Conway, AR
Hendrix College


62 Ratings

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Recent Reviews

Erin
Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

Hendrix College, because of its size, has a unique sense of community. With less than 1,500 students, professors, staff, and ...

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

Hendrix College, because of its size, has a unique sense of community. With less than 1,500 students, professors, staff, and students get to know one another and regularly interact with each other on and off campus. The Odyssey Program contributes to this integrated community, as students work closely with faculty and staff on local and global projects designed by students.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Before you head off to college, spend a little more time figuring out your comfort levels. Decide now if you are going to focus only on classes or get involved in student organizations, and actually go to the student organization fair when you have the chance! Think about possible majors but have a diverse freshman class schedule - take classes that fulfill requirements but also consider different disciplines. Connect with other students coming from your area before going to orientation so you know who you can hitch rides with back home or catch up with when you're home on winter and summer breaks. Throughout all four years, embrace the opportunities that come your way, even if you are nervous or it is so far out of your regular activities or routine. It's worth it! Academically and socially, things will crop up...go for it. Tackle topics in classes you aren't comfortable with - you will grow and learn so much more. Finally, take advantage of your professors and advisors. They are there to help and they want to talk. Learn their office hours and make sure they know your face!

What kind of person should attend this school?

The Hendrix student is excited and willing to learn and participate in class, wanting a tight-knit community with lots of campus-wide traditions, comfortable with frequent interaction with faculty and staff, and self-motivated in and out of the classroom. Hendrix College is always busy and students can always find something to do outside of the classroom, so it is important to learn how to balance social activities with academics as well as take advantage of the lectures and workshops offered around campus.

Thomas
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Stay the course with your studies and learn everything you can. Learning proper study skills will go a long way. It is goi...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Stay the course with your studies and learn everything you can. Learning proper study skills will go a long way. It is going to be hard in college but if you listen and learn from your teachers it will benefit you, even if you don't agree with them all the time. They were in college at one time too and they had to experience many of the same things you will in college. Learn from their experiences.

Bronwyn
What is your overall opinion of this school?

My opinion may be skewed because through my time here, I've discovered that Hendrix really isn't that great of a fit for me (...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

My opinion may be skewed because through my time here, I've discovered that Hendrix really isn't that great of a fit for me (alas, it's too late for me to transfer, as I'll be a senior next year - thank goodness for study abroad!). For one, it's WAY too small. The student body numbers around 1200-1300 and everyone is at least acquainted with everyone. You are literally never alone. If that's your cup of tea, then great, but it isn't mine - I value solitude and I don't like feeling like everyone knows my business. The smallness brings out another problem - lack of diversity. I feel like everyone is cut from the same classic white southern progressive liberal misfit cloth. There was more racial and religious diversity at my private southern prep school than there is at Hendrix. Academically, Hendrix is definitely challenging, however for me, my first two years felt a little like 13th and 14th grade (then again, my high school is one of the top private schools in the country, so I came in with a ton of preparation), but still, challenging. It has a high acceptance rate, but don't let that fool you - most of the kids who don't want to work hard drop out after their first semester, so I'd say that Hendrix is more self-selecting than anything (something that I do like). The majority of the professors are really kind people who are passionate about their subject, care about their students (I've personally never had a bad experience with a professor, but I'm sure there are some bad ones out there - nothing's perfect) and are really easy to get in touch with if you have any questions. Most people ask me "where" when I say that I go to Hendrix, though my mother (and others) swear to me that it's a nationally known school. However, I do still get a lot of Arkansas-centric vibes from it. And last but not least, Conway is nothing to write home about. The best two things about Conway are ZaZas (amazing, albeit pricey, pizzas, salads and gelato) and Panera Bread, both of which are located conveniently close to campus. Other than that, it's just your standard suburban sprawl town in the mid-south. Most students would say that 99% of the socializing at Hendrix is on-campus.

What are the academics like at your school?

