Los Angeles, CA
University of California-Los Angeles


578 Ratings

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Recent Reviews

Diana
What is your overall opinion of this school?

I like the fact that there are so many things to do at UCLA. Whether its a Monday, or Friday night, if you're looking to proc...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

I like the fact that there are so many things to do at UCLA. Whether its a Monday, or Friday night, if you're looking to procrastinate, you will always be sucessful. The school is extremely large, and it does take some skill to maneauver through the beaurocracy sucessfully. If you are motivated, it is equally as easy to join a club and create a smaller and more intimate community for yourself that will make the school seem much less huge.

Describe the students at your school.

I don't have a great deal of experiences with a large number of organizations on campus, but recently I have gotten more involved with the Bruin Democrats and I am really enjoying that. I feel like students tend to stick to their respective racial groups( as do the athletes) but there is some mixing on the basis of common interest.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

Greek life is a large part of UCLA (although I am not in a sorority nor do I often associate with people who are)and there are a lot of people that study a ridiculous amount- though it usually corresponds with major (engineering, chem, etc...) rather than race.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

I am involved with the Bruin Democrats. Its a great place to go to discuss and keep oneself updated and involved in what's happening politically; especially considering the rapidly approaching election.

What are the academics like at your school?

In my lower division courses, none of my professors knew my name. I did have some good relationships with Teaching Assistants and now that I am starting to take upper division classes in an unimpacted major (linguistics), my professors actually know who I am and notice whether I am in class or not.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

We are a bunch of frat bro's, sorority chicks and crazily studying asians.

Toby
What is your overall opinion of this school?

UCLA is one gigantic competition. If you thought it was competitive to get INTO UCLA, just wait till you get there and try to...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

UCLA is one gigantic competition. If you thought it was competitive to get INTO UCLA, just wait till you get there and try to survive. You may ask, "Well, isn't that just life? Isn't one always having to prove oneself to get ahead?" To that I will say yes and no, you argumentative douchebag. Yes, it is important that one uses the college experience to learn how to present oneself in the best way possible, so as to make the best impressions in all situations. However, it is unnecessary and downright tiring to be constantly forced to prove your worth to satisfy people you know to be not worth your time anyway.

Describe the students at your school.

I think you know my take on the student body.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

UCLA has a name, and it charges its students thousands of dollars to go through hell to get that name printed on their degrees.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

ABSOLUTELY! Every SINGLE one of them. If you ask me, some of them give UCLA even more credit than it deserves. I was told during campus tours, recruiting events, and freshman orientation that it was nothing but a rumor that UCLA students are treated as no more than a number. Then, when school began and I immediately WHOLE bunch of other crap, it didn't take long to realize that the few people available to speak to were so overwhelmed with other students' problems that I would be forced to figuratively- and sometimes literally- sit and wait for my number to be called. Rumor my ASS. Oh, and the student body- what a terribly lovely bunch. I could probably expound on this topic indefinitely, but I would hate to be cruel. Therefore, I will give you the extremely abbreviated (and admittedly grossly generalized)version of my overarching view of the UCLA student population. UCLA's students can be roughly divided into four groups. First, there are the athletes, but the general population doesn't really know much about them, nor does it interact with them very often. They stay to themselves, indulging in all the benefits student aid and a disgustingly large portion of the school's funding brings to them. They seem a happy bunch. Then, there are those in the Greek system. While a great deal more lively than most on campus, those in fraternities and sororities are a bit... warped. Let me explain. You see, the frat boys and sorority girls, on the whole, were obviously of average social standing in their high schools. They weren't part of the in-crowd, nor were they among the extremely attractive, outgoing, or well-known. Still though, they were nothing to be scoffed at. Decent-looking, interesting enough, and extremely intelligent, these students most likely occupied the part of their high school student body that no one noticed too much, and therefore never had much of an opinion either way about. Then they came to UCLA, and oh BOY! All of a sudden, thrown into a sea of pasty intellectuals and extreme book nerds- a sea ENTIRELY devoid of makeup, fahsion sense, and muscle definition- these average-loooking schmos really started to shine, and they knew it. Now, they have banded together, and O, do they think themselves great. Whether they're strutting around talking on their phones and making sure everyone in the surrounding area knows JUST how CRAZY their last night out was, giving the right looks to make sure that others know that they're of a league too great to be spoken to, or in the gym either doing cardio in sports bras and full makeup or lifting foolishly heavy weights and grunting just loudly enough so that everyone in the damn place can look over and see JUST how much weight they're lifting, you'll always know a frat guy or a sorority girl at UCLA. And if you're blind and deaf, just follow the smell of asshole. Now, this leaves two more groups... kind of. The first of these takes up the largest and most visible portion of UCLA's student body- a good 70%, I'd say. These are the people that you couldn't even IMAGINE caring about. Sure, they're smart. Sure, they're PROBABLY nice. BUT, has an interesting word EVER come out of their mouths? Has an interesting thought ever even been formed in their HEADS?! Most likely not. If NEGATIVE personality (as in not just the lack of personality, but the OPPOSITE of it) were something able to be measured and added, the amount one could find at UCLA would reach a sum too great for even the school's greatest plasmologists to comprehend. It's sad, really. The last group, we could basically just call "the rest." The people in this group are only those who couldn't really be placed in any of the others, on account of some quirk or abnormality. Of course, it is in this- the smallest of all groups- that you would be likely to find a person worth your time. And if you're looking, I wish you luck. I have found one in my two years in this hellhole, and thank goodness for her! At least that means there's hope. As for the overcrowding, just look at the stats. They don't lie. And don't be sw

What are the academics like at your school?

This is a tough subject for me to write about, because I can't quite tell if I have had an uncommonly poor experience with professors, or if everyone else is just too damn eager to succeed that they don't stop to ask why the hell they can't understand a damn thing they're being told. No one seems to be vocal as me about their dissatisfaction with the faculty, yet if you were to ask someone why they were struggling in their classes, that person would be likely to say that it is because their professor did an extremely poor job explaining it. You see, the greatest problem I have found with the professors is that, while they are EXTREMELY intelligent and competent people, they are interested primarily in the research being funded by the school, and have neither passion for teaching, nor the ability to do it. That leaves the TA's, who are often more interested in student learning, but who almost always use a very different method of explaning material than the professor. In fact, I have had a few TA's who don't even attend lecture. They merely take the topic being covered and find they quickest way to explain it to their students, who then often find themselves confused not only by the material itself, but also by the way in which they ought to go about handling it. There's also another big problem I've encountered with TA's (mainly in math and science courses), and this is kind of a touchy subject, so I'll do my best to be P.C. The majority of my TA's have been foreign. Okay, no problem. However, about half of these foreign TA's had such a poor grasp on the English language that they had trouble grasping some concepts (such as those in word problems), so students would have to explain them. Needless to say, this is not how the limited time of a discussion should be spent. And of course, many of these TA's had accents so thick that they would have to be asked to repeatedly repeat things so that students would understand. Honestly, I don't know what could be done about this problem, since someone should no be denied a position because of his or her background. Still, though, I think it does need to be acknowldged as a problem.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

If your'e not in the Greek system, good luck finding a social life. The big problem is, you have to be with people you like to enjoy a good social life, and good LUCK finding people worth liking. Oh, and as for Westwood, it's good for the occasional visit, but once you live there, you realize how little there is to do. The bus system can take you other, more interesting places around LA, and it's not terribly difficult to navigate, but it does take a long time to go anywhere on buses, so it's not very practical unless you block out whole days at a time.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

UCLA is rumored to be cold, impersonal, and so damn crammed full of students that you can never get the classes you want. And these students that swarm the campus- they're characterized as being over-acheiving know-it-alls armed with more useless knowledge than they know what to do with.

