University of California-Riverside Top Questions

What are the academics like at your school?

Dalayna

School will be a breeze if you take advantage of resources. Adjusting to college work will be easy if you stay on top of your work. On campus there is tutoring literally for everything. Their are tutoring centers for students spread through out campus offering guidance and assistance. Best of all the tutoring is free. They provide everything from proof reading of essays, to group sessions of tutoring in physics. In addition, professors have office hours to help students and offer extra guidance. Failing here is not an option. You may be in a classroom full of 300 people, but you have the power to be the one student the professor remembers desired to succeed.

Dalayna

School will be a breeze if you take advantage of resources. Adjusting to college work will be easy if you stay on top of your work. On campus there is tutoring literally for everything. Their are tutoring centers for students spread through out campus offering guidance and assistance. Best of all the tutoring is free. They provide everything from proof reading of essays, to group sessions of tutoring in physics. In addition, professors have office hours to help students and offer extra guidance. Failing here is not an option. You may be in a classroom full of 300 people, but you have the power to be the one student the professor remembers desired to succeed.

Marsha

The Science programs are definitely rigorous, but a lot of help is offered. Professors seem very inpersonable with the student body..almost robot-like. We pay so much to attend UC's you would think their would be more interaction. On that note, we are overpaying and we still manage to not get the classes we want or become wait-listed.

Carla

It really depends which classes you take or what major you are. It also depends on what topics you find interesting. There are some hard professors and there are some professors that aren't that harsh on their students. Most of the funner classes are easier than say science classes. In the smaller classes it is most likely for your professor to recognize you than in a larger lecture, unless you go to see that teacher in their office hours.

Kaitlyn

Academics at UCR are very commendable. They are well known for certain majors, like for Business, Psychology, and the Sciences. I am a business major, with a minor in dance who is considering double majoring in Linguistics as well. The classes are generally geared towards educating the students for the sake of learning and retaining information, but most professors also put it into perspective for the real word as well. I have found the professors to be very honest, and generally pleasant to talk to. I have gone to many of my professors' office hours, and they are always glad to see students and have the opportunity to discuss things one-on-one and hear each individual's story. Many of the general education classes are fairly big, so it isn't often that a teacher will know your name, unless you make the effort to talk to them. In that case, they often remember you and are very helpful in any way they can be. They seem to highly enjoy being able to help a student in whatever they may need assistance in. The professors are also pretty good about getting students to participate in class, which is refreshing. Some professors are a little boring when it comes to lecturing, but what lecture isn't a little boring at times? The students are mostly open to all their education, and I have surrounded myself with students that enjoy having intellectual conversations outside of class. I'm sure it depends on who you hang out with, but if the student makes the effort, they will find the people they fit in with.

Rebecca

The classes are huge so if students don't go to office hours, their professor will never know them. My favorite class was Religious Myths and Rituals, the diversity at UCR is quite large so this was a really interesting class. Participation in class is quite common. People study often, most people really do try to keep up their grades. Although there is partying on Thursdays, for the most part, the other days are fairly quiet. There are many intellectual conversations outside of class, as random as they may be. Students are very competitive. I am a Neuroscience major and the advisors and everything about our Psychology program is amazing. I often go to my professors' office hours. Academic requirements are reasonable. Our school is really geared towards what you make it geared towards.

Ashlyn

You'll get some good professors and some bad professors but the best part about it is you only have them for about 2 months and the good professors are so good, you will never forget them. We are a smart crowd here, we take education seriously and the school has many branches in which they help us to succeed and make our goals. My first year I took an entomology class. A class about INSECTS! Yes! Its was by far the most interesting thing I had ever done and professors are pretty much available all the time and are quickly responsive to emails and hold office hours a couple days per week. At UCR they try to give the students a voice and make sure that were accommodated to the best of their abilities.

Brian

Its hard for me to say what the academics are like in general because I've mainly studied clases in the Humanities district. The amount you learn from our campus definitely depends primarily on you. There weren't many professors that I could truly consider as a "bad profesor." If you're the type of student that consistently attends class and remembers big due dates, then you should be fine in the academic department. Almost all professors and teaching assistants are free and willing to talk to students with any questions or concerns that they might have. The best way for me to describe the academics on campus is to say that it's fair. You honestly feel that you earn the grade that you receive. The marketing classes I took here were my absolute favorite classes. They were engaging, interesting, and just fun. In your undergrad year, you'll be taking classes of all different subjects. I've taken science classes, math classes, english classes, foreign languages, history classes, etc. So you'll definitely have time to find something that might interest you. Talk to your professors as often as you can. They can become such a vital network for you and they are always there as a resource for the class you may be taking.

Ana

Classes in UCR are huge. For undergraduate classes, it is usually 50 plus students. For upper division, the number is narrowed to between 20 and 40. The Professors have a hard time learning everyone's name- however, they do make an effort. They are also very accessible. They have specified office hours and they also make appointments with individual students. They are also welcoming of students coming up to them after class and conversing with them. One of my favorite classes that I have taken here, was my Baroque Architecture class. The Professor was very clear about the lessons, he was very approachable, and went out of his way to prepare us for exams. I will never look at buildings the same way after this class. My least favorite class was my Booms and Bust class- just because the teacher was a bit unorganized. I did learn a great deal about banking and economic bubbles! As you can tell, I am a history major. I love the classes that I have taken so far and would take them again in a heart beat.

