Carbondale, IL
Southern Illinois University-Carbondale


147 Ratings

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Recent Reviews

Brian
Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

A very diverse, fun, and engertic place to get your education.

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

A very diverse, fun, and engertic place to get your education.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

It has a beautiful campus and seems very diverse. There is always something going on and everyone is so friendly. The dorms are pretty big too, according to others, they are the biggest in the state, which is a plus.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I would tell myself as a high school senior that you should go on to a university right away. Community college is not as fun as it could be. It actually gets quite boring. I woulld also tell him to not get sucked into the freedom of being able to skip class, it's not worth it. Also, I would tell him to remember his passion for music and don't get lost in thinking about what he wants to do when it's right in front of you. I would let him know not to get caught up in the wild scene or the many unknown people. Take advantage of it, and make yourself known. Stay focused and keep your eye on the prize, school is important, never forget that.

Scott
What is your overall opinion of this school?

I say this with the utmost sincerity: Southern Illinois is one of the most underrated schools in the entire country. The facu...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

I say this with the utmost sincerity: Southern Illinois is one of the most underrated schools in the entire country. The faculty here consist of some of the best teachers in the state of Illinois. What is unfortunate however, is that SIU happens to share the state with the University of Illinois, which demands much of the state's limited resources in these tough economic times. Having played on the rugby team for 4 years, I have personally traveled to all the other state schools in Illinois, and I can honestly say that Southern has the best campus. Unfortunately though, as I spoke to earlier, the school is owed a lot of money from the state, and the state simply doesn't have it. Because of this, some of the academic buildings needing improvement haven't been able to get it because there simply isn't room in the budget right now. That being said, SIU has a brand new state-of-the-art library, and a plethora of computer labs all with new computers. Furthermore, as part of a project that provided a new football stadium and renovated the basketball area, the school is going to construct new academic buildings where the old football stadium used to be. I will have graduated by the time they're ready for use, but to any prospective student, this is a very important thing to consider, since they're for you after all. As far as the administration is concerned, I will say that personally, I don't much care for them, a sentiment I believe is shared by a majority of students on campus. Earlier this school year the faculty went on strike because they had been working for nearly two years without a contract, and the administration decided to use this as an opportunity to fire tenured staff members without any reason other than budgetary concerns. For all those who are unaware of what tenure means, it means that you can't get fired. The administration, headed by Rita Cheng, found it acceptable to fire teachers rather than to find any other solution to the budget crisis. I am by no means an expert in the University's finances, however it would seem to me that firing staff members would ultimately cost the school more money in the future, as the reputation of the school and the validity of the degrees it hands out will be compromised if the faculty is decimated by firings and maligned to the point where any good teacher will leave, rather than stay somewhere with no job security. That being said, a solution was ultimately found and a labor agreement was reached. However, it still doesn't sit well with me that the administration seems to think of the students as customers, and that the University is run on an entirely profit driven motive. The administration threatened to replace all striking faculty members with replacement teachers, and that students who did not attend classes would be reprimanded departmentally, something I found incredibly insulting as a student. It is impossible to replace an entire staff of qualified college professors on the drop of a hat and contend that the level of education I am receiving as a student will be unaffected. All that being said, the administration is not a reflection of the faculty, for as I said earlier, they are some of the best teachers in the state. As an English major, I am speaking from a slightly narrowed perspective, and can really only speak for my department, but I can tell you truthfully that I've been told in good faith by other students from various other majors that they feel the same way about their departments. Carbondale as a town is interesting because there are some nice parts, but also some really bad parts. Southern Illinois as a whole is not a wealthy part of the country, and Carbondale is no exception. That being said, it's not the worst place you could spend 4 years. Being from Chicago, I was a bit apprehensive about moving so far south, but after I gave it a chance I've really come to like it down here. As far as the size of the school, I find it to be just right. There are 15,000 undergrads and about 5,000 graduate students. It's not as big as schools like University of Illinois or Ohio State, but it's still sizable enough where you won't know everyone, and everyone won't know you, unless you want them to. The biggest complaint I've found among incoming students is the food. I'll be honest, it's not great. The school only requires students to live in the dorms for one year, where as many schools require you to live on campus for at least two years, so the quality of the food hasn't been invested in nearly as much as one would hope. It's not like you're eating prison food or anything, but it's not gourmet either. Some people like it, others don't, it really comes down to personal preference. All in all, SIU is a great place to go to college. The campus is beautiful, it's close to one of the most gorgeous state parks in all of Illinois, cost of living is cheap, the faculty is excellent, and once you give Carbondale a chance it can be really great.