Academics are very typical for a small liberal arts school. Professors teach because they love to teach and are there for their students (as opposed to doing research and having TAs teach their classes). Of course they know your name and if you're close to them, they probably know even more about you than that. Classes generally require a good amount of work and studying to excel in, so again, despite the high acceptance rate, Hendrix isn't an easy, blow-off type of school. There's also generally quite a bit of class participation, but then again, this depends on the class and your fellow students and whether or not everyone has done the reading. My department is tiny (like everything else in this school), though all of the professors I've encountered have been nothing but kind and gracious towards me and ready to help whenever I needed them. Looking back, I think that I would've preferred being in a larger school with a larger department and more resources, but the professors here I definitely wouldn't trade for anything. I think my entire philosophy of education is at odds with the liberal arts model, based on what I've observed at other universities during my time abroad. Where I'm currently studying abroad, the universities work very differently. Students enter a major/career and specialize in that one thing (e.g. history teacher, sociologist, researcher in the sciences, math teacher, lawyer, doctor, etc) for around 5 years, so when they finish university, they're hyper-prepared in their field. They don't spend time taking gen-ed classes or classes that have nothing to do with their chosen major. There are definitely downsides to this (what if you don't know what you want to do at 18? for example), but I feel like if I had gone through this system, I would be way more prepared for graduate school than I am now. So, definitely, this school is geared toward "learning for its own sake," and geared around the entire liberal arts model of having some kind of knowledge about a range of subjects rather than specializing in one thing. There are quite a few gen-ed requirements, though I'm sure you could work them into your major/minor somehow.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

I would describe the majority of Hendrix students as the type of kids who were generally ostracized in some fashion in high school, mainly of the "liberal fish out of water in a conservative southern environment" variety. Or perhaps they weren't necessarily ostracized, but still, the majority of students fit the mold of "liberal who grew up in the conservative south." This isn't to say that there aren't conservatives or north easterners or west coasters on campus (there is quite a sizable population of jocks and their female counterparts in fact), but the "stereotypical" Hendrix student is a liberal hipster type from the southern US who's always striving to be as unique as possible (it's up to you to decide if that's good or bad).

Describe the students at your school.

Diversity: not that much racial diversity, lots and lots of white people. There's some religious diversity, and quite a bit of diversity in the sexuality/sexual orientation department (Hendrix is by far the most LGBT friendly place in the area). I'd say the majority of the diversity is socio-economic, because most of the students here receive some type of scholarship or financial aid, though sadly, many students are forced to transfer because tuition goes up every year and their scholarships remain the same, making it so that they're no longer able to pay for Hendrix (one of the reasons why Hendrix has around a 60% graduation rate). There's really almost every type of student here, even though the majority are white southern liberals, but I guess I'd say if you're conservative and come from a lot of money (like a lot a lot), like the classic southern fratboy or sorority girl, you'd feel out of place here. My main issue is that Hendrix students tend to pride themselves on how "open" and "welcoming" they are to everyone, but if you don't have a set group of friends by the end of your first semester, then, to put it bluntly, you're pretty much screwed socially. Because it is VERY difficult to break into another "friend group" after that period. People are nice and cordial to you and I'm sure if you are a very extroverted person, you can succeed in making friends with anyone and everyone, but if you're an introvert like me, then it's very hard to break into one of the tight knit cliques that Hendrix has after your first semester (when everyone is new and just getting to know each other).

Describe your favorite campus traditions.

Shirttails is always a lot of fun, I suppose.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

There are a lot of student organizations, some that are more organized and active than others, to say the least, so if you want to get involved, the opportunity is there. Like I said before, most of the social life is on campus (because Conway is a super boring town), so there's a ton of traditions as well, Shirttails and Miss Hendrix probably being the biggest among them. Outside of partying, there's also a fair amount of speakers and films and discussions that happen on campus as well that are events of sorts.

Sierra
Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

Don't let others define your identity. Try new things, and discover who you are. It's better to find a few people with whom...

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

Don't let others define your identity. Try new things, and discover who you are. It's better to find a few people with whom you can be best friends than to have a crowd of aquaintances. Have fun, but still try to be responsible with your school work. Really examine how you want to spend the rest of your life, and use what you find to help decide what to study.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Think about life and evaluate your beliefs. Make sure you are the one defining your identity and not others. Have courage to be who you are and try new things. Have fun, but be responsible with the blessings you have recieved. Make a couple of best friends. Get involved in both your campus and your community. Don't stress so much, and enjoy life.