Johnathan

The STEM subjects are what UCR is the best in. The professors, if they see you a lot, will take the effort to know your name. As a computer science major, with each passing year, I get more comfortable with the faculty. Half of my professors and TAs know that I have test anxiety. More than three have actually taken the time to send me a long email, with more than two paragraphs, trying to help me with my testing anxiety. And my grades improved after that. It isn't hard to find caring professors if you apply yourself. Visit their office hours. Get to know them. If you just want to pass with the bare minimum, don't expect them to care about you so much. As an engineering major, students tend to study a lot. There is an excellent study atmosphere. There aren't a lot of things to distract you from studying besides video games. At UCR, students are very cooperative and NOT competitive. In fact, so much so, that the CS department has ruled "direct collaboration with programming assignments" as cheating to encourage students to come up with their own unique solutions instead of working with their classmates. The academic requirements for engineering are rigorous. It also takes a lot of creativity. Curves might be given for subjects and areas that are known to be especially challenging but don't count on it. The CS/CE department definitely doesn't "hand out degrees". You have to earn it, and it is hard. It will require dedication and sacrifice. Most engineering majors drop out of the university or change majors to either humanities, business, or sciences to escape the requirements. If you are not dedicated to being an engineer, they will weed you out. But the rewards are great. The education is definitely leaned toward getting you a job. Within 6 months of graduating, 9 out of 10 CS students get jobs. The other students either go to grad school or take a year off before entering the job market. So, if you get a degree from here, you will get a job so long as you don't forget everything you learned.

Tonia

Contrary to popular belief, UCR does host some unbelievably difficult academics. Many of my peers who are science majors sleep an average of 3-4 hours per night. However, we must also acknowledge the fact that some breadth courses, for example Computer Science 8, will feature the professor lecturing on how to turn on a computer, open a web browser, or search up topics on Google. UCR is home to some of the best social science classes, because we take our diversity seriously. Students are not too competitive here, but generally take their coursework and their grades very seriously. Unfortunately, something most students do is cram before major tests, then forget all of the material right after. The worst part of my experience here is that classes are so full and impacted that you will literally be crammed in a 20-student classroom with about 78 people (not even kidding. I'm describing my Creative Writing Poetry class, which actually should be more student-focused, one-on-one, and smaller in size). Another direct effect of this is a universal feeling of anonymity, because no way in hell will a professor of a 400 student lecture class remember everyone's name. The education definitely feels as if it is geared towards students' careers, because most professors don't seem to enthused or determined to make us love or embrace the material as much as they do.

James

UC Riverside is made up of three colleges: College of Humanities and Social Sciences (CHASS), College of Natural and Agricultural Sciences (CNAS), and Bourns College of Engineering (BCOE). Each student chooses which major he or she would like to take and is then placed in the college that corresponds to major being taken. There are a total of 65 majors available for undergraduates who wish to attend UCR. Despite UC Riverside being known as the University of California Rejects, the university is surprisingly competitive. The professors can be thoroughly challenging, but usually in ways that develop a true understanding of the subject at hand. One of my favorite classes was "Biomedical Ethics" and involved discussing the difference between what is moral and immoral as well as what is ethical versus what is legal in medicine. What made this class so interesting was that your opinion was an integral part of class. Like many other classes on campus, "Biomedical Ethics" involved the use of clickers, remote control devices that allow the teacher to record student multiple choice answers. Every class the professor would ask for our opinions on controversial subjects, that would be answered anonymously, ranging from abortion to assisted suicide. At UCR the average class consists of three lectures comprised of 100-500 students as well as a discussion run by a teacher's assistant with 30 or less students. Lectures usually involve a professor going over lots of information. The discussions tend be where the teacher's assistant goes over the information in depth to better explain it to the students and answer any questions needed. If a student every has further questions or wants more clarification, every professor and teacher's assistant has office hours by which the student can get any additional assistance.

Vicky

Class sizes depend on your major, but most of the time lectures tend to be quite big since UCR is a big school, while discussions stay around 20-30 students per classroom, so TAs would know all the students' names and are eager to help. Professors have stable office hours as well so help would be easy to find. Some teachers even provide their phone numbers so students can call. During discussions, class participation is very common, some may even be graded. Students are competitive in a positive way. Instead of stepping on each other, students help each other out while all trynsing to get a good grade. I am a Business Administration major, which is quite a popular major at UCR, because it has a great business program. My favorite professor is Mr. Jasso. Even though his classes can be challenging, they are the most rewarding and are heavy on group projects. Business classes tend to be taught at major lecture halls or a movie theater near school (weird, I know!) because there are so many students, but the discussions are always helpful. One advise I have is that since there are so many students, it may be hard to get the upper division classes that you need. So before every quarter, check on the ucr advisor website and see when you can petition for classes. It is very easy; all you do is go online and type in three business electives that you want to take, and the counselors would try their best to put you in them before the official enrollment date. That saved me so many times!