Describe the students at your school.

The students at SIU are generally pretty smart, although you will be amazed by how many (I hate to say it, but...) dumb people there are at universities all over the country. SIU is in a unique position in which they are owed lots of money by the state government, and the state doesn't have it, so they tend to admit anyone with a pulse and a check in their hand. Because of this, there are lots of incoming freshman who attend SIU who probably shouldn't be at college, or aren't ready for college, but the university takes a chance on them anyway because if they fail out, at least the university still has their money. That being said, the students who survive the temptations of college life and commit to their academic careers tend to be very intelligent and successful. There is a diverse atmosphere at Southern with several demographics of people represented. About half of the students are from the Chicagoland area, and a good percentage of those students are from the inner city. The other half of the student body is made up of kids from the middle and Southern parts of Illinois, as well as parts of Missouri and Kentucky. Obviously there going to be stark differences between people from such a wide range of backgrounds--both culturally and politically. Carbondale itself, because of the university, is a fairly progressive place, but I'll be clear, the entire region of Southern Illinois is vastly conservative, and that presence is definitely felt on the campus. Due to the wide array of political ideals present on campus, with no one side making up the majority, the political atmosphere of the campus is overwhelmingly apathetic. This is the case about most things at SIU. Saluki athletics are a running joking on campus. Attendance at football and basketball games is laughable, as are the results on the field in recent years. Women's volleyball has had kind of a cult following recently, but that's begun to subside due to their recent struggles as well. All in all, the students at SIU are mainly concerned about getting their degrees, drinking (this is not unique to Southern, drinking is simply a part of the culture on college campuses) and having a good time--not necessarily in that order. Generally everyone is pretty friendly, and if you don't close yourself, it's not hard to make friends. Being a college freshman is a really unique time, because you might not know anyone at your school, but neither does anyone else, and if you just talk to people and put forth the effort to find friends, you're going to be successful at it.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

The most popular student groups on campus are probably the various fraternities and sororities, although I will say that Greek Life is less popular in Carbondale than at other schools. At many Universities you might find that frat parties are the most popular spots to be, and depending on who you are and who your friends are this might apply to you at SIU, but speaking generally the local bars are much more popular, as are non-student organization affiliated house parties. The best ways that I've found to meet people at SIU (something that I also think applies to any college) is to simply join a club or student activity group. Joining a club is a great way to meet people with similar interests as your own. Also, being at college is an amazing time to expand your horizons and try new things, so I would even recommend joining a club related to something you've never even done before, just to see how you like it. Just to list a few, there are many sport clubs, (i.e. Rugby, Baseball, Fencing, Skydiving, Ultimate Frisbee), and there are major specific clubs like Sigma Tau Delta, which is an honor society for English majors. There are other major specific honor societies that I would seriously recommend any aspiring scholar to join, because not only does it provide you an environment to expand your mind and meet other intelligent people with similar interests as yourself, but it also looks great on a resume, which is something you should always be working to improve. Also, becoming an active member in whatever student group you join is important as well, because it will show future employers that you take initiative and can handle responsibility. As far as what you can expect dating wise, I'll simply say that you can find people you're compatible with and enjoy just about anywhere, and SIU is no different. That being said, what seems to be the case at SIU, is that a lot of freshman continue dating their high school boyfriend or girlfriend well into and many times throughout the entirety of their freshman year, and sometimes further. This is not unique to Carbondale. I know many people who have very serious relationships in college, at SIU and elsewhere, and I know people who aren't exactly limiting themselves to a single relationship. Carbondale is the kind of town where you can pretty much find whatever you're looking for, you just might need to look particularly hard depending on what it is. Not every guy and girl is looking to be tied down, and some people are only looking to be tied down. What I will say is that college is a time when you can and in most cases should try everything you want to try and meet as many people as you can, because you'll never be in a place again where 15,000 people your own age are all living together in the same town and all looking for something to do on the weekend.