What do you consider the worst thing about your school? Why?

They are not very tolerant of Christians.

Shannon
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Before starting this new adventure you need to heed my advice. Firstly, find and apply to all the scholarships that are avail...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Before starting this new adventure you need to heed my advice. Firstly, find and apply to all the scholarships that are available to you. You don’t want to put a lot of financial burden on your parents. While you are looking, do not procrastinate. The teachers will give tremendous amounts of work and those scholarship deadlines will catch you by surprise if you are not prepared. After getting into college, continue the path of not procrastinating. These professors are tough and most of them will not be lenient. You’re grades depend on the amount of time you put writing and rewriting papers and how much time you spend studying. Meaning, skimming three chapters the night before your Chemistry test in the morning equals a failing grade. Lastly, be open to meeting your peers in your freshmen class. This school will be a different environment for you, but it is the same for your peers. A part of college is about the effort put into your classes, but the other side of that coin is about the relationships and bonds that are formed during your fours years there with people who will challenge you into being a better person.

What do you consider the worst thing about your school? Why?

After a night of hard raining, there are huge water puddles all over the main campus. They really need to do something about the drainage system on campus.

What do you brag about most when you tell your friends about your school?

We have the most updated equipment for students to use.

Meredith
What is your overall opinion of this school?

I am in love with my school, and I have a hard time imagining myself feeling better at any other institution. The school is ...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

I am in love with my school, and I have a hard time imagining myself feeling better at any other institution. The school is just the right size for me, and I love the atmosphere that is promoted by our student body. The warmth and friendliness that is synonymous with Hendrix doesn't stop with the students, though - it is something you feel immediately upon stepping foot on campus, and that you continue to experience beyond graduation (from what I hear, at least). This school is a family, and you can experience it through the "hello" you get from the grounds crew when you walk to class, the dining hall staff who know your nephew's name, and the professor who invites you over for dinner. Hendrix is small, so you can't expect everyone to recognize the name when you tell them where you are studying, but those who are familiar with the school get excited when they find out that you go there. It is generally recognized as an academically strong and selective school with a unique student body. Conway, Arkansas is certainly not a metropolis, but it has everything you need plus a little entertainment for the weekends. Little Rock is only about a thirty minute drive away, and it offers restaurants, museums, and shopping. That being said, I spend most of my time on campus. There are always fun things to do on nights and weekends that I worry I'll miss if I decide to have a night out on the town. There are walk-in movies in the brick pit in the center of campus, a plethora of costume theme parties, not to mention choir concerts, guest speakers, film viewings, and charity fundraisers.

Describe your favorite campus traditions.

We have a few traditions centered on birthdays, which can make that time really fun on campus. When you go to the cafeteria, the names of all the students who have a birthday that day are listed next to the menu at the door. Then, when you go to sit down with your friends, the cafeteria staff will come to your table with your own personal birthday cake, complete with a candle. One of the (louder) cafeteria workers will then announce to the whole dining hall that it's your birthday, and everyone will stop and sing/clap along to the Hendrix birthday song. After dinner, your friends will try to herd you toward the fountain, where they will then toss you in to end your special day with a splash. Don't worry- they'll check your pockets for your cell phone, etc.

Describe a typical weekend.

There is always something happening on campus, so I usually go to whatever the main event is that weekend (i.e. concerts, campus-wide theme parties, etc.) and the other night that weekend I'll usually do something a little quieter, either hanging out with a few friends for dinner or playing games at someone's apartment. Since there is no Greek life, a pretty good majority of the campus attends the bigger events sponsored by clubs on the weekends, and those events are almost always held on campus. For smaller parties people will open up their apartments around the border of campus so that their friends can drink and relax during their time off from class. Even though a lot of people drink, I've never felt pressured to drink/get drunk on nights that I want to take it easy. That easy-going attitude is definitely something that drew me to Hendrix. During the days, I usually try to do a little studying, often with friends, and then end up watching a movie or going out for lunch. If I'm feeling ambitious, I'll muster up the energy to go to the WAC (Wellness & Athletic Center) or if not, I might run over to a friend's place to cook up some dinner. Pretty much anything is game on the weekends.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

There is a lot of variety at Hendrix, but generally speaking students are seen as politically liberal, open-minded, smart, and quirky. That may be the case, but there are some vocal conservatives on campus, and beliefs fall everywhere on the spectrum. I would say the quality that could most easily be pinned to a majority of students is our acceptance of others' differences - regardless of sexuality, politics, religion, money, etc. you will be respected at Hendrix as long as you respect others.

