Philadelphia, PA
University of Pennsylvania


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Recent Reviews

Jake
What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best thing about this school is the academic spirit that permeates it and the support UPenn provides its high-caliber stu...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best thing about this school is the academic spirit that permeates it and the support UPenn provides its high-caliber students. Right now, UPenn is putting a lot of funding into its sciences.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

The biggest group on campus is by far the Hillel. Many students are involved in fraternities or student government or the student newspapers. For the past few semesters student life on Penn's campus has exploded with the introduction of many new choral groups.

Describe the students at your school.

Penn gives plenty of financial aid to its students. However even though they say there's zero aid, most students still take out Stafford/government loans.

What are the academics like at your school?

Students study all the time, and often people consider taking time off. But the consensus is students totally love it here. One thing that students don't like is the student newspaper and the administration which seem to always have a tremendous presence on campus.

Bryana
Describe the students at your school.

academically charged and career oriented.

Describe the students at your school.

academically charged and career oriented.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

As a high-school student, I experienced a lot of frustration about my “mediocrity”. I wanted to excel at something, but could never find my “one thing” that separated me from the rest. And then my life was flipped upside down during my senior year. In September 2010, I was diagnosed with advanced Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. In the blink of an eye, I went from my “normal” college application process and resenting my “normality”, to the ICU and longing for normality. I’m currently almost three years in remission, and having cancer made me understand things that I wish I understood beforehand. If I could tell my high-school self one thing, I would say to appreciate all of my blessings, despite how “average” they are. Normality is subjective. I didn’t understand that, until all I wanted was normality. In hindsight, I should have been thankful for my “average” life. Although I’m now in remission and I now understand how lucky it is to have even just a “normal” life, there are still thousands of people right now who crave normality and stability in their lives, and I was lucky to have all of my blessings, mediocrity included.

What do you consider the worst thing about your school? Why?

The cost because attending an Ivy Leage College is a huge financial responsibility, not only for me, but for my family. The cost of participating in extra curriculars, such a fraternities and soroties can be costly.

Nicole
Describe your favorite campus traditions.

Penn is the best of both worlds -- it is both academically and socially stimulating. There are so many amazing academic oppor...

Describe your favorite campus traditions.

Penn is the best of both worlds -- it is both academically and socially stimulating. There are so many amazing academic opportunities, and the professors are really willing to help their students. Additionally, there are many clubs and activities on campus filled with diverse groups of students.

What's the one thing you wish someone had told you about freshman year?

I wish I would have known how to balance my time better. People on campus juggle school, clubs, sports, and work. You have to be good at time management to take full advantage of all the opportunities.

Marissa
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

In high school I wasn’t a bad kid. I wasn’t particularly motivated and I wasn’t particularly driven, but I wasn’t a bad kid. ...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

In high school I wasn’t a bad kid. I wasn’t particularly motivated and I wasn’t particularly driven, but I wasn’t a bad kid. I liked to be friendly, social and outgoing. Rather than focusing on my future, I was focusing on my present. I guess most people would advise themselves, if given the chance, to try harder and to focus more on what matters like school work and grades. If given the opportunity, this is not the advice I would give. No, the advice I would give myself would be so much simpler than that. I would sit myself down and ask myself, “Are you proud of what you have accomplished?” I don’t think it is necessary to tell myself what I could do or should have done different. Instead, I would rather I give myself the opportunity to think it through a little more. Maybe I would append that to the advice as well, “Take a moment and consider Marissa, really consider. Are you ‘accomplished’?”

bethany
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I would definitely tell myself that being organized and on top of everything is one of the most important things you can do. ...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I would definitely tell myself that being organized and on top of everything is one of the most important things you can do. Not just in college, but in life. You really need to have a positive outlook & attitude to succeed. You need to have that "I'm going to graduate" mentality in your mind at all times. Also, always be on time to class and take your assignments seriously. Budget your time out so you have plenty of time to study and actually absorb information. Don't be afraid to ask questions and never make assumptions ever. Having a budget and planning ahead is really important and also making a schedule so that you can manage work, school, personal time, family, etc. Also, if you're going to take loans only take out the minimum - what you REALLY need. Taking out more loans than necessary is foolish and will only cost you more money and stress than you want.

