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The University of Findlay

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What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

The advice I would give to parents and/or students searching for the right college is does the college suit the student. When I visited the University of Findlay, I knew this was the college that I wanted to attend in the fall. The university is small, clean, and friendly, just what I was looking for. Also, the University of Findlay has small class sizes, where the professors knows the student personally. The professors help students with their studies and care about them. Faculty and staff are friendly and helpful, so students feel comfortable around them. To make the most of the college experience, be involved on campus and in the community. I am involved in many different organizations and volunteer service because I enjoy meeting new people and helping the university and community. Also, meet different people on campus. The University of Findlay has many diverse people from all over the world such as India, China, and Japan! Therefore, students can interact and personally know other students from other parts of the world. Also, to make the most of the college experience, attend different activities such as theater plays, social events, and athletics. Make yourself a well-rounded person!

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Students should definitely look at more than one college to obtain a broad understanding of what college is like. Asking numerous questions is very important, whether they are about financial aid, academics, or the social life on and off campus. If financial aid is a huge factor of chosing a college, always talk with a financial aid advisor because they will make sure you will be able to afford that particular school. After narrowing down the choices, make several visits to each college to get a feel of the atmosphere. Make sure the enviornment is comfortable and safe. Overnight visits are highly recommended. This option allows students to attend classes with upperclassmen and engage in a variety of activities. It is important for the school to offer extracurricular activities so students can be involved. Once the right school is chosen, make friends on the first weekend before classes begin. For the first few weeks of school, stay there and get involved. Many students want to go home. As a result, they are missing out on the opportunity to make new friends and engage in different activities. The main thing is study hard, have fun, and be involved!

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Research the school thuroughly. Make at least one visit to the school, and no less than one. Don't necessarily decide what school to go to based on the programs they offer (since you might switch programs). Try to stay overnight on campus and attend at least one class. Get a copy of the universities policies (on-campus living, behavioral, academic expectations) before deciding on a school, so that you can find a school that fits your personality and habits better. It is extremely frustrating to find out these things later on. Greek Life is incredible: in my experience it has not been anything like what is perpetuated by Hollywood stereotypes. granted that does take place in certain locales, I am sure, though it was much more that way in the early 90s and before. Greek Life has offered me a frequent opportunity to do community service, invaluble people skills, social and business networking, academic standards (much higher than the school's), and a home away from home. I would highly encourage any motivated individual to look into Greek Life at a small school, and possibly a large school too, but DO NOT stand for hazing.

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From my current experiences I have learned that personal exploration within one's field of study enhances the intrinsic value of his/her education. I became greatly inspired by one particular faculty member at the University of Findlay; her name is Dr. Evelyn Buday and she works in the Psychology Department. Her classes were very demanding but so thought-provoking and engaging that I could not get enough of Psychology. I then switched my major and my current career goal is to become a college professor in order to allow my newly-found passion to generate excitement in others, similarly to how I was affected. So, my best advice to Kevin H. Patton, high school senior, is to gain as much knowledge on your own in a particular field of interest, or multiple! Learn as much as you can outside of the classroom and apply it within the classroom, and in your daily routines. Make the best of what you learn, from a new word to a law in Physics. William Glasser defines Fun as "the genetic reward for learning." You will have great amounts of fun from adhering to this lifestyle. Good luck and enjoy the knowledge building process!

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Searching for the right place to further your educational career is a very stressful experience. However, it may also be one of the best experiences in an individual's life because it is an opportunity to selectively pick your future. Advice in this situation is critical and I would advise a new student to: narrow the search down to a handful and then take visits, select a campus that is right for you not your friends, join extracurricular organizations, enjoy your independence, and most importantly interact with fellow students. It is crucial to narrow your search to a couple campuses so you do not waste your time with schools that aren't for you. Also, this is your future and not your friends so it is important to select a school you like and not one that your friends like. Once you are on campus you need to join organizations so you can quickly make new friends to help reduce the inevitable home sickness. Independence is a great thing however; do not abuse it because you can quickly be in over your head. These are a few suggestions I wish somebody would have told me prior to my college education.

