Baltimore, MD
Johns Hopkins University


142 Ratings

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Recent Reviews

Josh
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Hopkins is a school that is a good fit for a lot of people. It is a medium sized school with about 4,400 undergrads. You ge...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Hopkins is a school that is a good fit for a lot of people. It is a medium sized school with about 4,400 undergrads. You get to know a lot of people on campus, especially in your year, but it is big enough where you can meet new people every day. It's an impressive school with lots of majors ranked in the top 10 in the country, even outside of the natural sciences and engineering. It has stuff for everyone.

Describe the students at your school.

Hopkins is very diverse. Not just in the sense that there are many races, places, and religions represented on campus (although that is true), but people have very different attitudes, hobbies, interests, etc. The only thing "typical" of Hopkins students is that they are driven to do well.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

The stereotypes are completely false. Hard working is the only one that is true, but JHU students are not overworked. Most of the time before a test people are taking advantage of group study and help each other out. There is plenty to do on and off campus that is fun. Hopkins students know how to find a way to relax after schoolwork.

What are the academics like at your school?

Classes are usually larger earlier on, but in most humanities classes (which are taught seminar style) and upper level classes, the size gets smaller. As a 2nd semester Freshman, I am in 4 out of 5 classes that have under 15 people in them. Professors get to know you and can help you. In these smaller classes, class participation is usually a big part of it because the professors want to make sure that students are learning material that they can use by communicating it to others. There is pre-professional advising on campus, but most of the learning is done for learning's sake.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

The only sport that is huge on campus is lacrosse. Other sports are well represented and well attended, but nothing brings out Hopkins spirit like lacrosse season. Other than sports, there are lots of performing arts groups that are fun to go to. Big name speakers come to Hopkins to give speeches. Greek life isn't huge here on campus, but it does constitute about 25% of the undergrad population. It's there if you want it, but if you don't that's cool too. There is a lot to do for fun in the area including exploring Baltimore's different villages, taking a trip to the Inner Harbor, or watching a movie at The Charles Theater. If Baltimore isn't enough for you, DC is only a short train ride away.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

People say Hopkins students are cutthroat, hard working, and antisocial. Also, people think it is a place where there is no fun.

Athlete
What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best part is being in a city, despite Baltimore being a rough city, there are plenty of great parts to it to discover. I...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best part is being in a city, despite Baltimore being a rough city, there are plenty of great parts to it to discover. I would change the emphasis on research instead of learning if I could, but the emphasis is definetly on research and undergraduates are left to fend for themselves. Learning is not the goal, making money is. Which I don't agree with. The school is small, but it's nice because you get to know people. People always are impressed when they hear I go to Johns Hopkins or they've never heard of it or they refuse to call it Johns Hopkins and ask me if "John Hopkins is a good doctor school". Most of my time is spent either sleeping or in the library. A fair amount of time is spent in the weight room or the gym too. A significant portion of my time is spent in PJs as well (a local bar). Baltimore is a collegetown, however, it is difficult to meet people from local schools and Hopkins is known for being snobby and looking down on local schools, so the people kinda hate us. JHU's administration is really frustrating, they don't seem to care about the students, mostly just on making money. It's something you can't really understand or know about until you arrive on campus and experience it for yourself. If you have a lot of money you may never notice it, but for a lot of my friends they are taking out huge loans to be here and the administration doesn't care that we'll be 200,000$ in debt after four years of undergraduate school. It's not a priority for undergraduates to be happy. It's seen as a privilege for us to be attending THE esteemed Johns Hopkins University. School pride was surprisingly lacking, the majority of students are foremost concerned with their studies. The athletes have a lot of pride for each other, but overall pride is lacking. THe most frequent student complaint is that all the classes assign too much work and the exams are too difficult. It's very stressful and requires a TON of work to do well in classes. People are also very cutthroat. Several friends have had their notes and books stolen from the library.

Describe the students at your school.

