University of Pittsburgh-Pittsburgh Campus Top Questions

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Justyn

If I could go back in time and talk to myself as a high school senior, I would tell myself to enjoy every last bit of my time in high school. Once you graduate, your parents are going to move and you're probably not going to see your hometown again for a long time. Walk through the woods, skip rocks across Lake Wallenpaupack, and go for long car rides at night while you still can. Soon, you'll be in a big city going to school with 20,000 other students that don't know who you are. Find out, for yourself, who you are and who you're going to be and I promise everything will make sense once you start to believe in yourself.

Joe

When I was in high school, I decided I wanted to be a doctor. I chose to study chemistry as my undergraduate major, although it didn't really matter which degree I studied as long as I took the pre-med courses. I would have told myself to study a different major such as finance, economics, or chemical engineering. After sophomore year, I began to despise my degree and courses I had to take, but decided to tough it out. If I was attending medical school, it wouldn't matter what major I studied since I would not be doing a chemistry related job for the rest of my life. I would also tell myself to be more outgoing and social. I made some great friends freshman year, but did not continue to make many new friends with each new dormitory and living arrangement. College is an incredible opportunity to meet unique people and become responsible for your own actions. Lastly, I would have told myself to enjoy my time more, since four years of college (3.5 for me) goes by extremely quickly and soon enough you will miss the freedom and fun.

Andrea

My first piece of advice would be to pick a college or university based on my comfort level there on the campus. The campus setting never became more clear to me than when I didn't like it. My second piece of advice would be to stick to studying a specific skill set- I should never have given up on pre-med because it was "too difficult" and "too stringent of a curriculum". My third piece of advice would be to join groups to play sports I had never played before and to make sure the campus had programs available. Do an overnight at the campus and make sure on the weekends students had activities available and that majority of the students stayed on campus. Finally, see how important it is to stay social based on involvement in greek life or no involvement.

Emilie

I consider myself to have a type-A personality; I like to be in control and do not always deal well with change. The entire college process was stressful to me just because I struggled to make a decision knowing that it would affect the rest of my life. I also stressed about how I would really deal with being away from home and on my own, if I would make friends, if I was truly ready, and would I make the right choice? Now, more than halfway done with my first year of college, I would tell my high school self to relax. To enjoy the experience and the process and to trust myself and my preparations. My first semester of college truly taught me how to relax and enjoy the ride. College should be stressful, but it should also be the best time of your life. Looking back, I would tell myself to trust my instincts, because I know that I made the right choice and could not see myself anywhere else.

Victoria

If I could go back in time, I would tell myself to be more financially aware. When I was in high school, I picked the University of Pittsburgh because I absolutely loved it and it seemed like the perfect fit for me. I knew at the time that it was expensive, but I just assumed I would be able to get loans and pay it off later. Now, as a student, I am fully aware of the financial burden going to an expensive school without much help can be. I still love the University of Pittsburgh, but I am constantly thinking about transferring simply because I am afraid of the amount of debt I will be in when I graduate. If I had realized this in high school, I might have picked a school that would not put so much financial stress on me. However, in my current position, I have decided to stay because I know that Pitt is an extremely good school for the career field I want to go in.

Eric

I would tell myself to take harder classes my senior year of highschool such as AP Biology and AP Chemistry. Coming in to college to general biology and chemistry classes I felt far behind the kids who had taken AP. I would also encourage myself to seek out people in my home area that were going to go to my school. Most importantly, I would tell myself to keep an open mind about future career and school plans.

Clayton

When I was in high school, I was convinced that in order for a college to be elite it had to have a very small acceptance rate. However, now that I am at Pitt, I see that selectivity is not as important as the media and people make it seem. Each and every university has something unique to offer. As a result, I would tell myself to not automatically assume that a school is lesser simply based on the number of students it accepts. In addition, I would tell myself to not be afraid to experiment and try different things. Even in the short 5 months that I have been here at Pitt I have done things I would have never done a year ago. It is important not to limit yourself and be open to new experiences and ideas. Similarly, I would tell myself not to be afraid to change. Yes, you may have enjoyed high school and who you were there, but college provides you with an amazing opportunity for growth. Finally, I would tell myself that, eventually, everything will work out. You will end up where you should be and you will be happy.

Shelby

The advice I would give my self is to know who you are before coming to college. Sometimes people can find it hard to stand up for themselves in such a different environment from high school, so I would remind my self to be strong in myself. I would also tell myself to keep an open mind in regards to which academic path to follow. I found myself being narrow minded, but after coming to school, I realized there are a lot of opportunities I can pursue in my academic career.