Adam
What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best thing about UCLA is the diversity and the academics. Next quarter I'm taking a class with General Wesley Clark!!! Ho...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best thing about UCLA is the diversity and the academics. Next quarter I'm taking a class with General Wesley Clark!!! How col is that??? UCLA is HUUUUUGE, but thats a good thing and bad thing. It might take you a while (maybe a whole year or 2) to find out what you are into, or find some friends, or discover good professors, but once you do, UCLA is a great place. When I tell people I go to UCLA the usual response usually has to do with Asians and the difficulty of the school and people assume I'm smart. If I am stuck on campus, I usually spend my time at 1 or the numerous north campus coffee houses. They are relaxed, play nice music, and I always run into a friendly face. There are south campus spots too, but since my major is north campus, i dont go south. South is also relatively ugly compared to N. campus. Westwood isnt really a college town. It is really expensive and the bar, late night scene isnt so bumping. The biggest "scene", I guess is the nook of apartments around UCLA or the dorms. I guess frats are a thing too, but not my thing. I have no opinion of administration, except that getting classes is a bitch the first 2 years and there is always a lot of red-tape if you need to do something. BY FAR, the biggest controversy was the tazering incident last year. There is a ton of school pride, especially whenever UCLA plays USC...the entire campus gets really into it and there are decorations and you basicaly cant hide from it. Its difficult to pin down one experience, but I have had certain professors an classes that will stick with me forever. Also, freshman year welcome week was a blast. The most frequent complaints havbe to do with freshman and sophmore diffulties in enrolling in classes. Also, lecture size and overall size in general. Also, there are a lot of bad, boring, research-interested professors at UCLA...you have to know how to avoid them.

Describe the students at your school.

UCLA pats itself on the back for its campus diversity, but there are very few non-athlete minorities at ucla. That being said however, there are clubs and social outlets for pretty much any group imaginable. Obviously, the asian population is huge and can be a bit overwhelming, especially in South campus science/math courses. UCLA students dont seem super rich or overly pretentious oppose to private school colleges (USC). Most students dress really casually to class, a lot of sandals, hats, ugg boots, the normal. Like every other school ive ever been to or seen, people generally stick with their own kind. I think thats the good and bad about so much emphasis on Multi-culturalism. Its cool to identiyt with gay Fillipinos, but if you only talk to other Gay Filipinos, whats the point of diverty? but, athletes talk to athletes, greeks to greeks, jews to jews, latinos to latinos...Most students are from California. Students are politivally active and the campus and professors is definitely Left. But, this isnt the 60s and for the most part, rallies and the like only attract weirdos. I havent found that students talk about how much theyll earn...

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

UCLA takes a while to get used to, and is sometimes lame socially, but, all in all, I sorta, begrudgingly love it....i cant help it. Also, our alumni is cool

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

Obviously, UCLA has a huge Asian population, and student do really care about grades and can be compettive. However, that isnt limited to Asians. Also, Greek life isnt that big here and contrary to popular belief, the beach isnt that close. Also, UCLA likes to advertise its proximity to sunset and Santa Monica and Venice and all these other cool UCLA places. But. the truth is, most UCLA kids never venture out of westwood to party.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

The biggest stereotype is that UCLA is super Asian and everyone is really into studying. The other big stereotype is that UCLA is like a west-coast, beach school, where the guys are buff and the girls are hot and everyone is into greek life.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Greek life is a big thing, but for the most part, kids get phased out of that scene by their 2nd year I find. There is a big apartment party scene and I pretty much see the same people every weekend at these smaller, apartment parties. Athletic events are huge, especially bball and football and especially when we play SC. I hated dorm life but that it where I met my closest friends, and I was not very social in my dorm and got very tired of the experiene. I dont know much about the dating scene, random hookups seem the norm all over the world. The weekdays can be quite at night, as people are serious about studying, but my friends will randomly go out and party during the week. Welcome week is huge, espeically for freshman, and is accompanied by a big concert. Undie run is big, dance marathon, spring sing, but i havent participated in any of those. People party thursday-saturday night and parties get decreasingly more regular/crazy as midterms and finals sneak up. Last weekend I went to several parties, often a couple a night. I also went to a bar in westwood and visited some friends at USC and partied there. I have no idea what you could do on a saturday night that doesnt involve drinking-maybe a movie and dinner in westwood???? Off campus, i go to good LA restaraunts or bars or visit friends at other schools.

What are the academics like at your school?

Some professors know me by name. Obviously, my fist 2 years it was rare that a professor would know me personally. Now that I am taking smaller classes, and the nature of the classes I take ( a lot based on discussions and interactions and opinions) you get to connect with your professors more. My favorite professors are either Getty or Lohmann. Getty teaches Soviet history and Lohmann teaches poli-sci with an emphasis on ethics. They both seemed genuinely interested in student learning over grades and had plenty of on-the field accounts to spice up lectures. Getty had incredible stories about times he met important players like Gorbachev and was easily the best lecturer ive ever had- he was realy old school. Lohmann is a gem- she is out of her mind and is obsessed with student interaction above all else. Some people can be annoyed by her tangents, but Im down. She really challenges you and grades are the last thing she worries about. I think her class is how university education should be. My least favority courses are ones where it is obvious that the teachers dont want to be there. A lot of teachers are experts in their fields and do research, and they just dont seem to give effort to class. Jacoby Russel comes to mind...Students study a lot, but my major is unique in the sense that it is sorta easy to bullshit and not dso all the assigned reading. Oppose to something like physics, where I image it is a lot more studying. Intellectual conversations are common outside of class and sometimes creep into parties, but it is more about praising or talking shit about progfessors. I am a double major (history/polsci) and enjoy both. Like I said, UCLA is huge and there are good professors and bad ones, finding and connecting with the good ones is key. The academic requirements are really that bad (but everyone complains about them). For me, I had no idea what I really wanted to study, so why not take a Bullshit science class???? They are for the most part easy and you meet people. Yeh, they are ultimately useless, but I guess I know about dinasours and nutrition now?? I think whether UCLA is geared towards getting a job or learning depends on the major and classes you take. History majors, for the most part, are interested in history and not necessarily concerned with a job. Obviously, Law school is emphasized in polisci courses, but it really depends on the professor.

