Princeton, NJ
Princeton University


87 Ratings

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Recent Reviews

Madison
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Give yourself a break. Grades and schoolwork is just that; don't let them alter how you live your life. Enjoy every moment an...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Give yourself a break. Grades and schoolwork is just that; don't let them alter how you live your life. Enjoy every moment and don't let the pressure of transition get to you. You only get to be in college once. Make the most of it.

What's the one thing you wish someone had told you about freshman year?

How strongly alcohol and partying play a role in social life on campus.

Dolores
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I would advise myself to stay in California for college because I had no idea how important things like familiy and culture w...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I would advise myself to stay in California for college because I had no idea how important things like familiy and culture were to my sense of normality. I arrived in New Jersey eighteen and alone, and the culture shock of it along with the transition of a California public school to an Ivy League university hit me like a brick wall. I chose to come to the east coast because I wanted to get away from the life I had. I never even realized that what I had was great. I don't regret coming here, but if I had known that a different university would be a better fit for me I would not have set Princeton as my first choice. So, I would tell myself to look at what I had and think about how it would be to lose everything in one day. I would tell myself to think about what I wanted and not focus trying to get into the "best" school possible because it doesnt matter where you go, it's about where you end.

What kind of person should attend this school?

A well organized and mentally strong person.

Hannah
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Princeton students are fascinating...no one seems to be totally one-sided. From foreign languages, to sports, to musical ins...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Princeton students are fascinating...no one seems to be totally one-sided. From foreign languages, to sports, to musical instruments, to the ability to dance salsa or program a computer, it seems like everyone you meet here has some sort of hidden passion or talent beyond simply what they are studying in their classes. In some ways, one of the downfalls of a place like Princeton is that there is often so much academic pressure, and such a competitive atmosphere, that it feels like there's never enough time to keep up with all of your interests or take advantage of all of the incredible opportunities Princeton has to offer. The school feels large at first during freshman year, but quickly seems to shrink sophomore year as you get into a "niche." It soon seems like you see the same small community of people everywhere, centered around the types of classes you take or the types of places you hang out or party. When this atmosphere feels too stifling its easy to forget that there are thousands more students on campus, but when you realize this its easy to reach out and meet completely new groups of people. The size is nice in this way, but it's still a relatively small school, which makes it much easier to have an identity, especially in classes and departments, than at larger schools. Another huge plus about the size is that the grad school at Princeton is tiny compared to the undergrad program, which means that the focus is truly on the undergrad students and the amazing professors here actually interact with you as early as freshman year (this isn't true at all the Ivy Leagues even and really makes Princeton stand out). The town of Princeton is smaller than a lot of college towns. As far as the part in walking distance from campus, there's not much. Some awesome ice cream stores (Bent Spoon and Thomas Sweet's are student favorites), some pricey restaurants (great for dates or when parents visit but not as much for day to day eating), and a few clothing stores (J.Crew, Ralph Lauren, and the like). That said, it is a gorgeous town, peaceful (always feels safe), and there are still fun places to discover. Since its so small, you always see other students, even off campus. To find the usual main stream chain stores, you have to take a car (you can have one in the student lot starting sophomore year) or a bus (runs every few hours from campus) to Route 1, about a 10 minute drive. There, you can find almost anything, and Target and such are good for dorm supplies (way cheaper than what you'll find in Princeton proper). Students spend the vast majority of their time on campus, however. Frist Campus Center is a popular hang out, with study space, a cafe, dining area, mail room, classrooms, and more. Students are very opinionated about the administration and have many criticisms, especially about certain recurring issues. Starting just a few years ago, the administration installed a policy of "grade deflation" which limits the number of A's that professors can give to their students. For obvious reasons, this is hugely controversial, and I don't think I've ever met a student who thinks it is reasonable. Students begrudge this policy and how getting A's at Harvard is "a breeze" in comparison, with no similar policy. This fall, the administration also revised the school's alcohol policy, making it much stricter than previously. Now RCAs (upperclassmen who live in freshman and sophomore dorms in mainly advisory roles) are required to break up parties in their dormitories, which many fear will drastically change the previously friendly relationship between students their advisers. Discussions about the future this policy are currently taking place. Students seem to love Princeton, and are very proud of their school and its traditions, but that said, school spirit surrounding sporting events is not particularly high. One awesome thing about the school in general is its tradition. The school is very proud of its many illustrious alumni over the years, and a sense of history is definitely present. Along with the seriousness, this is accompanied by some seriously fun traditions. For example, if Princeton beats both Harvard and Yale in its football season there is a massive bonfire in the middle of Cannon Green on campus. This happened for the first time in almost 13 years when I was a freshman and the celebration and excitement around the final Yale game and the victorious bonfire were unforgettable. The most common complaint students have is stress. Everyone always has a million things going at once, from academics, to applications for summer internships, to extracurriculars, and the stress levels seem to be at a constant high. That said, students still find time to have fun. There's a definite "work hard, play hard" mentality on campus.