Ryan

Even though I had an incredible high school experience, I still look back and tell myself I could have done more. For example, I wish I took advantage of the Advanced Placement courses in high school. Once I began scheduling my classes in the summer before college, I learned that some of the general education classes I needed could have easily been tested out of. Instead, I have to wait until my sophomore year of college to take a class related to my major while my classmates dive into their majors right away. Honestly, I am a little jealous of them. They are getting all this experience, and I’m falling more and more behind. I wish I thought ahead and motivated myself to take these challenging courses. I had the “brains” to, for I finished in the top 10% of my class, and I definitely could have borne the weight of higher-level classes. Motivation. The one thing I wish I had more of in high school. I learned my lesson, and I am happy to say I have a 3.9 GPA after my first college semester. It’s safe to say I’m motivated now.

Michal

Don't try so hard to reinvent yourself. Figuring out who you are is going to take time. Feel free to play with different identities, but make sure that ultimately you are being as authentic as possible. You will find people who like you for you, and you don't have to try to be something you're not.

Jennifer

I would tell myself to breath. That my life will not be over if I do not get into my dream school, that just because I cannot afford a certain place, I can still enjoy where I am. I would tell myself that our circumstances do not define us, it is how we react to them. It's okay that I could not afford the school where I wanted to go because I am going to be happy where I end up. I will make friends at this school, get into clubs, and find new interests. I would also tell myself that it is not going to be easy. There are going to be long nights studying, free time will be limited, and you will have to reach out to make friends, they do not always come to you. Most importantly though, I would remind myself to breath. There is no use getting stressed over things you cannot control and it is okay for things to not go as planned because they lead us to where we belong.

Paige

College is not about warmth or sunshine. It will not matter what letters you wear, the tailgates you attend, or the grades you receive. You’re looking at college all wrong. These things are great but they won’t make your college experience. Even when it's below freezing, if you're passionate about your classes you’ll happily bear the elements. The combination of Greek letters or absence of them altogether on your clothing does not mean “future bridesmaids”. Find the people who make you laugh, interest you, and support you, they won’t be the size of a pledge class but they’ll definitely be your “sisters”. Moreover you don’t play football and tailgates are few and far between; join a club, any club as long as it interests you, it doesn’t need to be a resume booster you just have to love it. Finally a high GPA means nothing if you aren’t challenged by your courses, take that honors class if it looks interesting, college is about learning not a calculation. Going through the motions will not make college the greatest years of your life; involve yourself, challenge yourself, and most importantly enjoy yourself.

Neema

You should know that change is both necessary and inevitable, so try to embrace it as best as you can. Growth is a beautiful, incredibly bittersweet process and there is (I’ve learned) nothing to fear from it. At the end of the day, that’s what you’re here for: to learn, to blossom, and to flourish into whoever it is you decide you’re going to be. Part of that process though, is making mistakes; so be kind to yourself, forgive yourself, and then, keep going. The only thing you’ll regret over these next four years are the things you didn’t do, so make sure you do everything you can; go out on weeknights, dress up for themed parties, attend as many of your university’s sporting events as you can, and always call home at least once a week. Do things you never gave yourself the liberty to do in high school, study abroad, revel in your newfound independence in whatever way you see fit, spend at least one summer on campus, and, perhaps most importantly, when you do finally find your voice – don’t ever be afraid to use it.

Courtney

Don't take the "easy" classes that will fit the requirements. If you want to change careers later and go back to school, those classes probably will transfer to the new major you want. For example, don't take Earth and Space or Geology to get your science requirements out of the way if you think you might want to change into the healthcare field one day. Take Biology or Chemistry, which you will probably actually need.

Cassidy

Do not be afraid to talk to people whenever you first arrive. Everyone is nervous and scared, and desperately wants to make new friends. It may be awkward at first, but it will get easier, and if you do not talk to people, you will regret it. The new found freedom will be exciting, but try not to let it get the best of you. Just becaus you can now stay out until whenever you want or do whatever you want, that does not mean you should go out every weekend, or stay up late on nights before you have early classes. Do not feel pressured to drink alcohol or do drugs just because others are. If they are true friends or truly appreciate who you are, they will respect your decision to abstain. Last but not least, stay in touch with your old friends. Though you are making countless new friends, you cannot forget about the people who have been there for you for years; make sure they know you still care about them and wish to remain friends. Enjoy yourself, but be responsible as well.

