Chicago, IL
University of Chicago


79 Ratings

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Rebecca
What are the academics like at your school?

The academics are terrific! I feel lucky every day when I go to class. The Core classes emphasis logical thinking and articul...

What are the academics like at your school?

The academics are terrific! I feel lucky every day when I go to class. The Core classes emphasis logical thinking and articulation in every area of life. As you take these classes, you can feel yourself becoming a person who thinks more rigorously and more insightfully, and who expresses herself better. There will probably be at least one Core class that you are completely uninterested in taking, but even that class will teach you how to think in a new way. The professors are readily available during office hours and by email. They are very interested in making sure you can succeed in the class. However, you must also be very interested in making sure you succeed in class. Classes do require a lot of work. My thought process about homework is usually that although it can be a pain to do, I always want to do it so I can participate in class and get as much out of it as possible. Most other students feel the same way, which leads to great class discussion and participation. These conversations will often spill out outside of class. A side benefit of the Core classes is that with so many students on campus learning the same material, these conversations can occur with almost anyone.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

There are two stereotypes of the UChicago student. The more widespread one is that of the geeky nose-in-a-book type whose idea of fun is to power through mathematical proofs. He may also translate obscure Greek poetry for kicks. The second type is the super-hipster, big-sweater wearing, Foucault obsessed kind of kid. He spends much of his time at the cooler coffee shops on campus and thinking deeply while smoking a handrolled cigarette. Neither of these stereotypes is particularly accurate. While classes at UChicago are very demanding, and students certainly experience academic pursuits as fun, most people manage a good balance of schoolwork and social life. As for the second type, it is inevitable that even the ones wearing the skinniest jeans and most ironic t-shirts are individuals with a great deal of depth and diverse interests, just like every other student at UChicago.

Stephen
What is your overall opinion of this school?

The University of Chicago is known, among other things, for its astounding number of associated Nobel Prize winners. These sc...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

The University of Chicago is known, among other things, for its astounding number of associated Nobel Prize winners. These scholars and academics have certainly left an impact on the University, and human life, but they are not what affects me on a daily basis. Instead, each day at the UofC I am even more astounded by the brilliance, diversity, and talent of my peers that is truly "prize" worthy. Sure, this University is populated by superior intellectuals that are aces in the classroom, but that is not what amazes me. Rather, what makes this school truly so unique is the unbelievable drive and talent that students here commit to other pursuits, outside of the classroom. I have a friend who is a committed student and a varsity athlete, as well as a concert pianist. Another has just incorporated a start-up that has gained nationwide, and global attention. Another still as a chef, has cooked with some of Chicago's leading restaurant chefs. One might have also caught drift of a number of web start-ups that have gained attention, and sold, from UChicago undergrads. There are chess masters, esteemed playwrights, international youth diplomats, debate champions, Starcraft whizzes, and nationally renowned classicists. Around each corner, and in each classroom seat is another student with another fascinating talent, skill, or lifelong pursuit. This cannot be the case at just any University. This cannot be the case at more than ten colleges nationwide. Combine this stellar student body with its unabated and unrivaled thirst for knowledge, and you find that there is not any place quite like the UofC. It is one of a kind.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

As mentioned, the UChicago student body is incredibly diverse and hard to pin down in to many common categories. Many students do not participate in organized student activities, but are incredibly active in their work or personal passion. Many students are RSO(Recognized Student Organization) maniacs, holding leadership positions in multiple student activities. Among our largest student networks would include: Model United Nations, University Theater, A Capella (various groups), investment/consultancy groups, and a wide variety of cultural/ethnic associations. While attendance at varsity athletics is certainly lacking, recent years has seen drastic increase in popularity. Informal athletics, on the other hand, plays a huge part in student life. Over 50% of students participate in intramural sports, and many more play pick-up sports, play club sports, or frequent one of the athletic centers. One essential part of student life on campus is the "House system", that much like in Harry Potter, places students in a residential "House". This house participates in IM sports, takes house trips, and eats together at the dining hall. For many, this is the main source of their social life. Besides these varied forms of "organized" social life, Chicago and the University offers a cornucopia of entertainment options. On campus there are well attended lectures and seminars every day of the week, and student performances galore from theatrical and musical groups. In Chicago, these opportunities are multiplied. Due to the diverse interests of the student body, there is something for anyone here. If you want to be a part of Greek life and frequent fraternities every weekend, you can. If you never want to even see Greek life, and rather see life in Greektown and the rest of Chicago, you can do that to. While there are more popular activities, nothing is held above all else here.