Jerry
What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best thing about UCLA is the love you will develop as you make your way through college. One thing I'd change: parking! E...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best thing about UCLA is the love you will develop as you make your way through college. One thing I'd change: parking! Even though the school is pretty large, since it's a public school, you get to meet the people you want to meet, and you're not constantly bumping into people. People are proud that I go to UCLA, and think it's a big achievement. I spend most of my time in classes, in a computer lab, or at the library when I'm on campus. We have an awesome college town - we're right next to Westwood Village, which is a wonderful array of stores and restaurants that students can go and enjoy. UCLA's administration helps - I'm in a separate school (school of engineering) so they are very specific in helping you out. The biggest recent controversy on campus was probably last year with the tasering situation in the library. There is SO much school pride at UCLA, it's outrageous. No one on the west coast can beat what we have. There are a lot of traditions here at UCLA that everyone takes a part of, but nothing unusual. Experiences I will always remember is being at the USC v. UCLA football game and when we beat them 13-9. THe most frequent student complaints are that classes fill up fast when you want them the most.

Describe the students at your school.

Our student body is very diverse. We have multiple groups expressing theirselves based on race, or religion, or LGBT. UCLA is a pretty liberal campus so there are not many disputes. I don't think any student would feel out of place at UCLA, unless they didn't like city-life. Most students are casual when they go to class - tees and jeans. All different students interact. Most UCLA students are from California - there is a fun NorCal SoCal battle between people from northern California and southern California.

What are the academics like at your school?

If you're in a small class, professors know your name, otherwise they won't. TA's will try to get to know you because you are in a smalelr class. My favorite class will probably have to be Life Science 15, and my least Computer Science 31. Students study when they need to study - for midterms, quizzes, homework, finals. Class participation is more common in smaller classrooms, and UCLA students definitely have intellectual conversations outside of class. Students are quite competitive, especially in my department. THe most unique class I've taken is Arts and Architecture. My major consists of 300 undergraduates, so there are less than 100 people per class, which means you can make strong connections with your peers. I spend time with some professors outside of class, such as my research professor - but mostly because I work with her. UCLA gears their education both on getting a job and learning for your own sake, because they teach what you want to know and what you should know.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

UCLA knows how to balance school and fun, have the most amazing student life (sports, extracurriculars).

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Many students in dorms leave their door opens to talk to them. Athletic events are super fun and important at UCLA. There are usually guest speakers discussing world events and everything at UCLA. Theater is very prevalent at UCLA, because many events can be held at the gorgeous Royce Hall, UCLAlive events always happen there. The dating scene is very diverse - you have a lto to choose from. Traditions that happen every year are BEAT 'SC week, when we have the football game against USC and there are events all weekend to support our school and to show school pride. Depending on the group of people, people can party every other week or less, to many times a week, just depending on how heavy your courseload is. Fraternities and sororities aren't vital to college life, but they are fun to go to when you are looking for somewhere to go. Saturday nights don't have to be for drinking - many people are down to just play board games, watch movies, hang out in Santa Monica.

Cody
What is your overall opinion of this school?

I would want more people i can relate to. People are impressed when they hear I go hear sometimes

What is your overall opinion of this school?

I would want more people i can relate to. People are impressed when they hear I go hear sometimes

What are the academics like at your school?

Some do, lectures are dry for civil engineering, some students are hardcore studying, but i feel most do just an adequate amount.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Christian groups, racial groups. I think people group up too much based on that, it creates seperation outside of the classes.

Danielle
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Not to sound so general, but the best thing about UCLA really is that it’s so well-rounded. I would challenge you to find an...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Not to sound so general, but the best thing about UCLA really is that it’s so well-rounded. I would challenge you to find another school that features such a high concentration of academics, athletics, social life, and networking. The size of the school is actually a huge advantage; more students means more interests, and it’s guaranteed that every individual will find students with similar goals. Once you realize that size translates to diversity, it’s very easy to make the school feel as small or large as you’d like, as we’re large enough to offer resources to support the smallest groups. If pressed, I’d change the distance between the apartments and classes, because to get from one end of campus to the other requires a good 25 minutes, which can be a pain if you’re running late. Something I didn’t realize until getting here was the reputation that the name “UCLA” carries; it’s very impressive without being unapproachable. Honestly, the only thing I find myself complaining about is the length of time it takes to walk to campus, as it’s so large, and the residential part of campus is really separate from the classrooms. But, I’ll also be honest, the 20 minute brisk walk also often serves as my excuse for exercise. A major selling point is the area—as it should be. Westwood sets the bar high for “college town”, with shops and restaurants catering (sometimes literally) to the collegiate lifestyle, both in their prices and hours. It’s a convenient and comfortable town that adds to the “home” feeling of campus by eliminating the pressing need for a car and creating an environment outside of the immediate campus that students can still feel connected to. Every UCLA student feels a sense of ownership over Westwood, relying upon it as much as it relies upon us. The campus itself boasts an impressive set of buildings and common areas, and the sort of brick and ivy ambience that I think a lot of West Coast schools lack. I like that there’s enough of a variety of spaces to spend time in, like coffee shops if you enjoy noise and company, or quiet lawns if you like peace and quiet. You never quite feel as if you’re on your own, though, which is a comfort to me although it might be an oddity for some. Thankfully the weather not only accommodates but encourages me to spend gaps in my schedule outside, on a bench or a lawn catching up on some reading or napping. It’s not uncommon for students on campus to feel very at home, comfortable enough to fall asleep in such a public place—is it the anonymity afforded by such a common-minded but large public? I’ve never experienced any problems personally with the administration, but if there’s any area in which the size of the school might get in the way it would be the bureaucracy. Like any formidable administration, though, it’s just a matter of doing a little research ahead of time and making appointments with those you need to reach. Undoubtedly the largest recent controversy was the Taser Incident. (A student was tasered in the library, by campus police, after refusing to cooperate, and the event was caught by a student cameraphone, causing an outbreak of debate over police brutality and student rights). I think the biggest problem resulted from the flood of gossip that prevented many of the students from getting a clear picture of what actually happened. I was fascinated, if not extremely surprised, though, by how quickly a spectrum of opinion appeared—and on Facebook, of all places. I saw a flood of groups formed to discuss the incident, half of which supported the actions of the police and half of which called for their reprimand. Personally I found myself torn; I do like to know that the campus police take security seriously in a city where crime and danger can be pervasive stereotypes, but the response seemed alarmingly disproportionate, and that kind of display was a sobering reminder that campus police are, in fact, regular police, and not necessarily there to accommodate student comforts. Undoubtedly the majority of school pride stems from our athletic program, and feeds off our crosstown rivalry with USC, but such pride and rivalry can only thrive in a place where there’s more to be proud of than simply sports. I’m extremely proud of our basketball team and it’s reputation, to be sure, but I’m also proud—and I feel my fellow students are too—of other equally impressive things that make up the blue and gold, like our campus, our library, our band, our school paper, and above all our academic reputation. Again, it’s all about our well-roundedness; there’s something at UCLA for everyone to be proud of, not just the all-star athletes. Our school pride goes beyond most. The most unusual thing about UCLA is its versatility, resulting directly from our size, because there’s no single point about the school that stands out from the rest enough to define us. We don’t necessarily specialize in anything, because we seem to specialize in everything—which makes UCLA a better place for the student who isn’t done exploring yet. There are plenty of places you can go if you’ve got a specific interest, places that cater directly and singularly to those interests, but there aren’t many other places you can go to explore everything. Because of this diversity, I think the right people end up here, i.e. the ones who haven’t made up their minds yet and want a place to do it. Many students come here because UCLA allows for such a wide spectrum of possibility, and we come here with very open minds, which are difficult things to disappoint. I do hear a lot of complaints about the enrollment process, and the difficulty of planning a schedule or getting into specific classes. Unfortunately, this is one of the drawback to a school of our size; space can be limited. But this can usually be avoided by some planning and foresight, such as designing multiple possible schedules and perhaps simply emailing a professor—they are very good about responding, and usually very quickly—with questions about enrollment capacity or waitlists.