David

If I were to go back to my senior year I would tell myself a few things. First, college is going to be completely different than high school and it is definitely not all about studying for the next exam. There is more to the experience and you should make sure you try and take adavantage of that right from the beginning or else you are going to miss out on some memorable freshman experiences that you may not get to experience later. Also, you are going to know almost no one when you get to Pitt so if there is something you want to change about yourself do it this summer and amaze the people you are going to meet with the new you. But, once you get here and meet all your amazing and wonderful new friends do not forget about your friends back home and at other colleges. Make sure to keep in touch with them while you are away or you will lose them in the process. Finally, while you take in everything that is your freshman year learn a few things both inside and outside the classroom to help make yourself a better person.

Taylor

Taylor, the world is your oyster, but here is some wisdom to make college easier. -Commute. My parents weren’t fibbing when they said living at home was financially savvy. Commuting is inconvenient, but taking city buses to school (free with my student ID) saved me over $35,000 in dorm fees. - Choose a school with various majors, a good reputation, and professors who specialize in your interests. A prestigious school doesn’t get you hired, but studying diligently and befriending professors ultimately earn success. - Find scholarships. Collegiate financial aid isn’t guaranteed and is riddled with caveats. Apply for private and niche scholarships which typically receive fewer applications. - Explore your interests. Declaring a major in your first year will likely make you unhappy, flip-flop majors, and have to stay longer to complete coursework. Engage yourself in a diverse learning experience, and declare as a sophomore. - Enjoy student life. College should teach you how to network, make friends, and have fun responsibly; you don’t want to become the library’s resident hermit. Joining clubs, volunteering, and midnight Frisbee tournaments relieve stress and improve résumés. Follow my advice and everything will fall into place. Hail to Pitt!

Asia

Remember where you are from, and remember that many kids would love to be in your position. Do not take this opportunity for granted, and always think of the amazing things you will be able to do for you country. Remember that the Marshall Islands needs you and all of your future coworkers and assets. Go to college not only for yourself, but also for your home because it is what makes you unique and the strong college student you will be. Going to college has its many different reasons, but the most important is making sure you end up with a career where you find yourself the happiest person. College is your ticket to freedom and being able to make choices based on your beliefs without the authorization of others. Although it will be a hard and long journey, you will be happy you did all that work for yourself. Life is a challenge of the pursuit of happiness, and it is in the hands of ourselves that it will be accomplished.

Brianna

If I could go back in time and talk to myself as a high school senior, I would tell myself that I would have to seriously hone in on my stuy habits and improve them. When I was in high school, I hardly ever studied, and I would still get As on most of my tests and in all of my classes. I never actually read the chapter we were covering in the book, and I was able to do the bare minimum and still get As. When I got to college, though, I realized I had absolutely no clue how to study, or even do homework, for that matter, because it was completely differenf from high school. I would tell myself to start doing all of the things I do now to study--read my books, take detailed notes, review often, and stay on top of my assignments (which means getting them done early in college and on time in high school). If I had already had great study skills when I entered college, the transition from high school senior to college freshman would have been MUCH easier, so that is what I would tell myself.

Kailey

I would tell myself that time goes by so fast. Having an education and putting forth your best effort in your academics is important, but you also need enjoy your college years. Find ways to involve study time and meet new people. Join clubs and other groups to meet new people and have the opportunity to meet your possible life long friends. College is what you make it. If you don't put yourself out there, then you may not enjoy it as much as if you were to involve yourself in activites through the college. I would tell myself to enjoy every minute of the next chapter of your life. Don't let it pass you by and work hard to study and meet new people.

Dominika

You are going to change no matter where you go. Don't be afraid of trying new things because that's what you should do. This is the time when you'll find out who you are and what you want to do and if it goes against what your parents wanted you to do, so be it. Explore your potentual, take the classes that interest you and just have fun and don't stress out too much. And if you do stress out, go seek out help whether it's through friends or a professional. They're there to help you. Not everyone in your life is out to get you so stop being afraid and start being awesome.

Amanda

I would strongly encourage myself to get involved on campus as soon as possible, and to remain open to new things. The University of Pittsburgh is the kind of place that truly allows students to discover and pursue their passions, even ones they might not have known about. When I got to college, I immediately joined the same kinds of activities I did in high school, which were music-based. However, during my sophomore year I opened myself up to new experiences and found a love for community service, leadership development, and mentoring. Though I still loved music, I remained in one music group (orchestra) and invested my time in other activities. Looking back, I would advise myself to come out of my shell more quickly, and to not be afraid to push my limits and grow as an individual and member of the Pittsburgh community.

