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University of Delaware

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What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I would tell parents to have a hands off approach when it comes time for their child to choose a college. I feel the best thing my parents did for me was to let me make all the decisions on my own. That way they knew that I was interested in and passionte about the schools I had choosen. I would also tell parents not to focus on or get too attached to one school. This could potentially lead to dissapointment if their child was not accepted. Applying to college can be very stressful and the last thing a student needs is the weighted pressure of their parents dreams that they go to one particular school. I saw many high school seniors who were crushed and completely depressed if they got rejected from their favorite school. Choosing and accepting to a University should be fun and often times outside pressures especially from parents or loved ones makes the process more stressful. In order to make the most of the college experiance it is important to surround yourself with positive activities, relationships, and courses that stimulate you and keep you engaged in your school.

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If I could go back in time and talk to myself as high school senior I would definitely give myself the advice of time management. College is all about time management because everything you do is all up to you there are no teachers or parents holding your hand telling you what to do or when to do it. My first semester at the University of Delaware as a freshman was extremely stressful for me because I would do all of my studying a week before an exam or complete homework assignments the night before they were due. I found myself loosing sleep and also not eating as healthy because I couldn?t seem to mange my time. This semester taught me that college is extremely tough but I have the ability to accomplish my dream. Making a planner or a schedule is very helpful when attending college so you know exactly what you need to accomplish each day. Also studying an hour every night for each class can also be helpful instead of cramming a few days before an exam. Professors also suggest studying the material as soon as you learn it helps you retain the information much better.

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Looking back at my senior year of high school, I realize that I was definitely on my way to becoming the confident and independent woman that I am today. Since my transition to college life, I have developed a new found assertiveness, abandoning my hesitation and coyness. If I could go back, I would tell myself not to be afraid to be outgoing and spontaneous. I would advise myself to talk to everyone and always be open to making new friends. In college, I?ve learned that if you need help, just ask. Organizing study groups and finding trusted peer-editors is always a great idea. I would tell myself to set goals and organize my time well. Getting school work done is important as well as having a healthy social life. I would remind myself that I made it through high school working a part time job while managing good grades. Working part time in college will be most helpful to purchase books and have a little extra spending money. Finally, I would tell myself that I have what it takes to succeed; I just need to apply myself and work to bring out the best in me.

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My parents did not attended college and educational emphasis growing up was to graduate from high school. I had been out of high school for more than ten years, and had started a family before I decided to attend college. Once I decided to attend college my husband accepted a contractor position in Iraq so that I could attend school full time, obtain my LPN license, and not work. This experience taught me that it did not matter how long I had been out of school, but that I could learn and retain new ideas. Upon graduating from the LPN program I immediately enrolled at the local community college to work toward my ASN. My husband returned home and I went to work full time while attending college to obtain my ASN. I successfully completed the ASN program in 2009, and am ready for my BSN. Earning my degrees, and attending college has taught me that my educational opportunities are endless. This is the life lesson that I am passing on to my children. College education is necessary and obtainable. Set goals, reach them, and make new ones. Learning is a life long process.

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In my college experience I have learned to try new things and put myself outside of my comfort zone. I have met all types of people with greatly varying interests and lifestyles. This makes it easy to be yourself at University of Delaware. The students who go here and get involved in clubs and activities become very passionate and committed to their causes. The students sincerely care about doing well academically and making a difference in the world. I think that the school is well worth the cost because the opportunities and availability of resources are so extensive. There are helpful resources everywhere, whether you need help with career advisement, writing tools, research, financial aid, guidance with classes, or anything else. The school draws a lot of intellectually stimulating presentations and speeches. There always seems to be plans for entertainment to come to the school so students always have something to do in their free time. The students make a great difference at University of Delaware and they are constantly involved in work to benefit the school.

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Everyone has an older sibling, friend, mentor, counselor, parent, or even college tour guide that says "I would have loved for someone to tell me this advice while i was in college". After this comes advice like: go to class; study; never procrastinate; get involved; balance work with play; make friends, and so on. But as a freshman year student, I learned that no one could describe what is it to make this transition until you go through it for yourself. For almost all incoming freshmen, this is the first experience you have without your parents, family and 'home' friends to help you. The one piece of advice I would give myself a year ago was don't be afraid to change, it's not always bad (you must change to mature and become a better, well rounded person). Talk to and meet people you wouldn’t typically approach; get involved with activities that you wouldn't normally choose to do; step out of your comfort zone; take classes that interest you not just what is "expected"; learn from your mistakes. College is the best place to improve yourself so jump to it and start!

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If I went back 2 years ago I would tell myself: Be confident in your decisions, and don't always second-guess yourself. You are a talented young lady and you have the ability to succeed anywhere. College life may be scary at first, but relax because eventually you will meet great friends and form strong bonds. Don't be afraid to join clubs and get involved with the school because you have nothing to lose and joining in these activities is rewarding. Also, don't feel like you need to know exactly what you want to do with your life because taking college courses gives you a chance to experiment with possible future career paths. Appreciate all the diverse people you will meet because you will benefit from being open minded and understanding, and don't be scared to socialize with people that are different from you. At the same time, be aware that not everyone is worth of your trust, but you can determine which people are truly genuine. Overall, enjoy college because it will go by fast and take time to appreciate even the smallest positive experiences while you can.

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My college experience has taught me how to be a self-sufficient young woman. Over the course of the past four years I have really had to learn how to be a "grown-up" in terms of juggling school, work, play, and other responsibilities. It's the little things that I’ve learned that have made me a self-sufficient person: like when I needed to reach out to my Cultural Geography professor about a paper. I had to find a tiny building on a sprawling campus and be articulate enough to voice my concerns. Coming to college forced me to be accountable in my research job, that involved going into inner city impoverished homes and assessing children. While keeping up with these apsects of life, I learned how to navigate friendships on my own, realizing how difficult it is to find people that truly "get you", and realizing that I still needed to hold my head high and keep up the pace of my demanding life. Junior year taught me how to pay a bill. These "abstract" concepts of adulthood have become a reality for me and I have had to grow emotionally and intellectually to keep up.

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This fall I will be attending Santa Monica Community College, and I am extremely excited, to say the least. Going to college is a dream come true. Ever since I was a kid I've always loved learning and have taken pride in my performance in school. Every thing I do, I use to make and shape me into a better person, and going to college is just another way for me to better myself and my future. My entire life there was never a doubt in my mind that I would be going to college. Which in hindsight is odd concidering my background. My mom got pregnant with me when she was a teenager, and my dad had just enrolled in the U.S. Army. Growing up, we always had financial difficulties. But even in the face of my parents divorce, my father being honorably discharged, financial instability, and the confusion and craziness of growing up and discovering who I am, both parents stressed the importance of an education. If nothing else, I have always been absolutely 100% possitive about school. That's why attending and doing well in college would mean the world to me and my family.

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I am very forunate to attend such a well-rounded, diverse and challenging school such as the University of Delaware. From my year and a half of attending this university, I have learned the importance of time management, stress management, and taking care of priorities before other tasks. The amount of work in each of my classes has taught me to organize my time in order to make sure all of my homework and projects get done before I arrive to class. This has also relected in my life outside of school. At work, time management has taught me to get the most important tasks done first, followed by things that are due at a later date. In addition to time management, living at the University of Delaware has taught me to be courteous of other peoples needs. Living with a roomate for the first time in my life has taught me to coexist with a new friend and to understand the needs and habits of a roomate. I have come to learn that people approach opportunities in different ways than I might expect. I can learn from other people's perspectives and take advice from others.

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