Joshua

Academics at UCR are like academics at any school. It all matters on the students. If you want a professor to know your name then make your voice heard. Attend class and participate. If a student wants to sit in the back on their cell phone, then of course a professor will not know they exist, but that is with any school. Students have intellectual conversations throughout campus, classes are competitive, and professors are approachable and helpful. My favorite class throughout my time at UCR was my intermediate fiction workshop with Professor Winer. To be able to sit in a class with only ten other students while a prolific author like Andrew Winer is teaching you what it takes to be a writer in this cold dark world is truly a gift. I learned so much from how to boost my writing to how to get a novel published. He prepared for what was to come after college. And it wasn't just Winer, I have had so many wonderful professors during my stay at UCR that I am forever grateful. UCR has truly changed me for the better

Reissa

Because of the huge class sizes, it's hard for professors to know your name unless you go and introduce yourself. You will find this to be especially true in introductory classes, which are required by nearly all majors. This is what makes a professor's office hours - time they specifically set out to interact with students - so crucial. As you advance further in your major, you begin to take specialized, smaller classes. These upper-division classes will also be more enjoyable, because they will be focused on topics that you (presumably) are interested in. Different professors will have different styles of teaching, so it's important to learn how to accommodate. Professors will, in general, be willing to talk to you. If you continue interacting with them, it's possible to build a relationship that will last beyond just one class. Graduate students sometimes teach courses as well, but don't forget that letters of recommendation are written by professors, not students. Student studying time will vary - it's said that for every one hour in class, two-four hours should be spent studying. This is often not the case. My favorite class has been an Honors Creative Writing course. Because it was an Honors course, the class consisted of no more than 12 students. We sat with our desks in a circle, and engaged in discussion about topics that truly interested me. Some of the best learning experiences you will have will come from outside the classroom, but academic curiosity can only help your GPA. Attitude about academics will depend on the students you interact with - you will find intense competition (as well as intense group studying) with those pursuing medical or graduate school. I've taken classes that have been taught merely to fulfill requirements, and those classes have not been fulfilling. Other courses, those that have a professor who cares about teaching students about concepts that go beyond what will go into a resume, have been far more satisfactory. Unfortunately, the advising for the science and creative writing department seems to care less about maximizing student experience and more about getting students to graduate on time. That being said, the professors for both departments have been, in general, passionate about what they teach.

Dana

As a Creative Writing major, I can tell you that interaction with professors is extremely important in order to not only do well in the class, but also succeed outside of school. As a writer, being able to see someone who has become successful in their craft outside of academics helps you envision the possible paths you might take in your own life. For the most part, professors are willing to meet with you. It's their job, after all. My favorite professors have been the ones who, despite their busy schedules, make time to talk to students on a one-on-one basis. Professors are as varied as any other group of people. I've had some give me really great insights and have inspired not only my creative works, but my professional persona. And I've had others nervously keep staring at their watch as they wait for me to finish what I have to say so they can leave for the day. But I do know that when you find the professors who are willing to give you the time--even if it's only ten minutes--and really listen to what you have to say; those are the ones you want to latch on to. I found those professors at UCR; but once you get 'em, you gotta hold onto 'em.

Rebecca

Academics at my school is at a comfortable level for me. I have classes that challenge me to put in all of my effort. I have some classes that are very easy for me and thus provide an easier workload and an outlet to have fun while learning. Most of my professors do not know my name because I do not visit them as much as I visit my teacher aids. My favorite class has been my English classes because I am an English major. I love the sizes of my English classes and I like that I can participate and have a relationship with my English professors. All of my English professors know my name because I visit their office hours or I participate in class a lot. I love that I can easily reach them and have a friendship with them. I feel like it's not particularly difficult to get into UCR in comparison to other Universities of California but it is definitely not an easy breezing passage throughout college. The courses are challenging and you have to work to get the grades you want.

Kara

I'm currently a Creative Writing major and my school is actually the only UC that offers the major. The major is designed to be different than traditional lectures and is not very difficult beyond the fact that it demands a lot of reading and writing, but you still grow remarkably in your writing skills. And it's really helpful in my other classes since I'm planning on a double major in History, which is a lot of essays. In both departments the faculty are friendly and genuinely interested in helping the students as long as you put in the effort and also go to office hours. As for my other classes, since you're required to take several different lower-division breadth or general eds., they are much larger with typically hundreds of students, but there are smaller discussions/labs that you concurrently enroll in. But overall there's a lot of support, and just as much expectation of you as any other UC.

Kara

I'm currently a Creative Writing major and my school is actually the only UC that offers the major. The major is designed to be different than traditional lectures and is not very difficult beyond the fact that it demands a lot of reading and writing, but you still grow remarkably in your writing skills. It's really helpful in my other classes since I'm planning on a double major in History, which is a lot of essays. In both departments the faculty are friendly and genuinely interested in helping the students as long as you put in the effort and also go to office hours. As for my other classes, since you're required to take several different lower-division breadth or general eds., there are much larger with typically hundreds of students, but there are smaller discussions/labs that you concurrently enroll in. But overall there's a lot of support, and just as much expectation of you as any other UC.

Dee

Since I'm a total freshman, I've only taken three classes at UCR so far. Each class has a large lecture, ranging from 150 to 400 students, and an adjacent discussion sections with fewer than 25 students each. The discussion is led by a T.A and the lectures by a professor. I'm a Creative Writing major, and I took Creative Writing 56 this semester. It was by far the most helpful writing class I have ever taken, taught by an amazing professor. Goldberry Long improved my writing so drastically that I'm legitimately excited about taking more writing classes in the future. She is engaging and dynamic, and a perfect example of what a research university should strive for when hiring professors. On any given weeknight, most of the kids in my dorm will either be studying in their room or in one of the two huge libraries on campus. The Orbach Science Library is my fave spot to study because it's modernized and has tons of desk clusters and study carrels so you can study with your friends. Bonus: it has vending machines selling notecards, coffee, Monster, even Hot Cheetos, the holy grail of 2 a.m study sessions. Maybe I've just been lucky, but so far my classes have been filled with kids who seem to be there to obtain a degree and get a job. My advisor constantly e-mails me with job opportunities and theater auditions, so I think that as an alum UCR will be a valuable tool.

