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Marymount Manhattan College

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What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

If I could go back in time and talk to myself as a high school senior, I would simply say embrace challenges- the reward is often greater. This small bit of advice is critical, because challenges will be met in College. Courses may be challenging, balancing school activities may be challenging, living with roomates may be challenging too. However, successfully tackling these challenges will prepare you for future success. Consider this: your parent asks you to mow the lawn. It doesn't look like it needs mowing, but you do it anyway. When teh job is done, you inform your parents. Now what if taht same lawn needed mowing, and weeding, and raking. You struggle through, you are exhausted, but the lawn is landscaper perfect! Your arents are amazed with your accomplishment, and appreciate having you as a child. They decided to get you the iPad3 for your birthday. College is similar, if you do your best, in challenging courses, faculty will recognize your efforts. Rewards may come in the form of recommendation letters, references, job placement, friends for life, success in life. You have the power to obtain it all- by navigating through challenge.

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For the student, I feel it is important to focus on being both selfish and realistic. You must clearly identify what it is that you are seeking not only in your education or career, but in your life at this point in time. This affects location, degree, timing, and a plethora of other variables that only you as a student and individual can decide for yourself. Also, you must be able to rationally view the cost of the school and the toll that will take on you and your family. Also, keeping a realistic understanding of your own independence. Some students are capable of paying their own rent, doing their own laundry, and cooking their own dinners until they come home for the holidays. Others are not. This is something important to dwell upon when considering the location, campus life, and class size of the college, among other defining qualities. I think parents should ensure that the students are keeping these two aspects keenly in sight while remaining supportive and honest themselves with these two aspects. It is easy to get caught up in ideals and wants, but they often hide the wise insight into the future we all have.

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Do not choose your major right away unless you are absolutely positive what you'd like to study; otherwise you'll probably change your major and have to start rebuilding your transcript from scratch. Take as many of the general requirements as you can early on, so that later in your college career you will have time-slots and credits to play around with, incase you want to develop a minor or something like that. Do not just take whatever advisor your school selects for you, always find a faculty advisor whose interest reflects your own, and who might also be interested in developing an independent study course with you. A strong relationship with your faculty advisor is really the best shot you have at getting something meaningful out of school; they will help you secure your footing in whatever field you intend to embark in. Know that most friendships tend to be transient, so bare this in mind when dividing your social time and your school work: you will always have another chance to have a fun night out with friends, but your GPA isn't easy to change, and you only get one shot at your exams/essays.

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There is a lot of expectation in the U.S to get into the "right" school immediately after high school. Every year the competition gets greater, the tuition gets hirer and the stress level extreme. Essentially, not everyone is ready to go to college after their senior year and I have found those students who are pressured into going to school are often the most unsuccessful because they have not found their individuality or their own voice. The name of your school won't make a student achieve greater things. I advise to meticulously investigate many schools. Parents, listen to your kids even if you don't agree with their choices,. Students be honest with yourself and your parents. If you are not ready to go to college, or are uncomfortable with the places your parents want you to go, that voice needs to be heard. You've been waiting a long time to be treated like an adult so now you are being asked to act like one, which involves honesty, realism and logic. The US has some of the greatest instutitions of learning but they are only useful when you are ready and know how to utilize them.

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First off, I would urge students and parents to visit the campus of the schools you are interested in. Every school has its own personality and vibe which can't be understood by merely looking at pictures or reading quotes in the paphlets the schools mail you. Get an idea of the campus and the surrounding area because you want to utilize both to springboard you into the next phase of your life. You need a school that will fulfill and challenge you academically, socially and personally. Don't invest too much in just one or your transition from college life to the real world might not be as smooth as you had hoped. Remember, you chose this school for a specific reason to help you when you graduate so remember to keep active outside the classroom and it is never too early to start enhancing your education by getting "real life" work experience in the area around the school. So check out businesses, museums, theatre and other things that interest you in the surrounding area. Make the most of the connections your school offers. Do your research and really grasp what college has to offer you.

