New Orleans, LA
Tulane University of Louisiana


120 Ratings

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Recent Reviews

Ryan
When you step off campus what do you see?

You see neighborhoods, Audubon Park, and the street car! You have Broadway on one side of campus which has many great places ...

When you step off campus what do you see?

You see neighborhoods, Audubon Park, and the street car! You have Broadway on one side of campus which has many great places to go! On the front side of campus you have historic St. Charles Avenue which has the street cars to take you into the city! It really is a beautiful city. Don't let anybody else convince you otherwise. Hurricane Katrina came but the people rebuilt their city in a masterpiece.

Describe the dorms.

Ah the dorms. The one thing every college student either fears or looks forward to. Well first off I must say the dorms are very nice! Much nicer than I was expecting when I started. Community bathrooms are really not as bad as you think either. The dorms are sizable enough for 2 people to fit comfortably, as long as you don't overpack of course. Each floor and wing has at least one RA residing there to help with all your needs on campus. Use them. They're invaluable resources. The bathroom is cleaned daily and always kept clean. Your room is your own responsibility however. There is free internet and cable to keep you occupied during your down time if you so desire. I came into Tulane dreading the dorm life but now that I've had a taste of it, I couldn't imagine being there without it.

Why did you decide to go to this school?

I chose Tulane University based off its affordability, location, and academics. Tulane is always willing to help make their school affordable for everybody. I'm attending Tulane on a scholarship, which makes the school cost as much as going to my State schools. Location! It's New Orleans, one of the greatest cities ever! You have culture, fun, places to see, and diversity abound! It's quite the astounding place and one where you'll find yourself never wanting to leave. Next would be academics. Tulane is ranked as the 50th college in the nation at the time I'm writing this. That's an impressive rating! Tulane is renowned for its academic abilities.

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

A modern day castle at the front of campus with lush green grass and far reaching trees, one of which holds many Mardi Gras beads. The campus stretches far back into Uptown New Orleans. Just past the front buildings are modern art creations to see! Then you have the long building of Stern Hall and the various science laboratories. Feret Street runs through the middle of campus, and crossing it leads us to the Lavern Bernick Center (LBC) where you can eat in the food court, visit the book store, or just study. The business school is to the right where you can see the stocks running by and students and teachers in suits. Monroe Hall and Sharp Hall, freshman dorms, are right behind the business school. A huge quad is to the left where many of the campus events are held. In short, the grass is always green, the people are always lively, and the campus is always ready for anybody.

Tell us about the sports scene on campus.

Well...to be quite honest, sports are not the biggest things here. We aren't technically known for our sports so if you're coming here expecting to go far, I wouldn't suggest it. We are in the NCAA Division I football league, have our own basketball, baseball, and volleyball programs. Sports are not absent on campus but they are not majorly stressed. Catching a flag football game by signing up at the Reily Center is a great way to get involved as well.

Where is the best place to get work done on campus?

The best place I've found to get work done is in Howard Tilton Memorial Library. There honestly is no better place to find some peace and quiet to study. If you prefer a little background noise, that isn't your iPod, I would suggest the Lavern Bernick Center (LBC) or in the multiple study rooms in the dorms.

Tell us about your professors.

The professors here are amazing! I have yet to run into a professor that is unwilling to help or direct you in any way. They seem to enjoy their jobs, which is pivotal for any teacher, and they want you to enjoy your college experience as much as you want to. Some professors though can be terrible though. That's the sad part. But most are like the ones described above.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

Most, if not all, students are Tulane are academically smart so yes that one is correct! Also while a good many students do go out and party most of the time, there is a large percentage of the student body that do not all the time, which makes that one incorrect!

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Academically smart! Very smart students congregate here. Although it is a stereotype, the most prevalent one is partiers. Yes, there a ton of outings and alcohol is readily available. While this is all true, the students here are still smart and concerned about their school work.

Describe the students at your school.

The students here are predominantly of middle class to upper middle class. I, being lower middle class myself, do not feel out of place here. They generally don't brag about anything, like the stereotypes in movies portray. I have yet to meet a student being actually rude. The students are very proactive in their prospective fields of study. They leave announcements everywhere! Posters, putting chalk on the street, emails, every way you can possibly imagine. All types of students here interact. Here we are one big school body.

What are the academics like at your school?

It isn't easy. I start with that because it's the truth and it's the main thing you need to understand when you come into a nationally ranked university. Now that you understand that here it is! The academics at Tulane are just plain awesome! The teachers will know your name. Freshman classes are generally bigger. Like you General Chemistry or Intro to Psych will be larger around 150 students but other than that, most have a cap at 20. The university has a TIDES program which is basically just an extremely fun class! The topics range from Business to Clinical Medicine to Architecture in New Orleans to Baking. The class is designed to get you integrated into the campus, the city, and to give you a good advisor.

Rebecca
What is your overall opinion of this school?

I think the best thing about Tulane is the opportunity to live in New Orleans, and every student should take advantage of tha...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

I think the best thing about Tulane is the opportunity to live in New Orleans, and every student should take advantage of that. New Orleans gets a national reputation as a party city, and there is no denying that part of it, but it's a city with so many great other opportunities too. Tulane Uptown Campus is situated right across from Audubon Park and right on St. Charles Ave. It's an incredibly beautiful and historical part of town. My favorite thing to do freshman year was walk or bike through the park with a friend to get groceries (there is a Whole Foods on the other side) and then stop and have a picnic by one of the many ponds on the way back. Tulane's campus is beautiful, but spending the $1.25 to take a streetcar ride down town, see the antique shops, street artists, and to of course grab some beignets (donut type things) and coffee is probably my favorite thing about this school. In terms of some of the more practical things, the campus is great, very beautiful and everything is easy to get to. One of the major complaints from students is the food, we have a nice area near the bookstore with some good options and two coffee shops, but the cafeteria tends to be pretty bad. But, even with some of the usual complaints, the administration isn't always on top of everything, trying to do unique projects requires lots of paper works, I find that students are usually glad about the choice to come here. My friends and I often talk about how glad we are that we have this great experience while many of our friends at home are talking about going to parties in dorm rooms for Halloween and we went to Frenchman St., which was packed with costumed people for almost a mile. And, when I tell my family or family friends I go to Tulane, they are always interested and proud, citing what a good school it is and in such an interesting town. I think Tulane is a great place, it's wonderful in terms of size because every time I walk to class I see at least a few people I know which is always nice. But I also see a lot of people I don't know, and its fun to have the opportunity to always meet new people.

Describe your favorite campus traditions.

This week we had our snow day, one of the quads is filled with snow and there is free hot chocolate.

Tell us about the food and dining options.

There are quite a few dining options so I'll start with the worst first. 1) Bruff--- the kinda gross cafeteria. They sometimes have good fries, and pizza. Other than that, most people avoid it after Freshman or Sophomore year. Though, they do have waffle makers available at anytime and you can make your own waffles, plus and ice cream freezer so you can eat your delicious waffles with ice cream. In terms of healthy food though, they're severely lacking. 2) The LBC- this has a bunch of food places, Panda Express, Baja Fresh, bagels, sandwiches etc. It's right near the book store and a lot of people eat there. 3) PJs- coffee shops, which provide the exhausted student with delicious coffee in the library, near the dorms, and under the science building on your way to almost every class you have, there will be a PJs. And they are fantastic. 4) NOLA Bucks- this is money that you can spend at some of the places that aren't owned by Tulane but do surround campus, and you can get pizza, crepes (yum) and some other places without spending anymore money. Great for ordering to your dorm with friends or all going out to dinner. Students have a few other on campus dining options but those are less popular. They can also go to 'Luff' (Loyola Bruff, meaning the cafeteria at the college next door). which has a reputation for being far better than ours.

What's unique about your campus?

The best, and most unique, thing about Tulane's campus is the fact it's in New Orleans. Because it's Uptown, the campus itself is surrounded by a pretty quiet neighborhood but just $1.25 and a 15-20 min streetcar ride and you're right downtown, able to experience all that New Orleans has to offer.

When you step off campus what do you see?

Well... it depends what direction you're stepping off in. At the back of campus there is a large street, which if you have a car, can take you quickly downtown or to a movie theater or towards the mall. And directly across that street is the Kupcake Factory, which has some of the most delicious cupcakes I have ever eaten. There is also a small pizza place, a subway and a Mexican place (thats amazing and fast) in that direction that many students go to. On the sides of campus there are mostly neighborhoods, some of them are student neighborhoods while others are the more elegant 'uptown' neighborhoods. And the front of campus faces St. Charles Ave, which has some of the most beautiful houses in New Orleans on it. And it is directly across from Audubon Park, which, if you cross, is also right near Audubon Zoo and a street that has a lot of bakeries, boutiques and a grocery store.

Tell us about the sports scene on campus.

There isn't a huge sports scene in terms of the school teams, many of the athletes hang out together and some students do go to games but it doesn't dominate the social scene. What is more common, is the amount of students who play club sports. Many people play club soccer, vollyball or even fencing. And ever more students play inter-mural sports with other students from their floors or groups of friends or other types of clubs sometimes form teams. These sports are extremely common and there are diverse levels of players who are involved in playing. It's a great way to get to know people and it's a lot of fun!