Describe the students at your school.

UCLA is a public school in every sense of the word; we represent the public quite well. There are some interesting racial and gender breakdowns between majors; for instance, there are more Asian students in south campus majors than in north campus, and more women in the humanities classes than men, etc. In my experience, students develop different circles of friends based more on shared experiences than upon demographic—you’ve got friends from your dorm, friends from your classes, and friends from your clubs. These circles are usually as diverse as the places you form them. UCLA has its artery—Bruin Walk, the main walkway between the dorms/off-campus apartments and the classrooms and lecture halls. Naturally, clubs use this to advertise themselves, meaning that in a five-minute stretch you can (and will) come into contact with activist groups for either side of the political spectrum, Greek representatives, job recruiters, religious/antireligious debaters, and literally everything else you could imagine. Sometimes it’s a pain, because often these groups are ones I would never be interested in, but if there’s a group you want to find and join, then they’re more than likely out there. All in all, most of the groups on campus feel really comfortable getting themselves out there because it’s such a diverse (and overall tolerant) campus. You’ll hear too many rather than too few opinions, which I think stimulates a pretty healthy environment for debate and learning things outside the classroom. Basically you can be as involved or uninvolved as you like, as always, but open-mindedness really is the key in such a place as UCLA, where there are plenty of people with opinions so strong that they have no qualms about questioning yours. Overall, the only discrimination I see is against ignorance. There’s enough diversity and large enough numbers here that there’s no real minority except in the numeric sense—even a “minority” group has a voice and an opportunity to use it, often very publicly on Bruin Walk. Most UCLA students are from California, and specifically the Southern California LA/Orange County area. But luckily the fact that we’re a public school eliminates a lot of ethnic or socioeconomic exclusivity; you’ll see a lot of very wealthy students, but you’ll also see just as many on a financial need scholarship, and because we’re not a private school, those demographic separations aren’t often the topic of conversation. Ethnically, you might see some cohesion, because we’re in LA, and that means that if you’re Persian or Korean, there are plenty of stores, restaurants, religious centers, etc, that cater to these cultural traditions and therefore attract specific audiences, making it easy to spend time with people of similar backgrounds. But, conversely, because we’re in a city that can support that kind of diversity, it’s just as easy and acceptable to overlap as it is to separate. Politically speaking, we’re California, and it’s a university, so it should be no real surprise that we’re fairly left-of-center. But Bruin Republicans are still a pretty strong and respected presence on campus, and while they may not have the number of Bruin Democrats, it seems to me that they make up for a lot of that difference in strength of participation. Essentially, the only significant singling-out you’d face as a political minority is a heightened opportunity to debate your opinions.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

If you're visiting the school, perhaps. But in joining the large community of UCLA you're also accessing countless opportunities to make that community smaller and more intimate. With a large student body comes a proportionally large range of activities and interest groups; it's harder to NOT find something to channel your interest and energy. And while the athletic and social influences play a big part of what we do with our spare time, most of us have no trouble remembering why and how we're here--the academics. UCLA presents an above-average academic challenge, and that's the first priority.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Group-wise, the school has too many to judge them by order of popularity. Athletically, I’d say the basketball following is the largest. Within intramural and sports, Frisbee and softball have a pretty big following. But Greek life is by far the biggest social “club” on campus, as we’ve got a very large number of fraternities and sororities, most of which are very large in and of themselves. UCLA is one of the schools that originates the frat boy/sorority girl stereotypes—it’s usually not hard to pick out the Greek students in a crowd, but an equal number of people thinks that’s a good thing and think it’s a bad thing. If you’re not in a frat or sorority (first of all, don’t worry, there are plenty), the next most likely source for friends and social groups is probably your neighbors, as the dorms are a pretty well-oiled social machine, in that everyone wants to get to know everyone. As a rule the residences get more social as the quality of the building itself decreases, as the older returning students with priority usually have already established groups of friends (and are more than likely living with these people) and thus are less dependent upon their neighbors. Freshmen seem to coagulate in the older dorms, trading a private bathroom for a social atmosphere which I wouldn’t hesitate to call priceless. Three years later, I live with friends from my freshman dorm, who have become my inseparable friends. If you’re in one of these predominantly freshman dorms—which I would recommend—you’ll find doors open to eager neighbors just as excited to meet new people and try new experiences as you are. There’s also a big sports culture that comes out of IM and club sports, which are generally more relaxed and recreational than the varsity sports, and, in my opinion, a matchless source for a rewarding extracurricular and a group of extraordinary people. I’m a member of the Sailing Team, which is at once incredibly rewarding and enjoyable, and also a formidable experience in team-building and cooperation. At the beginning of the year, every year, there’s an Activities Fair, featuring every single club and group on campus with a booth, representative, and information. I must emphasize—it is overwhelming. But it’s also the best way to find some way to soak up your spare time with something more worthwhile than Facebook. If you can’t find something that interests you, you didn’t look hard enough—there are cultural clubs, volunteer organizations, intramural and club sports, and hobby groups. The school is very self-sustaining, in that we’re large enough to function like a small city, thus the students rarely need to go outside school to find something to do. On-campus events, like sports games and movie screenings, become the main gatherings. But even if you venture into Westwood, you’ll find it very easy to connect with other students, because, like I said, the campus and immediate surroundings provide a very magnetic center for student life. There are plenty of activities, whether organized by groups or by individual circles of friends, that don’t require any drinking. Simply exploring the town of Westwood is exciting by itself, as there are plenty of comedy clubs, theaters, restaurants, coffee shops, museums, etc, that allow students to go out and mingle outside of a party, and lots of those opportunities are free. If you’re interested in getting out of Westwood for a day or night, the Big Blue Bus of Santa Monica offers a student discount, so you can get to essentially the best parts of town for 25 cents. We also have a pretty well-developed sense of tradition. Some highlights include the Beat ‘SC Week (I think it’s been changed officially to “Blue and Gold Week” for political correctness) and the culminating bonfire, which is a must for any sports fan. In addition, on the Wednesday of every finals week, thousands of students gather for the “Undie Run” across campus, which is exactly what it sounds like, in an attempt (usually successful) to blow off the steam from the pressure that builds up at the end of the quarter. The party scene, like many aspects of life here at UCLA, can take up as large or small a part of your life as you’d like. There’s no overt pressure to “go out” unless that’s a feature of your social circle, because while there’s no shortage of parties if you’re looking for them, there are just as many people who stay in the dorms on a Thursday night (typically the busiest night in the frat party circuit) and watch movies in the common room or play group video games. Again, it’s one of the perks of such a large school—regardless of your preference, there will be others who share it.