Describe the students at your school.

My previous response(opinion of school/stereotype) addresses this question well.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

There is perhaps no other school in the United States that has as specific a stereotype as the University of Chicago. Rather than the general opinions of certain types of school, UChicago has been transformed, at least in lore, to a type of its own: "Where Fun Comes to Die". While most reflect on the college years as a time of unabashed excitement and freedom, most also imagine that nothing positive can overcome the soul-crushing workload and cold of the UofC. This, however, is simply not the case. Although one could make the claim that the population here is perhaps a little more invested in the "Life of the Mind" than the average collegian, I would say that the real classification of the UChicago student ends there. As part of our intense investment in intellectual life comes intense investment in all walks of life, many even that can classify as good-ole-traditional fun. Those whom only know the University by rumor would be surprised to know that fun does live here, and in ample and varied opportunities. Yes, some of us are "geeks", but mainly in our commitment to our beloved pursuits: from theater to investment, and everything in between. There are jocks too, but also those who simply love sports. There are frat kids, but also those whom love a different ancient greece. You can find stoners too, and those committed to changing society's "foundations". In short (certainly something foreign to UChicagoan writing), there is perhaps less of a real "type" here than most places. Sure, most come here to be immersed in learning, but that learning is by no means independent, or mutually exclusive, or "fun".

Andrew
What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

When people think of the University of Chicago, they almost always bring up out school's unofficial motto - "Where fun comes ...

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

When people think of the University of Chicago, they almost always bring up out school's unofficial motto - "Where fun comes to die". With our strong academics, fast-paced schedule, reputation, and even climate, people get the impression that all we do is work hard and stress out. In realty, of course, life is never that difficult. Like any other school, we have demanding classes and sometimes work long hours, but we also have plenty of fun. There are a number of greek organizations on campus, arts groups, sporting events, concerts, plus a lot of really interesting, unique, kids and, of course, the city of Chicago! Fun is in the eye of the beholder, and most people at UChicago would tell you that if you're open to it, there are tons of opportunities for fun on campus .

Sarah
What is your overall opinion of this school?

I have met more unique, strange, hilarious, and surprising people at this school than I would have thought possible. Where el...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

I have met more unique, strange, hilarious, and surprising people at this school than I would have thought possible. Where else could I go to dinner with a Seventh-Day Adventist from Chile, a stuffed animal enthusiast/econ major, a Colombian anarchist, and a South Indian guy in a Jewish a cappella group? I have learned far more about the world and the people in it than I could have dreamed, coming out of small town Ohio. However, these fascinating people are also all brilliant - and, if you allow them to, they will intimidate you academically. Most people at this school come in as HS valedictorians or top students, and very quickly and painful find out, upon withdrawing from their first quarter math class, that their definition of "hard work" needs a reworking (this may or may not be a personal anecdote). However, once you've found your academic niche and can excel in one area, you'll find that you'll begin to enjoy these challenges (or, if you don't, that you're perhaps at the wrong school). The undergraduate population (~5,000 students) is a good size - you recognize a good number of people, but there is a wide enough variety of activity and enough social groups that it does not feel claustrophobic. It is also not so large that you become just a number among thousands. The administration has been working to improve student life on campus (UChicago had very poor student approval in the 80s), and they've added new gym facilities, a career services center, and other student support systems to improve student life. There is some tension between the university and surrounding neighborhoods - Hyde Park is surrounded by very poor neighborhoods and the crime rate is fairly high. Campus police are very vigilant and every attempt is made to ensure student safety, but there is certainly racial and economic tension (a recent controversy broke out when a black student was arrested in the library for refusing to show his ID).