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

Red brick buildings, pecan shells, trees, and flowers. It is easy to mix up buildings when you're learning your way around. Even though some buildings have been around since the early 1900s and others are only two or three years old, they've done a good job of making the architecture blend well and sometimes that means that buildings blend together as well. It's a pedestrian campus, with parking available around the border and footpaths made of cement or pecan shells between buildings. On the main part of campus, it should take less than ten minutes to get in between any two buildings. If you're coming from student apartments, it could take more like 15 minutes to get to class. It definitely helps to have all the academic buildings so close together, and the dorms are nearby as well. The only places where it might take longer to make it to a meeting are the art complex and the WAC (Wellness and Athletic Center) which have been added to the edge of campus fairly recently. I have a lot of favorite spots on campus. Anywhere outside is absolutely gorgeous in the spring, with the azaleas that wallpaper the campus. The Murphy House is my favorite building on campus, though. There is nothing better than snuggling up next to the fireplace and sipping on tea while working my way through books for class.

Describe the dorms.

Think of a stereotypical college dorm. That's pretty much what we have. There are six dorms - 3 for girls (Raney, Veasey, and Galloway), 2 for guys (Hardin and Martin), and one that's co-ed by floor (Couch). The dorms are not identical, but they have the same amenities. The first floor of each has a lobby area where you can hang out, a kitchen, a laundry room, and sometimes a TV room. Each floor of the dorms has two bathrooms that are shared, and two RA's (Resident Assistants). All the girls dorms have sinks and vanities in the rooms, and so does Martin. Hardin and Couch do not. Otherwise, the amenities are the same - everyone gets pretty much identical beds, desks, dressers, chairs, and closets. Most people only live in the dorms their freshman and sophomore years; after that, they move into Hendrix-owned apartments, houses, etc. The dorms are all open to any student, though. To choose where you get to live, you just list your preference of which dorm you want to live in, and the name of your roommate if you have one (there's a lottery system if you don't). There are pictures of the dorms on the school's website I think.

What's the dating scene like?

Hmm... I'm not really sure if I've figured out the dating scene at Hendrix. I have a boyfriend and several of my friends are in relationships, but I would say the vast majority of people are single or casually dating/ hooking up. Basically, the people who are seeking serious relationships can find them, and those who want something a little lighter you can find that, too. It's really just whatever you want to do.

Why did you decide to go to this school?

My older sister had gone to Hendrix, and so that's how I knew about it, but because she and I had done everyyyything the same way throughout school -same sports, same clubs, same instrument in band, etc.- I wanted to break out of that pattern and try something on my own. I really liked the idea of a small school that was similar to Hendrix, so I checked out Earlham, Oberlin, Oglethorpe, and a long list of other schools. Every time I visited a campus or researched a school though, there was something I would see and say "hmm... I like the way Hendrix does that better." I ended up only applying to Hendrix and two other schools as backups, and since Hendrix gave me a pretty spectacular scholarship package, it was an easy decision.

Tell us about the sports scene on campus.

We have varsity teams for basketball, soccer, tennis, volleyball, etc., but we don't have the same atmosphere surrounding athletics that you would expect at a large state university. I've gone to games, mostly to support friends of mine, but usually the whole campus doesn't turn out for an event. Starting in 2013 we will have a football team, which might make more people excited to have "team spirit" more than just supporting friends of theirs, but it's hard to say until that actually happens.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

I would say it's pretty accurate. Like any stereotype, you have to take it with a grain of salt, and understand that not everyone can be categorized that way. Generally speaking though, there is something "Hendrixy" about everyone that goes here.