What are your classes like?

A Princeton undergrad explains how high school and college academics differ.

What are your classes like?

A Princeton student explains what's different about academics in college and gives advice to new students.

Describe the dorms.

This is a closer view of the front of Nassau Hall at Princeton, including the tiger statues.

Describe the dorms.

This is a closer look at Nassau Hall, Princeton’s oldest building.

Describe the dorms.

This video is a look at one of the most beautiful and famous views at Princeton, Nassau Hall.

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

This is a look at Blair Arch, one of the most beautiful views on the Princeton campus.

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

This is another view of Princeton’s famous Blair Arch.

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

This is a closer look at Blair Arch, on Princeton’s campus.

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

This is a closer view of one of Princeton’s most famous landmarks.

Why did you decide to go to this school?

A Princeton student describes why he chose to come to Princeton and what he didn’t know about it when he decided.

Why did you decide to go to this school?

A Princeton student describes why he chose to come to Princeton and what he didn’t know about it when he decided.

Why did you decide to go to this school?

A Princeton student describes why he chose to come to Princeton and what he didn’t know about it when he decided.

Why did you decide to go to this school?

A Princeton student describes why he chose to come to Princeton and what he didn’t know about it when he decided.

Why did you decide to go to this school?

A Princeton student describing why he chose to come to Princeton and what he didn’t know about it when he decided.

Why did you decide to go to this school?

A Princeton student describing why he chose to come to Princeton and what he didn’t know about it when he decided.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

A Princeton student describes his favorite movie, class, and free time activity.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

A Princeton student describes her favorite movie, class, and free time activity.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

A Princeton student describes his favorite movie, class, and free time activity.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

A Princeton student describes his favorite movie, class, and free time activity.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

A Princeton student describes her favorite movie, class, and free time activity.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

A Princeton student describes his favorite movie, class, and free time activity.

Describe a day on campus you'll never forget.

A Princeton students tells a story about a weird thing that’s happened to her while in college.

What do students complain about most?

A Princeton student explains what students complain about a lot and gives his opinion on the matter.

What do students complain about most?

A Princeton student explains what students complain about a lot and gives her opinion on the matter.

What do students complain about most?

A Princeton student explains what students complain about a lot and gives his opinion on the matter.

Describe a day on campus you'll never forget.

A Princeton student tells a story about a weird thing that’s happened to her while in college.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

A student at Princeton describes what they imagine the school’s reputation to be, and how much truth there is it.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

A student at Princeton describes what they imagine the school’s reputation to be, and how much truth there is it.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

A student at Princeton describes what they imagine the school’s reputation to be, and how much truth there is behind it.

Why did you decide to go to this school?

A Princeton student tells which other schools Princeton applicants usually apply to and why students choose Pton.

Why did you decide to go to this school?

A Princeton student tells which other schools Princeton applicants usually apply to and why students choose Pton.

Why did you decide to go to this school?

A Princeton student tells which other schools Princeton applicants usually apply to and why students choose Pton.

Why did you decide to go to this school?

A Princeton student tells which other schools Princeton applicants usually apply to and why students choose Pton.

Describe the students at your school.

A Princeton student explains who shouldn’t go to Princeton and who would feel out of place at this school.

Describe the students at your school.

A Princeton student explains who shouldn’t go to Princeton and who would feel out of place at this school.