Rhiannon

You should be filling out your applications right now. Yes, at the beginning of the school year; those essays are going to need that long. You can't afford to go out of state, so don't even try. Volunteer more. Start working. Join more clubs. Take the SAT one more time. Socialize a bit. At least pretend that you're going to improve your work ethic. Hug mom more.

Taylor

Taylor, Do not be afraid to explore subjects you wrote off in high school, especially the biological sciences. The teachers and experiences you had in high school tainted your view of them, and you shouldn't sell yourself short becuase of those past obstacles. Take biology classes, take chemistry classes; learn what you really love to learn and run with it. Also, don't let anyone tell you that there is a certain path to take to graduate or to get into the major that you want, or even to get the job you want. It's okay to not know what you want, and finding out what you do want is the most interesting part of the college experience, so embrace it, don't shy away from it because you are anxious about being "on track." Most importantly, never stop loving and appreciating yourself; it will get you through any and all other hardships you could encounter. Love, Taylor

Brittany

Knowing what I know now about college, as a Junior, I would tell my high school senior self to get involved in campus activities and to not be afraid of doing something you've never tried. College is supposed to be a new exprience in which you make life-long friends, and experience life-changing events. It may seem like a scary concept to step outside of your confort zone but I can promise that it will be worth it in the end. You don't want to get to your senior year or even post-graduation and think "what if?" It's important to take advantage of the opportunities presented and make them your own. Finally, be yourself and remain humble. In college, it can be easy to get away from yourself. Freedom has the power to change people but you want to make sure you're changing for the better. College is just the beginning so make it something great to remember!

Stephanie

First, I would tell myself that you really need to take it slow and enjoy senior year with all the friends that I had. I would tell myself that you need to make sure that you make the effort to keep in touch with your closest friends because they are the ones you can go to about almost anything. I would tell myself to take a deep breath when you think something isn't going your way, and wanting to go home isn't the right choice and shouldn't be an option. You need to learn to take the time to sort things out and you'll realize that everything will work out in the end. You shouldn't go running home when it gets tough, this is the time to really begin to live your own life and learn to deal with problems and situations on your own. I would also tell myself to remember to stop for a minute and enjoy every second you have in college because you're here for four years and it goes by in the blink of an eye. Never take a single day for granted and just enjoy.

Kelsey

You're going to stress and worrry and that's fine, but just know it will work out and be ok. Just be true to yourself and do what you love.

Leah

My first piece of advice to my high school self as a college freshman is to stop and listen. I would love to go back to hear and remember some of the pre-game locker room speeches that my basketball coach told us girls before we went out onto that court. My coach inspired me to play with my whole heart and not play for myself, but rather be a leader and encourage my teammates and fans. The second piece of advice that I would offer to my high school self is to remember who your friends are. Those true friends will always have your back and you should not betray them for people who act like your friends. You need people to have your back and you will make new friends in college, but the ones that you have known since you were three years old are irreplaceable so do not let them out of your life. Finally, I would advise my high school self to take in every moment and write it down, because you will experience a vast amount of excitement, disappointment, hurt, and love in life. You do not want to miss or forget any moment.

Bria

The advice that I would give myself would be to develop an effective studying routine. I’ve learned in my first year of college that you have to be able to retain and recover the information you’re taught. In high school, I didn’t really study because the work was easy but now in college the work is much harder and when I try to study I find my method difficult. This is because I never practiced a method in high school, so in a sense I don’t really know the best way for myself to study. If I was able to go back and start a studying routine as a senior it would definitely help me and as a result improve my grades. I have learned that effective studying routines are the only way you will succeed at the college level and the earlier you develop this routine, the better you will be at the next level.

Chelsea

I would tell myself to always be open to opportunities to expand my knowledge and skills. I would tell myself to never pass up a chance to better myself out of fear of failure or rejection. I would tell myself to apply to as many scholarships as possible because they are worth more than I could ever imagine. I would tell myself to hold true to my beliefs and convictions no matter who is standing in opposition.

Angela

College is the beginning of your life - it's when you can start making your own choices. Listen to your heart, and follow it, no matter how bad an idea everyone else thinks it is. Being an adult is better than you can possibly imagine. Even parts that are awful are so much better than high school. Breathe deep, and know you're almost there, you're doing a great job, and it's going to get so much better.