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

My school is old, and my favorite thing about it are the beautiful old trees on campus. It makes walking through campus feel like the 'real college experience' and it's just beautiful. Many of the buildings have different styles as they were built at different times but they all seem to go together very well. I love the Tulane Uptown Campus, it's one of the reason's I chose the school when I was a senior.

What are your classes like?

My classes are great, this semester I'm in Ballet, Anthropology of Women and Men, Adolescent Psychology, Developmental Psychopathology, Nursery School Observation and an English class in a special topic that talks about pain and atrocities in literature and popular culture. The classes are extremely diverse, requiring different levels of attendance, participation and outside of class work along with their extremely different subjects. I really enjoy them all this semester and I think as you finish with your general ed classes and focus on things you're interested in, most people are really happy with their schedules by junior and senior year.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

I have to admit, I'm not a huge athletics fan. And, from what I have heard, our athletics teams are generally not very good, except for baseball? Maybe, baseball... But I do know many other students do attend tailgating parties and cheer on our teams. I think one of the biggest areas of student involvement is community service. Due to the community service required by Tulane, most people find themselves completing at least some service during their time at Tulane. This manifests in a lot of different ways, as many of the biggest traditions on campus tend to revolve around causes. Such as 'Walk a Mile in Her Shoes,' where many of the guys put on heels and walk a mile, raising awareness for sexual violence. It's a good cause, and it's hilarious. In terms of the party scene, there are a few options. Bourbon St., one of the most famous party streets in the country, tends to be where people bring their friends if they have never been to New Orleans, but it's expensive and honestly just a little gross if you think about it while sober. There is also a pretty big Frat/Sorority scene, with at least a couple parties most weekends. The parties are always free and they are usually a lot of fun, especially the parties that the Frats are known for such as the 'Delts around the world party' or 'the bayou bash.' Frats tend to go all out for their headliner parties and even people who usually don't show up to Frat events come. There are also a few bars not far from campus. And there are many things to do that aren't drinking. As a theater and dance person, I go out to a lot of shows. Not to long ago I went to the New Orleans Fringe Festival, which presents fringe theater in many strange locations, such as old abandoned churches, coffee shops, hidden bars and just some person's front yard. New Orleans has a wonderful theater scene and even when Fringe isn't happening there is usually something to see. Tulane also offers some 'Take Back the Night' activities, which are late night things that are on campus. There are movies played on the quad, music and other options. Plus, there is always the fun and relaxing evenings watching movies in your floor common room or inviting some friends to watch a movie in your room. If you're looking for something to do that isn't drinking, there are always a lot of options.

Describe the students at your school.

I think students at Tulane are pretty diverse, but one of the things that keeps students more divided is the fact that the rich, sorority girls are also often business majors, and the LGBT students are often psych or gender and sexuality studies majors or things like that. It's not so much that there are uncrossable lines, and most people have friends in all sorts of different groups, but since we spend so much time with people in our classes the type of people tends to narrow. The general political feel of the school is usually pretty left, but being in the South there is still a fair number of right and center students. These students seem to get along fairly well as most of the focus is on awareness, and encouraging students to vote, rather than on tearing each other down. I think Tulane does a good job of creating an environment where no student feels automatically out of place. It may take some time to find the right video game club, the right sorority sisters, or that one other kid on your floor who likes heavy metal, but it can be done. That's one of the great things about the small size, whatever you're interested in, there is someone else who is too. And they aren't too hard to find if you keep looking.

What are the academics like at your school?

I'm a psychology major (School of Science and Engineering), an English minor (liberal arts) and a dance minor so I have a lot of experience with many of the different class structures. I think that science classes are probably some of the hardest to be motivated in because they tend to be on the extremely high end in terms of the amount of students in the class. Biology is taught in a HUGE lecture hall and it was hard to even be motivated to go some days because I felt like no one would notice if I wasn't there. As you move into the higher levels of all classes though, class size shrinks, and as you take more classes with the same specialized professors they learn your names and you begin to really feel like a part of the department. I think dance classes are usually my favorite classes, especially the lower level classes, because they offer such an eclectic mix of people trying dance for the first time. Everyone gets a chance to get to know each other, and the professor. English classes also offer that opportunity, and class participation is more frequent in liberal arts classes in general. One of the reasons I applied to Tulane was because I really dislike hyper-competetive environments. I like environments that foster the idea that we should all be helping each other achieve more, not ones that seem to encourage you to let your fellow students fail because it will make you closer to the top. I think Tulane has a less competitive environment than many schools of similar academic caliber, and most of the students I know really are here to enjoy learning. Even outside of the classroom my friends share things they learned in their classes, and we are each pretty happy with our major choices even if we don't know what we want to do with our lives yet. I think the amount students study is another important thing to think about, and here students do study quite a bit but not so much that it interferes with having a social life. The library is closed early on Friday and Saturday nights and students are out, even when it might be a little irresponsible to be. During finals students really get to work though, and show that we're a school that works hard so we can play hard.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Tulane University students are thought of in different ways, depending on who you ask. There is a higher Jewish population than the national average, so there is a bit of a stereotype that everyone who goes here is Jewish and usually from the Northeast. But not everyone really is, and there are plenty of people from all over the country. Another stereotype is that everyone drinks a LOT, it is in New Orleans and I know from my friends at other schools that we do have more access to bars (which are more often to those 18+ instead of 21+) and there is clearly a drinking culture. That said, people often over estimate the amount of drinking that takes place, and it seems to me that there are usually a few people in any group of friends who don't drink at all.

Chelsea
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Tulane University is a great college for business, pre-med and public health, but unfortunately, not so much for liberal arts...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Tulane University is a great college for business, pre-med and public health, but unfortunately, not so much for liberal arts. While a lot of liberal arts professors are great and the classes offered are interesting, the facilities for business students, for example, far surpass those for liberal arts majors. The campus is fairly nice and the library is decent. The food on campus is pretty awful, and it's really a shame that there is an obligatory meal plan for the first two years when you're in New Orleans. New Orleans is a great city to go to college in. The bars are great and fairly cheap, as is a lot of food. There is always something to do. If you are looking for a university that rallies around its sports teams, Tulane is not the school. I myself, have never been to a single sporting event. Word is that a football stadium is going to be built on campus--we have our games in the Superdome currently--so this may change. The best experience I have gotten from Tulane is being a DJ and staff member of our radio station, WTUL. We broadcast over an FM frequency throughout the city and the audience and DJs are not just limited to Tulane students. WTUL has introduced me to a lot of great music and interesting people.

Describe the dorms.

The dorms range from really nice and brand spanking new, to fairly disgusting! I, for whatever reason, elected to slum it both Freshman and Sophomore year. The rooms were fairly similar, with one roommate and a fairly large, single room. Sophomore year I lived with seven girls in a suite-style dorm with a bathroom in the middle. This was a very strange and hormone-laden experience. I knew all of the girls beforehand, but it was still a very difficult situation as there was NO privacy. There are also apartment style dorms for upper-level students as well as much nicer suite-style options in which you only have one room connected to yours through a bathroom. There is also the new Sophomore Honors dorm, which I have not yet seen but it's alleged to be really nice! I now live off campus and it's a vast improvement.

What are your classes like?

Most of my classes are fairly small, but many of the required courses are very large lectures with up to 200 people. These classes are often fairly easy, so I have not seen this as a problem in the past. As a Film Studies major and an English major specializing in Creative Writing, most of my classes are around 3 hours a session, once or twice a week. This makes for really intense schedules. However, most of the 3 hour classes are fairly interesting as they usually include both a film screening and a lecture, or they are a workshop class such as Screenwriting or Advanced Poetry.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

The most popular groups are service based, but I feel like these groups only participate in one or two major events or builds each year and this serves more to pad resumés. There are a lot of really interesting clubs... one of which is The Juggling Club, which meets on the rooftop of our parking garage to juggle, but who also run a bike repair desk and have a pretty cool garden. There's also a French speaking club that meets once a week and only talks in French, a wine and cheese club and a couple political organizations. I am the Program Director and a DJ at WTUL which is our FM radio station. I DJ for 2 hours every week and get awesome phone calls from listeners and get to rip all kinds of music onto my laptop. DJs also get to do artist interviews and have in-studio performances. One of my friends just did an interview with St. Vincent! While there isn't a ton of DJ-interaction, we do get together to do service projects and have parties. This past week we had an open-to-the-public holiday party with two bands at Tipitina's. I also get a ton of free concert tickets in return for how much work I put in at the station. I met most of my close friends freshman year in my dorm, though they didn't live on my floor. I hated nearly everyone on my floor for whatever reason, so I hung out on my best friend's floor all the time and met all the girls who lived there. The next year I lived in a suite style set-up with seven other girls and we always left our doors open. The dating scene at Tulane is odd. Most guys are more interested in casual hook ups than dating, though most of my friends ended up with boyfriends eventually. Mardi Gras is as much fun as you think it will be. When I was a Freshman, I would go to frat parties for the free booze, but they are generally very sloppy and gross. I don't usually drink during the week, nor do my friends, but there are people who do. I was talking to a girl in a 6 PM Wednesday class last week and quickly realized she was drunk and had just gotten back from happy hour. As an example of a typical Friday night, last night I got back from the library around 9 PM. (Wooo!) I drank a Red Bull, rallied my energy, and went to a small party at a good friend's house, then went to a divey, but cool bar on Magazine. Now that I live off campus, a lot of evenings my roommates and I will invite friends over, cook dinner and have drinks. There are a lot of things to do on a Saturday night that don't involve drinking. One fun, non-drinking event is St. Claude Art Walk which happens once a month on a weekend night in the Bywater. All the art galleries in that area stay open late that night and have some pretty cool work on display. There is wine served, but it's not necessary to be drunk... I must say though, why are you in New Orleans if you don't drink?!