Describe the students at your school.

A Princeton student explains who shouldn’t go to Princeton and who would feel out of place at this school.

When you step off campus what do you see?

The plaza in front of the Princeton Public Library is home to a number of local shops.

When you step off campus what do you see?

The Bent Spoon is one of the best and most popular ice cream stores in Princeton.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Dodgeball tournament is one of the largest events. It starts at 5pm and goes until 2am.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

View of the gym lobby during the Dodgeball tournament, with free food and students milling about to check the brackets.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

View of the small teams currently playing in the Princeton Dodgeball tournament, some of the smaller clubs.

What's unique about your campus?

Students used to steal the clapper from the bell in the tower on Nassau Hall on the night before classes started for the

When you step off campus what do you see?

Nassau Street is the main street off of campus in the Princeton borough.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

The Princeton Dodgeball tournament is a big annual event on campus.

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

The FitzRandolph gates, between Nassau Hall and Nassau Street, mark the main entrance to campus.

When you step off campus what do you see?

Small World Coffee is a popular off-campus study spot and hangout.

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

A view down Prospect “The” Street, home to Princeton’s famous eating clubs.

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

A view of Terrace Club, the only eating club at Princeton not on the Street, and the backs of several other clubs.

Describe the dorms.

Edwards Hall, one of the dorms in Mathey College, now a four-year residential college.

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

The Frist Campus Center is an important hub on campus for students, encompassing a dining hall, cafes, and much more.

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

Prospect Garden is one of the most picturesque locations on campus, and is adjacent to Prospect House.

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

This is the central area in the Wilson residential college in Princeton, which houses freshman and sophomores.

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

The recently renovated Mathey common room, a study and hang out space. It is a quiet and comfortable place to do work.

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

The Mathey quad, between Blair and Joline dorms, is a popular hang out spot for underclassmen on sunny days.

Describe the dorms.

Little is ironically one of the biggest dorms on campus and is partially upperclass and partially Mathey College.

Describe the dorms.

Brown is a dorm, and though it is far from most other upperclass dorms, it's in a central location.

Describe the dorms.

Feinburg Hall, part of Wilson College at Princeton, houses freshman and sophomores in the residential college.

Describe the students at your school.

There are student groups to accommodate almost anyone, including very active LGBT groups, ethnic clubs, and religious organizations. There is also a very large community of international students, and even American students all seem to be very well traveled and internationally-minded, so there is an acceptance and interest in different cultures. The Jewish community in particular seems very prominent and active with the CJL (Center for Jewish Life) adjacent to campus and frequently hosting events. There is a significant gay community, but many do not choose to participate in LGBT groups on campus and complain about the gay dating scene, which is very limited at Princeton. Like on most college campuses, the political lean is to the left, but there is still definitely a significant and active conservative portion of the student body. There are numerous political or politically related groups, like the College Democrats, College Republicans, Pro-Choice Vox, and Anscombe Society. While a majority of students aren't in one of these political organizations on campus, the student body is still generally informed and opinionated and current events make common conversation topics both in academics and among friends. One great way that Princeton encourages students from all backgrounds to apply is through their amazing financial aid packages, which guarantee to meet all calculated family need, eliminating the need to take out loans to cover the otherwise pricey tuition. A little over half of the student body receives aid from the school which greatly enhances the campus diversity, however wealthier financial backgrounds are also prevalent, and the other half of campus can afford to pay the over 40,000 a year for school. Sometimes this portion of campus seems like more than half because of the higher visibility of students with expensive clothing who are able to take pricier vacations over break, but they are actually not the majority. This can lead to some stress to students from different backgrounds, who may feel like they cannot necessarily afford to keep up with their peers. Regardless of their financial background, however, all students seem to be equally ambitious, with the knowledge that a Princeton education can take them far in life if they make the most of the opportunities it offers. While there are students from almost every state and hundreds of countries, the largest groups are probably from California, New York, Connecticut, and New Jersey, with one of the larger international contingencies from London. In addition, many students come from private, boarding, prep, or magnet schools. As a graduate of a public high school in Virginia, I entered Princeton knowing only one other person in the school, with no peers from my graduating class, unlike many of my classmates who had up to 20 people from their year alone coming to school with them. Though at first it seemed daunting at times when so many other people all seemed to already know each other, I found it refreshing to be able to start college with a completely clean slate and meet new people without basing my social life around people I knew previously. Princeton students usually tend to look well put together. While some, especially a lot of athletes, will go to class in sweats, most tend to dress a little nicer, but not over the top fancy. Jeans with sandals, heels or boots is pretty typical for girls, though sneakers like Converse are also common. On the weekends, if going out to a party, dress becomes a little fancier and more club-like. Short but casual dresses or nice tops with jeans or leggings is common for girls and guys will often wear a polo or more fitted T-shirt. While classes and extracurricular activities bring many diverse students together, there is still a definite divide, especially among those who are involved in life on the Street (eating club members or those who frequently attend parties there) and those who are not. While there is no particular animosity among these two groups, there is more of a lack of mixing, and it is not based on racial, ethnic, religious, or LGBT status, but more on a combination of personal choice and at times socioeconomic factors (eating club membership often is more expensive, though the university is slowly working on using financial aid to reduce this cost). Though there are always exceptions to this divide in friend groups and in teams and clubs that bring people together, it still remains a recognized issue on campus.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