What's the Greek scene like?

Hendrix doesn't have Greek life - in fact we have a "Faux Rush Week" full of events on campus that promote community in the residence halls and celebrates the fact that we don't have fraternities or sororities.

Tell us about your professors.

My professors are great. They provide challenging work, but are always willing to help when I have questions. Not only are they great in the classroom, but they are generally involved in social life on campus. I have visited more than one professor's home for dinner, and one of my professors even has an annual holiday party at his home for all of his students. Not all professors are perfect, of course, but I think that Hendrix has done a great job of finding people who are excited about what they do and who are invested in their students. At the end of every semester, professors give students course evaluations which are read after grades have been submitted. I like that my instructors don't think that they are infallible, but instead they are open to suggestions from students and often take them to heart.

Describe the students at your school.

For such a small student body, there is a lot of variety. It is hard to imagine someone coming to Hendrix and not feeling welcome, or not feeling like they fit in. We tend to be very open-minded, and we tend to lean to the left politically (but we do have a vocal group of conservatives). If you prefer to spend time with people who are just like you, this is not your school. Students are very accepting of people of all backgrounds, regardless of sexuality, religion, economic status, etc. Even though people do tend to form groups of friends that they spend most of their time with, there are not really rigid cliques that divide us. I have friends who study creative writing, politics, theater, and biology and who are gay, straight, and from all parts of the world. Most people at Hendrix could probably say the same. People here tend to be very engaged in their environment, whether that means helping plan events for the Social Committee (SoCo), working on a political campaign, or playing on the Quidditch team. If students feel strongly about a proposed policy on campus, they make their voices heard.

What are the academics like at your school?

Academics at Hendrix play to the school motto, "Unto the whole person." It's a liberal arts school, so the general education courses (we call them "learning domains") are diverse and numerous. Even within departments, there is a lot of diversity. For my German minor, I've studied both ancient poetry and contemporary film. The nice thing is that classes tend to be small (around 15-20 students is probably average), which is especially nice when you are taking courses outside your major, so that you can get extra help. In smaller classes especially, discussion takes up the majority of class time. Participation from students is an expectation, and professors will hold you to it. Even in larger classes, there will often be discussions, and professors always allow time for questions. On that note, professors are very attentive to their students. Several of my professors have given me their home and/or cell phone numbers so that they can be reached even if they're not at their office, and it is not uncommon to hang out with professors outside of class. I have had dinner at more than one professors' home, and professors can often be seen at campus events. The curriculum at Hendrix is also very focused on experiential learning. Because of the Odyssey Program, it is now a graduation requirement to complete 3 extensive hands-on projects. Students can choose from 6 categories - service to the world, undergraduate research, artistic creativity, global awareness, professional & leadership development, and special projects (a catch-all category). The requirements vary for each category, but students can apply for funding for their projects and all students have advisors for each project, to offer guidance.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

It is difficult to define a Hendrix student, so it's difficult to say that there is a stereotype about us. There is a huge diversity in the interests and activities represented in such a small student body, and so the stereotype that you might hear from one person would be completely different from what you would hear from another. In general, I would say that we are very open-minded and engaged in the world around us. Probably one of the more common things said about us is that we lean to the left politically, but there is also a very vocal group of conservatives on campus, and people of all beliefs are respected. No matter the "niche" you might fit into, you will still feel like a part of the community as a whole.