Describe the students at your school.

Most students at Tulane are well-off and white, and hail from the Northeast. There are a lot of Jewish students. I think it is somewhere near 40% Jewish. Other races are present on campus, but the divide is pretty harsh. This is not to say that someone from a different background would be uncomfortable, but they would be in a fairly small minority. Tulane is not a religiously affiliated school and I don't think I know a single person who attends services. Most students are laid back in terms of clothing. There is not much pressure to be incredibly well-dressed at all times. Political activism is pretty much non-existent, but most Tulane students are pretty left-wing and liberal, though generally apathetic and certainly not radical. If there were four hypothetical tables of students in the dining hall, one would be frat guys and sorority girls, one would be an uncomfortably racially segregated table of athletes, one would be "hipsters" and generally interesting or intellectual folk, and the last would be miscellaneous geeks. We certainly have enough geeks for there to be a healthy game of Humans vs. Zombies going down on campus!

What are the academics like at your school?

I am a Film Studies and English major at Tulane. Most liberal arts classes are fairly small, and most professors certainly know your name and care about your performance. I have also been in large lectures of up to 200 people. Most professors make themselves available outside of class. I, myself, am not particularly close with any professors for whatever reason, but one of my roommates has become close enough with one of her professors to have eaten dinner at his house with him and his wife. Some professors make it quite blatant that they have other priorities and teaching is just a way to pay the bills. In the liberal arts, students are supportive, rather than competitive. If there is a large assignment, I often find myself meeting up with classmates in the library to complete them and have someone to take breaks with. I am currently in a Screenwriting class and we're doing a BYOB, scene-reading session at someone's house next Saturday before our final scripts are due. Most of my classmates are fairly intelligent, but of course, there are some that make you question how you're getting the same degree as them. I think some of the academic requirements should be done away with, but I understand that the purpose is "well-roundedness." I am currently in Geology to fulfill my science with a lab requirement and it's dreadful. An interesting requirement that Tulane has is the service learning component. You are required to take one class with a 20-hour service learning component and one with a 40-hour service learning component by the time you graduate. A lot of students feel that where they are placed within the community is largely ineffectual. I currently serve as an assistant tennis coach for under-privileged children attending Lafayette Charter School. The service learning really forces you to step outside of your comfort zone at times, but I think it's great to give back to the city.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Tulane students have a reputation for partying. This is partially true, but we generally work really hard academically, then drink... heavily. A lot of Tulane students come from the Northeast, with New York as the second largest "feeder-state," after Louisiana. Greek life exists, but it is not overpowering and one can still have a great social life without it. I would say that there are definitely more bro-tastic frat boys and vapid sorority girls at Tulane than eccentric bohemians, but most people find their niche all the same.

Matthew
What is the stereotype of students at your school?

Upper-middle Class, Jewish, drunks. ...It fits pretty darn well, really.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

Upper-middle Class, Jewish, drunks. ...It fits pretty darn well, really.

What are some hot-button issues on campus?

The people who work at Bruff went on strike a couple years ago...I don't think they won. Um... ....*thinking* ....*thinking* ...*thinking* There's a new football stadium going up! That's pretty cool!...Ya, like I've said, Tulane isn't a very active place. People will complain here and there but noting ever happens. Some people like that, if you don't keep looking.

What are the most popular classes offered?

Pre-Med is huge here, as least at first. It seems like everyone has grand dreams of being a sexy overseas doctor when they come in, only to get their first c- ever and give it up (including me!). Besides that, there's a real large selection of majors. My friend and I are English, my other friend is Phych, I know people in the B-School, and a teacher, and Poli-sci. Again, as far as learning goes this school is as good as you'll find. It's New Orleans and the student atmosphere that will affect how much you like it here.

Describe the best and worst parts of the social scene on campus.

Best: Friday and Saturday nights really are a blast here. Some people complain about how repetitive things can be, but with a good group of friends there's always fun to be had. There's a great mix of people in the bars, with all age groups mingling (including a few way-too-old-for-a-college-bar guys that ladies should look out for). Everyone is wound pretty tight here during the week, but they all seem to let off some steam on the weekends. I've always fond drunk Tulane kids to be way nicer, and willing to talk than the fast-moving breed I find during the week. Worst: I don't have anything against the Greek system, but the people in it seem to think they're way more important than they are. At most Southern schools I know the Greeks are king due to having the only places to drink, but New Orleans kind of shuts them down. Despite that, many Greeks, especially the more popular ones, tend to look down on anyone not in their system, or at least not in a frat/sorority as popular as theirs. I had a couple would-be Greek friends Freshmen year, but they all left soon after joining. It can just be frustrating to be talking to a guy/girl, but once they hear you're not in a frat/sorority they like, they lose interest.

What do students complain about most?

The food probably. Bruff, and the food-court don't change things up much, and after a few semesters, the food becomes extremely boring. The problem is that unless one moves off campus, those are the only real meal options for the entire stay here. Just tonight, I had dinner at Bruff and at the same cheeseburger I've had probably 300 times over the past 2-and-a-half years. The middle-management is also often un-liked. The teachers are all great, and everyone loves president Cowen. The problem stems with everyone who works between the two. Things such as scheduling changes, internships, and study-abroad programs are under-developed which has lead to headaches for me and all my friends. After a while, people realize that if they want something to be done involving school, that they themselves will have to work it through.

What's the Greek scene like?

The Greek scene is pretty weird here because while Greeks usually dictate the party scene at a school because they set the parties and thus have all the power, here bars dominate and thus frat parties are total freshmen-fests. I have nothing against the Greeks, but I'm not one. What I mostly hear is that they're super fun for rush and Sophomore year, then turn into a drag as an older student. If you wanna be a frat-star, you totally can be...just don't expect people like me to care about you because we don't need frats to party.

Tell us about your professors.

New Orleans is a pretty sweet place to live, and to teach in so I have to figure that Tulane has little or no trouble attracting teachers to come work here. Because of that fact, Tulane has no shortage of tenured, excellent teachers that have generally served me well. There will be bad teachers at every school, but they're usually easy to spot early (If they speak English as a second language, that's not a good sign) and Tulane makes it easy to drop and add classes with more...desirable professors. Schools love to boast about personable teachers who guide you through your journey and make you feel at home. I never had one quite like that. I'm kind of a "stay in the back and pray not to be called on" kind of guy so I never made a ton of report. Still, every teacher has tons of office hours and will E-Mail you back nearly immediately if you have any questions. Most teachers here are fine to good. Some are great, some are terrible. You'll have them all by the time you graduate. Just roll with the punches.

Describe your school to someone who's never heard of it.

This is easy for me because in California no one does know what Tulane is. The first thing I'd have to mention is that yes, it did flood, and no, you can't tell. Then I'd go on to say that it's a pretty, East-coast prep college like BC, Yale, or Harvard in look and personality, just easier to get into and with more drinking. Then I'd go into all the cool stuff there is around campus because hey, most colleges are pretty similar, ya know?

Describe the dorms.

The Freshmen dorms are loud, obnoxious, ugly, and old...and I wouldn't have it any other way. Here's a breakdown. Monroe/Sharp: If you want the generic, insane, college freshman these are absolutely it. I lived in Monroe, and loved every second of it. Basically these dorms are 12, and 7 floors high respectively, with each floor housing half girls and half boys, separated by a common area. What the means is that all students there are surround by both sexes, all of whom are new and just want to have as much fun as possible. If you don't know or don't care where you live, choose Monroe or sharp as your two options. You won't regret it. Butler: Kind of a Mo/Sharp wanna-be. It's fine and I know of lots of people who are still friends from there. Wall: The honors dorm. The rooms are super nice and new, but things are awfully quiet. If that sounds more like your style (and hey, more power to you) this will fit nicely. JL: The all girls dorm. This school has more girls than guys and a majority of the excess ends up here. Most JL girls tend to not spend much time there, instead moving in with Monroe or Sharp friends, and only going back to sleep. Also, if you bring a boy there, he must ALWAYS be with a girl or risk being arrested. I've dated a couple girls here so I have soft spot for it really. Basically, if you're a girl, get your living orders in ASAP. That will make it more likely you don't get bumped into one of the "other" dorms. Best of luck!

Describe a day on campus you'll never forget.

