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Northern Arizona University

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What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

The main things to consider are, first how much money the student or parent is willing to spend. If cheaper is the answer and the student doesnt mind, community college is the route to go. If not universities are really great. Also if the student does not like where he or she is living currently then maybe consider what type of climate they would prefer. Think about the size of the school desired, and the size of the classrooms. If the student wants a sorority/fraternity based school, research ones that provide that. Think about whether or not it matters to the student if the school is concerened about the environment, or has a lot of sports and or clubs to join. But, if the parent(s) dont have a strong heart, and cant handle their kids being far away, they should try to convince their student of staying closer to home, but keep in mind, your kid does not neccessarily want you around often. This is their chance to learn what it is like in the real world. It may be scary at first, but it is worth it to have a college education along with new friends.

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I would tell myself not to worry so much! Universities are interested in retention of their students and therefore they have a lot of student services aimed at helping students tackle the challenges they may face, especially during the freshman transition. From Residence Hall Assistants to Disability Support Services, you will find people who are there to help. You just have to do a little research on your university’s website and reach out in order get the support you need. The friends you meet will be your biggest supporters. Professors also want their students to succeed, so take advantage of their office hours if you need to speak with them. You can always send them an email if you cannot attend their office hours. Go to all your classes and do not be afraid to ask questions! Take advantage of the support services offered at your university and don't be afraid to challenge yourself with new experiences. Having a supportive network can provide the perfect launching pad for new and exciting opportunities. After all, that is what college is all about!

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College is what you make it. It's not about what school you get into or what you end up majoring in; it's what you learn about LIFE that's important. Parents: Don't make decisions for your children. Let them choose their schools. And once your children are away at college, let them be the ones to call you. Don't pester them. If they call you with complaints and problems, don't coddle them or solve the problems yourself. Encourage your child to be an adult and solve the problems on his or her own, and help them along the way. Students: There is no right college, and there is no right major. Visit all the schools that appeal to you, and go wherever feels "right" (after you get accepted, of course). Explore. Take classes that sound interesting, talk to people, and get involved. If there's something you want to do that your campus doesn't offer, do it anyway. Find other students who share your interests and start a club together. If you're unhappy with something, change it. College is what you make it, so make it what you want it to be.

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I would tell myself that college is a totally new experience. It's the first time you're away from home and it's ok to have fun but don't forget that you're here for school. Take your classes seriously and take advantage of all the resources the university has to offer. The library is a great place to study. Apply for scholarships, college is very expensive. Don't stress the parents out with college expenses. Get a job as soon as you can before all of them are gone. Being broke sucks. Rent your textbooks (It's called Chegg...look it up)! Get involved in extra-curricular activities, you meet new people that way. Choose your friends wisely, they'll be your support when you're under stress. Be careful with college guys at parties, you thought highschool was bad...just wait. Freshmen boys are the worst. Rule number 1: "Come as a group, leave as a group." Keep in touch with your highschool friends. Hearing from them every once in a while will be good for you. Phone home as much as you can, your family will miss you. Finally, don't forget who you are.

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Initially upon reading this I thought I would advise myself on the very difficult transition from a small town to a big university far away from home as it was a rather strenous and emotionally draining year for me which resulted in high levels of stress and anxiety. However, upon reflection I realize I would not be the person I am today without having had to learn how to be independent and gaining the knowledge of knowing I can survive on my own. Therefore I think the biggest piece of advice I could offer myself would be not to define who I am based upon a letter grade. I have always been very driven academically running from a fear of failure. This only intensified in college again resutling in high stress and anxiety issues. I would tell myself to slow down, absorb my surroundings and environment and most importantly to enjoy the true process of living and learning. Through several years and a number of health issues I have finally learned it is the process that is important, not the end result and imperfection is actually really ok.

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There is an abundant amount of advice I would give myself as a senior in high school if I could go back in time. Some of the most imperative topics of advice would include scholarships, financial aid, and community involvement. As a senior in high school I could not find motivation to sit down at the table and write/fill out scholarship applications. As a result, I now am beginning to increase my student debt. As a senior I wish I could have forseen that scholarship money and financial aid are a huge factor in paying for college, one piece of advice I would give to myself. The other piece of advice is community involvement. As a freshman in college, I now realize the importance of a resume and how it can open up opportunities based upon the information in the resume. I know now that the best way to promote myself as an individual is to give back to my community in any way possible, a vital piece of information that can be put into a resume. So if I could go back in time, I would tell myself to wake up and stop wasting essestial time.

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Amy, going to college needs a lot of work and time. As a high school senior spend your time to apply as much scholarships as you can. There are a lot of opportunities of scholarship in high school. This can help you in college when you have to pay tuitions, housing, meals, and personal things. It isn't easy finding a job in college when there's too much to do. Therefore, take the chance while you can to apply as much as you can because money doesn't grow out of trees. You should also work hard in your classes because it would help your learning in college. During senior year in high school, also spend time in socializing with close friends. In college, it is hard to find close friends because of different classes every semester. Thus, when you?re in college and you?re not happy you can rely on your close friends that you connected with in high school. Just make sure to be prepared and get ready for college life. It would be a big change. Whether it?s positive or negative, you'll enjoy it, especially the experience you will get in college.

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Throughout high school I never really tried to apply myself. As a result I received low grades, an even lower self esteem, and just barely graduated. After high school I hopped from job to job, following in the footsteps of my parents (who did not graduate high school), and wasted a lot of time struggling to get from paycheck to paycheck. I had lived my entire life well below the poverty level and finally decided the only way to get out of my situation was to go to college. In college I have done (so far) extremely well compared to high school. My college experience has taught me that I, liek anyone else, can do anything that I set out to do if I just try to acheive my goals. I have learned that a person is better, and more, than the situation they were born into, and if they want to change their life the power to do so lies only in their hands. Everyone can benefit from education, and for most the only way to get out of poverty is to stay in school, get good grades, and graduate from college, but most importantly to strive for success.

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Julie, as a high school senior, you should do your best to get straight A's even if that means having tutors or asking teachers for additional help during study hall or after school. During your freshmen, sophomore, and junior year you should have tried harder in math and spanish. Also, you should have taken an additional language so instead of being bilingual you could be trilingual. After school, you should have worked more hours and work more hours during senior year to save up more money for a fuel economy car that would last a long time. Doing that will help during college because it will save money so you don't drive around a big gas hog. Since I am a high school senior, I really need to figure out what degree and what university I should go to, so I don't waste time after I graduate high school. I need to apply for as many scholarships as possible because I am not currently making enough money and no one is supporting me. Since I am the only child out of five going to college/university, I want to set the best example for them.

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It's an out of body experience going back in time to watch myself walk across that stage, shaking the principals hand again, and waving to my family. I don't know what I was thinking getting that haircut. I walked up to myself. Very weird situation. I say, "Teresa, you're going to go through tough health prolems that could potentially get in the way of your education. Don't allow it to! College is an adventure, life changing, worth the time you're going to put in. The transition is going to confuse you. Seeing your nephews on Skype will pull at your heart strings a little, too. However, after all your health problems have departed and you slam the door to those exeriences, there is going to be nothing you want more then to be the best nurse you can be for all your future patients. You will want to confort them and won't allow them to feel alone during their time of sickness as you went through. Finally, don't freak out! Stay calm, enjoy yourself, and make new friends. Don't look back. Look forward. NAU is just where you're suppose to be."

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