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Most students are involved heavily in at least one RSO (registered student organizations). Some of the more popular are the ethnic RSOs such as SASA (South Asian Student Association) and the economics/investing RSOs (such as BlueChips). Students also participate in political RSOs such as College Republicans and SFS (Students for a Free Society), and performing arts RSOs (University Theater, a cappella, UBallet) are also quite popular. I am personally involved in a cappella on campus, having sung in two a cappella groups and currently serving as music director for one of them. Athletic events are generally very poorly attended and school spirit is negligible, and instead the largest crowds are gathered by important speakers and performance arts RSOs. Most friendships are formed in the dorms, as house culture is very strong and you are forced to interact regularly with the same 40-100 people with whom you live. Other friendships are formed in RSOs and in very tight-knit classes and majors (though this is more uncommon). I personally live with and spend most of my time with friends made in the dorms, and other than that mostly hang out with people in my a cappella group. UChicago has a number of traditions (Kuvia, Scav) that occur every year and awaken the dormant school spirit in a large percentage of students, and some consider these events "the ultimate UChicago experience."

Describe the students at your school.

Racially the school is broken down like most top-tier schools: mostly white and Asian (including Southeast Asian), with a sprinkling of Hispanic and black students on top. A decent percent of students come from very well-off and well-connected families, and this is especially prominent among foreign students, as they receive no financial aid. However, a good percentage of students also receive financial need-based aid, and so overall there is no one socio-economic majority. The housing system (everyone is required to live in housing first year, and all students are assigned to a house of 40-100 people with whom they live and share a dining table) allows students to mix and form friendships with people they may not have previously interacted with. That being said, racial and cultural groups do form, as they are wont to do anywhere. Students are predominantly left-leaning socially, but there is a strong population of fiscal conservatives on campus and the College Republicans RSO (registered student organization) is one of the best funded RSOs on campus.

What are the academics like at your school?

Like most other schools, beginning science and math classes and intro classes are often large lectures, while classes in the humanities and more advanced are generally smaller discussions with professors seemingly more invested in your input and success. As a English/Romance Languages major (who dabbled in Linguistics and Arabic), I am more used to the latter, though the majority of my friends are in the former category and so I have a general idea of how class size/individualized attention works in most majors. I have personally found most professors extremely accomodating and invested in your success, though this is less true of professors teaching some of the Core sequences. Sosc and Hum sequences (part of the Core that everyone has to take to graduate) form a common intellectual ground for people to begin intellectual debates and discussions (knowing that your conversational partner has likely read Marx and Adam Smith helps facilitate such things). Other Core sequences, like Physical Science classes, are generally more of a pain, and most people complain that these requirements are silly and unnecessary. Some students even have to take Physical Education classes (your requirements as far as that goes are determined during O-week swim and P.E. tests). Over all the school's academic requirements in terms of classes needed to graduate are reasonable, even if workloads in some of those classes aren't. Very few majors prepare you for a job straight out of school (as most majors are highly theoretical), and most students intend to eventually further their education in graduate or professional schools before beginning their careers.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

I'm not going to lie - there is some truth to UChicago's unofficial motto ("where fun comes to die"). Most students care very much about their academics, and many RSOs (registered student organizations) on campus are largely related to academic and career ambitions. However, not all students are, as a result, socially awkward and unable to "party." A good time is had by most, though the definition of that good time varies depending on your social circles and, honestly, on your dorm. The dorms at this school have reputations, and while not all who inhabit them fit into these stereotypes, they are there for a reason. Max P is unofficially the "jock dorm," filled with students on the school's athletic teams. It is also, as a result, one of the more notoriously social and drinking-focused of the dorms. South Campus houses 800 students and also has a fairly strong party culture, as over half of the dorm is first years. On the other end of the spectrum are Snell-Hitchcock and BJ, both of which are regarded as the more nerdy and "UChicago strange." Both of these dorms participate heavily in Scav (a large yearly scavenger hunt), and their definition of fun is generally closer to the board game/intellectual discussion side of the spectrum. I don't mean to say that your dorm determines your social status however - you will find like-minded people wherever you go, be it to a frat party or to the Starcraft club's weekly meeting.