What are the academics like at your school?

The academics at SIU, I believe, are grossly underrated. Southern has a reputation of being a party school, and because of that its academic reputation suffers. However, speaking from my own experiences, I've found my classes to be both challenging, informative, and speaking generally, having contributed positively to my academic growth. I'm an English major and have been for essentially the duration of my college career, so my personal experience with other departments is limited. What I will say, is that for the most part, all of my teachers, regardless of their departmental affiliation, have been more than willing to take a personal interest in me, and been incredibly flexible with their office hours. This is important, because at least for me, I've found that when I'm able to build a personal relationship with a teacher, I feel more comfortable in class, more comfortable seeking help when I need it, and generally feel that my performance in the class is helped. Now, not every department on campus is greatest thing ever. I've heard droves of complaints about the math department. Personally, I'm terrible at math, and I always have been, so it was no surprise to me that I struggled in the one math class I took at SIU. What I will say, is that my T.A. was more than willing to sit down with anyone who wanted help, and the department offered study sessions each week for any student interested. In all honesty, much of the problem with the math department stems from the fact that it's consistent mostly of foreigners almost exclusively from Asian countries, and to put it plainly, there is a language barrier. As unfortunate as it is to say, things like that matter. If the students literally can't understand what the teacher is saying, there is going to be an issue, regardless of that teacher's abilities. What I will say though, is that many of the students in the lower level math classes, like Math 113, which the university requires that everyone take, tend to give the bare minimum effort, because math is boring, and hardly anyone likes doing it. As far as other departments that tend to be viewed negatively, the Education Department is at the top of the list. As an English major, I've had classes with tons of people studying education, and overwhelmingly those students complain that their teachers and advisers are simply not good. I'm not an education student, so I can't speak from personal experience, but from what I've heard, the Education Department is one of the worst on campus. However, the English department is one of the best in the state. I can honestly say that I haven't had a bad English teacher yet. English 101 can be a little tricky, because it's taught by graduate assistants, and it can be hit or miss sometimes with the quality or aptitude of their educational abilities. Plus, some graduate students tend to think a little more highly of themselves than they should, and can be overly critical or scrutinize too heavily, but as far as the tenured professors of the college are concerned, they're some of the best. It should be noted that the bread and butter of SIU academics are the Engineering program and the Aviation program. We have the second best Engineering program in the state, and the best Aviation school in the nation, withholding the Air Force academy. Depending on your field, your program can be geared in one direction or another in terms of whether it's designed for getting a job immediately or simply learning for the sake of doing so. The English department is definitely a program geared more towards gaining knowledge, as most English students either pursue a secondary degree, go into education, or have another major as well. However, one of my roommates is a part of the Radio-TV department, and his program is the polar opposite. His department is definitely geared toward job placement, and according to him, many of his former classmates who have graduated are currently holding jobs in their department. Furthermore, one of my former rugby teammates was an engineering major, and he got a job right out of college making 80,000 dollars a year. This is obviously not typical, and he works in an incredibly narrow field, but it's just another example of how some programs prepare you to get a job right away, while others give you to the tools to go into any number of fields. As far as classroom competitiveness, I'd say that it's fairly mild. Personally, I'm incredibly competitive, and I want to be the best all the time, so I treat every class like a competition. Not everyone at SIU shares this motivation, and that's not necessarily a bad thing. There is a great sense of community at SIU, and at least from my experiences, students like to help each other, and use each other as resources. We're all smart here (for the most part...like at any college, intellectually challenged individuals can seem abundant at times) and we're all capable of doing great things, so it's only logical for students to rely on each other for help and to bounce ideas off one another. I've met a lot of really intelligent people that have expanded my ways of thinking and provided me with insights that I might not have gotten from a college with a lesser sense of community.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Southern Illinois has the reputation of being a "party school", something that invites rather negative connotations about its student body, and consequently the seriousness of their academic pursuits. Obviously, like at any college, there is an active party scene here at SIU. However, that is by no means an accurate, or even semi-accurate reflection of the student body. As a fourth year senior at SIU, I've seen plenty of people find a healthy balance between their social and academic lives, as well as those who are unable to find such a balance, and ultimately fail out or decide that college isn't right for them. This is not unique to SIU. Deciding to be a serious student is a personal choice, and one that requires an individual to make certain sacrifices at times. Although, like any school, SIU does have an active social circuit, that by no means qualifies its student body as any less serious or smart or capable as any other college's. It has been my experience that the students who wholeheartedly commit to their academic careers far exceed the reputation of the school, which it should be noted, has vastly improved in recent years. Also, speaking quickly to Greek Life and other student organizations, there are many to choose from, and I would highly suggest joining a student club or organization. Personally, I am a member of the SIU Men's Rugby Club, and in addition to hosting some of the most well attended and highly anticipated socials of the year, we boast the highest GPA of any club sport on campus.