The water in New Orleans is really bad, so every year I invest in a Kentwood water cooler for my apartment. The water comes from Kentwood Spring in norther Louisiana and is really quite delicious. I even named my pet fishy Kentwood after it! Last year, however, I had a problem. The cooler used to release the water was jammed for the cold water, and thus I couldn't gather the cool, delicious water I so craved. This went on for about a week, until my friends and I, likely guided by some liquid courage decided to take action. We figured that the most likely problem involved the water pressure of the tank. Since the water was coming out, just in a very weak stream we assumed that by releasing the pressure, a harder stream would result. Thus, just like one shot-guns a beer, we took a sharp knife and stabbed a whole on top of the 5-gallon jug, so as to increase the pressure and make the water come out. It worked awesome! The spicket worked and the delicious water came flooding out. Satisfied, we turned the water off. It kept coming out. We unplugged the wall socket, still no difference. Quickly the water became so great that water began to roll out from under the hole we placed the jugs. Quickly we realized our new 5-gallon tank was going to completely empty itself on our carpet. In a rush, we gathered the jug and rushed it into the bathroom shower. All the while the water continued to flow all over the carpet and us. By the time we got the jug into a safe location, the carpet, as well as we were completely soaked. The next day we hired the Kentwood guys to come help us. They noticed the still-soaked floor and commented how dangerous it was to mix water and the cooler electrical cord. Whoops. Now, if that story doesn't convince you to pick me for a live-chat, I don't know what will.

Where is the best place to get work done on campus?

Just like in high-school, it is really up to the student to figure out where one want's to study. Obviously, the most quiet spot is camped up in a dorm room over a computer or desk. That's usually my method as when it's time for me to work, I can't have any distractions. For quiet, yet social settings, the library and coffee shop are both open until at least 4AM, and provide calm, social settings to get work done, as well as printers which are often hard to find in a dorm. The most festive option is to take your work to a common area just outside your door. In the majority of freshmen dorms this area will be the social hub with people coming and going, saying hi, watching the TV, preparing for bed, being drunk, and everything in between. I've never heard of anyone complain of a lack of places to study on campus. Everyone finds their niche quickly

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

If I could go back in time, the one thing I would tell myself would be to be smarter about picking my "joke" classes so that I could have more easily formed a minor. Basically the way the classes work their are four groups. Major classes: These should come naturally Pre-Requisits: You have to take these, don't rush into them. Minor classes: If you plan to take a liberal arts major like me, it's a good idea to double-major or minor in something else. The key to these are that you should remember to take classes in the same department early on so that you may add to them earlier. For example, I wanted to minor in history. Stupidly, as a freshmen I took a Latin American Studies class. This would have been great except that the class was labeled under Latin American Studies, and not History. If I has taken the HISTORY of Latin America, than that would be one less class I'd have to take now. Talk to your advisors about classes. You can do yourself a lot of help by picking smart classes early on. Joke classes: I recommend communications.

What's the dating scene like?

I have a girlfriend, and I had to work my ass off to get one. Tulane has one might call a "hook-up culture." People go out to bars, get drunk, kiss people they don't know, occasionally bring them back, and then usually not much happens after that. It's a great way to meet people (and stroke one's own ego) but it isn't a great system for finding true love. That isn't to say there aren't relationships. Not a day will go by without seeing two love birds holding hands walking or cuddling in the library. Relationships are a natural part of college and if one really puts themselves out there, they'll happen. The key is that you shouldn't expect a boyfriend or girlfriend to fall into your lap. Even a handsome, charming catch like myself had to work real hard, and meet lots of people before finding one that clicked. A lot of it might have been due to my California style which never clicked with the heavy-set east-coast attitude. Ultimately, there are enough pretty, sexy people that you should be able to get exactly what you want, given you're willing to spend the effort.

Describe a typical weekend.

The weekend is really Friday and Saturday here. Most schools have Thursday as their big party night because everyone goes back home on the weekend. Because everyone lives so far away everyone stays all week. People still go out on Thursday (and Wednesday...and Tuesday) but generally it's pretty underwhelming. As a Freshmen, it's pretty typical to go out both Friday and Saturday, and there is no shortage of things to do. Frat parties, bars, clubs, movies, this city has everything a fun-loving college kid could want.As you age a bit, however, one night a week becomes more typical with the other night being supplemented with a drunken boys-night-in. For example, last Friday I pre-gamed at a friend's house then went on a Safe-ride (Tulane's night shuttle service) to a friend's party a couple miles away. We hung there for a little bit than split off as I and a friend went to a bar to play shuffle board and my other friends went to a different party. I got back, ordered late-night tacos and fell asleep. On Saturday I played mousetrap while drinking boxed wine. Whatever you're looking for, Tulane and New Orleans will provide it for you.

What's unique about your campus?

New Orleans is pretty awesome. Basically imagine Disney Land if the goal of the park instead of entertaining children was getting 20-something mad hammered. Welcome to the big easy. Tulane exists in a land-locked grid of about a square mile surrounded by a some-what affluent up-town community, and then surrounded by the biggest party city in the nation. On any night - given you're willing to throw down around a hundred bucks and are morally ambiguous - you can seemingly do anything. Get trashed on daqueri, play checkers with a homeless man, go to an all male strip club are all wild adventures Tulane and its city have provided me. This is seriously a crazy city and three years later, I haven't even scraped the service of what this place has to provide.

Why did you decide to go to this school?

All throughout high-school I heard rumors of it - a magical, fulfilling warmth that would let every nervous senior know exactly where they were destined to end up. "That feeling" they said, would mysteriously fill your soul the second your eyes laid upon what was to be your new home. I visited over a dozen school in a grand cross-country journey. Santa Barbara, Cal Poly, Davis, USC, all super nice and yet missing...something. They all missed that feeling. Then I went to Tulane. Tulane gave me that feeling. By reading the rest of my work you know I am not madly in love with this school. I am however, proud to go here every single day. Like it or not, this school has become one with me, and I will never be able to shake that, nor do I want to. Sites like these are great for obtaining all the facts and data you and your parent's heads can handle. Yet ultimately, I recommend you let the feeling pay out for you too.

Tell us about the food and dining options.

There are four places to eat on campus. 1) Bruff: Bruff is the super generic dining hall which Freshmen will find themselves in more than they'll ever care for. The food is plain, greasy, and not particularly enjoyable. There are also big TV's all over the place that play really bad top-40 music that always seems to be about 10 decibels too loud. Still, everyone has a soft spot for Bruff and I personally had a lot of really good times there sitting with friends and meeting new ones. 2) The LBC: The LBC is the food-court on campus. The selections are: bagels, pasta, sushi, smoothies, Panda Express, Quiznos, Byblos (greek food), Baja Fresh, and a wide variety of sandwiches and cookies that no one ever buys. The food here is as you'de expect except it's all over-priced. Expect to pay ten dollars for a sandwich and a soda to go. Still, by Junior year students are thanking god that this haven exists. 3) The Rat: Underneath the LBC sits the "open till 4AM" food stop of hungry drunks and stoners everywhere, Dart Rathskeller! Basically this is your average Wing-Joint with greasy fried chicken strips and burgers a plenty. The food isn't great, and it certainly isn't healthy, but with a good buzz at 2:30 in the morning there is no greater sanctuary. 4) Le Gourmet: And then there's the hipstery, fruity sandwich shop. I'm not cool enough to eat here. Also they charge like three dollars for a soda and my momma didn't raise no fool.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

People think that this a party school with tons of jews at it...It is. The best I can argue is that there is much more than to see. You just might need to do quite a bit of digging.

Describe your favorite campus traditions.

Most of Tulane on-campus programming is pretty quiet (they do, after-all have to compete with New Orleans!) Yet once a year in the Spring, Crawfest roles in and it's awesome! Basically for ten dollars you receive admission to music festival crossed with an all-you-can-eat crawfish buffet.Local bands play, food comes by the bucket load (literally) and everyone enjoys cold beverages while sun-bathing on the grass. It's gotten so big that outsiders actually pay extra to get in on the fun. It's a great time to enjoy the last few weeks of the year and remember how damn fun this place is.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

I really like the party culture at this school. The weather is pretty good when it isn't raining, and the classes are usually fine, but that's all to be expected. I presume it's mostly students reading this and you get plenty of that nonsense from the tour (I'm bitter. I lost out on being a tour guide due to my inability to walk backwards in sandals). There are two major party streets at Tulane. Broadway, and Maple. Broadway is the frat-row if you will, and as a Freshman you will likely spend much time there because hey, free booze! About four blocks down Broadway one will reach Maple. Maple holds about seven bars, four of which you will ever step foot in. These bars all are very college with loud, bad music, and cheap yet poorly made drinks. If you crave the college experience, it's hard to beat finding yourself in a trashy dive- bar at 2 AM singing along to Journey with your best friends. There's also the Boot...I'll let you figure that one out. The reason the party scene is so nice is that it's close, yet isolated. I constantly hear complaints from friends at other schools that on Friday Nights it can be impossible to study with all the music and partying going on around them. That doesn't happen at Tulane. Because the bars and parties are always so close, there's no need or want to have parties in the dorms. Sure, as a freshmen you will still have the occasional ****-show in the dorms, but rarely enough that it still stays fun. When you really need to study however, there are plenty of quiet safe havens where there will be no temptation to break focus. See, what I did there? I just justified the party scene in New Orleans. --- On the complaint scale there are a few. First, no one cares about anything here. A couple years ago a highly controversial speaker came to visit. He was a former leader of Isreal, and as a result a small Palestinian group took up protest outside the speaking hall. Here's the thing, it's not that people were surprised that they were protesting him, we were surprised that there were protesters at all. Coming from Berkley California, this change in opinion absolutely shocked me. If protest rallies, and Occupy movements sound fun to you, this probably isn't your school. Next, the sports are pretty bad. I write for the sports section of the Tulane newspaper, "The Hullabaloo" and it can be a bummer writing about our seventh football loss in a row. The football team is bad, and even worse, they play in the Super dome downtown. Sometimes under a thousand people show up to "fill" a 80,000 seat building. Even worse is when good schools come to crush us, their away fans show up in droves to party in New Orleans and out-fan us by 3 to 1 or worse. To be fair, the men's baseball team is competitive, and some of our women's programs like tennis, golf, and running are very competitive. Even as a bad D1 program, we are still D1. Lastly, the food situation is pretty bad. There's a dining hall called Bruff that you will come to know quite well. There's also a food court which has the basics - Panda, Quiznos, Bagels, ECT... That's a lot better but as a freshmen you will only be given 250 bucks for that food which runs out quick. I'll put it this way, as a Junior I changed my food package to have 750 food-court bucks...I'm out.