Advice to future Princetonians... Be proud of the silly traditions and the (sometimes hideous) orange decor...Princeton alumni certainly are as thousands descend on campus for reunions every year. Try out all the unique things Princeton has to offer: run naked through the Woody Woo fountain, get a Heartstop from Hoagie Haven, have a meal at every club on the Street, take a class Pass/Fail about something you know nothing about.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

To a small extent, some of these stereotypes do hold true. However, they all fail to cover the full scope of the school and its students. The students are very intelligent and everyone seems to be uniquely talented, sometimes in unexpected ways, but most students are by no means stuck up. The presence of wealthy students may be visible, but it does not dominate the campus, which is far more diverse and progressive than the stereotypes would lead you to believe.

What are the academics like at your school?

Classes are hard. When people hear you go to Princeton, most assume you're some sort of genius. That may be, but most likely you don't feel like it most of the time when you're at Princeton, because everyone is so academically driven that even Pass/Fail classes aren't a joke. When I came back home after my first semester at Princeton, lots of my friends at other schools were talking about how much easier college was compared with high school. Unless you went to a ridiculously tough high school, this will probably not be the case at Princeton. Given the academic rigor, Princeton students do study a lot, partly because of the amount of work their given, and partly because most of them just seem to be ambitious, driven individuals. There are tons of libraries on campus (and the library system is immense/impressive...students here definitely take it for granted) and students can also be found studying in dorm common areas, cafes, and the campus center. On average most students work 3-5 hours per night, but sometimes less, sometimes more. A lot depends on your major. Humanities students tend to have lots of reading, often seemingly impossible to complete, whereas science major usually have lab reports and problem sets. Finals take place after winter break, with a week's reading period and then two weeks for exams. This can be a stressful period, but it's great having to class to focus on finals work. It is easy to forget a lot over winter break though. The student/professor relationship is generally very positive, and becomes more personal when you begin to focus in on your preferred department for a major or certificate (the Princeton equivalent of a minor). While there are many large intro classes, there are also plenty of smaller seminars, and these are usually the majority once you get past the intro levels. The large classes usually break into what's called precept once a week, a one hour small discussion group to cover the material in a smaller setting, led by a TA or the professor. This is good to keep you from getting lost in large classes, but it also means you can't totally zone out in these, because you'll be expected to contribute to precept discussion, which makes up a part of your class grade. Popular majors are always Politics, Woodrow Wilson School, Economics, and History, and these are all stellar departments. All of the smaller departments have awesome faculty as well though, and students sometimes benefit from the extra attention they can get from majoring in a less common field, especially when it comes time for the two JPs (junior papers) and the daunting senior thesis they must complete before graduation. You don't have to declare a major until sophomore spring, which is great for those like me who enter Princeton clueless as to their academic goals. I've settled on Comparative Literature, because it has the potential to incorporate many of my interests, such as foreign language, translation, creative writing, literature, film, and art. One way to figure out what you're interested in studying is simply by completing the required courses. All freshman have to take a writing seminar, and although most people I know seem to have hated this, my writing seminar, on the culture of consumption, has been one of my favorite classes so far. There's also a foreign language requirement and a number of "distribution requirements," which compel you to take classes in a number of broad categories. The hardest of these to complete for a hardcore humanities person like me are the one Quantitative Reasoning (mostly math classes) and two Science and Technology (with lab!) classes. These are good opportunities to use the four PDF classes you're allotted. I took an Astronomy class like this last spring as my math, and science I got out of the way with Intro to Psych and a class on Lasers I'm currently taking. All in all, the requirements aren't too painful and can introduce you to a new field of interest, or at least provide you with a funny story about bumbling cluelessly through lab. There are many career-driven students on campus (many seem to be aspiring analysts and i-bankers), but probably an equal number like me who still haven't quite figured out what the future holds for them. Even the career-driven seem to branch out and take the opportunity to explore other interests while at Princeton though, so people in your classes usually range from department majors to the random finance student who has always wanted to take a ceramics class. Princeton is quite a competitive place, and getting in is far from the last time you feel the strain of competition. While classes aren't aggressively competitive, the grade deflation policies still give everyone the feeling that its necessary to outperform their peers. Sophomore year, many students compete to get into the Woodrow Wilson foreign policy school. Others compete for summer internships or grants. Even fun at Princeton seems competitive at times. Many extracurricular groups require audition and acceptance--from a capella, dance groups, the business society, and theater, to just being a campus tour guide. In addition, half of the eating clubs that many students join during sophomore year require "bicker" (similar to rush) to gain admittance.