Alida
What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

UChicago students generally classify themselves as "anti-social" because they put coursework, work-work, and extracurriculars...

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

UChicago students generally classify themselves as "anti-social" because they put coursework, work-work, and extracurriculars over hanging out and socializing. The University of Chicago is one of the most rigorous universities in the country, and it's also really self-selective, which means the students who come here want to study hard and slave over papers. Call it masochism or dedication, but whatever it is, it leads to a smaller emphasis on social life. However, in terms of my own experience, I have had much richer social life at college than in high school. Like I mentioned earlier, UChicago is self-selective, meaning that the students who come here are more alike than different. As a result, people who are normally anti-social actually become more social, participating in quirky and/or intellectual activities like Scav (the largest scavenger hunt in the world), Icelandic calisthenics at 4 in the morning, intellectual debates over Durkheim and Hegel, Humans v. Zombies, etc. As a student a student here, I've made most of my friends through House activities and student organizations. I am currently dramaturging for a Beowulf dance show for University Theater's "Apocalypse" entry in the Festival of the Arts, which allows me to connect with quirky, smart people who share my interests and therefore don't question my choices.

Karim
Describe the students at your school.

In general, the University of Chicago is a very accepting environment. The University community obviously encompasses a lot o...

Describe the students at your school.

In general, the University of Chicago is a very accepting environment. The University community obviously encompasses a lot of different backgrounds. Most students fit in perfectly and find their own niche in terms of apt cultural, ethnic, racial and other student groups. The unique House system of the University initially helps you acclimate to the social challenges of the University by providing you with a close-knit community of 50-80 students who you live with and can say hi to anywhere you see them on compass. It should be noted that these are the students that you normally sit with at the dining tables (though it is certainly not mandatory), especially when you first arrive on campus and feel daunted by the amount of people you meet. Moreover, it is important to remember that the University of Chicago is made up of a diverse group of students. Of the student body, most are middle to upper class and, surprisingly, 30% of the student body is made up of international students. It seems that every student at the University is united, however, by the common bond to learn in a competitive environment, obtain a quality education, and one day become a successful and productive member of their respective societies. Additionally, most students are very politically aware and- while the school, institutionally speaking, seems to be conservative in standing, most of the students are indeed more liberal and progressive. In fact, LGBT rights and racial tolerance seldom prove themselves as hotly contested issues as most students are very accepting and broadminded. Overall, the student body is incredibly varied; to be sure, it is in this diversity that there is strength.

What are the academics like at your school?

Make no mistake, academics are the biggest part of one’s experience at the University of Chicago. Luckily, your academic experience is bound to be a great one given the University’s faculty and facilities. Not only has the University been home to more Nobel Laureates than any other schools, but it is also in the process of revamping its infrastructure (meaning gyms, labs, libraries, and all the other good stuff). The classes offered at the University, moreover, are more interesting in reality than they sound on paper. Students share a reciprocal feeling for their classes and often talk about them out of class. Surely, it is not uncommon for students to be discussing their classes in the dining hall (or their GPAs for that matter). Of course, the academic rigor also means a lot of studying with the average student probably doing about 4-5 hours a night (that is given a regular course load which is 4 classes). These 4-5 hours a day do not include, furthermore, the time one spends at problem sessions and/or meeting with one’s professors (who are usually very flexible and try and see you whenever necessary). Overall, I’ve noticed that the University of Chicago fosters learning for the sake of learning and- through its mandatory Core Curriculum- ensures that every student receives a fulfilling liberal arts education. At the University of Chicago, then, it is possible to get the advantages of a big city and the research facilities and the benefits of a great engaging education.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

The most common stereotype of the students at the University of Chicago is that they are mostly nerdy or geeky. I feel as though this stereotype is rooted in the fact that the University of Chicago is a very competitive school with a very rigorous academic environment. Also, it is true that the University of Chicago has a very high mean ACT and SAT score acceptance rate. Nevertheless, I find that this stereotype is not completely accurate and assuredly does not do justice to the University. Indeed it is true that many of the students- my peers- are witty and clever, but they are as “normal,” engaging, and eager to have a fun and fulfilling college experience (in the social and academic spheres) as any other college students. Thus, while the University definitely has an aura of wittiness about it, it certainly is an enjoyable and productive community of which to avail. In essence, it is not necessarily the place “where fun comes to die.” In fact, I see this stereotype put to the test each and every day with our intriguing dining hall conversations, interesting intramural sport opportunities, and entertaining Saturday nights.