When you step off campus what do you see?

I'm not gonna pull punches here, this is a dangerous school to go to. Not at all on campus, but very much so once you leave the tightly placed grid and venture around. Within the surrounding mile of campus, over ten incidents of robbery at gun-point have occurred. Tulane sends out school-wide E-Mails and at this point it's embarrassing how frequently "two armed black men with silver handguns" have terrified the local community. It's at its worst this year to the point that people not so jokingly wish you not to get mugged if you ever tell them you're going somewhere after six o' clock. It's currently the biggest problem I've seen since getting here.

Tell us about the sports scene on campus.

I write for the sports section of my newspaper, thus I actually have a real firm grasp of the athletics here. The best I can say is that if you want to play a sport, this is a great place. We are proudly a D1 school and thus have pretty much every sport you can imagine: varsity, club, and intramural. My roommate last year lead his sailing club to the South-East finals, and my buddy just won his intramural dodge-ball game. There is no shortage of competitive, or not-so competitive events for you to live for, or just have fun with. That's the good. --- This is not USC. Hell, it's not even Syracuse or Gonzaga. There is little or no ra-ra attitude about team sports. You're more likely to see a friend at the bar watching the Saints than you ever are to see them at a prep rally or actual game. It's not that people hate sports, it's that because so few people have close ties to New Orleans, and our teams never win so no body bothers. I love sports. SF Giants, Dallas Cowboys, and Olympic curling (oh yes). I just don't have a lot to say about the Wave's chances against Army next week. It all kind of feeds back into what I've said about the general climate here - people just don't care about stuff.

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

That was my first thought walking around campus. It's fitting that we're the "green wave" because everywhere you go things are nice, sparkly, and green. The school benefits from the 40+ inches of rain each year and it shows. The grass glistens and sparkles (the hotties sunbathing in the spring doesn't hurt). While our school got sunk pretty bad during Katrina, you'd never know it by looking around. The old buildings were all rebuilt to still look old so you get that classic old vs new effect that make College campuses so outstanding. It really is a gorgeous school and one you'd be proud to walk your friends and family around.

What are your classes like?

Tulane is a very competitive school, and thus the classes are usually very good. I've certainly had some stinkers, and you will too, but generally I have been pleased. I recommend using Rate My Professor when choosing between seemingly identical class periods.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

As mentioned, Tulane is a surprisingly tranquil school, at least on campus. Even on a Friday night, the actual campus looks little different than usual, besides the occasional drunk group chuckling their way to the bars. Once you reach those bars, however, things are much wilder. This school (and every other party school) like to make the claim that succeeding at a school like this is about balance, and that is absolutely true. This school is one of the top 50 in the Nation and will demand much from you (less so from an English major like me!) It is important to balance fun time with work time, and because the bars and parties are all completely separated by a ten minute walk, that really isn't so hard. The people who can't hack it tend to be gone by Sophomore year, and at that point the parties a little less fun, and getting good grades is a little more important so people tend to chill out. ---- THERE ARE PEOPLE WHO DON'T DRINK HERE!!!! There, I had to get it out. Again, you don't have to drink to go here...you might just get some raised eyebrows. If you don't however, it's likely you will still find yourself surrounded by alcohol and in places where people are very drunk. No one will ever pressure you to drink if you don't want to. Again, this is college, peer pressure is for high-school idiots. There are also weekly drink-free events called "Tulane After Dark". They usually sound fun...but I don't think too many people go to them.

Describe the students at your school.

This school is very chill. It's a lot of east-coast, white, straight people but that doesn't mean there aren't alternative lifestyles, and that they aren't respected. I came from a super-liberal high-school which brainwashed me into believing that everyone had to tolerate everyone else because that was the law of compassion and sacrifice. I was then shocked when I moved to this much more moderate University and realized no, the reason you respect everyone else is because otherwise you're a jerk who no one will want to talk to. One shouldn't expect big LGBTQ rallies or black power protests because they don't exist. What one should expect is a calm, smart, respectful community which does not really care what you are, so long as you're not bothering anyone else. I like to think the best change between high-school and college is how much people care. In high-school, everyone cares about everything. In college, no one cares about anything, including what you like to do in your free time. That kind of freedom is part of the real reason college (and Tulane) are awesome.

What are the academics like at your school?

I really like the party culture at this school. The weather is pretty good when it isn't raining, and the classes are usually fine, but that's all to be expected. I presume it's mostly students reading this and you get plenty of that nonsense from the tour (I'm bitter. I lost out on being a tour guide due to my inability to walk backwards in sandals). There are two major party streets at Tulane. Broadway, and Maple. Broadway is the frat-row if you will, and as a Freshman you will likely spend much time there because hey, free booze! About four blocks down Broadway one will reach Maple. Maple holds about seven bars, four of which you will ever step foot in. These bars all are very college with loud, bad music, and cheap yet poorly made drinks. If you crave the college experience, it's hard to beat finding yourself in a trashy dive- bar at 2 AM singing along to Journey with your best friends. There's also the Boot...I'll let you figure that one out. The reason the party scene is so nice is that it's close, yet isolated. I constantly hear complaints from friends at other schools that on Friday Nights it can be impossible to study with all the music and partying going on around them. That doesn't happen at Tulane. Because the bars and parties are always so close, there's no need or want to have parties in the dorms. Sure, as a freshmen you will still have the occasional ****-show in the dorms, but rarely enough that it still stays fun. When you really need to study however, there are plenty of quiet safe havens where there will be no temptation to break focus. See, what I did there? I just justified the party scene in New Orleans. --- On the complaint scale there are a few. First, no one cares about anything here. A couple years ago a highly controversial speaker came to visit. He was a former leader of Isreal, and as a result a small Palestinian group took up protest outside the speaking hall. Here's the thing, it's not that people were surprised that they were protesting him, we were surprised that there were protesters at all. Coming from Berkley California, this change in opinion absolutely shocked me. If protest rallies, and Occupy movements sound fun to you, this probably isn't your school. Next, the sports are pretty bad. I write for the sports section of the Tulane newspaper, "The Hullabaloo" and it can be a bummer writing about our seventh football loss in a row. The football team is bad, and even worse, they play in the Super dome downtown. Sometimes under a thousand people show up to "fill" a 80,000 seat building. Even worse is when good schools come to crush us, their away fans show up in droves to party in New Orleans and out-fan us by 3 to 1 or worse. To be fair, the men's baseball team is competitive, and some of our women's programs like tennis, golf, and running are very competitive. Even as a bad D1 program, we are still D1. Lastly, the food situation is pretty bad. There's a dining hall called Bruff that you will come to know quite well. There's also a food court which has the basics - Panda, Quiznos, Bagels, ECT... That's a lot better but as a freshmen you will only be given 250 bucks for that food which runs out quick. I'll put it this way, as a Junior I changed my food package to have 750 food-court bucks...I'm out.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Don't let the location fool you, Tulane is an East-Coast prep school through and through, merely air-lifted to the deep-south. The vast majority of Tulane students come from over 500 miles away, with states like New York, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Connecticut being the most common. If you are from one of those areas and like the social climate, great! Expect more of it here. If you're like me, and stem from the beaches of California...expect a fair amount of culture shock. Expect designer purses on girls, and guys wearing button ups to a dive bar. Also, it needs to be noted, a not-so-proud nickname of Tulane is "Jewlane". Simply put, lots of Jews go here. That wasn't so much a problem for me, but it is certainly something to know before making the leap (can you believe they don't note this all in the tour?) But don't let this suddenly make you scamper off and run. Stereotypes always have counters and Tulane is no exception. There is a healthy nerd population with an active video-game club, and yearly Human Vs. Zombies game. There are the jocks that you will either live with or only see in the dining hall. There are goths, there are preps, and there are guys like me who are just dudes looking to get a degree and have a fun time. There's a niche for everyone.

