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Syracuse University

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Now that I'm a sophomore I've gotten through most of my big lecture classes. Almost all of my professors learned my name by the third class. Professors are also always available for office hours and once you come and talk to them there, they never forget you. My favorite class was MAG205 last semester. My professor (who I have again this semester), is a former writer for People magazine and knows all about the industry. Since this is my major, I found this class to be interesting because we took a magazine of our choice and wrote a term paper about all the different components. Basically we got to look at magazines and really understand what goes into them to get a better understanding of how the industry works. Human Sexuality is another popular class. You basically come to a two hour lecture and talk about sex. It's like sex ed only with the details that people actually care about added in. It's funny and extremely eye opening. My least favorite classes were big lectures like astronomy or nutrition. The professor never takes attendance so I'm not motivated to go to class especially since I can get the notes from another student. Then the tests are impossible. Students study a good amount, but it's broken up nicely throughout the week. Students usually go out on Tuesday and Thursday nights (in addition to weekends) and study in between. Most students don't have classes on Fridays which makes life easier. Class participation is extremely common and very encouraged in all of my classes aside from large lectures. My news class is essentially based on class discussion about story ideas and how we can make things better. I definitely discuss class readings as well as current events and politics with students outside of class. If I really enjoyed the reading from the class I'll talk to other classmates about it before and after class. Newhouse students are constantly discussing current events- especially politics right now. It's impossible not to. Most students aren't competitive with one another. I've found that students block off according to their major and they all help each other along the way. In terms of looking for internships, students may be more competitive in that area, but in terms of school work, everyone wants everyone to succeed. The most unique class I've taken is within my minor- religion in the news media. It is definitely an interesting class because it intersects two subjects that seemingly do not intersect, but you find everywhere. My major is magazine journalism. It is definitely a unique program to Syracuse. There are specific classes that teach students how to write magazine articles as opposed to newspaper. Almost all of the professors are experienced in the field and help give the perspective of the industry and prepare the students for that. I see my magazine/news professor in his office hours on a regular basis. I'm in the process of finding an internship and he has helped with networking or any questions I may have about the business. Professors are helpful not only in the classroom, but for questions that pertain to jobs or the industry. Most respond to their email within a few hours (some within minutes) and almost all of them give their office or cell phone numbers for easy contact. The core requirements are relatively annoying for students who already know what they want to do. Syracuse has a variety of strong programs such as communications, management, architecture, performing arts, design, film etc. For those students, many came to Syracuse solely for that major and do not plan on changing. For them, the core requirements of say a science class for a right-brained writer may be tedious. However, they do not take long to complete and AP credit helps boost students through the core early. Newhouse definitely prepares its students to get a job. Finding an internship is important right away, however the curriculum focuses on giving students a breadth of skills. Dean Rubin always said that more than anything, students should leave Newhouse knowing how to write- if they didn't learn anything else but that, they would succeed.

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I went to Syracuse for film. I applied to and was rejected from the Newhouse School of Communications. That turned out to be a blessing in disguise, because I walked across the quad to Visual and Performing Arts and was accepted into their film program, where I was able to study the art side of things and learn to become a real director, rather than strictly the business end, which was emphasized over at Newhouse. I did end up taking classes at Newhouse as a senior though, after cutting through a lot of red tape. And it was at Newhouse where I took the most important classes for me and my subsequent career... My first three years at Syracuse (1998-2001) were spent primarily within the walls of the VPA Film program, studying the aesthetics and intricacies of film language and film making. Sure, I had interned at one of the most successful music video production companies in NYC, but at school, I had no formal guidance in how to go after a job in the film business. Going into my senior year, I knew I needed to get into Professor Richard Dubin's Film Business class, and after talking to a ton of people in administration and cutting through a lot of tape, I did. I distinctly remember a project where, split into groups, the class was to pick a movie and dissect its makings. My group chose "The Fast and the Furious" and my job was to dig up numbers from pre-production. Being in college, I did what every other kid in that class did, and went to the internet, printed out figures from IMDB.com and showed up the next time in class, only to have Dubin shoot everyone's work down. He told us all that people in the film business are just like anyone else, and it's not hard to get in touch with them; go ask them for numbers. I - knowing I had to take this seriously, not to mention having something to prove, being one of only two non-Newhousers in the room - did as I was told. I went home, looked up the exec. producer's name, then his phone number in the phone book, left a message on his home's answering machine. He called me the next day and gave me the phone numbers of all of his associate producers and assistants and they gave me all the numbers I needed. The next class, you better believe that my hand was the first one raised. Going into the next semester, my last at Syracuse, I was scrambling to schedule the 5 credits needed for graduation that my advisor didn't notice I was missing. I decided to create an independent study that would not only provide 5 credits, but would also help me in getting a job. Dubin was kind enough to be the faculty advisor to this class, where I led three friends in documenting the process of pitching an original screenplay to producers, production companies and agents. We met weekly with Prof. Dubin to discuss strategy and create the best product we could. With minimal-to-no help from the others in my group, I secured meetings with Barry Diller, the Godfather producers, large production houses, agents, cinematographers, writers and others. Prof. Dubin's tutelage during my senior year has proven to be invaluable. Lessons learned from both of those classes have guided me since college, and have turned up fantastic results