JAMES

UCR is a big campus, It is one of the most diverse UC's so of course there are going to be a lot of students. When it comes to academics, UCR is like any other big campus. You have big lecture halls with close to 3 to 4 hundred people in there. You'll be lucky if the professor knows your name in there. However, you also have discussions led by the TA. This is where you get in depth learning and can ask specific questions. In discussion you have a class of about 20 people. The TA's actually take the time to learn your name and give you the attention needed to learn the material. If you still feel that is not enough, professors and TA's always hold office hours. This is basically your chance to get a one on one session with the professor or TA. In my opinion, GO TO OFFICE HOURS because they honestly do help a lot.

Tonia

Contrary to popular belief, UCR does host some unbelievably difficult academics. Many of my peers who are science majors sleep an average of 3-4 hours per night. However, we must also acknowledge the fact that some breadth courses, for example Computer Science 8, will feature the professor lecturing on how to turn on a computer, open a web browser, or search up topics on Google. UCR is home to some of the best social science classes, because we take our diversity seriously. Students are not too competitive here, but generally take their coursework and their grades very seriously. Unfortunately, something most students do is cram before major tests, then forget all of the material right after. The worst part of my experience here is that classes are so full and impacted that you will literally be crammed in a 20-student classroom with about 78 people (not even kidding. I'm describing my Creative Writing Poetry class, which actually should be more student-focused, one-on-one, and smaller in size). Another direct effect of this is a universal feeling of anonymity, because no way in hell will a professor of a 400 student lecture class remember everyone's name. The education definitely feels as if it is geared towards students' careers, because most professors don't seem to enthused or determined to make us love or embrace the material as much as they do.

Erin

The academics at this school are very good. For the most part I can honestly say I have taken very good teachers and have enjoyed all my classes here at UC Riverside. Like every college, there are a few teachers that probably belong more in a lab than teaching students but that is understood. I think a lot of the courses prepare you for what you want to do in life. If you are involved in creative writing you will have a ton of workshops to do to get peer input on your works, and if you are involved in the sciences, the teacher encourages study groups. The dynamics of academics here suit the student's needs very well and the teachers are extremely helpful in making your learning their top priority.

F

In large lecture classes, it is difficult for a professor to remember everyone's name and he is expected to. If, however, one wishes to establish a connection with a professor so he or she can remember one's name, all professors have office hours. Office hours are blocks of time dedicated for students to drop in to ask questions, discuss the material, or simply introduce themselves. Sitting in the front and engaging in discussion also improves one's chance of being remembered. TA's typically put effort in trying to remember their students' names; it is slightly easier for TA's to do this because they handle less students than the professor. Like professors, TA's also hold office hours for their students. When it comes to studying, I feel that most know how to manage their time effectively and study well enough to prepare for exams. More than once, a student has set up a google doc with all the questions from the study guide; through class collaboration, the study guide is completed quickly and sometimes becomes a forum for discussion. This is great because it is available to all students enrolled in the course and is a great way to receive help and exchange ideas. I do find myself discussing course material and lectures outside of class with my peers; many things taught in class are great topics for discussion amongst friends. As far as competition, many students are highly competitive with themselves as apposed to each other. I am a Creative Writing major; so far I've been very content with my courses and haven't found much to complain about the department; the only exception would be how the budget cuts have affected the Creative Writing department. I feel UCR's academic requirements are clear and reasonable. UCR as a whole is geared towards the learning experience as well as preparing students for life after college.

Portia

I am really proud of the academics at this school so far. This was my first quarter, and all of my professors were great. They all knew my name because I'm one of those students who always raises their hand in class to ask a question or to make a comment. I'm always participating because I take my education serious and I really want to make the best out of my experience here. My favorite class this quarter was my Environmentalism course. I learned so much just in those ten weeks than I've learned my entire high school career. I couldn't believe how oblivious I was to what was happening in the environment around me. I learned how to be open and receptive of different arguments when it comes to the many opinions about the ecological crisis happening today. My professor was very engaging and her words were always very clear and loud. She was a great professor, hands down. Students in my resident hall study a lot. They're always in the study lounges or computer labs. The most unique class I've taken would have to be my Creative Writing course. It really opened my eyes as a writer and I've learned things that I thought I was already aware of but I actually wasn't. It's really helped me enhance my writing skills. My major is Creative Writing because I am an aspiring song writer. I'm proud of my major. Writing is one of my many talents and I am always willing to learn new things and better my craft. I definitely spend time with all of my professors after class. I'm always in their office hours asking questions or getting help. I spent the most time in my English Professor's office this quarter. I was always asking her questions about my essays and getting clarity on the things that I didn't understand. The school's academic requirements are very practical. I like them because it allows students to change their major if they want to do so. For example, say a student comes to this school with the intention of becoming a Business major, but because of the acadmeic requirements he/she has to take one of the courses offered in the Fine Arts department and decides to take an acting class. That student might fall in love with that class and realize he/she would much rather major in Theatre. It provides students with the opportunity to make their own academic decisions and try new things. I believe that the education at this school is honestly geared towards learning for its own sake. Of course the material students learn here will help them get a job, but I don't think that is UCR's main objective. I believe education is truly valued here, and the courses they off here prove that it's not just about getting a job.