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Football games are probably the most highly attended athletic events on campus, and that isn't always saying much (except for the massive enthusiasm when we were working hard to beat Harvard and Yale to get our bonfire last year)...Ivy League football is a totally different environment than at a bigger state school. That said, basketball and lacrosse games can sometimes draw a crowd, but for other spirts mostly friends of players will just come and watch. Half of the students who "go" to football games often don't even go to the game, especially if it's not a big name opponent, but instead go just for the fun of tailgating. Tailgates take place in a field across the parking lot from the stadium, and frats, sports teams, and clubs will set up grills for hot dogs and burgers with kegs and mixed drinks. Students usually come early for these, and stay well into (if not through) the start of the actual game. The a cappella and the dance groups are both really popular with students. The singing groups will have "arch sings" a few times a month where they stand under one of the university's many arches and each group puts on a fifteen minute set. These are a lot of fun to go to because you can come and go whenever you feel like it, and of course they're free. The arch sings are always popular with friends, fans, and passersby who hear the music. The dance groups, especially the two bigger ones, BodyHype and Disiac, are also very well-attended student performances, and tickets often sell out. The audience is always filled with lively fans and friends yelling out for their favorite hot dancer. Dorm life for freshman and sophomores centers around the residential colleges. There are four, and students are randomly placed in one at the beginning of freshman year. Living with only other underclassman, the residential college is one easy way you meet friends and neighbors freshman year, especially when everyone is enthusiastic about meeting as many new faces as possible. Greek life at Princeton is a little different. The university no longer recognizes fraternities and sororities, however there remain about 10 fraternities and 3 sororities on campus. These groups hold rush in the fall, about a month after freshman arrive, but do not have houses and are unable to work with or through the university in any way. Nevertheless, there is still a portion of the student body who is affiliated, larger especially among students who frequent parties and eating club life. Sophomore year, the concept of "affiliation" (whether with a Greek society, sport, or prominent club) becomes important to some students seeking to join the more selective eating clubs. In a small town like Princeton, the party scene is very different and unique. There are only a few bars in the area, which are very strict about carding. So some juniors and seniors enjoy pub nights out in the town, but it doesn't compete at all with the social scene on campus and on "The Street" which is dominant even among students over 21. The biggest party nights are Thursday and Saturday. There are parties Friday night as well, but it is much more common to stay in on Friday and these parties are more low key. In addition, there is usually something going on Tuesday and Wednesday nights for those interested in going out. Parties usually start around 10. These will be frat parties (which are held in the common rooms of large suites), group gatherings at one of the BYOB restaurants in town (the most popular is a Chinese place called Ivy Garden), other room parties, or small pregames in the dorm with friends. At around 12, students will head out to "The Street," a road adjacent to campus that houses the ten eating clubs, mansions that serve as both junior and senior dining and social clubs. Some of the more selective clubs might be "on pass" that you have to get from an older member. The clubs will often have themed nights (country night and two articles of clothing are both popular every year), serve beer, and have bands or DJs. Despite the possible stereotype that Princeton students are all serious and bookish and therefore can't have wild parties, many people seem to party as hard as they work here, probably to work off all the stress that builds up during the week. Membership to the clubs begins in the winter of sophomore year, and this time can be very stressful for those trying to decide what club to join or worrying about getting into the selective club of their choice. There are alternatives for those who do not get into an eating club (called "getting hosed") including going independent, joining a co-op, or continuing to eat in the dining hall, but the traditional option of joining a club remains the most popular. For those who don't drink, there is still plenty to do on the weekend. I know non-drinkers who still enjoy going to parties and out to the clubs sober and having fun dancing there with their friends. If the Street scene isn't your thing, there are movie theaters close by, performances and concerts, and many alcohol free events on Thursday and Saturday night (parties in the residential colleges, game nights, free film screenings, live music). In addition, New York City is only an hour train ride away, which costs about 25 dollars round trip (though there are free transit weeks a few times per year). Taking the train from Princeton is incredibly easy, as there is a "dinky" on campus that shuttles students to the larger train station 10 minutes away. New York is a popular escape on the weekends, is great for meeting up with friends from other places, or just provides exciting alternatives to Princeton--great shopping, shows, and museums. The school sponsors many fun trips to the city, including reduced price shows, so it is definitely worth spending time in the city while at Princeton. Dating at Princeton seems to be one extreme or another. There is not too much casual dating. Random (or serial) hookups abound, but students sometimes complain about the inability to get past this stage (though this seems to be a complaint on almost every college campus). However, there are also many people in serious long-term relationships at Princeton, but not much in-between. I met my boyfriend through my roommate during freshman year and we've been dating over a year now, and this type of relationship is not uncommon among my friends and peers.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