Caitlin
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Tulane seems to offer a place for every type of student. Whether or not you're in Greek life or interested in other activitie...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Tulane seems to offer a place for every type of student. Whether or not you're in Greek life or interested in other activities, its possible for everyone to find their "group." New Orleans itself is hands down one of the bigger positives of going to Tulane. Not only are there numerous opportunities to get involved, but New Orleans also offers a great social scene suited to college life. Students can hear live music, eat amazing food, or just go out with their friends any day of the week; it is really incomparable to any other city in the country. One of the downsides to New Orleans is transportation, while the street car seems fun and accessible in theory, it really isn't an efficient way to get around the city. Not everyone has a car, but they are really useful for jobs,volunteering, internships, etc.By sophomore year you will pretty much recognize every person on campus- so if you're looking for a school where it is easy to remain anonymous Tulane isn't for you. Although it is on the smaller side, it is big enough where you won't have to say hello to every person you pass on the way to class. I personally find the size just right because while I do know a good amount of people, I could always branch out and make more friends. Tulane has a well respected reputation, but you will have to explain many times that we do not spend all of our time in the French Quarter. There is such a thing as the "Tulane Bubble" but it mostly applies to underclassmen who take advantage of the campus' vicinity to bars and other entertainment close by. When on campus students are normally studying in the Business School, Library, or PJs Coffee. Tulane offers a lot of perks for their student body, strangely enough it is not out of the ordinary to see a bouncy castle on one of the quads every Friday night. "Fridays on the Quad" were a great series of concerts and free foods offered during the fall semester right on campus and was a great way to start off the weekend, showing that the administration is committed to keeping the student body happy. One of the negatives to Tulane is the lack of school pride- besides homecoming venturing downtown to the Superdome for a football game is nearly unheard of. Hopefully with the new coach and possible on campus stadium, this will change in the coming years. Another issue students have is the difficulty of studying abroad. While a good portion of students are able to and do go abroad, Tulane's program has its limits and often people will have to settle for their second choice location.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

A large portion of the student body is involved in Greek life, although it is not the end all of the social scene. There seems to be a sorority and fraternity for every type of student, and with the addition of two new sororities next year, it is a good opportunity for anyone who would like to take that path. Most people in Greek life are involved in a ton of extra activities proving that Tulane students don't have to be Greek to have a good time. As I said before there are endless opportunities to participate socially with out drinking, but that does not mean the bar scene is not one of the most popular choices. It seems that mostly everyone goes out and enjoys themselves at one or more of the many establishments close to campus. Some people choose to be involved with club sports such as crew or volleyball.

Describe the students at your school.

Tulane's student body is very geographically diverse, with many people from the Northeast. From my point of view, everyone should be capable of making and enjoying a group of friends. There are people who can be considered main stream, hipster, or on the far end of the "alternative" spectrum. Even the "frattiest" of Tulane's population wouldn't compare to those in Greek life at a public school. Most students tend to hang out with people who are most like themselves, but there really isn't a "social hierarchy" and everyone gets along. Greek life is a great way to make friends, but it isn't a necessity. We are welcoming two new sororities to our campus next year, making it easier to be Greek if thats the direction you choose. Tulane's student body definitely represents more of the "1%" versus the "99%" but financial background isn't an alienating factor. Most students choose to dress comfortably for class, but its not unusual to dress in more fashionable clothes. Tulane students are driven, especially those in the Business or "B" school. They plan to be successful and involve themselves in activities that will help them in the future.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

The first question people ask me when I tell them I go to Tulane is normally,"How do you get any studying done with Bourbon Street so close?" People tend to think that Tulane students are kids with too much money who spend their time partying. While we definitely party, everyone knows that work comes first. Tulane students are more well balanced- they'll get their work done and then go out. A large portion of our student body has some sort of scholarship without unlimited access to their parent's money. Students are normally working, going to school, and extremely social creating a motivated and driven student body.

Zoe
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Tulane University has exceeded all my expectations about the college experience. It is one of the most welcoming, spirited an...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Tulane University has exceeded all my expectations about the college experience. It is one of the most welcoming, spirited and exciting environments a college student could wish for, and I feel so lucky to be a part of it. Going off to college can be a scary or anxious time in a young person’s life, but Tulane’s student population and faculty make it feel like a home away from home. The feeling you get just stepping onto Tulane’s campus is one of warmth and happiness, and it is clear that everyone feels that way. There are always events happening on the quad or in the student center that aim to unify the students as well as the faculty, and are very successful in doing so. The professors are awesome and really take the time to help their students both in and out of class. New Orleans is such an amazing place to live; the rich culture of the city provides an opportunity to absorb knowledge supplementary to our studies and participate in new, fun activities. Community service is a very important part of Tulane’s philosophy and instills in its student a sense of responsibility and desire to help others. The city plays a huge role in the diversity of the student population and is one of Tulane’s defining qualities. I could go on and on about how much I love Tulane University, but there is really no way to put into words how incredibly rewarding attending Tulane is. The best way I can put it is that I feel so fortunate to be at a school where I am truly happy to wake up for class every day, and have made friends and memories that will last a lifetime.

Describe the dorms.

The dorms at Tulane are so great! They provide an awesome way to meet new people, especially during your first year. When I was a freshman I lived in Sharp. I loved being able to walk down the stairs and walk into any of my friends' rooms. Sharp was extremely social and fun. The RA's were great and made of feel comfortable and were always there if we needed help with anything. Now, as a sophomore, I live in Mayer. Mayer is great because I live with my best friend but we each have our own room and just share a bathroom. It is so nice to have our own bathroom and especially to have our own space but still have each other just on the other side of the door. Dorms at Tulane are very nice and I think they are pretty spacious in comparison with other schools. We are so lucky to have such great dorms at Tulane!!

Tell us about the sports scene on campus.

Unfortunately the sports scene at Tulane is not very big. There is not a huge football following because the team does not win very often. Other sports are starting to gain more of a following on campus such as basketball because the team is doing pretty well so far. What we lack in sports spirit, however, we make up for in school spirit. The study body has lots of Tulane spirit since we all love the school so much. There is also lots of New Orleans spirit, especially when it comes to the New Orleans Saints football team. Students love to watch the games and cheer on the saints when they play. This is our version of a sports scene!

Where is the best place to get work done on campus?

Definitely the library! Although it gets packed sometimes, it is a great quiet environment to get your work done. It is not only an easy place to do work, it is very close to the dorms as well as most off-campus housing, it also is nice to sit and do work with friends. There are many areas depending on if you want to study in silence or with a group. The third and second floor are quiet areas while the first floor is an area where study groups can meet and discuss without disturbing others. There are also many printers and photocopy machines available whenever you need them. The library also has a coffee shop right in the front for students to grab a quick cup of coffee to help them study! The library is my favorite place to study on campus so try it out!!

What's the Greek scene like?

Being a part of Greek Life at Tulane is awesome. I am a member of Alpha Epsilon Phi and I love being part of such a warm and loving group. Every single person in my sorority truly cares about each other and will go out of their way to help each other out. We are always there for our sisters, whether it be to go for dinner, study for an exam, or just for advice. We love to spend time together and have sisterhood events as much as we can fit into our busy schedules. We have great social events such as mixers with the frats, formals and date parties. Not only is AEPHI so special to be a part of but Greek Life in general is really great. As a part of Panhellenic, we join together with the other sororities on campus and participate in many events involving community service or other cultural events that serve to better our sororities. Greek Life provides a venue for students who want to find others with similar interests and get involved in some great and rewarding activities!

Describe the students at your school.

One of Tulane’s most notable attributes is the unique nature of its student body. Students come from around the globe to attend Tulane because it is a prestigious and well-rounded university. I’ve always believed that despite the differences that exist between the students, the fact that we all chose to come to Tulane University unites us. We all possess boundless school spirit and display these feelings every day. Everyone at Tulane is extremely friendly and welcomes each other with open arms. The relatively small student body compared to other schools allows for a close-knit group of students that enjoy helping each other despite their level of friendship. As I mentioned earlier, the students here definitely know how to have fun, whether it be activities around New Orleans or concerts on the quad, but also know when to be serious and get work done. The friends I have made here at Tulane are ones I know I will maintain relationships with long after we graduate and continue to make lasting memories. Regardless of the different backgrounds and cultures of the Tulane study body, we are all bonded by our love for Tulane.

What are the academics like at your school?

While the courses are challenging at Tulane, they are also very interesting and informative. Tulane really caters to the diverse student population by offering so many different options for courses each semester. The classes at Tulane are much smaller than at other colleges, which is a huge advantage; the ratio of students to faculty is 16 to 1. The intimacy provided by the small class size allows the students to create relationships with their professors and get to know them more easily. Tulane has wonderful professors who are extremely passionate and dedicated to their work. They will always go the extra mile to ensure that their students are learning as much as possible and that each student feels that their efforts are acknowledged. All professors offer designated office hours for students to come get one-on-one extra help if they are struggling or missed class. Professors are very flexible and will always make an individual appointment with you if you are unable to attend the assigned office hours. Tulane University epitomizes the word hard, play hard attitude. You will always find students studying in the library but we definitely know how to have a good time! Of course school can get frustrating and stressful during midterms or finals, but Tulane University manages to make learning fun and I know that is something every student at Tulane would agree on!