I think JHU is very open to all different types of people. There aren't as many minorities as I thought there would be, however there are some. Most students wear jeans and a polo to class, as the majority of Hopkins students are wealthy upper class. The four tables in the dining hall are: the athletes, the black kids, the asian kids, and a table of sorority/fraternity kids. People don't "mix" well, groups are created and then boundaries aren't crossed. A lot of students are from New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Maryland. A lot are from California too. The majority of students are really wealthy, as they wouldn't be able to afford to go here if they weren't. It's not really a good school for you unless you're really poor so you'll get lots of financial aid or you're rich and don't need it. It's not geared for middle class students. Yes, it's a constant in conversation that someone will bring up the "i'm going to be your boss/make millions of dollars". Politically it's split between republicans and democrats. It's not really a concern, as most people are trying to get better grades.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

The idea that all hopkins kids are awkward is very true. Even the "normal" kids are awkward. it's hilarious and at the same time depressing. The idea that all Hopkins kids do is study can be verified by going to the library on a Friday or a Saturday night to find that more students are there than at the local bars. However, those kids who do party, party hard. The kids who attempt to make Hopkins more like the traditional college experience we are told about (you know, parties, making friends, drinking, having fun, crazy stories) exist, and most of them know each other because there aren't that many of them compared to the 5000 undergrads. Most of them are either athletes or involved in greek life, or both. Lots of undergrads are premed when they arrive at Hopkins, but not as many stick with being premed or an engineering major, for 4 years. Many switch to Econ or IR, which are easier.

What are the academics like at your school?

None of the professors I've had for any of my classes know my name. My favorite classes were labs, because I like working hands on. Grading for labs sucked, but the actual procedures/experiments I enjoyed. Least favorite class was organic chemistry. 300 person lecture with a professor who didn't teach well, great experience. Students study all the time. There are easier majors that don't require it, however with any math/science/engineering/premed degree to get straight b's (if you are smart and didn't work hard, got straight a's in high school, good numbers on the sats, etc) i'd say 2 hours a day MINIMUM. Yes students are competitive, it's not an environment condusive to learning, the stress is on one-upping your neighbor to get ahead, so that's how it goes. The engineering department is supposed to be amazing, and for research it's great, but for undergraduate learning I cannot stress enough how little emphasis is put on actually learning. Cheating is a HUGE problem on campus, as students are expected to succeed however they can. JHU is definetly geared toward making lots of money, learning is irrelevant as is helping other people.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

The stereotypes are that all Hopkins students are awkward. There are a lot of Asian kids, which doesn't really matter, but it's a stereotype and it's true. Another stereotype is that all Hopkins students do is study. Another stereotype is that all Hopkins undergrads are premeds.

Mandy
What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best thing about JHU is the student body. It is so diverse and made up of entirely unique and interesting people. The s...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best thing about JHU is the student body. It is so diverse and made up of entirely unique and interesting people. The size is perfect, in my opinion. It's small enough that I recognize faces most everywhere I go, but it's big enough that I see new faces all the time.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

The idea that all JHU students are pre-med is entirely inaccurate. Of course there will be some students who are hyper-competitive and who prefer the library to a relaxing evening, but these students are in the minority and a part of every student body, regardless of the school. I, personally, have had no incidents of cut-throat competition and have never been the library on a weekend for more than a couple of hours during the day.

What are the academics like at your school?

My favorite class turned out to be a huge lecture dreaded by most natural science majors--Organic Chemistry. It's tough but my professor is great. He makes every effort to engage students, even though there are over 250 of us. There are also some very interesting small seminar-style classes that allow students to get to know the professor and other classmates very well. All of the classes require work and effort, but what you get out of a class is related to what you put into it.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

I live in Wolman Hall, which is suite-style for Freshmen. Walking down my floor, you'll often find suite doors propped open with students studying together or just hanging out, or you'll find students in our floor's common room which has a TV, DVD player and couches. I'm not involved with many groups on campus but there are TONS and I know a lot of people who are involved in several and love them all. There's a group for pretty much any interest, and it's a great way to meet new people. As for a Saturday night at Hopkins, there are plenty of parties held by the fraternities, but there is also plenty to do other than that. Baltimore's Inner Harbor is a great place for dinner and a bit of shopping, the Charles Theater is amazing for seeing lesser-known movies, and there's typically things going on around campus as well. If nothing else, it's always nice to stay in and watch movies with friends.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

Typically people think JHU students are all pre-med, all only interested in grades, and the kind of people who spend all of their time in the library. There is also a common stereotype that the school is very cut-throat in terms of competition

Andy
Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

I'd say these stereotypes aren't accurate, although I have seen instances in which they seem true. For instance, for the "...