Erika

I am a Creative Writing major at the University of California, Riverside, and I have had an enriching experience with this department. Many of the creative writing courses I have taken have had no more than twenty students, thus allowing for close interaction with professors and peers. All the professors from the smaller sized classes know their students by name, and highly encourage class participation. I have found that because of the small sized classes many students know each other better, and engage in intellectual conversations in relation to their major both in and out of class. I feel that the education within this department is geared towards learning for its own sake, but some of the professors have been very useful in providing information about actually working in this field. The acadmeic counselor within this department also provides information on internships, and employment opportunities within this field.

Jennifer

The lower-division classrooms are generally a lot larger than upper-division. I've been in classrooms from 5 students to 500 students. This means professors generally don't know students by name the first two years unless you attend office hours (which I strongly suggest). However, in upper-division classes, most students get to work closely with professors and they begin to put names with faces. It's an awesome feeling knowing that you're not just another butt filling a seat in class. My favorite class at UC Riverside was a Creative Writing class with Professor Juan Herrera. This class was by-far my favorite because we were given interesting books to read including now one of my favorites, "Always Running," and got the opportunity to creative a short story of our own. Taking this class my freshman year made me want to major in Creative Writing. My least favorite class at UC Riverside would have to be History 20 because there was tons of reading material and, personally, I found most of it to be boring. But, then again, history has never been an enjoyable subject for me. Classroom participation isn't as common in large classrooms as much as it is in smaller classrooms. I'm not sure if it has anything to do with students that don't like to speak in front of large crowds, but that seems to be the case in my experience. Students tend to be more competitive within their field of study. As for the Breadth Requirements (lower-division classes), students aren't as competitive. My major is Creative Writing and I absolutely LOVE the Creative Writing department at UCR. UC Riverside is one out of two Universities in California that offer Creative Writing as a major. The Chair of the department is Andrew Winer, author of recently published novel, "The Marriage Artist." I have had the privilege of working closely with authors such as Susan Straight, Tom Lutz, Juan Herrera, Andrew Winer, and Goldberry Long, just to name a few. We have an incredible staff of novelists and UC Riverside. In the Creative Writing department, upper-division classes typically hold about fifteen students. Thus, students and professors work together on a first name basis and every professor I know is honored to work with students on their writing during office hours as well. There is an incredible satisfaction of walking into a Borders or Barns and Noble Bookstore and seeing your professors name plastered on the wall or copies of their recent book stacked high on the shelves. One of the best things about the University of California, Riverside is that it's a research school, meaning there are tons of research opportunities in a variety of fields. This gives students the opportunity to work one-on-one with a professor in their specific field of interest. At the University a professor have to publish a novel once every seven years and they always need extra help doing research. This is where students, if chosen, get the chance to research a specific topic with a professor. It's a great way to gain experience in your field and build up your resume. UC Riverside is geared toward setting up students for success after graduation.

Joanella

I am a part of CHASS, which is short of College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences. As an upperclassmen who is pursuing a Creative Writing degree, a majority of my creative writing professors know my name since most of my upper-division classes have no more than twenty students. At a lower-division level, it is more likely for your teaching assistant (TA) to know your name more than your professor. This makes sense since a usually TA-instructed discussion class has about 20-30 students whereas a professor-instructed lecture has about 150+. However, if you really make the effort to introduce yourself to your professor during the first week of class and participate in lecture regularly, they'll learn your name soon enough. My favorite class so far was Entomology 10- History of Insects. This was the first class where my science and math skills (or lack thereof) did not have to be put to the test and I was able to enjoy a required science breadth requirement. The class was interactive and very informative not only because the professor was interesting enough to motivate me to come to class every day, but because our Entomology department is one of the stronger departments at UCR. The amount that students study really depend on what they're studying for. I myself rarely have to study because of my major. However, I have teammates who are biochemistry majors or psychology majors who will student for hours nonstop so that they can do well on their midterms. Despite all the studying they have to do, I have never heard of them complain about being left in the dust with the material they have learned. In fact, many of them talk about the availability of their TA's and the study sessions that are held outside class hours just so the students will have extra help before exams. If that fails, UCR has a student learning center where students can schedule appointments with tutors who specialize in the classes that students are having a difficult time in. I love my major, plain and simple. The class sizes are small so there is more one on one time with the professors who are all published authors and are almost always working on a new story. I feel blessed to be in the presence of seasoned writers who are willing to share their experiences with beginning writers. I don't usually spend time with professors after class mostly because of my schedule with sports and classes. However, on the rare occasions that I needed extra assistance with my stories, my professors were ready and willing to help. I think that the school's academic requirements are fair and that it's very possible to complete them in four years. The education at this school is geared towards a job because not only am I gaining the writing experience I need in order to pursue my career as a journalist, but my professors also refer me to potential employers who are looking for students that have learned what I am currently learning at UCR.