Chandler
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I would go back and tell myself to take your time and do things fully and to the best of my ablility. By this i mean to take ...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I would go back and tell myself to take your time and do things fully and to the best of my ablility. By this i mean to take classes more seriously and try my very hardest at every little and big thing that I will do in school. Every piece of paper that you do in school will affect your future indefinately. Its not worth skipping out on homework just to hang out with some friend for a little bit. the grades you get in high school are extremely important and will follow yhou onto college and can be seen by pretty much any college professor. So all in all STOP, slow down, take you time and do things the right way the first time because trust me if will pay off in the future.

Emily
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Don't be afraid to work after high school instead of going straight into college. Find an entry-level position or internship ...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Don't be afraid to work after high school instead of going straight into college. Find an entry-level position or internship in a field you're interested in, and work in that field for a while. This will help you learn if it's really the right profession for you! If you're not sure yet what field you might like to pursue, use this time to explore different areas. Be adventurous! Take that summer position leading horseback tours in Equador. Volunteer your time at an orphanage. Apply for the internship at the bank. Buy a study guide and attempt some Microsoft certifications. Join your community garden co-op and learn to grow your own food. Find out what you do and don't like spending your day doing, and what your time is worth to you. This experience will help you start to learn what direction you would like to go in a career, and you'll be earning money instead of spending it on tuition as an undeclared major college freshman. Plus, there's nothing like working a low-paying job for a year to motivate you to pursue a degree!

James
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

As a high school senior I knew I wanted to go to college, but I did not know what I wanted to pursue. I was indecisive and ma...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

As a high school senior I knew I wanted to go to college, but I did not know what I wanted to pursue. I was indecisive and made a hasty decision to explore a degree/career in Biology and eventually attempt Medical School. In two weeks I had it all figured out; I would get my Biology degree from the College of Charleston and my medical school would be completed at the Medical University of South Carolina. I went through with this plan for two years at C of C just getting by with my grades, before I realized that I hated everything I was doing and was hemorrhaging money in the form of student loans, especially since I lost my $5,000 state scholarship after my second semester. I made the tough decision to leave C of C and pursue my already existant interest in the Automotive industry and am now in a two year Automotive Technology associates degree program. So if there was anything I could tell myself before I left high school, it would be to pursue what you enjoy and what you're good at and let it pay off for you in the long run.

Xavier
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Know yourself, and once you do, have the courage to be true to yourself. In the frenzy of orientation, remember that you will likely only make a handful of important friendships, and that popularity is only as important as it is fulfilling to you. Staying home on a Friday night is only missing out if you would actually enjoy going to a frat party. If hard work and intelligence are big parts of your self-identity, then work hard from the beginning of freshman year. There is time to explore and still get your work done.Lastly, grow. Whatever you are, or think you are, don’t let that set boundaries to who you become. Join the crew team even if you’ve never rowed before; do anything that strikes you as worthwhile. All the while, remember you’re still young and susceptible to peer pressure. If you’re aware of it, you will be less likely to adhere to it. Ultimately life is like any other path, the way seems obvious and inevitable. It isn’t. It’s a perpetual crossroads between that well-trodden path, and the un-trodden wilderness on either side. Step off the path.

What's unique about your campus?

The professors. They are intelligent, enthusiastic abou engaging with students, and willing to help in any way possible.

Kimberly
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Live your life for yourself, not for your parents or teachers. Never stop thinking about the future. Learn to love ambition....

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Live your life for yourself, not for your parents or teachers. Never stop thinking about the future. Learn to love ambition. The expectations set upon you can be overwhelming, especially when they seem unattainable. Focus on just a few key goals at a time, even when some people may be pressuring you to have more. Part of the frustration of youth is everyone trying to tell you what's best and all the things you need to do to prepare, but it's really impossible to follow every bit of advice. You don't have to. Say "thank you for caring about my future", smile graciously, but do not adopt their advice unless it contributes to your own goals. A lot of it won't. Never listen when someone tells you to get a degree in something practical, just to be "safe". That's a recipe for dissatisfaction and mediocrity. Follow the path that inspires you, and find people you respect to help you walk that path. Be willing to take risks. Even when they don't pan out, you learn from the experience. You develop courage. And with a courageous heart, you can passionately follow your dreams without regret.

Details

  • Enrollment
  • 11,525
  • Tuition & Fees
  • $45,890
  • Acceptance rate
  • 13%

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