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

I'd say these stereotypes aren't accurate, although I have seen instances in which they seem true. For instance, for the "pre-med" stereotype, depending on who your friends are, you might end up spending a lot of time with many pre-med people. If you're a pre-med student in a natural science major, you might find that many of your classes are dominated by pre-med students. However, the overall student population isn't as pre-med as you might think - most students at Hopkins *aren't* pre-med! As for the cutthroat stereotype, that's largely untrue. Many professors encourage collaboration among students in completing homework and studying for exams, and most people I know are willing to help out others. I must warn, though, that there are some students who tend not to help other students, but they also tend not to ask other students for help. Meanwhile, I've encountered a few students who truly are the definition of "cutthroat" - however, I can count them only on one hand, and compared with the overall student body, they're a very small minority. Plus, there's nothing as socially alienating as a cutthroat reputation! Finally, for the "perpetual studying" stereotype, it's not true in the sense that we definitely don't spend all our time outside class studying. Most students here spend a lot of time with extracurricular activities, jobs, community service, socialization, et cetera - but yes, at the same time, we do study a lot here. This school isn't a piece of cake. Still, studying all the time is definitely not the scenario here.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

First of all, that everyone is pre-med. Second of all, that everyone is cutthroat. Third of all, that everyone spends time studying.

Stefanie
What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best thing about JHU is the people. The students are amazing individuals, and I am inspired and honored to be apart of t...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best thing about JHU is the people. The students are amazing individuals, and I am inspired and honored to be apart of this student body. It is the perfect size to make a mark with my own passion if desired. If I could change one thing about Hopkins, it would be that students should take no more than 16 credits per semester. Most people react positively when I tell them I attend Hopkins because it is academically a very prestigious institution.

Describe the students at your school.

The student body seems to mesh well. There are not too many "cliques" and racial groups are not always known to "stick together". It is a very diverse campus, and my experience has been that I have friends from all different backgrounds. There is a group for any type of student out there -- thus, I do not believe sort of student would be neglected.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

No, although Hopkins students are very active and serious about their studies, it does not come off as "cut-throat". Students are focused, but they are also young adults (aged 18-22) who have fun outside of the classroom.

What are the academics like at your school?

Some professors are very amicable and know students on a first name basis. Many professors are very down to earth and in tune with the students' needs. My favorite class is Medical Sociology because it eliminates the science factor of medicine and health. The students study an average of 5 days out of the week. In class participation in the majority of classes is highly encouraged, and the professors make a tremendous effort to see this happen. Public Health is an amazing department because it's diverse and open to an individual's interests and passions.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Performing arts is very popular at Hopkins. Whether it's the Gospel Choir or the Allnighters (the all male acappella group), the student body is excited and out to support them. The freshmen dorms are very active and traditional in the fact that doors are kept open. However, dorms for sophomores and up tend to be a bit quieter.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

JHU has a strong stigma for being "cut-throat". It is generally known to be a place where "fun comes to die" because students are too engulfed in their work. Students are thought to be consumed with their work both in the classroom and in the research labs.

Robin
Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

It's true that JHU kids take academics very seriously and put academics ahead of most everything else. This doesn't mean that...

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

It's true that JHU kids take academics very seriously and put academics ahead of most everything else. This doesn't mean that we don't like to be creative and have fun and do things.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

JHU students are stereotyped as all work and no play.

Jamie
What is your overall opinion of this school?