What are the academics like at your school?

It’s a misconception—even an excuse—that the professors will not know your name. Yes, there are enormous lectures, but I’d rather be in a large lecture from a world-class professor than a seminar with someone less qualified. The professor can and will get to know you if you make the effort. Sitting in the front, raising your hand a few times, and attending office hours are small prices to pay for the recommendations and connections you could gain from the first-class professors at UCLA. As a north campus major, my classes subsist on a healthy balance of professor lectures and student discussions, usually both within the same hour period. The academic expectations of UCLA translate into a competitive student body, which means that discussions can actually be useful. And, while it may say something about my “party life”, more often than not I find myself in intellectual conversations outside of class, because in the end, most of us got here and remain here because we value intelligent thought and discussion. UCLA has designed a totally optional one-year program for freshmen, a class known as a “cluster”, which focuses on a certain theme with multi-disciplinary approaches. For example, I took one on “History of Modern/Social Thought”. (Topics vary from “The 1960s” to “Global Environment”, “Interracial Development, etc.) The class spans all three quarters, and features lecturers from related and overlapping fields—my cluster was taught by professors and teaching fellows from the history, anthropology, philosophy, and sociology departments. It was difficult, and intense, especially for a freshman, but I have used the knowledge I gained in that class in literally every class that has followed. In addition, some perks include priority enrollment for cluster students and early training in seminar writing and discussion, which not only trains students for upper division classes but satisfies otherwise often tricky seminar and writing requirements for the university. I have recommended the cluster program to literally every student that I’ve talked to about coming to UCLA. I came to UCLA as a physics major, impressed with and excited about the well-respected science department. However, after a few quarters I realized that my strengths and interests lay instead in the English department. I was incredibly satisfied, therefore, to experience UCLA’s versatility, because the English department here is as world-renowned as its science department, if not more so, allowing me the same academic excitement that had brought me here on a different academic track. My experience within the department has been quite inspiring, as I’ve gotten the opportunity to study with some big names within the field. I would stress the influence of the study abroad program within my major as well, because it’s afforded me the opportunity to get to know some of these professors in a very focused setting, plus it’s studying abroad. It’s been within seminar settings such as the study abroad classes that I’ve been able to really experience some awe-inspiring intellectual discussions that ensure my enthusiasm for the subject. After taking a Fiat Lux—a small, one-unit, pass/fail class meant purely for fun—I got to know the professor, who every summer took students to a major English conference for professors and graduate students, that we might get to observe, and participate in, a higher level of discussion than most undergraduates. This experience allowed me to make the absolute most out of my major, and I’ve been thrilled about studying English, with the UCLA English department, ever since. There’s a lot of opportunity for a student to make the most out of their major here, because all it takes is the time to get to know one professor, and suddenly a wide range of connections and opportunities opens. I feel that individual departments are very good about rewarding those students that want to be there, and when you’re already in a big pond, getting to be a big fish carries some considerable rewards and renown. Thus, it’s often easy to get a little intimidated by the minds teaching the classes—for instance, when your professor has written the textbook which you’re assigned—but my experience has been that, during office hours or appointments, these world-recognized professors are here to encourage students to get as excited about their field as they are, and so they reward students who show a little more interest or willingness to do well. The one thing to remember is that it’s a student’s responsibility to make him/herself memorable. Sitting in the front is a small price to pay for a letter of recommendation from a top-ranked professor. I’ve gotten to know a few of my favorite professors by taking multiple classes from them, visiting their office hours to discuss everything from a specific paper thesis to my academic career and possible future opportunities. Also, I’ve had overall a pretty good experience with TA’s, who, I’ve found, are great sources of information on things like grad school, because they’re so close to my own age and experience. To sum up, the professors here, while they’re gods during lecture, are approachable and helpful human beings as soon as you approach them as such. Thanks to the academic rigor at UCLA, while each class is structured and taught as if it were learning for learning’s sake, it’s as effective and applicable to the working world as if it were taught that way. Since our professors are so knowledgeable and our students so competitive, what feels like “learning for learning’s sake” is effective job training in itself. Some of the academic requirements have forced me outside my field of interests, but in hindsight I am glad that I’ve had to take south-campus science and math classes despite their utter irrelevance to my future degree in British Literature. The GE requirements are tedious at the outset—they make schedule-planning seem like a chore and they often result in a lecture-long nap session. But, every once in a while, a GE class in a field which you thought you disliked can offer some uncanny and interesting connections. Luckily, the quarter system allies particularly well with GE requirements, because they go very quickly. Also, with just a little bit of research or counseling, you’ll find that there is more than one way to fill a requirement—for me, History of Rock and Roll fulfilled a performing arts requirement, and Linguistics fulfilled a life science requirement, which means that even if your interests lie firmly and solely in one area of study, there’s still a little room to tailor those “unrelated” requirements to round out, if not parallel, your preferred fields.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

We are often painted specifically as a school that revolves around athletics and the related celebrations--a feeder school for professional sports that happens to hold classes by day and countless parties by night. UCLA absorbs many of the stereotypes of Los Angeles in general, in that we're often seen as anonymously large and superficial.

Ali
What is your overall opinion of this school?