Katherine

Similar to most freshmen, my biggest fear was being alone in a new school. The number one advice addressing this fear was to get involved. This is great advice, but my recommendation is much more compelling: Take a Risk. Most freshmen do get involved, but I have seen firsthand that many retreat from more competitive and demanding activities, including joining sororities or applying for leadership positions. Well, I followed my own advice; I took a risk and it paid off! While visiting the University of Pittsburgh, I met several students who were “Pathfinders”- students who represented the school by running tours, giving presentations, and mingling with potential students. These Pathfinders were not only knowledgeable of the University’s resources, but also exhibited the camaraderie and school pride that I found essential in making my decision to attend PITT. I was eager to join this organization but heard it was very competitive. So, I initially decided to wait until sophomore year, but later, felt a surge of confidence and applied. After writing two essays, creating an infomercial, and completing several interviews, I found out I was accepted. So, never be afraid to take a risk; I’m grateful that I did.

Kristin

If I could go back in time, I would have told myself that high school is important! When I was in High school I was too busy doing drugs and hating everyone I came in contact with. Maybe the real problem was I hated myself. I have suffered from depression most of my life and because of that I usually don’t attempt to apply myself, for I am afraid to fail. I never understood that my grades would be affecting me almost ten years later. I usually slept in class because I was too tired from staying out the night before. I’m still not quite sure how I managed to graduate. I am now a single mother working a dead end job, realizing how important an education is. I now aspire to be a Registered Nurse and I hope that I can inspire my daughter to want more out of life than I did.

Michelle

Hello, high school self, I’m your college future. Trust me when I say it doesn’t turn out anything like you think it will. So you know that move that mom and dad have been threatening for years now, well guess what, it happened. Yup, right after you graduate you going to be up and moving out of this state. Yes, yes I know that you think you wont be going with them cause your going to go to 4 year college away from then. I’m sorry to be the one to burst that bubble but you don’t. your going to be going to community college for 2 and a half years. Yes I know that that sound like it sucks but trust me you get some pretty good perks out of it. You do move out of mom and dads place, and into the Florida house and live there for a year and a half. And finally you decide to go to Pitt, yes that school mom always talks about. My only advise is get out there and don’t be afraid of being in new situations. You will eventually find your place, you always do.

christine

If I could go back in time, I would emphasize the importance of time management. I struggled with the course load at first and it took me a whole year to really adjust to it. It is important to make a weekly plan for assignments and get them done in a timely manner.

Angela

A friend once told me “the easiest way to make God laugh is to tell Him your plans.” Well I guess to Him college is 4 years of stand-up comedy. When I entered college I thought I had it all figured out. Yet, as the years went on things started to take on a different form— in both my academic and personal lives. What I thought I knew about myself and where I wanted to go in my life ended up being challenged. College is a time to learn who you are as a young woman. In the midst of classes, friends, and having a good time you will be faced with many different obstacles and presented with many great opportunities. There are times were you are going to want to give up and your near the point of just throwing in the towel. It is in that time that you begin to develop what is called character. It’s what defines you as a person and answers the ultimate question “who am I?” I’ll leave you with a few words from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. “Intelligence plus character—that is the goal of true education.”

Molly

If I was to go back and talk to my high-school senior self, I would tell myself to listen to my mom. She knew exactly what major I should go into, but I didn't want to listen to her and went into one which made me struggle. Once I figured out that she was right in what I should study, my grades and GPA soared. It took me a year to realize what my mom realized a year before I did. Another piece of advice I would give is to do whatever you want (within reason) and don't hesitate. Take the classes that seem interesting to you because you'll regret it if you don't. If you want to study abroad, go. You'll definitely regret not being able to go to Europe by the time you graduated. Go out and make friends; that way you won't be stuck with the crappy roommates you had your junior and senior year. Stay with band, you won't regret it. Most of all, enjoy yourself. You only experience undergrad once, make it memorable. Make it fun. Most of all make it count. You won't regret anything.

MonaLisa

MonaLisa

MonaLisa

don't be scared!!!

