is quite a different thing from being engaged in work for social change. On the other hand, there is a growing undercurrent of students dedicated to anti-racist, feminist, queer and worker justice activism. There are, certainly, a large number of students grooming themselves for elite corporate futures in fields like international banking. The student body is largely homogenous -- white, middle/upper class, sheltered Christian upbringing, concerned with success defined in the traditional terms of money and power. Again, however, there is certainly enough diversity that you can make your Georgetown experience quite separate from that homogenous mainstream -- I managed to surround myself with a much more diverse group of very cool students who are feminists, activists, bohemian theater kids, or whatever else.

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The vast majority of our students admittedly come from money and that affects their physical appearance as well as attitude - but not as much as you'd think. Students are surprisingly down-to-earth due to Georgetown's focus on community service and international diversity. This is DC, so everyone who decided to come here is very accepting of all types of backgrounds and even curious about those diverse backgrounds. DC also breeds political activism, which you'll definitely find on Georgetown's campus but won't feel stifled by such activity like on American U or George Washington U's campuses. Recently, for example, students from American U publicly criticized Georgetown students in a number of different media outlets for not joining the Occupy DC protests in large enough numbers. Despite a slightly left-leaning majority, Georgetown students feel as though protest involvement is not a substitute for finals studying.

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Georgetown's greatest asset is its student body. Everyone is incredibly intelligent and well-spoken, and people have a very interesting array of experiences and insights. You have the normal diversity in types -- jockier types, more studious types, counterculture types -- but I would say it's incredibly hard to find "jocks", "nerds", or "hipster" kids. Everyone is able to relate to everyone else, even though there's a wide variety of preference in everything from musical taste, to dress, to extracurricular activities. I've never had a problem finding something in common with a student here, and I've been shocked time and again when I've sat down with someone who I expected to be a meathead and found a truly intelligent and thoughtful person. Or, on the other hand, sitting down with a very intellectual person and having great conversations about Hoyas bball or current events.

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One of the things I learned here was never judge people - I never really did it before, actually, but I stoped it completely at Georgetown. The school teaches you to get a long with people of all different backgrounds, which is useful. I rememeber after Sept 11 some professor made a comment about Jordan in class, and this girl, whom I had always assumed was some ditzy, white, blonde idiot, said something like "Um, Professor, I am not sure what you are saying is accurate." And when he challenged her, she said "Well, I grew up there, etc" and then they started arguing - in Arabic. Things like that happen routinely at Georgetown, and not at most other schools. The student body as a whole is more worldly than similar student bodies at Princeton, etc. (whose students are just rich, whereas the gtown students are rich and speak a couple of languages, etc.)

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