Kate
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Hendrix is my dream school. Being from the north, I wouldn't deal with all the hassles of travelling to Arkansas if I didn't ...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Hendrix is my dream school. Being from the north, I wouldn't deal with all the hassles of travelling to Arkansas if I didn't want to be here. It's small, so don't come here if you're looking to hide out in the back of your classrooms and sleep, or if you don't want people to know your name (and when I say people, I mean everyone from the people in your dorm, to your profs, to the cafeteria ladies). It's a half hour outside of Little Rock, so, suffice to say, the town we're in doesn't exactly offer a cosmopolitan experience. If being in a small town in Middle-of-Nowhere, Arkansas doesn't work for you, re-think it. But seriously, there's so much going on here that I don't like to leave campus; you miss things if you leave. Example: Girl Talk came my sophomore year. Sweet? I think so. Most frequent student complaint is that the cafeteria only serves Honolulu Chicken (BEST. MEAL.) on specialty days. Luckily we have those every three weeks or so.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Typical Hendrix student: there is none. Seriously. Think of every college stereotype and I can think of a face to match. To better explain… I had three roommates my freshman year, and two girls who practically lived in my room. Memphis, New Orleans, upstate New York, California-turned-Arkansas, St. Louis and Philadelphia were represented geographically. Dance, band, tennis, arts-and-crafter-extraordinaire, Ultimate Frisbee and swimming were our ‘main’ extra-curriculars. Stereotypes: brainy future politician, stoner bisexual, intensely competitive blonde athlete, goofy band geek, hot-lesbian-next-door, über-busy Mom-type. We all got along and still have dinner together every Saturday night. Now expand that out campus-wide and you’ll better understand why there’s not a “typical” Hendrix student. The most commonly shared characteristic of the student body is that some freakishly large percentage of the campus voted for Obama; democratic bastion in Arkansas, I guess (even so, my roommate is a die-hard Republican… go figure). What I hear from kids at the AR state schools who come to our rockin' parties, we're the "smart rich kids who party hard" (rich because it's a private school). Stereotype accuracy: low. Let's break this down. "Smart rich kids who party hard." Smart? Yeah. You don't come to Hendrix unless you want to learn. We work hard. Rich? Not so much. 100% of current students get some kind of financial aid. Kids? Well, yeah, we're still kids. But we're in college. As for the partying, I'll say this: we work hard enough that we need time off. In that time off some people hang out with friends, others work out, others enjoy the insane outdoor activities that Arkansas has to offer (this IS the natural state... hiking, canoeing, spelunking, we've got it all), and others party. This is a college campus after all. That being said, partying and drinking is an individual decision; you won't be pressured. Hendrix is big on making your own decisions and taking responsibility for them... that attitude is found in our student body as well.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

If I am awake at 2am on a Tuesday I am either wishing I'm asleep but can't because I've GOT to finish more homework before I call it quits, or am stubbornly refusing to end a fantastic discussion about something that could easily be discussed at a normal hour. A lot of people are involved with sports, either for the school or in intramurals, but there are plenty of non-athletes. Environmental awareness is big (we've got a fairly large hipster population, especially for central Arkansas), but mostly people just kinda do their own thing. Parties are mostly in the Hendrix-owned apartments that border campus (We don't have Greek life so parties don't ever turn into those raucous keg parties that movies love to show). Work hard, play hard. And if your version of "play" involves alcohol, just don't be an idiot about it.

Describe the students at your school.

Hendrix is an incredibly accepting environment, and it asks that each of its students maintain that level of acceptance. True, it's a mostly vanilla school, but Hendrix is diverse in the truest sense of the word: Students from across the country and around the world study here, so it's not like we're all middle class suburban white kids. My roommate this year is from Iceland, and one of my favorite new friends from working Orientation is from China. I had never met so many LGBT people before I came to school, NOT something that you might expect from a small school in the middle of Arkansas. So if you're closed-off to people of different beliefs and lifestyles, don't come here expecting to find people with that same mindset. A religiously-pushy, collar-popping racist would feel out of place at Hendrix. Don't worry if you're just a collar-popper like me, you'll only get a little bit of grief about it!

What are the academics like at your school?

You will work your butt off as a student here. Hendrix is an academic institution, and our workload is reflective of that. We only take four classes per semester because the load is so heavy. Professors know your name, so it's really awkward when you're in a class with just 7 other people and haven't done the reading. Thus, you do the reading. Students are driven to succeed, but not at each other's expense; pressure to succeed comes from yourself, so we aren't constantly trying to academically out-do each other. We study in groups and individually, and we're big on helping each other out when we don't understand something in class. That notwithstanding, there's free tutoring offered by the school, and many classes have tutors assigned just for those students. Sweet!