There are many stereotypes about Princeton, including those just associated with all of the Ivy League schools. For instance, Princeton is often perceived as an elite and intellectual institution, and its students as smart, stuck-up, and bookish. To differentiate it from the other Ivies, Princeton is also often seen as more of a traditional institution loaded with old money families and the elite (especially compared with the reputation of some of the other Ivies, like Brown).

Flavia
Describe the students at your school.

They could not come from more diverse ethnic backgrounds.

Describe the students at your school.

They could not come from more diverse ethnic backgrounds.

Describe your favorite campus traditions.

Best "old place" of them all

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

College is unlike high school in that no one is holding your hand, setting intermediate deadlines for drafts of papers or giving you quizzes periodically to assess learning; good time management will be more important than ever. Nonetheless, college is an amazing time -- good luck on making the most of it!

Robin
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Don't worry about the fact that you like girls, too. The main open lesbians on campus aren't incredibly fun anyway, so makin...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Don't worry about the fact that you like girls, too. The main open lesbians on campus aren't incredibly fun anyway, so making an impression is not a big deal. Take biology in the fall, because 8:30 classes in February in the snow are impossible. Stock up on Red Bull, all-nighters are expensive. Find the right balance between aloof and passionate, because even at Princeton, you might be all alone in your love of something. Don't hook up in the first week. There will always be someone who starts off as a fantastic friend, but then reveals himself to be a complete douchebag; cut him loose. Do your reading. Stay up late to do your reading, even. Don't spend too much time rehearsing your answers in precept; everyone sounds stupid anyway. Learn to love the nap. You might have a great immune system, but that still doesn't make sleeping in a sick person's bed, even if she's not in it, a good idea. Try to be less witty, more sincere. People like witty, but sincere is more lasting. Go to that foam party.

What's the most frustrating thing about your school?

The seemingly lackluster approach toward radically new ways of organization even though everyone bemoans the current arrangements.

What do you brag about most when you tell your friends about your school?