Marcella
What is your overall opinion of this school?

The University of Chicago is very academically rigorous. If you decide to attend UChicago, you have to be prepared for four y...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

The University of Chicago is very academically rigorous. If you decide to attend UChicago, you have to be prepared for four years of hard work. A UChicago degree will definitely set you apart from other job and graduate school applicants, however. Not only do employers know you are intelligent, but they know how hardworking and creatively thinking you really are. Although work load can be tough here, you will have so many opportunities to explore campus and the city of Chicago. During undergrad, I was a varsity athlete, tour guide, editor-in-chief of a campus fashion magazine, and volunteered for numerous organizations. I also held a few internships during the course of the school year. You really can become involved in different organizations, and make meaningful contributions to them, all while balancing your school work. I think UChicago students are unique from other leading institutions in that way. One aspect of your college life doesn't dominate the rest.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Here's a little peg for my organization: MODA is one of the largest organizations on campus. It puts out two magazines each year which includes student models, writers, stylists, and layout specialists. MODA also has two well-attended fashion shows each year, and students can walk the runway or design the clothes. Other top student groups include University Theatre, Rhythmic Bodies in Motion (a dance group), and a Capella groups. And Scav Hunt is HUGE. We were just included in the Guinness Book of World Records for the largest scavenger hunt. Past items included bringing wild animals (elephants, lions, tigers) to campus, designing all sorts of cool projects (including a nuclear reactor, which some kid accomplished in his dorm room), going on road trips (one had students headed to Las Vegas with only a bathing suit, ball gown or suit, and an ID!), and more. So popular on campus, and you can be as involved as you want to be (or steer clear entirely).

Describe the students at your school.

It's pretty hard to describe the typical student at the University of Chicago, because each student is so different from another. That's what makes the University of Chicago such a fantastic academic and social experience, because you have the opportunity to get to know so many diverse individuals. I was an athlete, but also was involved in a fashion magazine. This put me in contact with two very different groups of people on campus. But then again, I was a tour guide, and tour guides tended to be absolutely amazing, quirky, incredibly involved individuals. UChicago has so many different people that it's hard to stereotype them. Even at the frat parties, I'd see people who would have been deemed way too nerdy at my high school-- yet here they were the life of the party. That's because UChicago tends to treat people based on their personalities, and not on their looks, which is awesome. We're a very welcoming bunch of people, and I think that's why UChicago gets typecast as an incredibly quirky/nerdy school. It's not that we necessarily are-- we just welcome those people, and they don't need to change their quirkiness or nerdiness to fit in. They're welcome here regardless.

What are the academics like at your school?

Course work at the University is very difficult, but professors are incredibly accessible, both inside and outside the classroom. Many of the classes are arranged in the Socratic seminar style of learning, without a podium in sight. This way, students and professors sit as equals around a table, and students are able to engage not only with the text, but also can learn from professors and their peers at an equal rate. It really enables you to get to know your professors and classmates on a greater level. Students may study a lot, but they truly do love it. There is a love of learning that permeates the air at UChicago, and it's true that discussions of academic topics often can be overheard while eating in the cafeteria. Though that is true, many students are very normal in their everyday lives, and a math genius in the classroom. It is truly remarkable how much your peers have accomplished, and how humble they are about these accomplishments. You can definitely learn as much from your peers as you can in any classroom. Additionally, UChicago has very good pre-professional programs called Chicago Careers In ________ (business, science and technology, health professions, journalism, and more). One of UChicago's former criticisms was that the school was too theoretical. Now, students have the opportunity of enrolling in these programs to receive practical instruction in their intended careers. Through CCI programs, students meet with advisers to discuss resumes and cover letters. They often work with mentors in the field, job shadow over spring break, and hear about unique internships. There are also recruiting fairs and guest speakers, both of which are incredibly useful.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Many prospective students assume that UChicago is where fun comes to die. Time and time again I've tried to battle this stigma. University of Chicago students have incredibly diverse interests, which means that there are tons of activities to join on the weekends and plays, concerts, sporting events to attend, as well. Joining an activity (we have over 400 registered student organizations) will definitely enhance your social life on campus. There are over 70 volunteer groups, which will definitely give you something fun to do on the weekend, as well as dance groups, literary magazines, student government, and even a zombie readiness task force! The housing system at UChicago is also conducive to having a good social life. At UChicago, every first year student is required to live in the dorms. Each dorm is split into a few houses, and houses typically have 70-100 students each. Those students live together, and often eat and play together, too. As a first year, I went to a Bulls basketball game with my house, on the annual ski trip, to a few plays in the city, and joined them for many, many meals both in the cafeteria and out and about in Chicago. All activities are subsidized using house funds, so an amazing musical can cost you on $5!