Megan
What are the academics like at your school?

The academic stature at SIUC is very overlooked and underrated, which is primarily due to the school’s past reputation of bei...

What are the academics like at your school?

The academic stature at SIUC is very overlooked and underrated, which is primarily due to the school’s past reputation of being a ‘party school.’ Therefore, many incoming students often enter the university with the presumption that the classes and coursework will be easy. However, from my own experiences (as well as the aforementioned who soon discover that their presupposition was inaccurate), I have found my courses to be exigent, yet enlightening, and thus I have grown as a student as the knowledge I have acquired has only further contributed to my future as a scholar. Although I do have much insight of the Teacher Education Program, because I am an English major, I am somewhat limited to my knowledge of other departments. Even though my opinion is biased, in regards to the English department at SIUC, all of my professors know my name and have taken a personal interest in me. Furthermore, they have all been exceptionally accommodating with their office hours. This is relevant in that it is incredibly important for a student to build a positive, professional relationship with his or her professor. Because I have established a personal and productive relationship with each of my professors, I consequently feel more content in class and more apt in seeking assistance when needed, and, more importantly, I believe that my performance in class is also enhanced. In regards to the other departments at SIUC, some are not nearly as wonderful as others—many students have a negative outlook on these departments, particularly the Education Department. Although I am currently an English major with a minor in Women’s/Gender/Sexuality Studies, I was recently majoring in English education (which I had been throughout my entire college career until fairly recently). Although I had terrific education professors, the advisement that I had received was very poor. My advisor was placing me in classes that I did not need. Furthermore, she had me enrolled in multiple education courses (which each required 60+ hours of observation) and multiple 400-level English courses. Although I am a very hard-working and competent student, I would have been extremely overwhelmed. On the contrary, the English department is one of the best not only on campus, but also in Illinois. Although it may be hard to believe, I have not had one terrible English professor yet. Even though the English composition courses (i.e. English 101 and 102) are often taught by graduate students, who can either be terrific or terrible, the assistant and associate professors are some of the best. The English department has had fourteen Outstanding Teacher Awards rewarded to its faculty members from the university. Additionally, three members have nationally received recognition for excellence in teaching. Even though the English department is unfortunately not the most renowned program at Southern, the Engineering and Aviation programs are two of the top prestigious programs both in the university and in the nation. The sense of community at SIUC is wonderful. I have thus far met many other undergraduate and graduate students and professors all of whom are incredibly intellectual and who have furthered and contributed to my academic journey—something that I may not have experienced at another institution that did not value community.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Southern Illinois University at Carbondale has been recognized as many as being a "party school." Back in the 1970s, parties on 'the strip' and riots were some of the popular occurrences. Today, its former legacy lives on, and therefore many are reminded of the school’s past, which has now become the stereotype that continues to remain with the university. Additionally, this has only implemented relatively negative implications that have tarnished the academia’s view of SIUC’s students and the seriousness of their erudite efforts. Although, like many other universities, SIUC does have an active social scene (which does include the average 'party goers'); however, its reputation from the 1970s does not accurately depict the majority of students. Furthermore, its students are not any less adamant, adroit, or able compared to other colleges. SIUC is a research institution that provides many opportunities for students to acquire an excellent education, to research particular interests, and to be provided financial assistance. Although SIUC did have the conjecture of being a ‘party school’ in the past, it, by no means today, fits this stereotype and thus one should see the current educational development of the student body. It is evident that the school has vastly improved in recent years and, moreover, the students (who are entirely committed to their academic careers) undoubtedly surpass the former reputation of the school. It is merely time to look past the past and see the present (and the future) of Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.

