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University of Delaware

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What are the academics like at your school?

Professors within your major should become familiar with your name. My favorite class was my feature writing class with McKay Jenkins. It was a great class where own only “textbook” was a subscription to The New Yorker and we would not only learn to write feature stories but discuss current events as well. My least favorite class was an intro statistics class. I mostly didn’t enjoy the class because I find math to be boring, plus it was math a freshman in high school shouldn’t have a problem doing. For the average class I probably spent a few hours each week on assignments, however it does depend on the class and how big the assignment is. I tried to attend class every day, but I probably averaged making it to class 80 percent of the time (classes within my English major program I rarely missed). In big lecture hall classes there are usually a select few students who do all the participating, it is not important to participate because you are just another face in the crowd anyway. It is slightly more important to participate in smaller classes because your professor will most likely know who you are and notice your effort or lack-there-of. Currently in my school bag are three notebooks (which I always leave in my bag), two textbooks and an iPod. I am an English major with a concentration in journalism. It is a small major where you are basically required to write for the school newspaper; however the newspaper is still independent from the college. The journalism professors are all extremely eager to help you with anything you need. Most journalism students rely on one or two of the journalism professors to help them through the program and with their writing. Delaware has a core curriculum that can be pretty obnoxious and annoying; however it does give you a pretty good track to follow in order to graduate. Everyone is required to take a multi-cultural class and a second writing class. Many other majors also have other requirements which consist of a number of credits in each category of classes.

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1. yes, but you have to go out fo your way to go to office hours, even if you dont really have a question, just for themt o put a name to the face. go before your first paper in EVERY class!!! 2. nutrition - most interesting content, comm stats - boring, repetetive. 3. usually do work for at least an hour every day. 4. yes 5. maybe on a particularly interesting topic - religion, politics, nutrition 6. depends on the class, probably more in the harder majors. 7. my independent study - i taught visual litearcy to gifted elementary students 8. i was very disapointed with the comm program. i felt that it was very theory based, and when i went to interviews and jobs, i was not prepared for anything. they do not enforce real-world experience like other majors. i think internships should be mandatory for an entire sememster, and the program should actually help you find something. they don't. my advisor bareley knew me, and did not help me combine all my intersts in a valuable way. i took classes i had no interest in just to fill credits. i was an honors student, and technically should have been able to 'create my own major,' but when i attempted to do taht, i was nto able to take the classes i was interested in - even if they were open, i had the prereqs or said i'd take them pass/fail. 9. yes - one of my comm professors i still email and did some outside stuff with him. 10. i think its a good idea to demand well-rounded students outside specific majors, but the number of credits and the limited number of classes makes it hard to find interesting classes that fit requirements. 11. learning. they say preparing for a job, but i didnt really feel prepared from my classes, more from the internships i had found myself.

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The school is very strong in the sciences. I meet a lot of engineering and majors. Psychology and business are also pretty popular. If you take a smaller class, you're professor will know your name, especially if you participate. In most classes, if you put in the effort, you'll have a better relationship with your professor. My favorite classes so far have been my communication classes, which is my major. I loved Theories in Mass Communication. It was a very large lecture - about 200. The professor was really engaging and interesting, and very helpful in office hours. I took an honors English class which focused on Southern Crimes. I wrote my research paper about how barbershops were cultural gathering places in the 1800s. It was a small class that involved a lot of participation. My professor was helpful in office hours and my writing definitely improved. I don't think our campus is very academic in the sense that students don't have a lot of intellectual conversation outside of class. We're all very concerned with our grades and managing our work and extracurriculars. I do think people are very concerned about resumes and their future jobs, more than just learning for the sake of learning. Especially because in the first year/year and a half many students are taking breadth requirement classes they don't care about. I think students are competitive depending on the major, but I don't feel a strong sense of competition on campus. Even engineers, who are in a competitive field, often do their work together.

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I feel that academics at the University of Delaware are all about what you put into them. Because of the size of the school, it is hard to have a close relationship with all of your professors. However, that does not mean it is not possible to have any relationships whatsoever. I was able to create relationships with some of my journalism professors, but this took some effort on my part. As an English major working in finance now, I feel that all students should be required in some capacity to take at least an intro to finance, or some practical application to money outside of college. I took a program called the "Certificate of Business fundamentals" which I found extremely helpful towards getting me a job. I feel that at least one class related to this field is important because the tangible goal of attending college is to get a job. Before taking any of these classes, I did not have the faintest idea of personal finance; I didn't know what a stock was, what a 401k was or even how to handle my own money. Taking at least one of these classes would provide at a minimum basic knowledge for students so that when they do get a job, they are not overwhelmed by the money that associates it.