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

Don't come to Hendrix if you don't like to meet people who are different from you. Don't come here if you don't like grandmotherly cafeteria ladies who know your name and ask about your day when you go through the food lines. Don't come if you don't want to learn something along the way. If none of those apply to you, you should come visit and see where you would fit into the school fabric.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

Stereotype accuracy: low. Let's break this down. "Smart rich kids who party hard." Smart? Yeah. You don't come to Hendrix unless you want to learn. We work hard. Rich? Not so much. 100% of current students get some kind of financial aid. Kids? Well, yeah, we're still kids. But we're in college. As for the partying, I'll say this: we work hard enough that we need time off. In that time off some people hang out with friends, others work out, others enjoy the insane outdoor activities that Arkansas has to offer (this IS the natural state, after all... hiking, canoeing, spelunking, we've got it all), and others party. This is a college campus after all. That being said, partying and drinking is an individual decision; you won't be pressured. Hendrix is big on making your own decisions and taking responsibility for them... that attitude is found in our student body as well.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

Typical Hendrix student: there is none. Seriously. Think of every college stereotype and I can think of a face to match. To better explain… I had three roommates my freshman year, and two girls who practically lived in my room. Memphis, New Orleans, upstate New York, California-turned-Arkansas, St. Louis and Philadelphia were represented geographically. Dance, band, tennis, arts-and-crafter-extraordinaire, Ultimate Frisbee and swimming were our ‘main’ extra-curriculars. Stereotypes: brainy future politician, stoner sex kitten, intensely competitive blonde athlete, goofy-but-lovable girl, hot-bisexual-next-door, über-busy Mom-type. We all got along and still have dinner together every Saturday night. Now expand that out campus-wide and you’ll better understand why there’s not a “typical” Hendrix student. The most commonly shared characteristic of the student body is that some freakishly large percentage of the campus voted for Obama; democratic bastion in Arkansas, I guess (even so, my roommate is a die-hard Republican… go figure). What I hear from kids at the AR state schools who come to our rockin' parties, we're the "smart rich kids who party hard" (rich because it's a private school).

Genevieve
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Genevieve, you are about to make a big change with your life. Although you may feel like you are an adult and completely put ...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Genevieve, you are about to make a big change with your life. Although you may feel like you are an adult and completely put together, know that you are inevitably going to change. In order to make that change easier, be open to it. Allow yourself to grow and try new things. Happiness comes with flexibility and an eagerness to learn. You are going to make friends unlike any you have had before and they will not know what to expect from you. You are at a time when you can make whatever impression you'd like on whomever you want. Professors don't know what standards or ethics you uphold and new friends don't know how much fun you are. Be who you've always wanted to be and who you feel best as. Friends will come, good times will happen and knowledge will be acquired through confidence and faith that life will turn out well when you put your best effort forward. When the hard times come, know they will end and that there will always be people to support you. Good luck, and have a good time!

What's unique about your campus?

The classes were engaging and I enjoyed the homework. The teachers were inspirational and personalible and seemed to take a personal interest in their students, especially if the students were engaging and willing to work hard.

What's the one thing you wish someone had told you about freshman year?

I wish I had known that the school is less environmentally focused than they had advertized, and also that the school is becoming more sports orientated.

Woukency
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I think attending college is the most important decision I have made in my entire life. I have gained a knowledgeable experi...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I think attending college is the most important decision I have made in my entire life. I have gained a knowledgeable experience, and I have also found out more about what I can achieve. Going to college is important not only to gain training for the outside world but also to promote myself to have a great career in the future. I started out in a community college, where I received my Associate in Arts in business administration. Then, I transferred to a university in order to further my education with my major, finance. Attending a university has several challenges, but starting off at a community college felt like a good decision because it gave me time to be certain about what I wanted to do with my life. In my college experience, I expect to gain a good GPA, my Bachelors degree within four years, and an enjoyable social life. So far, it has been a valuable choice to attend college because I know I am achieving something that makes me feel better about where I am going in my life. I do not regret anything and it has made me a stronger person, which I am thankful for.

Details

  • Enrollment
  • 1,321
  • Tuition & Fees
  • $42,440
  • Acceptance rate
  • 77%

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