Gabriel

Professors are always swamped with work but without a doubt going to their office hours makes things much better, knowing a professor has never hurt anyone. They will know you and they like feedback, nobody wants to have a bad class. As far as the content outside of class, just like high school you can tell who puts the time in and without a doubt the ones who put the time in know more when it counts on exams. That being said Professors are usually around to help and students can usually find a group or partner to work with come exam time. Teachers do teach a curriculum but they are always willing to talk about work in the field and getting a job. Each school of study is different depending on requirements but each has a diverse curriculum. Im in the Creative Writing department and all the teachers are published authors or have degrees and experience in the field and will talk with students about their work.

Hanaa

There is a wide variety of academics at UCR, in almost area of expertise. It was quite fortunate for me that UCR happened to be one of the only UCs to offer Creative Writing as a major, and as an undergraduate and graduate student in that department, I can say with confidence that it is an amazing department with an amazing staff. It offers specialties in fiction, non-fiction, poetry and even journalism. The department is comprised of numerous well-acclaimed and brilliant writers. What I truly appreciated is that all of my professors know me by name and are very supportive of myself and of everyone in the program. They offer office hours in which we can visit them if we need their counsel. The majority of the professors at UCR are often well acquainted with their students. Classes are very enjoyable because each student participates in the class discussions. The most enjoyable and unique class I took at UCR was a fiction and film class with Andrew Winder. It was an incredibly enlightening course, especially with insight as intriguing as the well renowned Andrew Winer. I studied novels that were translated into films and I learned so much about craft, structure and theme. Students fill the libraries every week at UCR, and I would say that the majority of the students are studious and have intellectual conversations outside of class frequently. UCR is a highly academic campus and I think the academics are elevated as well as challenging, but still enjoyable all the same. In regards to the academic requirements, I feel that they could use some adjustments. Often times, more seminars were offered than workshops, while most of the requirements were workshops rather than seminars, so it was a bit challenging to fit the requirements into a framed amount of time. Other than that, they were tolerable and achievable.

Hanaa

There is a wide variety of academics at UCR, in almost area of expertise. It was quite fortunate for me that UCR happened to be one of the only UCs to offer Creative Writing as a major, and as an undergraduate and graduate student in that department, I can say with confidence that it is an amazing department with an amazing staff. It offers specialties in fiction, non-fiction, poetry and even journalism. The department is comprised of numerous well-acclaimed and brilliant writers. What I truly appreciated is that all of my professors know me by name and are very supportive of myself and of everyone in the program. They offer office hours in which we can visit them if we need their counsel. The majority of the professors at UCR are often well acquainted with their students. Classes are very enjoyable because each student participates in the class discussions. The most enjoyable and unique class I took at UCR was a fiction and film class with Andrew Winder. It was an incredibly enlightening course, especially with insight as intriguing as the well renowned Andrew Winer. I studied novels that were translated into films and I learned so much about craft, structure and theme. Students fill the libraries every week at UCR, and I would say that the majority of the students are studious and have intellectual conversations outside of class frequently. UCR is a highly academic campus and I think the academics are elevated as well as challenging, but still enjoyable all the same. In regards to the academic requirements, I feel that they could use some adjustments. Often times, more seminars were offered than workshops, while most of the requirements were workshops rather than seminars, so it was a bit challenging to fit the requirements into a framed amount of time. Other than that, they were tolerable and achievable.

Hanaa

There is a wide variety of academics at UCR, in almost area of expertise. It was quite fortunate for me that UCR happened to be one of the only UCs to offer Creative Writing as a major, and as an undergraduate and graduate student in that department, I can say with confidence that it is an amazing department with an amazing staff. It offers specialties in fiction, non-fiction, poetry and even journalism. The department is comprised of numerous well-acclaimed and brilliant writers. What I truly appreciated is that all of my professors know me by name and are very supportive of myself and of everyone in the program. They offer office hours in which we can visit them if we need their counsel. The majority of the professors at UCR are often well acquainted with their students. Classes are very enjoyable because each student participates in the class discussions. The most enjoyable and unique class I took at UCR was a fiction and film class with Andrew Winder. It was an incredibly enlightening course, especially with insight as intriguing as the well renowned Andrew Winer. I studied novels that were translated into films and I learned so much about craft, structure and theme. Students fill the libraries every week at UCR, and I would say that the majority of the students are studious and have intellectual conversations outside of class frequently. UCR is a highly academic campus and I think the academics are elevated as well as challenging, but still enjoyable all the same. In regards to the academic requirements, I feel that they could use some adjustments. Often times, more seminars were offered than workshops, while most of the requirements were workshops rather than seminars, so it was a bit challenging to fit the requirements into a framed amount of time. Other than that, they were tolerable and achievable.