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Some professors know my name. My favorite class is currently Film Theory and Criticism. My least favorite class was Pre-Calculus. Students are always studying. Class participation is very common. I'd say that students have intellectual conversations outside of class. Students are very competitive. For the Communications major, they only accept the top 100 students into the major, so you have to be competitive. The most unique class I have taken is probably Film Theory and Criticism. I have a double major in Communication and English. The communication department is understaffed which is why only 100 students are allowed in. Besides that, the department has amazing teachers. The English department has many concentrations students can pursue, such as journalism, drama, and film. I don't usually spend time with professors outside of class, unless I have to ask them a question. The requirements were recently changed and I'm glad because before everyone needed 13 credits of science courses, which seems a little extreme. I believe the education is both geared toward a job and toward learning.

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I've never met a class I didn't like, or a class that was overwhelmingly challenging. Professors by no means want to hang out with you outside of class and most classes are pretty big (I'd say the average is about 65 students). There are TAs for big classes, but I've never heard of this being an issue. Although it's a big school and there aren't many personal relationships between students and professors, I've had a lot of professors who were enthusiastic about writing letters of recommendation and frequently reminding us that they were there to help us with our future careers. General classes tend to be dull and a bit discouraging for the intellectually curious, but once you get into higher classes or further into your major (sophomore or junior year) students are a lot more engaged in class discussion. No one is looked down on for being a "nerd" if they study a lot. Academically, UD varies a lot by professor; I've had professors who turn a huge lecture into a roundtable discussion and others who have a 30 student class and blandly read off of powerpoint slides.

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Here at UD throughout your academic career, you will go through a variety of class sizes. The general 101 classes tend to have upwards of 150 students and in those cases, it is very uncommon for a professor to know your name. On the other hand, as you start taking your major classes, the class size becomes smaller and professors do learn your name in those instances. Even in big classes though, class participation is welcome and expected. The professors want an interactive learning environment and in truth, it makes the class more fun. The professors are more than willing to offer help to students and have office hours frequently for extra help. The education at this school is definitely geared towards learning for its own sake rather than specifically towards gearing for a career field. The professors are passionate about their subjects and inspire passion in their students as well. My favorite class was MUSC101 because my professor was so quirky and interesting. He really made the material enjoyable and I laughed every class!

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As a grad student all my professors know my name, as an undergrad very few of them did. My favorite class was an anthropology class I took about Human Evolution and the Fossil Record. My least favorite was either physics or organic chemistry. Some students study a lot, others not much at all. Class particiaption is sometimes common depending on the size of the class. The biology department was great. The biology undergraduate advisor was so helpful when it came time to pick classes and plan out your schedule for years to come. I took a summer physics class and I spent time outside the classroom with my professor then. Now in grad school I spend more time out of class with many of my professors as well. I feel UD's academic requirements are reasonable if not a little lower than they could be, and I feel I got an excellent education at UD and was well prepared for grad school or to take on the real world and getting a job.

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Depends on the class. Favorite class- business law was great because I had a really good professor. I strongly disliked my statistics classes- very difficult and dry. Students study various amounts- that is completely by the person. Class participation varies by the class. Depends on the students- many do and many do not. Most unique class- entrepeneurship of business. This was a great class. Economics was my major- I had some great professors who were down to earth and easy to relate to but I didn't love the classes. Usually not but I had coffee with a professor and some classmates for having perfect attendance. The requirements are fair for the most part. I think UD can do more to help students obtain jobs. Push for internships more.

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I have one or two professors who knew my name. But it's an effort to talk to them, especially if you're a psych major with 200 other kids in your classes. Favorite class was expository writing. Lease favorite: measurements & statistics. Most unique class: psychopathology in the movies, we watched movies and ate pizza once a week. it was great. The psych department isn't very personal. We don't have advisors, so getting help is a bit rough, plus, the grad student I tried to see was never in the office during office hours. I think UD is more geared towards learning for its own sake, at least the classes I took were. I mean, Biological Evolution? Interesting class, not helpful for a real-person job.

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