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The academics here are top notch. Each school within SU has the best and most experienced faculty out there. Newhouse school of communications, Whitman school of management and the L.C. Smith college of engineering are some of the best schools in the country, respective to the career field. At these schools especially, the academics are extremely competitive. I can't speak for every student on how much they study, but I can say that if you want to do well in college, you definitely need to put in the work and stay on top of things. One of my professors once told me you can only have two of the three thing in college (sleep, academics, social life). In order to do excel at two of them, the third thing will be sacrificed. It really is true. However, no matter what facade someone puts on, college sets you up for your career, so everyone does work and puts in effort. Classes are good sized- most are around 40 students or less, but you will find some intro/lecture courses with a couple hundred students. The professors really do make an effort to get to know you though, no matter how big or small the class. (I've had a class of more than 50 people, when the teacher recited every student's name by the third week of class!) But remember, you need to meet them halfway; not only will you make a connection with them, but it will be in your benefit when it comes to grading, etc. If you have made a connection, they will be more inclined to help you out! SU sets requirements for its students to ensure we all walk away with a wide array of knowledge in a multitude of areas. I think this is why so many Orange succeed. .

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It really depends on what kinds of classes you take. I'm in a class with 13 people and then another with 300. My favorite class would have to be my RTN class, which is for my major, broadcast journalism. And I DESPISE Spanish. My professor is awful, but most other people i know really like the languages they take. People definitely get down to work when they have to here. It's all about balance- go crazy on Saturday night, but know that you will spend the majority of your Sunday in the library. For class participation, it really depends on the class and professor. Some professors claim you need to talk to get a good grade, but many times you can get by without saying too much. Students do have intellectual conversations outside of class...people talk abuot everything from politics to the "M" theory. Students are competitive, especially in Newhouse. The most unique class I've taken is Human Sexuality and I would recommend it. I am a broadcast journalism major in Newhouse, and I can tell it's going to be a lot of work. People in Newhouse think that they are the shit, and there are some really cocky people out there. But it's one of the best communications schools in the nation, so that's to be expected, I guess. I dont really see my professors outside of class ever. And at least in Newhouse, the education is 100% about getting a job. There are so many connections with alumni, it's crazy. If you graduate from Newhouse, youre basically set.

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Although I am not a theatre major, this semester I'm taking stage makeup which is a really cool class. Although at times it can be difficult (precision is key) it is fun learning all of the techniques. Our last project we had to make ourselves look old and our next one we are making ourselves look like a celebrity. I get along very well with my teachers and I think that partly has to do with coming from a small prestigous high school where teacher-student relationships are highly encouraged. At Syracuse it's really up to you. If you want to persue after class discussions, the teachers are more than happy to speak with you and if you want nothing to do with them you can do that as well.

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I trust the professors and feel they know what they are doing. Almost all my teacher's know my name and I can get to know personally. I feel fully confident I will graduate knowing how to do my profession and will not be nervous to enter the field. Syracuse is also great when it comes to taking care of their students. I have gotten so much help and direction here from my advisor and the career services center. Whenever I feel lost i trust the school to help me out. They also are VERY helpful when it comes to finding internships, jobs, and networking, which is so important.

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All the hype you've ever heard about Newhouse, it's true. People in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications are better then everybody else and that's a fact. I'm lucky enough to have a Public Communications Studies Minor; it's really given me a lot of direction and helped me to set real career goals. My favorite class within the minor is COM 300, The News According to Hollywood. It's pretty intense: once a week we show up for three hours and watch movies, and then we have a take home midterm and a take home final. Gosh I really hope I pass.

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people study here. people do work. we take things seriously and then come the weekend we let go. the classes arent thatttt hard, if you do the work youll be fine. sometimes the tests are really hard because you dont know eactly what to expect but hte teachers are always there to answer questions. all my teachers have been really nice and outgoing. theyre there to help, not just to get paid. NEVER take bio 121 or any other class with Marvin Drueger. hes aweful. thats the only bad experience iv had with classes.

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tough, must stay focused if you want to get a good grade, small class professors know your name, the gen ed's are interesting, some intellectual conversations outside of class but mostly your doing alot of work in a short amount of time and then partying hard that night. you do spend time with your professors outside of class, usually the ones in your major. students are competitive and want to do better than someone else.

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