Leticia

I think it depends on you major, i often hear students talking in class or outside of class about what they learn and they apply it to everyday life. Most students participate in class and there are some debated which i think adds to the class room environment. You can always go to a class mate for help. And you shouldn't be afraid to talk to your T.A's of Professors is you have a question, they will more then likely help you to answer it. As a freshman it is difficult to get the classes that you want but if you wait until the first week of december of so there should be a few more openings, but don't get discouraged if you don't get the class you want. Also Study study study, the last think you want is to fall behind in readings and have to cram a quarters work of information in your head during finals

Jessica

As a Creative Writing major, I’m limited to a small score of professors, but from the breadth courses I’ve taken, I have had just as much good experience with others outside of my major. I took an Anthropology class as a G.E., and although the subject matter was not my favorite, I came to class everyday to hear the professor speak. He was passionate and inspirational, and opened my eyes to a more global perspective. He also had this to say: he chose to work at UCR, not because he had no other offers (he had plenty!), but because he admired us. He admired out spunk and our grit. He knew that with a reputation like UC “Rejects” that we were a hard-working student body. The rumors only spurned us on to achieve more and prove the world wrong. I will never forget what he said, and I have come to learn that he was not alone in that way of thinking. The professors I’ve had share the same vision: that we are just as good as any students from an Ivy League or private school. They thrive on the commonality that most of us come from under-privileged lifestyles, and in the Creative Writing department, that is a wellspring of inspiration. Everyone loves the stories of the under-dogs, the Cinderellas, and comedic heroes. Adversity breeds the best creativity, and the professors understand that. They listen and they teach with passion. You will very rarely find a professor who hated the class they were teaching. From a 300-seat lecture hall to the intimate workshop settings, they actually care. It’s why they teach, and from what I’ve heard, our “unique-ness” inspires them just as much as they inspire us: it's a cycle of creativity that can only move forward.

Elizabeth

When I first came to UCR, I only had one major: Sociology. However, because I was taking 5 classes a quarter [versus the usual 3 that most others take] I was on track to graduate in two years. Considering the looks of the economy, I wasn't ready to graduate and decided to tack on another major as well as a minor. The Sociology department isn't my favorite of the three, but I have heard much worse about other departments, so I don't have much to complain about. In the Sociology department, there are two faculty advisors who, compared to my Creative Writing and LGBT Studies advisors, are much more stern. Actually, there are often times when I feel that they are just downright rude but they do get the job done, so at least there's that. There are a few professors that I would suggest you avoid like the plague because they are just absolutely terrible but most of them are okay. It feels as though they lack a lot more passion than the professors of my Creative Writing and LGBT Studies classes. I have had one or two professors that I like a bit more than the rest but I think in Sociology classes, the TAs are more important than the professors. It's can be better to have a good TA and a bad professor than it is to have a bad TA and a good professor. Unfortunately, rateyourprofessor.com doesn't include TAs. The main professor for the Intro to Creative Writing class is Goldberry Long and she is absolutely amazing. She is the reason many people switch to Creative Writing after taking her class. Of course, she does have her rules and regulations but she is never harsh and always fun. Years ago, she was even a Stanford Stegner Fellow - a prestigious fellowship for writers. Recipients even include Tobias Wolff! There are professors in every department who take too much pride in their degrees and accomplishments but you would never feel that way from Goldberry. The faculty advisor is much friendly than the ones in the Sociology department and usually answers emails in a timely matter. I am probably taking for granted, the great LGBT environment we have here at UCR but it is definitely an amazing minor. I personally believe that sexuality is fluid and therefore am not too fond of labels. However, in the long run, I do identify as being heterosexual. Having said that, I have never had to go through a coming out process or anything that our society kind of forces our LGBT population to experience .Luckily, there is a program on campus called Allies, in which participants go through training and receive a placard and have their names on the website. The idea is for LGBT individuals and those are questioning to have people to talk to and know that it is safe. In addition to that, the LBGT center on campus holds many other opportunities for safe space discussions such as a weekly online chat called Peer Connections. In the LGBT Studies minor department are the most passionate professors I have met in my life. They are an absolute delight to talk to and if you don't have the opportunity to declare it as your minor, I strongly suggest that you at least take a class in the subject. The faculty advisor is also the advisor for Media and Cultural Studies and he is very personable and friendly.

Danielle

A lot of my professors know my name, but not in the larger classes of around 250 people. That's completely understandable though. My favorite class is my English class because it's a class of 23 people and the professor and I get along quite well. My least favorite class would have to be my Macro Economics class because there are just way too many people and I don't really find the material interesting. I have personally noticed that the students in my class participate only if they enjoy the teacher. If a teacher drones on and on, the students get bored and don’t want to interact with the teacher at all. I’ve had many intellectual conversations outside of class. I talk to people all the time about US politics and the amount of people in the University. Students seem to be fairly competitive with each other, which is always good to see. The most unique class I’ve taken would have to be my Intro to Creative Writing class. Goldberry is a great teacher and never ceases to make me laugh. Many professors spend extra time outside of their office hours to help any students with questions.

Joseph

Being a Creative Writing and English Major, class sizes are often times just right for engagement with the teacher and effective room for participation and discussion. Also, the 10-30 student courses often times result in the Professor learning all of the students' names very quickly, which creates a friendly, very open learning experience. Most of the Professors in this subject area are also very well-versed in their respective subjects and offer a broad scope of viewing the world and its intricacies.

Elizabeth

Professors at UCR are friendly and always willing to help students to succeed. All of my professors know my name, and always clarify any questions a student can produce. Office hours are available and accommodating, and if class schedules conflict one can always make an appointment to get help from a professor. The courses are rigorous but manageable and always fair. Most importantly they inspire students to be passionate and involved in their education.

Rowena

I'm very happy to see the wide range of subjects that the school has to offer. The major requirements employ that you take units from different areas so you really get a good feel of what you want to do before declaring a concentration. I've taken a dance class, painting class, language class, astronomy class, creative writing class and have enjoyed all of these. There are very competitive students, those who set the curve, so by all means school is not easy! Those kind of students are the ones I know will be very successful after school, because they utilize their education here. As for the professors, there are some great ones here who show that they're concerned with your progress, and really make an effort to connect with you. On the other hand, there are certain professors who students have not liked, and I can see why (not following the course guide line, unprepared in lecture, etc). But I suppose every school has that.