I don't know what the best thing here is, because half the time I hate it here and the rest of the time, it's all right. Spr...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

I don't know what the best thing here is, because half the time I hate it here and the rest of the time, it's all right. Spring Fair is pretty fun. Can't think of much at the moment (I'm rather tired). When I tell people that I go to JHU, they are usually fairly impressed. (Unfortunately, this is often followed by the question: "So you're going to be a doctor?") I'm pretty impressed, too, as I still really don't know how the hell I got in here in the first place. I don't think I'm the best person to answer these kinds of questions, but oh well. The campus is very pretty. And the Harbor and Towson Town Center are nearby, which is nice when you have free time. I usually don't unless I force it, but I think that's the case for most people here. Probably at a lot of colleges. I wonder a bit about the ability or wisdom or sanity of the administration, if only because they decided to implement a drastic scheduling change in the middle of the school year. Up through last semester, classes were either MTW, or ThF. And I hated the engineers who could play with their schedules and give themselves four-day weekends. As of this semester, classes are now MWF or TTh, like most other schools. We'd heard about this plan maybe two or three years ago, and then it sort of faded away. So the change was very sudden, and the timing just seems strange to me. But it happened, so whatever.

Describe the students at your school.

...I can't think of any experience that stands out here, because pretty much everyone gets along. That's my experience. I do remember that once, a classmate said he'd been verbally abused for being Asian (which is strange, considering the high percentage of Asians here), but that was an anomaly. Students of every subgrouping interact with every other one. Just go to a party. Out of place? Students like me...but students like me would feel out of place anywhere, because what my problem is extreme shyness. Well, there's something else, too. I grew up in a place that was extremely white - that is, in elementary and middle school, the only Asians were me and my younger sister. So it was a bit of a culture shock for me to come here and see all these other Asians. And I have only a very rudimentary knowledge of Korean, so I feel a bit awkward when other Koreans (usually fluent) assume that I can understand them. But that isn't really a big deal. I'm no fashion guru, but I think it's pretty safe to guess that what people here wear are what most people in college wear. Jeans, t-shirts, sweats, etc., with a flavoring of, honestly, just about every style there is.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

No. Yes, there are a lot of science majors, but there are also a lot of public health majors and IR majors. The writing seminars program is also very good.

What are the academics like at your school?

I like my Japanese class. Unfortunately, the workload this year is significantly higher than last, but that's to be expected at the advanced level. I enjoy learning languages. I'm not sure about a least favorite, although there were a number of classes I was less than fond of, but I didn't really like the economics courses I took after the basic ones. I was just not very good at them and it was frustrating. You can find students in the library at any time, though of course it really fills up around finals time. Apparently some kids would just stay in the Hut for days, but I never personally knew anyone who did. I'm not really a study-in-the-library type of person. In every class I've been in, there has been at least some participation. I generally don't participate much, myself. The exception is Japanese class, but the class is tiny, so participation is pretty much inevitable. I don't mix much with science majors, so I don't know how competitive they get, but I do know that our BME program is the best in the country so I imagine that it gets pretty fierce. My personal experience has been that people like to study and work on assignments together as possible. I was a little annoyed by the distribution requirements (when will I need science?) but I suppose there is some reasoning for it... I do feel like we are learning for its own sake, which I rather like, though it will probably screw me over in the real world.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

The lacrosse team. National champions last season, which makes it something like the ninth time. I don't follow sports much, so that's the extent of my knowledge on JHU sports. The a capella groups are popular. There are at least six. I think the three biggest ones are the All-Nighters, the Sirens, and the Octopodes. They always sing to a crammed house - people sitting in the aisles, standing in the back. For guest speakers, it depends on who is the guest speaker, really. When Bill Nye came, Shriver Hall was filled possibly past capacity, but when David Simon came, it was maybe two thirds full. (To be fair in that comparison...well, everyone knows Bill Nye.) Theater groups are pretty popular, too, from what I can tell. If I'm awake at 2am on a Tuesday, I'm probably just bumming around online, or doing homework. I have a really strange sleeping schedule. I'm not much into Greek life, can't tell you about the parties...usually I hang with people off campus. Party in their apartments, or just watch movies there, or go out for Korean BBQ at this awesome restaurant on 20th and Maryland... Nothing special.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

We are all science majors. Pre-meds, BMEs, ChemEs, whatever. I'm sure there are more, but that's really the only one I hear.