Jenna
What is your overall opinion of this school?

The first thing everyone asks is, "What's a saluki?" Well, it's an Egyptian hunting dog that looks a little like a greyhound,...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

The first thing everyone asks is, "What's a saluki?" Well, it's an Egyptian hunting dog that looks a little like a greyhound, and we are very proud of our mascot. Of all the colleges and universities in the United States, we're the only Salukis! I transferred to SIUC from another university in Illinois, and I'm so glad I made the decision. The campus, while gigantic and spread out, is gorgeous. I've heard it's supposed to be set up like a state park, and you'll know what I'm talking about when you visit. There are small hills and trees everywhere, and we have a small woods and lake on campus. It's really pretty here, especially in the fall. The size of the school is really nice. It's big, so there's a lot of diversity among students and faculty, but the class sizes are small. All my professors know my name - I feel like it's a good balance. When I tell people I go to Southern, I get mixed reactions. Several years ago, there were student riots and people trashed the community. Those who remember that sometimes wonder what I'm in school for. But there are others, particularly those who are familiar with the work that we do at SIUC, who really respect the institution. Overall, I love this school. I feel like I've gotten a fantastic education, and the faculty and administration really care about the students.

What are the academics like at your school?

All my professors know my name. I'm a double major in Theater and English Education, so I've taken some crazy classes! One of the most unique classes I took was Stage Makeup - I learned how to change the shape of my face using only makeup, and how to make myself age 60 years! The theater department is incredibly close, and I call almost all my professors by their first names. In the theater department, every student is assigned a faculty mentor and an older student to show them the ropes and make sure their transition to college is a smooth one. Even though I'm done with my theater coursework, I still make time to visit with my mentor. I consider her a dear friend. In education, the students are incredibly motivated. Most students show up in the same classes, and you get very close to one another. Because of the classes I've taken, I feel very prepared to begin teaching. Part of the education requirements here are that you observe a teacher and teach a few lessons to a real class before you begin student teaching, so you can decide if teaching is for you or not. I feel like there is emphasis on learning and critical thinking overall at the university, though in this economy, the advisors are very helpful in helping you think about your career. We also have a fantastic resource in Career Services, which helps you write resumes and conducts mock interviews with students.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Everyone thinks that the students at SIUC are here to party - it's not true! We are a fantastic research institution, and we've got everyone from inventors to Emmy winners as alumni. Truthfully, any school is a "party school" if that's what you're there to do. But if you come to Southern to get a fantastic degree and broaden your horizons, you'll find that we'll exceed your expectations.

gerardo
What is your overall opinion of this school?

My overall opinion of SIU is tha its a small college town with the full big ten experience. We have all new stadiums as well ...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

My overall opinion of SIU is tha its a small college town with the full big ten experience. We have all new stadiums as well as state of the art facilities. You know everyone in your major and its the perfect amount of student whether you are in a lecture hall or a small classroom. Everyone gets the same attention as the next person. SIU has had a few bumps in the road by becoming one of the first colleges who teachers have went on strike. Even though it didnt last long it had a huge impact on peoples decisions whether this is a stable college. There are always rumors of the school shutting down because of money issues but those are rumors. This place i consider my home for the past 4 years and i am blessed to have met and enjoy the company of my colleagues.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Everyone says that SIU is a party school and honestly it is not. SIU has changed in the past 4 years since i have been here and students have got more serious about their curriculum as well as the faculty.