Arveen

I thought it would be more of a challenge. To be honest, I find the AP program at my high school tougher than the classes at UCR. I think this is partially because students in the AP program actually wants good grades and are of equal potential as their peers. On the other hand, in lower division classes, there are individuals who don't even care. All they think about is party and get F's in their classes. Another reason for UCR being too easy is that they don't expect much from students. The pace lectures are going is that of a child. I can self study a weeks worth of lecture in like an hour. However, there are some intelligent students here that makes class competition more interesting.

Brittany

I'm not the type of student that raises my hand in a lecture of 300+ students to answer a question. We definitely have those students as well, I'm just not one of them. I like to sit in the second row and take my notes. I've only been to 3 office hours in my 3 years in college. The professors aren't likely to know your name just from seeing you 3 times a week, but if you make an effort they will get to know you. I am a 3rd year Biology major, so you could say I'm surrounded with very competitive students. Its not always a bad thing though. It pushes everyone to try their best. Every professor I've had so far has exhibited a passion for their subject. I think that is the most important and impressive thing.

Giulliana

The academics at our school are really great, even though classes tend to be large professors still manage to get to know their students and cooperate with them. Students do have discussions after class, especially when the subject being discussed is relevant to today's world. I also think that the schools academic requirements are very helpful and appropriate.

Nolan

Most of my professors didn't know my name but again, they still show that they care about your learning and want to get along with you. Class participation actually depends on the professor's lecturing skills. Engineering and Science students study considerably harder and more often than Business, Psychology majors. I have "intellectual conversations" when i'm studying/working with friends. I do not spend time with professors outside. I have no idea if UCR professors want to do that with their students. maybe? This school's academic requirements are not too high compared to other UCs. This school extends many internship/career/volunteer opportunities through your department's faculty advisors emails.

James

There are professors who know my name because I do research and being in engineering allows me ample time to spend with professors since class sizes are generally smaller and the same professors teach the classes, so you get to know each other on a one-to-one basis. My favorite classes would probably be Organic Chemistry (CHEM112A-CHEM112C or the whole series), Biochemistry (BCH100), or Women's Studies (WMST100) because they were all classes I did well in and I think if you put enough effort in classes, you will reap what you sow. My least favorite classes would be Computer Science (CS010), Electrical Circuits (EE01A), and Physics (40A, 40C) because they are generally classes that required a lot of logical thinking and problem solving. Although I did okay in these classes, they were a struggle to get through and took a hit on my GPA quite hard. People may not think it, but with like-minded peers, I do tend to have many interesting, intellectually-stimulating conversations about various subjects ranging from politics to quantum theory to global poverty to pathology to health. Generally, students are not really competitive with each other but rather with themselves for the hard working types. Others who skip classes generally do not care much for competition either because they are brilliant or just want a passing grade and to have fun in college. I am in the Bioengineering Department, which I heard has only been established just recently (within a decade), so there are still improvements that could be made, but it is a great major! I feel like the classes are all geared towards learning for one's own sake and that is why I chose this major.

Jay

Academics are good. Most professors do not know my name in the 200-600 person lecture halls, but in the smaller 20-50 person classes, they do. In terms of time spent studying, engineers, hard-science majors, and econ kids study harder than the rest, but that's expected at any university. Class participation in rather uncommon in the big classes as well as the required ones, but that improves as you go along. You'll hear a few intellectual conversations outside of class every so often at the coffeeshops or in lounges. Students aren't very competitive. Economics department is good and certainly growing. Academic requirements (GEs) are manageable if you budget your classes appropriately; we're on the quarter system, so you could reasonably expect to have them done by fall of your soph year. Education at UCR is somewhere between preprofessional and for its own sake, depending on your major and school.

Julia B

Professors were easy to access and get info from. Office hours flexible, email, phone all ways to keep in touch with them.

Dylan

I enjoyed my classes at Riverside. I was a Grad student and took mainly Colonial American History and Public History Classes. The problem was that many times teachers would go on sabbatical and you would be left with nobody to teach the classes for your major and/or the classes would get canceled. It is important before you chose any school, especially research/publish or perish schools that you find out if professors are going to be around throughout your time there and if people leave what can you do. I had been disappointed only once when I needed a class and the person teaching it was not a person who should have taught it because the person who was going to teach it left on sabbatical after only working there a year.

Mel

The Business school of UCR is complete nonsense. You do not learn anything when you have teachers who cannot speak english. This is a school that is supposed to compete with other UC's but the hiring staff has no competency of what a good teacher is. It seems they only care about research. Do not go to this school if you are looking for good education.

Cathy

When I attended UCR the classes weren't too big, so if you made an effort and attended your professors office hours you could really get to know them and them you.

Marshall

The academics at UCR is really really really what you make of it, despite that being a ridiculous cliche. I will explain. At some private schools if you get behind or miss classes they will seek you out to help. At UCR a tremendous number of freshman are gone before the end of their first year, due to the apathy of the administration and the generally low admission standards (letting in students who don't really care about higher education). There are however a BILLION different great opportunities for dedicated students.

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