Jordan
What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best thing about JHU is that you can have as much or as little of a presence as you want. It's a small school, so you can...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best thing about JHU is that you can have as much or as little of a presence as you want. It's a small school, so you can make an impact in student life, get your teachers to know who you are, etc - or you can just coast by. For me it's the perfect size, because I know a lot of people but don't know a lot more, yet still don't feel like I'm drowning in anonymity like I would at some 40,000+ university. If I could change one thing it'd be the bureaucracy. It's way too hard to get things done, sometimes, because paperwork, complicated procedures and unhelpful university staff get in the way. When I tell people I go to JHU, most assume I want to be a doctor. I don't spend much time on campus. There's not really a "college town" either, though now there's this row of shops on St. Paul that is kind of a sad attempt at a college town, and at least an improvement on what it used to be. There's 0 school pride, outside sports. Still, no one really came here for school spirit, so it's not something anyone worries about - the biggest complaints are usually the food, the housing, and the administration, instead.

Describe the students at your school.

PJs and sweats are a typical freshman uniform at JHU, but upperclassmen usually have the decency to put on a pair of jeans. Honestly, most people are too focused on studying to notice or care about race, orientation, socioeconomic background, etc. There are active Black Student Associations, Muslim Student Associations, a LGBT group, etc etc - everyone can find their niche.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

1) A lot of people are as hardcore as if they were applying for med school, but there are plenty of other science majors, engineers, etc. There are also lots of slackers - ie lacrosse types - and kids in between. 2) It's easy to have a social life, just not a campus life. Especially once you move off-campus (practically a requirement by the time you're a junior or a senior, though there's now some housing for upperclassmen) you pretty much hang out with your friends, and there aren't really a lot of school or campus activities to get involved in.

What are the academics like at your school?

Professors know who you are in seminar classes. Whether they know you in giant lecture classes depends on how many questions you ask them outside of class. Don't be one of those people who has discussions with the Prof in the middle of a 300 person lecture. Class participation in seminars is necessary, not just common, though lectures you can sit on your hands and get by just fine. Students study as much as they need to for the class, but there's a pretty heavy study culture here. There's not much competition in my major (Writing Seminars) other than with oneself, but a friend of mine, while studying for finals, once saw a pair of lost glasses in the library, and in his sleep-deprived delirium thought "Maybe it's someone else in my class! I should break them!" Thankfully, he didn't. JHU has some idiotic distribution requirements, and if you aren't in a reading- or writing-related major I hear the writing requirements can be annoying. Still, I took a lot of good classes for my distribution requirements, so I can't say I hated the whole thing. Science majors get you a job, English, writing and humanities majors get you just as much as they'd get you anywhere else.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

There are a ton of clubs, and most of them are pretty small. The biggest one is probably the co-ed volunteer fraternity, which is essentially just a way for premed kids to boost their resume. Lacrosse is big, all other events less so. Popular speaks (Bill Nye, etc) get a big turnout, but there are plenty of people who visit without anyone ever knowing. The dating scene is horrible. Don't come here if you actually want to meet somebody. Most people are perfectly nice but majorly socially awkward. This is a school of nerds. Frats and sororities are there to throw parties for the rest of us. Some people join them, but it's not as huge here as it is at other schools. At least one of them can be counted on to throw a party every weekend, though. I met most of my friends through class, which I think is atypical - most people meet their friends through their dorms freshman and sophomore year. You can always hang out with friends Saturday night, but most people consider drinking the highest form of entertainment. There isn't a lot off campus, except the Inner Harbor, which loses its appeal by freshman year, and the mall in Towson. My friend tells me there's a pretty good club and dance scene, and there are two small music venues within a short walk/cab ride of campus.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

1) Everyone is premed and wants to be a doctor. 2) No social life.

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