Janine
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Tulane University was unbeknownst to me during the never-ending process of college applications. Quite frankly, I had no id...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Tulane University was unbeknownst to me during the never-ending process of college applications. Quite frankly, I had no idea what I was looking for. But like many of my peers I found it in New Orleans without expecting to. My first impression of the school was derived from the seemingly endless flow of mail being sent to me. What I perceived as desperateness on the part of the administration was actually the strategic way to increase the applicant pool, thus making the university more competitive each year. I did not have to write an essay to apply and the application would be free. I applied without even considering the school or taking my application seriously. Ironically, I was touring the University of Miami when my interest in Tulane was sparked. The elder sibling of a girl taking the Miami tour with me was a freshman at Tulane University. Her enthusiasm for Tulane drowned out the words of the tour guide. I realized that I had to visit. As I wandered around Tulane’s campus just a month later, I fell victim to the familiar embarrassment of being a prospective student with my parents by my side. I couldn’t help but notice that that when students gazed my way and noticed the bright green “Roll Wave” folder I was holding, instead of giving me a vapid stare they smiled. People seemed happy and it was as simple as that. I was leaving the LBC (equivalent to a student union on other campuses), when I thought I heard my name. I wasn’t sure, so I kept walking. But the shout persisted and got clearer. It was the girl from the Miami tour. She recognized me and when I turned around she gave me a hug and took a break from her studies to provide a squeal to the group tour I had just taken. She showed me her favorite study spots, and a room in every freshman dorm. Although she didn’t have to do much talking to sell me on the picture-perfect campus, she did anyway. Her pride for Tulane was undeniable. She told me everything and anything she could think of, and she introduced me to numerous friends that she ran into on campus. The students professed their “love for prospective students” as well as their pride in Tulane and I was overwhelmed by how friendly everyone seemed. Making a decision had never been so easy. When I moved in my freshman year I was pleased to find that I had no reason to be skeptical of the enthusiasm of the students I had met the previous May. The happy students do not just have an odd fetish for prospective students, they genuinely want people to know what it is like to go to Tulane and live in New Orleans. The picture-perfect day I experienced upon visiting was not such an oddity either, and the weather is often sighted as one of the best things about going to Tulane. But, let me note that when it rains, it pours. Everyone has rain boots and an investment in a pair of new Hunters will not be in vain. When people ask me where I go to school I am proud to say Tulane University in New Orleans. This regularly facilitates rich conversation about the opportunities available in such a unique city, the incredible access to music, food, and culture. It is somewhere most people like to come visit or somewhere that many people hold fond memories of. Tulane students are spoiled by the free give-aways that are often doled out on campus. Forget pizza and cookies, the administration provides generous tastes of Jambalaya, crawfish, potatoes and Snowballs, consistent with New Orleans culture. Jazz music often pervades the well-kept central quad.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Tulane University draws a unique crowd. The stereotype holds that over-privileged, well-dressed students flock to the 'dirty south' to perpetuate the mantra, 'work hard, play hard.' While it is true that the student body at Tulane is comprised of myriad students from the Northeast, with a persevering stereotype popularizing the nickname 'Jewlane' (T-Shirts were sold on the quad last year due to popular demand), Tulane University benefits from the geographic diversity that is the reality. Students from different regional backgrounds are drawn to the culturally rich party city, as over 75% of its students travel over 500 miles from home to attend. Even though students come to Tulane from all over the country, many do come from well-to-do families (around the country) eager to get a taste the crawfish, grits, and jambalaya and party it up during Mardi Gras, and just about any other possible opportunity. However, when students partake in such festivities, they do so in style. Girls at Tulane are known to showcase the latest fashion trends, hinting at the capital of their families. The stereotype maintains that the girls are more attractive than the boys, and this is confirmed on a daily basis. However, materialism aside, the culture of the city as well as the community service prospects unites students and it is seen that students are not just drawn to the party atmosphere of New Orleans. Although they will be sure to enjoy the lax drinking laws, and the Mardi Gras holiday break, students really do want to benefit from the culture of the city and get involved. The playing field is further leveled when scholarships doled out by Tulane Admissions each year are considered, as all freshmen applicants are considered for partial merit scholarships, ranging from $7,500 to $25,000 per year. The blend of students from different regional backgrounds proves to falsify the stereotype that Tulanians are all snobby white kids. Well... half of the stereotype. Tulane is undeniably white. However, regional diversity undermines the homogeneity of the student body, and students are overwhelmingly intelligent, friendly, involved, and hard-working. And they definitely know how to have a good time. As the prestige of Tulane University mounts each year, the school is becoming more selective. Sororities and fraternities are in fear that the selection pool will not be as beneficial to ensuring a ‘perfect pledge class’ as the intellect correlates positively with dorkiness, which is not a bad thing.

What are the academics like at your school?

Tulane University is the only college in the country that I know of that has integrated a service-learning requirement into the curriculum. This two-tier requirement means that students must complete a total of 40 community service hours, revealing the willingness of students to give back to the school and community. I completed this requirement at Sophie B. Wright, a nearby charter school. The program was arranged through the Latin American Studies department. I was paired with a seventh grade student as a reading buddy. I found this experience to be very valuable. As the University is consistently ranked amongst the nation’s top universities, incoming students should not expect to party away their four years in New Orleans, although some are tempted. Students will, consequently learn to maintain a balance between the academic rigors and cultural and social events. With each progressive year, the freshman class at Tulane continues to raise the academic bar and the high caliber staff exceeds expectations. Tulane University is classified as a ‘medium size university,’ with a total undergraduate enrollment of 7,803 students. This means that students can anticipate seeing many familiar faces while walking on campus, but also expect to meet new students throughout the duration of their time at Tulane. Introductory lecture courses on average are large, ranging from one to two hundred. Even in this larger lecture setting, however, courses have been taught by dedicated professors willing to make time for students. The majority of my courses during the first two years consisted of twenty students or less. My freshman year Spanish class, for example, had just twelve. As a student in the honors program, I have benefitted from the fact that classes become even more intimate. This ensured individual attention that facilitates the strong academic ethos of Tulane. I have never had a teacher than did not know my name after one or two weeks of class. Contacting professors is incredibly easy, as professors commonly make their cell phone numbers available. As a freshman I was shocked to find that the library closes at 9:00 p.m. on Friday and Saturday nights. I felt that this was not conducive to studying, but students prove to be highly motivated and resourceful, ignoring that going out every night of the week is an option. I oftentimes find myself wondering how students at Tulane do it, but they manage to get work done, and do it exceptionally well. Majoring in English and International Development, the liberal arts curriculum of Tulane University allows for so much flexibility that I have been able to also minor in art studio. Even though I was an exploratory freshman, the roundabout path of arriving at my major illustrates that education at Tulane is geared to learning for its own sake. I have multiple favorite teachers from Tulane. In my beginning drawing course I met one of the most dedicated teachers imaginable. Aaron Collier opens his art courses to students of all skill levels and is committed to the teaching the art of ‘learning to see.’ Students are willing to collaborate and the atmosphere is one of sharing.

Alex
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Tulane is a small school. The school is growing, but compared to many schools that attract a similar type of student (Univers...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Tulane is a small school. The school is growing, but compared to many schools that attract a similar type of student (University of Miami, WashU, Vanderbuilt) it is much smaller. The sports program isn't particularly great and there isn't a lot of spirit for the sports teams. Tulane's nightife is unmatched, and is definitely in one of the greatest college towns. There are a lot bars, restaurants and shopping in walking distance from the school. There are limited majors, but you are not required to apply to switch if you want to change the school your in (you don't need to apply to change into the Business School, Public health school, etc.)

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

More than a third of students participate in greek life. There is an active student government, green club, theater programs and interesting campus programing. There are two bars that are basically on campus, and about five more in walking distance on maple street.

Describe the students at your school.

Very jewish, very northern. There are students from across the country, but i think there are an equal amount from New York as there are from Louisiana in the freshmen class.

What are the academics like at your school?

Professors will know your name. They are always helpful at office hours and the school has a great tutoring center. There are a lot of bad professors, but also some really great ones. I have loved taking Legal studies, ethics and economics.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Tulane is often thought of as a "party school." You only need to spend a little time in New Orleans to see why this is the case. Students at Tulane are quite diverse, however. Tulane students are known for being involved on campus, and the University's community service requirement gets students involved in New Orleans. Tulane is becoming a more and more competitive school to get into, and this has caused interest in the school by a whole different class of students. Tulane is defiantly a play hard school, but there are so many different things going on and defiantly a lot of smart students. The school is heavily northern, and my of the students come from areas around the country's large cities. The school is about a third Jewish.

Vivien
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Generally, Tulane students are regarded as being party animals who are either native to Louisiana or from the Northeast. Tula...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Generally, Tulane students are regarded as being party animals who are either native to Louisiana or from the Northeast. Tulane is also considered to have an ethnically diverse student body which a lot of school spirit and affinity for greek life. Additionally, being in New Orleans, students are considered to be humanitarians looking to rebuild the city post-Katrina. Partying is definitely a huge aspect of life at Tulane and in New Orleans! Most of the bars only require an ID of 18+ to enter. This allows freshmen and sophomores a wide range of places to go including The Boot, a bar so close to campus, most students pass it on their way between classes. While nights in New Orleans are filled with infinite numbers of things to do, places to eat and even more places to drink, the students are all miraculously motivated. Lectures are taken seriously and upper classmen in particular mature into thoughtful, intellectual young adults. Underclassmen are another story. Greek life consumes about a third of the incoming freshmen. Within a year or two, many have dropped their sororities and fraternities. We have kids from all over (my class oddly has no one from Vermont) though I would say it seems most students are from Louisiana, Texas, New York, Connecticut, New Jersey, or California. If I had to guess, I'd say 85% of the student body is Caucasian. Community service is a big part of who the students are. We are required to do 2 classes while enrolled that are community service oriented. I had expected to be given a hammer and some nails and literally rebuild homes and schools that had been destroyed or damaged by the hurricane. In reality, most TU students are assigned to tutor students from local schools or lead debate teams for schools in the New Orleans area. Students looking for a real feeling of satisfaction should seek out Habitat for Humanity or any of the numerous programs readily available and eager for help in NOLA.