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If I could go back in time and give advice to my undergraduate self, I would tell them two things: make sure to get an internship and double major! At the time I had no idea how invaluable internships are when seeking employment. Not only do they give you a skill set and experiences that can be applicable in whatever career you choose after graduation, but they also show potential employers how you handle yourself in a real world, professional setting. Internships are also a good way to test out the career you think you want before committing yourself to it. My major was something a bit esoteric, Japanese, and I really wish someone would have given me the advice to still pursue a degree in what I was interested in, but to also double major in something that would give me more skills in the working world. Being able to speak a foreign language is great, but I would be even more marketable if I had matched that with something practical such as business or accounting. These pieces of advice would have been invaluable to me, but unfortunately some things can only be learned in hindsight.

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Learn how to suck it up, turn off the television, the music, your cell phone, and disconnect your internet if that's what it takes for you to hunker down and dig into that ten page paper that needs to be done within the next two hours or those three fifty-page chapters you neglected to read until the night before the exam. Begin to learn the fine art of microwave cooking. Prepare yourself, mentally and physically, for dining hall food. To prepare physically, consider sustaining yourself before hand on mushy fish sticks, rubber pizza, Cheerios, popcorn, and beef jerkey. Oh, and lots of caffeine. Your major does not have to be set in stone. Don't look at it that way. Have goals and aspirations, but always have a back-up plan. Keep multiple doors open in case you ever need (or want) to look for another route. It?s going to fly by. You?re going to blink and first semester will be over. You?re going to blink again and second semester finals will be creeping up on you. Pace yourself. Balance hard work with fun. And remember that you will survive. Well?Most people do, anyway. ;)

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To find the right college, I would suggest visiting all the colleges you are interested in and getting a private tour. The tour guides give you a lot more information in private tours than in public ones, and you will be able to learn more about each school this way. After visiting all the possibilities, I would make a list of the pro's and con's of each school. After reviewing the list that was made, I would then decide which school made you feel most at home. You want to make sure you go somewhere where you feel comfortable. Your academics will be affected if you don't feel at home on campus. To make the most of the college experience, I would make sure to get involved in as many organizations as you are interested in. The more things you get involved in, the more friends you make. Also, make sure to go to the on campus activities. There are always more students at these activities than you would expect, which gives you another opportunity to network with other students. Your college friends become your family, so the more you have, the better your experience will be.

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If I know thenlwould study harderto enable me to get a good GPA. The foundation I lay inhigh school is whats going to take me through my college academic degree. So if I were to go back I would be an advocate for high school children to be serious and dedicated to their school work for instance someone wants to go into Pharmacy. I would educate them about what classes they need to take to strengthened them before they get toPharmacy school cos its adifficilt programin the sense that they are harder cls.have also started from a private school to get a good foundation and the skills I need to help me succeed in graduate school,Knowing that one comes from a poor background I would encouraged them to learn hard to get a good GPA to enable them to get schorlarships for college. This is pertaining to people coming from third world countries and not only that but also poor background about education in the U.S. I would educate them and insist in doing programs they can get jobs in even when they return back to their home country so they can educate the less fortunate ones.

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I recommend to "go with your gut instinct". Don't let someone else make the decision for you. If the only reason for looking at a college is because you think it will be the safest bet or because your parents want you to go there, then do not look at it for another moment. Life is never safe, and doing what your parents think is best for you only because you might be afraid of the consequences of not following the "beaten, or well known path" is never rewarding. Find the school that best matches yourself! Look at the campus. Do you seee yourself wlaking down the hallways every day for at least the next four years? Pay attention to the current students as they walk by. Do they seem happy or satisfied? Look at the extra curriculars and school organizations. Many times friends are made through these outlets, so make sure you can find at least a couple of groups that you can see youself joining. Last and most important, figure out if the college has your intended major, or at least some interesting majors if you are undecided once you start your college career.

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