Katelyn
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Our biggest controversy this year, was a strike. The strike really set back a lot of classes by a week. Now that it is close ...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Our biggest controversy this year, was a strike. The strike really set back a lot of classes by a week. Now that it is close to finals week, a lot of people are rushing to get their projects completed on time. It was the first strike SIUC had ever experienced and was difficult for all parties to get through. The amount of Saluki pride that happened during that week of school was absolutely amazing. You know that professor at SIUC are outstanding people, when they have their whole class out striking with them out of respect.

What are your classes like?

This semester I enrolled in and online course at SIUC. It is through Distance learning and was a great way to work at my own pace. A bonus is that you have four weeks more than the traditional semester.

Describe the students at your school.

A big dividing factor at SIUC is the separation of West campus and East campus. A main road and all of the academic buildings separate these two living areas. East campus, which is known as "The towers" is predominately mixed, black people, minorities, and white people. West campus, known as Thompson's Point is predominately white people. Over the past few years, University housing has begun to attempt to change this by calling these areas West and East, but still to be they seem separated areas. West campus now incorporates the new and expensive apartments, Wall and Grand. So University housing is trying to change this segregation issue.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

I think the best party time at SIUC is unofficial Halloween. I think that because it is usually still warm out, everyone is out and it is a very fun time. The bars always have specials and competitions going on. The whole atmosphere of the strip lights up and everyone has a great time.

What are the academics like at your school?

When I was a Resident Assistant in the halls I would give my freshmen one key pieces of advice, You must meet your professors. I would explain, leave them alone that first weeks of school, but around week three go into their office hours and introduce yourself and have a short conversation with them. It may not seem like a big deal to you, but if you need something, they will be more likely to help out since they know a little about you. I was in charge of a majority of the Mass Communication and Media Arts College Freshman. If you are in this college you need to live your mandatory year in the residents halls in Kellogg. If you do this, you will have over 100 study buddies that get what you're going through. Also, this is the ONLY residence hall with its own computer lab in the basement. Imagine this for a minute; You are shooting your film and your actor gets sick, you grip had a few too many last night, and your make-up artist is missing. You would be simply out of luck and have to cancel the shoot. If you live in Kellogg, these people all probably live in the building. You can go knock on door to get these people up and going, or even quickly find people who are suitable replacements. Kellogg is a living learning community (LLC), their whole existence is there for freshmen to learn where they live, and to have a community of students around them supporting them through the tough times and the good times. When your Bolex film comes back ruined because you had a light leak, you have over 100 friend who already know what your going through. When you finish a shoot, you have over 100 friends who will celebrate with you. An added education bonus that Kellogg has to offer is its peer mentors. The three (on of each floor of Kellogg) peer mentors are juniors or seniors who live in Kellogg and are additional resources for students from any thing like Math 113 to how to properly download their HD footage. Everyone get down to the wire with assignments and when you get in a bind or simply have a question about the college, these people are at students disposal. This program was started a year an a half ago by Clare Mitchell who is the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs and also the Chief Academic Advisor. She is a great resource and always has her door open for students who have any questions or needs. Another benefit of SIUC MCMA college is that we have our own internship coordinator, Krissi Geary-Boehm. This woman goes above and beyond for students to place them in internships. She hosts over 12 free workshops a semester on how to perfect your resume, cover letter, and interviews. She also hosts a senior level class on professionalism and prepares you for everything you will need to be a professional in your field.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

When I came to school that stereotype was that SIUC was a party school. I have found that the not be true in a lot of ways. A lot of this stereotype was associated with Halloween and events that have happened in the past. SIUC still shuts down all of its bars and liquor stores "the strip" for the whole weekend around Halloween, but it really doesn't seem to be a big deal. As of right now you can not drink in a majority of the residence halls. The only one that allows you to is Neeley Hall, but it is only three of the upper floors and you have to be over 21 to live on it. So for a stereotype that sticks around, it's simply not true.