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I am an African American woman who originally comes from a small town in southwest MN. I went to a small private high school where there were 13 kids in my graduating class. It wasn?t until I went to R.C.T.C in Rochester MN that I took a step out of my small and mostly safe little box and really experienced life and diversity. I met people from every walk of life in my Human Services Specialist program and through these people we formed friendships & study groups that greatly helped me in Biology, Psychology, English classes and many other classes. With the support and encouragement of my new found friends I made the Deans list and was inducted into Phi Theta Kappa. Through the array of different people I was able to experience life with a different perspective The thing I valued the most at RCTC was I had the opportunity to expand my education. I firmly believe ?Knowledge is power.? I am transferring to UWL in Wisconsin where I will be able to obtain my Bachelors Degree to become a Mental Health Counselor for children and then be able to start giving back to my community.

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Finding the right college is an important and personal decision that may become a little stressful if you do not ask the right people for help. Although this is your final decision, having a good support system through your parents and school concilors will make this experience more enjoyable and efficient. Here is my advice for finding the right college and making the most out of the college experience. First, identify your priorities as a student. Some prorities to consider would be location, academic programs, cost, and diversity. Second, begin researching and visiting a wide variety of institutions to see what campus style fits the student best. Finally, match the goals and priorities of the student with the different institutional characteristics to further narrow down your search. My last bit of advice would be to keep in mind that no matter what University you choose, college can and will get tough. Choose an institution where you feel the faculty and staff are most qualified to help assist in your many transitions through out your college experience.

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I would take myself by the shoulders, stare into my eyes, and stress to not underestimate my abilities. I would say, "Evan, aim higher than you think you'll achieve, because you just might be surprised at how far you'll go." I'd urge myself to apply to a few more reach schools, and broaden my interests of study so that I'd have more opportunities in areas of study should I wish to veer from the path of an Acting major. Also, I might add that it is important to visit potential schools and sit in on classes. Without that personal, first-hand experience of the campus environment, I really had a hard time transitioning and making my way in my first year attending Marymount Manhattan. Struggling with depression during my freshman year, I focused too much on what I couldn't do, how difficult living in New York City was, and how far away from my family I became. The most pertinent piece of advice I'd share is to keep your goals in plain sight. It is when you lose sight of those hopes that distractions and negativity will bog down your success and happiness.

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First day of senior year, better yet, the last first day of high school! There is tall, strawberry blond wearing sweat pants and headed to PE I pursue. Daily she chooses to put it off. I know just what her mind is thinking as I grab her wrist and look this mirror reflection straight in the eye because she is me at seventeen. It is Back to the Future without the sweet car and 80's clothing and I have an important message for my former self. No time to waist, I must save myself from senior year being the worst year of my life. "Take the AP classes that you can without being overwhelmed, grades are going to help, start this very day by asking what you want: Location? Major? Size?? No wrong answers, but knowing yourself will make your college experience phenominal. Scholarships are vital! Do one a week now. Most of all DON?T FEAR. Fear of pursuing your passion produces regret. So apply to several universities including your dream one. Nothing is worse than having not gone for it." And then I am gone, back to my own time, happy I diligently went for my future.

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“Get a hold of yourself, woman!” is what I would tell my senior self. I remember being so stressed out thinking no college or university would want me, which of course, was not the case! At the time, I felt like I was drowning in a sea of emotions, applications, and emotional applications. It seemed like climbing Mount Everest would have been easier than finishing the year—especially as a bad case of “Senioritis” began setting in, but what I would have told myself is to keep climbing, because what’s at the other side of that mountain is far better than you could have ever imagined: It is college—a life free of promposals, awkard school dances, (and in my case, terrible acne). So, kid, don’t sweat the small stuff because it will get easier from here on out, your acne WILL get better (although your jeans may get tighter—freshman fifteen, what can I say?), and who you do or don’t go to prom with won’t matter a year from now, so focus on getting good grades and stay calm because there really is nothing to worry about!

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