The social life in spite of the course load, the professors, the location, the housing and dining halls.

Robert
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Your greatest danger is fear: fear that, perhaps, you will not live up to your college's or parents' expectations; that your ...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Your greatest danger is fear: fear that, perhaps, you will not live up to your college's or parents' expectations; that your talents in high school will not impress your new peers; that your personality will not win over new friends; worse yet, that the admissions department made a sloppy mistake. College should be a great experiment, where others' perspectives enrich and enlarge your own world-view so that you can see what is possible. To make college such an experience, however, you must banish this fear. Do not ask whether Alice will find you intelligent or attractive enoughfor her tastes, but rather what you can learn from her example. Do not ask whether the auditions director will hate the fact that your C-sharps are just a little flat or your quarter notes a bit fast, but rather whether playing violin is a true passion and a worthwhile pursuit. You fear in the moment that others judge you and only later will you regret all those missed oppurtunities. But, while your fear lasted an instant, your regret will extend far beyond the moment and harass you years later with a series of "what if" 's and alternate outcomes.

What kind of person should attend this school?

Do not attend unless you have a solid academic background coupled with an especially strong academic concentration.. In addition, everyone must complete the equivalent of an honor's thesis regardless of his/her academic standing, which quite naturally takes immense time and dedication. Come to campus prepared to have your perspective stretched and expanded in the most interesting ways and be eager to learn from the greatest resource around you: the student body.

What's the most frustrating thing about your school?

Being around an incredibly intelligent student body, while stimulating and inspiring, can also bring about an increase in grade competition. Couple such a student population with rampant grade deflation that requires each class to submit only a certain percetage of A's to the registrar's office and this cut-throat atmosphere is made even worse. I would imagine most Princeton students, while recognizing the need for grades to reflect academic performance, would opt for relaxing the quota and in its place instituting a more qualitative agreement.

Tara
Describe the students at your school.

Students are extremely motivated, generally quite confident, and focused intently upon their futures.

Describe the students at your school.

Students are extremely motivated, generally quite confident, and focused intently upon their futures.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

The environment in general stands out: students thirst to learn more and are eager to get to know each other, the faculty sincerely cares and motivates the students, and there is a tangible energy that fills the campus. It's the kind of place where you wake up and do a million things or else you feel like you're being lazy.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I would tell myself to understand that what matters is not being the best at everything. While that may have been a focus in high school, focusing on winning while surrounded by thousands of extremely talented students results in unnecessary stress and anxiety. Instead, pursue your goals according to your personal best- all corny-ness aside, it's the best motivation.

Brittany
What do you consider the worst thing about your school? Why?

The student body is very racially and ethnically diverse but sometimes people segregate themselves into social groups that so...

What do you consider the worst thing about your school? Why?

The student body is very racially and ethnically diverse but sometimes people segregate themselves into social groups that somewhat undo the admissions office's efforts.

What kind of person should not attend this school?

Anyone who believes that the purpose of college is strictly to prepare you for a set career, someone who is not passionate about learning, someone who doesn't expect to work very hard, someone who is not open-minded, someone who only wants to study and won't take advantage of the myriad opportunities available on this campus...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

No one forces me to go to 9 AM class or stay in before an exam. There is no one to stop me from doing just enough to get by - except myself. Have high expectations for yourself, but believe in yourself too. College is a chance to delve deeper into old passions and discover new ones. Far from detracting from your education, devoting time to groups and projects outside the classroom facilitates lasting friendships, teaches valuable lessons about cooperation and time management, and provides an outlet for real world application of knowledge. Strive to maintain balance between major priorities: health, academics, social life, and extracurricular activities. Never forget that so many would love to be in your place. Everyone deserves the opportunity to study at a university that encourages independent thought and supports its students in every endeavor. Yet only a fraction of the world's population gets a chance - for millions, like an African student whose every penny goes towards paying for his malarial sister's medication, a college education is merely a dream to be fantasized about in rare moments of rest. Embrace every opportunity so that your education will matter beyond your four years on campus.

Details

  • Enrollment
  • 5,400
  • Tuition & Fees
  • $45,300
  • Acceptance rate
  • 7%

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