The worst thing is how big it is- like not necessarily the size, but how the school doesn't care about you individually. You...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

The worst thing is how big it is- like not necessarily the size, but how the school doesn't care about you individually. You get stuck in a ton of red tape and bureaucratic runarounds to do anything and no one remembers you or cares. I really like going to school here anyway because I like my classes and I have met a lot of people I really like. There are a ton of people I totally hate like all the assholish sorority/frat people bein' gay all over the place. I guess that's ok though because we can make fun of how dooshy they are. We are a lot cooler than them. Also there aren't a huge amount of fat people here which is great. Well there are a lot of fat sorority pieces of shit but hey, what are you going to do?

Describe the students at your school.

That's pretty presumptuous of you to say there are four tables of students in the dining hall. Anyway I don't know about that. Most people can fit in with each other except immigrants and student athletes. Student athletes are stupid as hell and only hang out with each other and get a ton of help and tutoring with their super fuckin' easy classes. Immigrants- well they have language and most of all cultural barriers so they hang out with each other and there's not much else to that. Most people I talk to are liberal but maybe that's because I only talk to the cooler people 8-)

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

The weather in LA sucks a lot considering the "sunny LA" stereotype. It's hella cloudy and cold. Like in JUNE fer chrissake! But I guess when August rolls around, all is forgiven. It's warm but not burning and the ocean is just a fabulous cool temperature but not too cold-- you can surf all day without a wetsuit and be fine. I love Venice. Even though that's not especially UCLA related...

What are the academics like at your school?

Professors don't usually know your name. Although recently I got a high score on an exam and my professor gave me a present in front of the whole class. It was fun but embarrassing too! I don't really talk to other students unless I know them already so I don't know that much about people being competitive. I hear they are assholes about things like that though, especially pre-meds. I don't know about most unique class but I took a really cool Viking history class with Jesse Byock. That guy was way awesome and the class was cool too. Vikings are just cool anyway I guess so it might be hard to mess that up. I went to office hours for my physics 6C professor all the time because he was hella helpful and I totally owned that class. I don't like to go to office hours normally- they are a lot better when there are other kids there. I wouldn't want to just go in and ask a question by myself.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

I guess some dumbass Korean Christian shit is pretty popular.. Maybe it's not. There is a lot of that goin' down on Bruinwalk though. I lived in sunset village when I was in dorms and that was pretty cool and I guess people left their doors bolted? Not always and they weren't wide open. But it was like a little community in B5 anyway so you could just knock and go hang out with someone. Athletic events are way popular and the people who attend them are broish and dumb as shit. Dating scene? I don't know about a SCENE. Since when is dating a SCENE? I met my closest friends in the dorms freshman year! Dance marathon happens each year and I don't give a fuck about it. Oh man how important are frats/sororities? Really important. Important in keeping sexism and inequality alive and healthy! It's really miserable that people buy into that shit. It really is a great way to encourage young men to think like date rapists (and act like them.. literally). Also the sorority girls are just being taught "their place", and how to impose that place upon other women as well. It makes me sick. It's still the weekend... I was in Las Vegas! Normally I don't drink on a saturday night though- I study/play video games/have a ton of hot sex (drunk sex is terrible)... you know.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

I don't know- that they're douchey frat bros?

Anthea
What is your overall opinion of this school?

UCLA, is well, in Southern California. We enjoy great weather (which seems really important to most of the students here, who...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

UCLA, is well, in Southern California. We enjoy great weather (which seems really important to most of the students here, who are extremely sensitive to clouds or rain) and a lovely campus with plenty of bright green grass and large trees. UCLA is also located in LA - so there is always plenty to do - if you make the effort. If you like stalking stars, they are reportedly seen at the Whole Foods Market, or the Starbucks, or you can always attend a movie premiere because many are held right here in Westwood. There are always movies to go watch, whether you enjoy the mainstream or the obscure. There are plenty of restaurants to try out and bars/clubs to go to. Hollywood is not that far away, and neither is Universal Studios. Driving around to get to these places is one of the biggest problems though. Parking spots are expensive (and so is gas) and the traffic can be atrocious. UCLA is huge. It is the most applied to school in the United States, and as a consequence, you tend to end up being your 9-digit student ID number. In addition, instead of mingling, the students tend to fall into smaller cliques or join student groups (more often than not arranged by racial background) so there's not much interaction. Moreover, the campus is geographically divided into South and North campuses, which also creates bubbles and does not make mingling easy. UCLA students generally have a lot of school pride. We like to support out phenomenal basketball team and go to sporting events with a blue wig on, or apply blue and yellow paint to our bodies to show school spirit. We also like to remind everyone that we're the first establishment to have 100 NCAA titles and celebrate it at every basketball and football game. Others, who don't care for athletics much, show their school pride by boasting about UCLA academics, which is less subtle but no less effective (my roommate does this).

Describe the students at your school.

Most students go to class via "bruinwalk," a long hilly path (well, larger than a path) that connects the "hill" where the dormitories are located, and the main school campus. Strolling down "bruinwalk" one may notice that: 1. Most UCLA students are from California: Being an international student, I am overwhelmed by the sheer number of Californians. Not that I'm complaining, but anytime I meet someone out of state, or shock! out of the country, I feel like I found something of a rarity, well, statistically, we international students are something of a rarity. The out of state-rs and the international students share one strong common feeling and that is the feeling of being robbed, or having our blood sucked out, as we pay roughly three times more tuition than a Californian would, and frequently receive no financial aid whatsoever. But of course, if you are from California, UCLA is a great school that happens to be relatively cheap. Case in point; my roommate, who hails from "Nor-Cal Baby" states that the best thing about UCLA is that while being a great school (like a public ivy), she can afford it comfortably, which makes UCLA "hella cool." Sticking to money matters, there is a great variety in students' economic backgrounds. Many receive and need some form of financial aid, whether in scholarships, loans or through work-study. Some students struggle to put themselves through UCLA and are constantly working, while many others drive around in their BMWs and are sustained by parental support. 2. UCLA - University of Caucasians Lost among Asians: I'm from Hong Kong, so I'm used to Asians. BUT, many students have told me that they experienced something called a "culture shock," which I am unacquainted with, becuase they had apparently never seen so many Asians in one place before. 3. There are three (a possible fourth) dress codes, and people tend to generally fall into one of three categories or somewhere in between - a. I like to wear jeans and my UCLA sweatshirt everyday. I sometimes go to my early morning classes in my pajamas, this way, I have the option of falling straight back into bed when I return to my dorm room. I only own flip-flops. Recently though, it's been cold so I like to wear UGG boots. b. I like to look good for class. My outfits make no logical sense; sometimes, even though it is really cold, I like to wear my really short jean skirt with my UGG boots and a lacy tank top. I wear a lot of perfume/cologne. I adore Abercrombie and Fitch. c. I like to dress hip for class. I wear super skinny jeans with really brightly colored, tight hoodies, or sometimes blazers. I like converse sneakers. I like to grow facial hair, and hell, the hair on my head can grow long too! (d. I have no idea what I'm wearing, and obviously have no awareness.)