Kelli
What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Southern Illinois University - Carbondale has long been viewed as the 'party school'. Back in the 70's parties and riots wer...

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Southern Illinois University - Carbondale has long been viewed as the 'party school'. Back in the 70's parties and riots were not an uncommon occurance and that stereotype has stuck with the university these 40 years later. This stereotype is definitely not accurate! While there are the typical 'party goers' this is not a reputation that accurately depicts the majority of students. SIUC is a research college and there are many opportunities for students to have an Undergraduate Assistanceship that pays you to research things that you find interesting. There are over 200 student organizations to join and become involved in as well as many fellowship opportunities off of campus.

Chelsea
Describe the students at your school.

My classmates are friendly familar faces that are willing to help and encourage you.

Describe the students at your school.

My classmates are friendly familar faces that are willing to help and encourage you.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

If I could go back in time and talk to myself as a high school senior I would say, research more. As a high school senior I felt like I knew what I wanted to do and going to auniversity that had the major would be the easiest way to get to that career. What in actualality happened was that I truely did not know what went in to achieving that degree and getting that career. When I actually did the program, it was more challenging than I ever thought, and it was not for me. I would tell my high school self to go to the community college and get the general education classes out of the way and really figure out what I was good at and how that would truly encourage, and show what the best career could ever be for me. I have changed my major three times since being in college, and I wish I could tell my high school self to learn more about myself and any desired careers, before deciding on a major and university.

What kind of person should attend this school?

The kind of person that should attend this school is a student looking for an education that is specific but willing to learn the things that are not always expected. Majors include some classes you would not expect, but in the long run, really appretiate taking them. Having an open mind is important and embrasing change is possible. Being outgoing and school spirited is important and makes the time here more enjoyable.

Megan
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Most people, if they could, would warn their past selves about partying, exes, or studying. But my biggest warning would be a...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Most people, if they could, would warn their past selves about partying, exes, or studying. But my biggest warning would be about pride. In my freshman year, I took a job at the local Taco Bell. I thought that because I worked thirty or more hours a week in High School, I could do it in college too. But I was wrong. College required a lot of studying, and working the hours that I did was not very conducive to my schedule. But I was too stubborn to admit defeat and quit. And because I was too stubborn to quit, I ended up losing way more money than I made. Working there also stressed me out more than any of my classes, messed up my sleeping schedule, and made me hate people for a little while. It was just a terrible experience. So, if there was anything that I could tell my past self to avoid, it would be my pride. It caused too many problems.

What kind of person should attend this school?

This school is wonderful for outdoor enthusiest. Not more than a 20 minute drive away is the National Shawnee forrest. It's chock full of beautiful trails and campgrounds. But for those who aren't the outdoorsy type, Carbondale is known for it's partying. The bars are always full, and house parties are a common thing. And as long as someone is 19, then they can always find a place for entertainment.

What kind of person should not attend this school?

This school is a terrible choice for anyone looking for a small school. The teachers here are warm and friendly, but need to be sought out. The people are also wonderful. But if people don't seek out others, they can end up being lonely. Basically, this school makes students take the initiative to go and find others. Another set of students that shouldn't come here are those looking for a large metropolitan area. Carbondale is close to the National Shawnee forest, and surrounded by towns with populations of 2,000 people or less.

Jamey
Describe the students at your school.

My classmates are young and act carefree. Most of them have no idea what they will do with their lives.

Describe the students at your school.

My classmates are young and act carefree. Most of them have no idea what they will do with their lives.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I have learned that life is not easy and you have to fight for what you need. I honestly did not think I was going to be able to attend college because my family is not wealthy. College is something I do not take for granted. This scholarship could lift a huge burden off of my family.

Details

  • Enrollment
  • 12,182
  • Tuition & Fees
  • $13,073
  • Acceptance rate
  • 77%

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