Ryan
What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Probably the two most telling characteristics of the University of Chicago from an outside perspective. Scav Hunt is an oppor...

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Probably the two most telling characteristics of the University of Chicago from an outside perspective. Scav Hunt is an opportunity for U of C students' relentless erudition to climax into its full absurdity, bringing tigers onto campus, building breeder reactors in sheds, and driving across the country to find pictures of the largest feet that are unavailable on the internet. Despite its notoriety, though, Scav Hunt's presence on campus is largely avoidable for the uninterested, say, third to two-thirds of campus. Similarly, although Econ is the most popular major on campus and undeniably influenced by economic precepts of the Milton Freedman school, there is no dearth of variety in political dispositions even among students in the department. The idea of the "Paul Wolfowitz Douche" at U of C, as articulated by GQ however many years ago now, is largely unfounded.

Seleste
What is your overall opinion of this school?

This school is amazing! Many students say that you either love the school or you hate it, but either way you can never deny t...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

This school is amazing! Many students say that you either love the school or you hate it, but either way you can never deny the great academic institution it is. One of the things that is so awesome about the school is the eagerness and determination that people here have for learning everything they can about the world, and then going out there and changing it. Everyone who has gone to this school or has heard about it knows that it is an impressive place to be at. Population-wise, this school is just the right size, so there is an even number of small classes as well as lectures. The neighborhood around it makes it feel a little bit like a college town, but there's also that urban feel from being so close to the city.

Describe the students at your school.

The school is relatively diverse in relation to their students. One doesn't just meet students from all over the country, but also from around the world. Every student can find at least one way to immerse themselves in what the School has to offer. There are different groups of peoples here, with a wide range of ethnic, social and political groups.

What are the academics like at your school?

One of the things that the school is known for is their strict Undergraduate class requirements. Commonly called "the Core", it is a guideline and list of classes that all undergraduate students are required to take, in addition to classes for the major. They emphasize the necessity of being a well-rounded person, so the core is filled with classes ranging from physical sciences and mathematics to art and physical education. Outside the core, however, there is such a diverse range of classes that people can take. Sometimes they offer classes about Lord of the Rings, modern and ancient civilizations, among countless other subjects.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

People say this is "The place where Fun comes to die". There is the constant stereotype that everyone here is a geek or a nerd, that all we do is work, study and sleep (in that order, too). It all couldn't be farther from the truth. While, admittedly, students here are intensely focused on their studies (and on everything else we do), there's a passion here for learning and thinking that I doubt many places in the world could top. Everyone pushes each other to do the best that they can, and while it can sometimes feel overwhelming, the rewards are well worth everything we go through. We study hard, but we also know how to have fun just as much. There are countless things to do around campus, many student organizations, clubs and events. And last, but certainly not least, we have the amazing city of Chicago nearby, and it's certainly one of the main attractions.

Ilknur
What is your overall opinion of this school?