Where is the best place to get work done on campus?

I prefer studying outdoors. Most students though will congregate in the library or the PJ's coffee shop on McAlister and Willow for study sessions. If the weather is nice, I will work outside the LBC (our student center) or on the quad behind Bruff (our dining commons). The Bruff quad is often packed with girls in bikinis sunbathing while studying for exams. I suppose depending on your gender or sexual orientation, this could be among the worst places to study. When boys aren't playing frisbee though, it makes for a relaxing, low key place to get some work done. A popular place to study is in the study room on the first floor of the LBC. There are couches that tend to act as beds during exams and individual desks with outlets. It's always dead silent in there which freaks me out but I have gotten a lot of work done in there. Another option is any one of the study rooms. Most dormitories have at least one study room on each floor. My favorite study rooms are in the Wall dormitory. They are new, modern, have their own thermostats, dry erase boards and have phenomenal natural light from floor to ceiling windows which let the Louisiana sunshine into the room. One of the things I love about Tulane is how relaxed the campus is. Almost anywhere can be made into a nice place to study. You'll see students on benches, at tables outside, sitting on the quads, or in any of the buildings working. It's not that we're always working, but we have a beautiful campus that allows us to get comfortable outside our dorm rooms.

What's the dating scene like?

The dating scene has been entirely redefined over the past several years. Like most schools, Tulane has thrown monogamy out the window and is run entirely by the hookup culture. One night stands are common while finding a partner(s) to have casual sex with is even more common. There are a handful of couples within the student body.Generally these relationships form freshmen year and deteriorate by the spring semester. Because alcohol flows so readily, it contributes heavily to the hook up mentality. Most people meet at bars off campus such as The Palms, The Boot, Bruno's or Rocko's.

What are the academics like at your school?

Classes usually meet every other day. Beginner language classes might meet 4 or 5 times a week while writing workshops in the English department meet for 3 hours once a week. I am enrolled in 6 classes (or 18 credits) and 5 of my 6 professors know my name. The one professor who doesn't lectures a psychology 101 course with about 100 students. In 3 years, this is the biggest class I've been in and the only time a professor hasn't known my name. Generally classes have between 15-25 pupils. However, smaller classes are available. Last year I took a course with only 6 other students. Every student is assigned an advisor and once the student chooses a major, he or she is assigned a new advisor in that specific department. Courses are both manageable and competitive. Most students come out of classes they are interested in with As or Bs. Discussion about class topics is very common outside the classroom but only by certain people. Upperclassmen have a greater interest in discussing the outside world because their entry into it is imminent. Politics and international issues in the news are popular topics (though local sports seems to take the cake) to discuss. This may also have to do with most upperclassmen living off campus and thus not being entirely consumed within the "Tulane Bubble." The best courses I've taken are within the Sociology, English, Psychology and Art departments. Sociology and English courses rely heavily on class participation while psychology is just fascinating to learn about. The art professors insist you call them by their first names and the environment is totally conducive to creative thought. The Pre-Requisites are relatively dull but after you knock them out, you have literally thousands of courses to choose from, one of which is glass-blowing. This is the class everyone should take before they graduate. Sometimes I like to sit in the studio during the winter and just watch firey balls of magma go in and out of the oven. One time I was there and a boy made me a glass rose right in front of my eyes! Needless to say, studios are always open and those who partake in the making of art and those who watch are always welcome. It should be noted, few students share my interest in the arts. Most students are enrolled in the "B School" or the business school. It's these courses which are taught with the focus on future employment while all other schools teach for the sake of learning. Professors offer office hours 1, 2 or 3 times a week depending on their schedule. Students are not only welcome but encouraged to go during these times to discuss their progress in the course, express any concerns, or just to have a casual talk about life. Every professor I've had has encouraged students to come see them outside class and when I've gone, I've never regretted it afterward.

Samantha
What is your overall opinion of this school?

My favorite thing about this school is definitely New Orleans, which has a ton of amazing things for college students to enjo...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

My favorite thing about this school is definitely New Orleans, which has a ton of amazing things for college students to enjoy. Everyone knows about the French Quarter and Bourbon Street, but most people don't realize that Maple Street is about one block away from campus, and is filled with bars, restaurants and shops. There are always promotions and events, and it is absolutely impossible to be bored on any given night. Uptown is an awesome place to be, and it's impossible not to fall in love with NOLA culture. There's also a thriving Greek scene, and those parties are always a lot of fun. The campus is beautiful, and the perfect size. It is big enough that you will never meet anyone in your class, but it is small enough that you will always see the people you want to see. One of the best things about Tulane is the weather, which starts out very humid but then hovers around 70 for much of the year. The professors are a mixed bag, with many being very good and others being pretty awful. However, if you use ratemyprofessor and the course evaluations that are posted online, you can avoid some of the bad ones. Students always complain about registration, but I've never actually heard of it impeding anyone's ability to graduate. Our football coach recently resigned (it's common knowledge that he was fired), and students are split on the topic of what we should do next. Some say that this is our chance to finally become a football powerhouse, while others say we should remain focused on academics. There is a lot of school pride but not usually in the context of athletics, although our baseball team is very good. Almost every student I know does community service, mostly of their own volition. We do have service learning courses, which vary between incredible and useless. It's simply luck of the draw.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

It's really easy to get involved at Tulane, and there is an activity for every interest. Student Government is very popular, and there is an undergraduate government as well as separate councils for each school. Cactus is one of the largest student organizations, and it spearheads many community service opportunities. Another popular organization is TUCP, which plans campus programming, and brings musicians, speakers and activities to campus. One of the major events of the year is Crawfest, which is free to Tulane students, and basically involves eating unlimited Crawfish while tanning on the quad listening to local bands. This is something almost all students participate in, and it is not to be missed. There are also a lot of events within the city, such as Po-boy fest, Southern Decadence, Mardi Gras (obviously), that attract Tulane students. Frats and sororities are exactly as important to you as you want them to be. If you want nothing to do with them, that is absolutely fine, and you can spend your time at clubs and bars around the city. If you want to join one, you will likely have best friends for life, but might also be subject to unnecessary drama. Frats have a lot of fun themed parties, and they are much more popular among underclassmen. Drinking is a huge part of Tulane nightlife, and New Orleans culture in general. However, Tulane does have a program called Tulane After Dark, which hosts comedians and other fun events on Thursday and Friday nights. There is no pressure to drink, but it is definitely a popular way to spend your time.

Describe the students at your school.

Students are generally easy-going and friendly, and open to meeting different groups of people. There are people who clearly came to Tulane to party, but there are just as many who were interested in various community service opportunities and great education. Hillel and Chabad are very popular because of the prevalence of Jewish students, but both organizations are inclusive of everyone. There are definitely a lot of wealthy people here, with a lot of BMW's and Mercedes in the school parking lot. Because Tulane gives so much financial aid, there are a lot of students that got into "better" schools and chose to come down here. This makes for a very intelligent and well-rounded student body, as well as allowing for more middle and lower class students to take advantage of the lower cost. The campus definitely leans left, but politics are not a significant part of campus life.

What are the academics like at your school?

The professors are largely pretty good, with some being better or worse than the average. Some take the time to get to know your name, but others just can't be bothered. However, if you are willing to ask for help, I have never heard of a professor rejecting that request. They will not come to you and ask, but they are there for assistance if you need it. If you want to establish a relationship with your professors, it is crucial that you attend office hours and let them know that you're interested in the subject. Many are intellectuals, and can talk about their respective subjects for hours without getting bored. There are students that have plenty of intellectual conversations outside of class, but I wouldn't say this is the majority. A lot of students are in the b-school, which doesn't exactly lend itself to analytical thinking. Science and engineering students work really hard, but probably not any harder than students at another school of Tulane's caliber. Liberal arts majors tend to enjoy their studies, while other students are more focused on their career paths. Overall, this is definitely a work hard, play hard school, and it's really important to maintain a balance. If you blow off work and party 5 nights a week, you will fail out of school, no matter what your major is. But if you never go out because you're studying all the time, you will be absolutely miserable, and not taking advantage of this opportunity. Academics are really important to most students, but they still recognize the need for fun.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Although Tulane students are often stereotyped as being wealthy, white and jappy, there are many more people who defy this stereotype rather than embody it. There is a definite contingent of girls from Long Island walking around in designer clothing, but this is not the majority. You don't need to be like this to make friends, but you will see them on campus. Most of the people I've met are down to earth, and don't get caught up in material things. The guys are pretty bro, but there are tons who are much more laid back. It is an expensive private school, but Tulane also gives a ton of merit and financial aid, so not everyone is rich. I've met a bunch of people who are actually paying their own tuition, which is pretty impressive when you consider how high it is. The student body is definitely very white, however, and I haven't been impressed with the diversity here. It's important to remember that people come to Tulane (and NOLA) for tons of different reasons, so there really is no typical student.

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