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

I'm an international student (yep, you knew that), and I knew virtually nothing about UCLA coming here other than the fact that it was 1. a good academic institution, 2. That is was in the city (I couldn't not go to a city. That would've killed me). I'd actually never been here until I arrived for orientation. I had to learn many things through trial and error which was sort of inefficient (I am way over the unit maximum here becuase I took many useless classes that I thought I had to take but didn't. This was because of my orientation counselor who was useless when it came to international students). This was sort of frustrating. Anyway, some random things I forgot to mention. The dining hall food here is really great; there are so many choices. Inevitably, you get sick of it during your stay at the dorms, but if you move out to an apartment where you much now cook for yourself, there is nothing you will miss more (which is why forming close connections with younger students who have access to and may sometimes treat you to dining hall food is of utmost importance). Also you get a lot of free food and stuff during your first/second year here. Victoria's Secret gave out a bunch of goodies to girls (and boys) during my first term here, and there is always free food during finals week (cookies, bagels, drinks, fruit etc. ) If that isn't enough, donate blood to receive coupons for free movies or burritos!

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

While there does exist a definite divide between the Sciences and the Humanities/Social Sciences, the stereotypes applied to the people of the respective fields are more often than not incorrect. There are many students who choose to take part in both academic spheres. However there is palpable tension between the two areas at UCLA and the belief about the stereotypes are quite strong. As for the claim that all UCLA students hate USC students, I myself have no ill feelings towards any USC individual or their establishment. Although, many UCLA students took to setting fires on to sofas on the streets of Westwood after the 2006 Football Victory over USC in their fit of celebration. It is hard not to get roped in so I ended up yelling harmless but demeaning remarks at the USC players and students on T.V. (but this is not an indication that I hate them). Some also partake in destroying a car, which apparently symbolizes USC, before each game.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

There are generally two types of UCLA students. The South Campus Majors, and the North Campus Majors. South Campus Majors study Science. They are generally Asian, pasty, have poor dress sense, poor social skills and are insanely competitive. During finals week, they are known to go for inexcusably long periods of time in which they ignore basic personal hygiene and live at the library. South Campus Majors believe that they are superior to North Campus majors. North Campus students study the Humanities and the Social Sciences. They have it easy; they never study, wear hip sunglasses, smoke cigarettes, talk endlessly about movies and pop culture, walk around with their iPods plugged in, and will inevitably end up living in a box after graduation. North Camus Majors believe that they are superior to South Campus Majors. Other stereotypes include, All UCLA students despise USC students. UCLA students refuse to go outdoors in time of inclement weather conditions (i.e. when it is raining) and believe that it is a legitimate excuse to skip class becuase they are blessed with sunlight 350 days out of the year.

What are the academics like at your school?

As aforementioned, UCLA is a very, very large school. Frequently, you hear lectures in a auditorium with two hundred other people. You could probably go through your four years here with never having a professor call you by your first name. You may find that private attention from your instructors is wanting. However, if you put in the effort, it is not too difficult to form closer relationships with the professors. Classes usually get much smaller as you progress through your major, and as a junior or senior you will find ample opportunity to participate and discuss in class. Professors are also generally very nice; they like having you come to their office hours and will frequently extend it or will make special time for you to visit them. But there are definite downsides to having such a large student body. Not getting individual attention pervades outside of the classroom; it is virtually impossible to get an appointment with an academic counselor come enrollment times, when you need them. Academically, students are very competitive and care deeply about their studies, or at least I am, and so are many of my friends. I think I mentioned that some people sleep in the library -- this is definitely true, especially during Finals Week. I think UCLA fosters academic excellence; there are many opportunities for scholarships, or competitions (like essay competitions) and getting honors so you can shine. Being in the UCLA Honors program also comes with a few perks, one of which is priority enrollment, which comes in really handy. There are definitely those who really don't care though, who never go to lecture (and magically show up in times for midterms or the final exam) -- so there is quite a spread.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Social life in the dorms vary according to where you live. If you live in the Halls, you tend to have more contact with your fellow floor mates, as you are forced to shower with them, pee with them and have bowel movements with them on a daily basis. Yes, they must share public bathrooms. If you live in a suite, you get your own private bathroom, so such poignant experiences are regrettably not possible. Most of the time though, the doors in the Halls or the Suites are open, (the halls, more often than in the suites, mind you) and facilitate and welcome socialization. Many times, students just hang out in the corridors or the floor lounge, which is technically for studying, but turns more into a common room of sorts. Sometimes, one room on the floor is informally designated as the "social room," possibly becuase of their T.V, xbox 360 elite, wii and playstation. Floors frequently go out on outings together (ours went to Pink's Hot Dog in Hollywood - I got the Ozzie Osbourne dog - it is amazing, you should try it with onion rings) or arrange other activities to do together; movie nights, karaoke nights and the like. Your sleeping schedule generally becomes extremely irregular during your stay at the dorms. People stay awake till dawn doing absolutely nothing, and becuase of this, you inevitably end up staying up till dawn doing absolutely nothing. It is rather hard to sleep when you hear other people chatting right outside your room eating pizza, and the walls are very thin. UCLA also invites many musicians, actors and speakers/comedians to come perform at Royce Hall, and students can obtain tickets to these events for a really good price. Ian McKellen came to play King Lear here, Tom Cruise came to speak, Joshua Bell came to play his violin as well as many others. Bill Clinton also came for a big event here, which was of course, open to all students. The students themselves also put on many really good performances. The Opera group once did Puccini's Gianni Schicchi and Suor Angelica which was thoroughly entertaining, even to my friends, who stated that "opera is not my cup of tea." Once you leave the dorms though you must make your own social life happen and this can include more than getting drunk at a random apartment on a Thursday night. Like I mentioned before, there is plenty to do in LA, and you can go watch and Opera (I enjoy opera. Maybe you noticed?), go to the theatre and watch a musical (Wicked, is really good) or take a drive down the Sunset strip. Also one can go to Santa Monica during the weekends to go shopping or do hang out on the beach or the pier.

Rebecca
What is your overall opinion of this school?

UCLA has so much to offer simply because of its sheer size, and there are endless oppurtunities no matter what your interests...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

UCLA has so much to offer simply because of its sheer size, and there are endless oppurtunities no matter what your interests are. Of course, classes are also huge, which can also be a disadvantage, and oftentimes professors seem only interested in their research, and not in teaching. UCLA has a big name- both in the US and across the world. Los Angeles is a great city, and Westwood offers a nice area of movies, restaurants and of course, Diddy! UCLA has an amazing athletic program, and students are more than proud to be able to say that they are a Bruin. Support at football and games are amazing, and students show their pride by wearing school colors and sporting "BEAT SC" tattoos, among other things. UCLA has tons of traditions and I'm proud to participate in them each year. The rally and bonfire for the USC game, undie run, and Blue and Gold week are just a few of my favorite memories and things I look forward to every time they come around. Something interesting about UCLA's campus is its layout: north campus is almost entirely devoted to humanities (and the FIlm/TV school as well as the Theatre school). South campus houses the science labs and engineering buildings.