I might say that the best thing about UofC is that it is full of bright people who are ready to share and receive knowledge. ...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

I might say that the best thing about UofC is that it is full of bright people who are ready to share and receive knowledge. It is really exciting in the sense of learning for the sake of learning; however, this learning environment sometimes prevents the university administration to invest in sports. At the end, once they built a library (Regenstein) over the football field. I personally believe that having more competitive varsity teams and more school spirit would make the university more interesting and exciting. Apart from that, the administration led by President ZImmer is doing a great job by being very liberal and respecting different opinions. Recently, the Occupy Movement became a bit of a sensation on campus and unlike some other schools in the East, University Police respected students' protests. The UCPD is very nice and understanding protecting the UofC community.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Model United Nations is very intense at UofC. A lot of students are involved in MUN and the MUN team is ranked as one of the best in the country. Apart from that, ethnical student organizations like South Asian Student Organization or Turkish Student Organization are very active. They always organize events. Even though a lot of varsity teams are division 3, there are also lots of athletes at UChicago. Speaking of sports, I am a rower and doing crew is definitely awesome at the University of Chicago. Rowing on the Chicago River and seeing downtown Chicago every morning are just perfect! I am also a representative for my class hence a member of Student Government. SG works a lot organizing events, distributing money to Registered Student Organizations (RSO) and reviewing RSO applications. It is demanding and at the same time an honor to be in SG.

Describe the students at your school.

The University of Chicago is very diverse indeed. There are a lot of people with different ideas, religions, ethnical and financial background. Here, everybody is interesting! I do not think that someone would feel out of place at UChicago. Chicago is cold so students wear a lot of layers to class. There are definitely preppy, hipster or casually dressed students in a class. But, different people here always interact. It is not surprising to see a football player speaking to a math geek. Furthermore, UChicago students and professors are politically aware. For example, in my Hum class last week, we discussed the reaction of UC Davis Police against student protestors. Students are predominantly liberal however there are also very conservative students. All in all, as it is aforementioned: the university is very diverse.

What are the academics like at your school?

Yes, UofC is academically challenging but it is very manageable. Here, professors and other members of the university help students a lot. They always invite students to their office hours and they answer student e-mails within hours. We also have very talented TAs who are always there to help us. With those in mind, students here spend minimum 4-5 hours studying every day. My favorite class so far is Media Aesthetics. It is a Humanities Class. Students take Humanities to meet the requirements for the Core Curriculum. I really enjoy Media Aesthetics because the class is very small and it is led by a very skillful, knowledgeable professor. The academic environment of the class is mind blowing making students to ask questions and answer those questions during discussions. Moreover, I am very undecided about my major right now but probably, I will be a biology major. Biology department in the University of Chicago is very good. Often people know UofC with its Econ Department but biology, biological research and biochemistry are very well taught in the University. For example, for first year students with an early interest in biology and with an AP 5 score who want to research, there is an intense biology sequence offered by the department . It is very hard to find such an opportunity in other schools.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

The University of Chicago has a reputation as the place where fun comes to die. As a first year student, I question that a lot. I came to UofC with the same stereotypical beliefs: students are studying all the time, workload is so heavy and there is no fun on campus. Unfortunately, It turned out to be not that accurate after all. The students of UofC are definitely studious but it does not mean that they are not having fun. First of all, Greek life is expanding rapidly . This year Delta Gamma had a record number of new sisters. In addition to that, not only Sigma Chi is rising as the new fraternity of UChicago but also other frats are much larger this year. These all mean that there is definitely a party scene on campus. We even have bar-nights on Wednesdays. Apart from the activities of fraternities, there are always apartment parties, house/dorm activities, regular downtown trips and shows/activities of Registered Student Organizations such as but not limited to the shows of South Asian Student Association, downtown Restaurant Week of the Student Government (ChewChicago), tea parties of International Student Organization. All those in mind, it is definitely true that a UChicago student is intellectual. Yes, we are intellectual and yes, we are proud of that! It is very easy to see a UofC student talking about Plato, Kant, Mozart, Occupy Movement or economic crisis in Greece in the dining hall or in a coffee shop. At the end, we know that crescat scientia; vita excolatur, thus we we will be enriched by the knowledge. All those might seem a lot to do; however, at UofC you learn how to organize yourself. Here students are social, intellectual and hard-working therefore multi-tasking. It might come as a surprise but UofC students also love sports. One can always see the gyms (Ratner and Henry Crown) with full of people.

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