Describe the students at your school.

UCLA is a very accepting community. There is every type of person here, and while many groups tend to be homogenous, this does not mean that interaction between these groups is absent. Economically, UCLA has everything, and there is a large LGBT community as well. Race-wise, UCLA essentially has two groups: white and asian. These two groups are not necassarily separated, however, as in my own group of friends it's about half white half asian. However, the few number of black students we do have tend to stick to themselves, while the somewhat larger hispanic populations tends to spread themselves out more among the white and asian populations. There is definitly some segregation, but overall students are willing to interact with just about any type of person. The way people dress can often be seen as a group dress code, but in general students tend to be very trendy, as the Los Angeles influence can be felt throughout campus. Students are very involved both politically and religiously, though most students are liberal, and the religious groups are a very specific portion of the student body.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

To some extent, yes. These stereotypes are often accurate, but one thing that many overlook is regardless of the way UCLA student act, most of them are quite intelligent people. Also, UCLA has a huge student body--pretty much anyone can find their niche if they really try.

What are the academics like at your school?

Classes are often huge, so big, in fact, that sometimes it's impossible to get a seat. Professors rarely know names in big lecture halls, but going to office hours certainly helps. Professors teaching smaller classes tend to be more concerned with student learning and getting to know the people they are teaching. Office hours are a great way to increase your chance of getting to know the professor, and many professors are more than willing to make time to help with paper writing and other concerns. Student studying often depends on the intensity of the major. South campus majors tend to study more, while north campusers wind up spending their time writing papers. Students tend to be very vocal regarding academics, and intellectual discussion, especially political, are extremely common. My major, English, is relatively broad, as the requirements are quite flexible and they offer several different concentrations (Creative Writing, World LIterature, etc). Of course, I was also required to take general education requirements, which give insight into fields of study I might not otherwise pursue. UCLA gives a liberal arts education- most people will wind up needing a masters in order to move up in the workforce. UCLA seems concentrated on making students well rounded and interested in learning, but not necassarily preparing for the most technicaly jobs, as it is expected most will go to grad school.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

UCLA student are often characterized as being blonde bimbos with an average of two brain cells which they use to drink beer while cheering for the sports teams in skimpy outfits. Another stereotype is the asian nerd, who only associate with asians of their own flavor, and rarely leave their study rooms. Guys are often seen as fraternity whores and slackers, whereas on the other spectrum there is the typical science geek.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

UCLA has a ton of clubs and organizations for students to join. Being politically active is quite popular, and even the Republican minority at UCLA is extremely visible. One of the best things about UCLA is its ability to draw an amazing array of guest speakers and interest from people outside the UCLA community. UCLA students see a plethora of famous people, from movie stars, to politicians to authors come to campus and speak. Due to its location in Los Angeles, UCLA gets tons of free sneak peak movies, as well as the actual movie premiers in Westwood which provides a great oppurtunity for star watching as well as a chance to attend the premier. Perhaps one of the strangest things about UCLA is the celebrity presence- Adam Sandler plays basketball in our gym, how much closer can they get? The highrise dorms at UCLA are perhaps the greatest way to meet a variety of people with interests of all kinds. 90% of my friends this year are friends I met on my floor as a freshman. The dorms do an amazing job of getting people involved, from floor government to karaoke parties to gingerbread house making, there is something for everyone. The dorms are a great place to bond with people just by sitting in their room and chatting, and many activities are just sit back and relax. Nintendo is a favorite pastime of my friends, as well as board games and beer pong. Greek life is only important if you want it to be important. While i chose not to join a sorority, I still attend frat parties at my leisure. Dating is not impossibly if you're not into the Greek life, in fact, most people tend to meet significant others through their friends! Dating doesn’t usually happen per se, rather just general hanging out, with the occasional date for a special occasions. There are tons of on campus activities that couples can do together (such as go to an Ackerman $2 movie). Weekends are filled with anything from going to beach, going shopping in Santa Monica, or just going to the On-Campus Sunset Recreation center to swim or play some volleyball. At night, a trip to get cookies from Diddy Reise in Westwood or playing Pictionary is the perfect way to hang out after a rough week. UCLA has tons of on-campus theatre production, both student run and professional. Additionally, museums, such as the Fowler or the Getty are great afternoon places to check out.

Addar
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Best Things: The opportunities and James Franco attends here... studying while being outside all year round. I would chang...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Best Things: The opportunities and James Franco attends here... studying while being outside all year round. I would change: it's a commuter school and empty on the weekends Too Large. Impressed! Good balance of social and academic. Kerckhoff Coffeehouse, Wooden Center. What college town? Administration: don't even get me started. Red tape is the name of the game. Get used to lines, the run-around and inefficiency. Controversy: Diversity Crisis, Dental school cheating, Taser incident School pride: Yes but it's fragmented--so many different groups of people. Unusual: There are steam tunnels underneath the school, movies were filmed on our school. Playboy tour buses meet at the Anderson business school Most Frequent student complaints: Class enrollments are hard, walking up the hills, professor outreach, meal swipes don't work on campus.

Describe the students at your school.

Pressure is strong to connect to some ethnic group. They are very radical and strongly active on campus. Out of place: overweight, Conservative and shy student Clothing: jeans, Uggs, Chanel sunglasses, big american apparel v-tee, leggings. Cute gym attire is acceptable but only if you haven't worked out in it yet. A yoga mat is a status symbol. Interaction is rare unless forced. People aren't necessarily racist, but comfortable within their own groups. Financial backgrounds: all backgrounds

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

Some of them, some of them aren't. And of course, a lot of stereotypes are based on some kernel of truth.

What are the academics like at your school?

Professors don't know your name. depends on the major.. some study every day, art majors never study. Participation not common; no intellectual conversations. Competition depends on the major, especially curved majors are very competitive.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Dorm Doors: depends on the dorm. Athletic events: very popular, speakers: not very--we don't want to go to any more lectures than we have to. Movie directors are popular theater: popular The dating scene: No one dates. Hookups are hot. Undergrads are popular with grad students. Closest Friends: proximity is everything, especially first year. The Greek scene is good for meeting a lot of people. Classes = 10 week friends. 2 am on a Tuesday: studying, getting high. watching a movie. Traditions: Undie run

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

Beach school, lots of palm trees, superficial and materialistic, everyone is Asian, everyone just studies, big and impersonal

Details

  • Enrollment
  • 30,873
  • Tuition & Fees
  • $12,920
  • Acceptance rate
  • 18%

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