MonaLisa

MonaLisa

YUSUF

i thing my advise was going true with young generation who like to study a college for 2yrs or 4yrs make sure if you are not study hurd for high school you will never sacseed a college because i saw the time i am study for college i see so mony peoble site in my class they sey iam finnish high schooll and they doint evan read a grammer for inglish i undrestand america its very hurd to study but if you bond hear in united state atleast you have to spick english so and doint west your time for your high schooll do not sell a drugs athers wys you never servive and you have to undrestand you are the land of apourtunity our god sey you need to bray like you die write now and you need to wark like you life longer thanks and god bless you

Sandra

If I could back in time, I would tell myself to attend a community college. When I was a senior in high school I made the decision to go to a university I really didn't want to go to. After one semester, I transfered into the local community college and was much happier. Also, I would advise myself to take my time and explore my interests before picking a major. Finally, I would tell myself to work hard and stay dedicated to school. Although, the transition from high school to college can be a difficult one hard work and dedication make it much easier.

Timothy

Accept any job and make as much money as possible. Attending a univisersity is too expensive. Also dedicate yourself to reading.

Becky

Our campus lies along and in between two major city roads, Forbes Ave and Fifth Ave. A common trick played on freshmen is, when they ask where something is, to say "at the intersection of Forbes and Fifth." So every freshman should know that the roads are actually parallel!

Adam

The most important thing is time management. There is a lot to do, and not enough time to do it (my biggest problem is always that I don't have time to do everything I want to do, which is a great problem to have). It's important to set your priorities, and make time for them (priorities may include staying in shape, getting good enough grades, making time to hang out...). When you set your priorities, it's important make them realistic, and know that there's always a trade off and opportunity cost to your time. So say you want to get straight A's, know that it'll require a lot of time, and thus you'll have less time for other things (you can get straight A's and still do other things, I'm just saying you can do less of other things). For example, you can't get straight A's, be a member of 3 clubs, volunteer in 2 labs and a hospital, play video games, and follow 3 tv shows. In addition to setting realistic goals, it's important to use your time efficiently and not procrastinate. Another important thing is to figure out the best way to learn in a class. Every class and professor is different, and you should keep an open mind and try out a few methods of note taking, studying etc., decide on what works best, and use that. For example, different ways of note taking may include pen and paper, printing out lecture slides and writing on them, and using your laptop. There are also many ways to study, including reading over lecture notes to identify what you are shaky on, and then going over that, reading the textbook, making review sheets, doing practice problems, watching khanacademy.com or youtube videos, going to office hours, using free tutoring services, studying with friends. Again, your time is limited and you can't do this all, so figure out what works best for each class, and use it. Socially, I'd recommend (especially in the beginning) being friendly and introducing yourself to people. Everyone is in the same shoes and is looking to make friends, and lots of people will go introduce themselves to random people(so it's definitely not weird to approach strangers to introduce yourself). I'd especially recommend doing this to people you'll likely see a lot, such as kids on your floor, in your classes, who you meet doing something you like (ex. playing basketball) etc. You can always meet new people and make new friends, but the beginning of freshman year is the best time to do so. Edit: Keep your door open too, especially in the beginning. Its a great way to meet people and make friends.

Adam

The most important thing is time management. There is a lot to do, and not enough time to do it (my biggest problem is always that I don't have time to do everything I want to do, which is a great problem to have). It's important to set your priorities, and make time for them (priorities may include staying in shape, getting good enough grades, making time to hang out...). When you set your priorities, it's important make them realistic, and know that there's always a trade off and opportunity cost to your time. So say you want to get straight A's, know that it'll require a lot of time, and thus you'll have less time for other things (you can get straight A's and still do other things, I'm just saying you can do less of other things). For example, you can't get straight A's, be a member of 3 clubs, volunteer in 2 labs and a hospital, play video games, and follow 3 tv shows. In addition to setting realistic goals, it's important to use your time efficiently and not procrastinate. Another important thing is to figure out the best way to learn in a class. Every class and professor is different, and you should keep an open mind and try out a few methods of note taking, studying etc., decide on what works best, and use that. For example, different ways of note taking may include pen and paper, printing out lecture slides and writing on them, and using your laptop. There are also many ways to study, including reading over lecture notes to identify what you are shaky on, and then going over that, reading the textbook, making review sheets, doing practice problems, watching khanacademy.com or youtube videos, going to office hours, using free tutoring services, studying with friends. Again, your time is limited and you can't do this all, so figure out what works best for each class, and use it. Socially, I'd recommend (especially in the beginning) being friendly and introducing yourself to people. Everyone is in the same shoes and is looking to make friends, and lots of people will go introduce themselves to random people(so it's definitely not weird to approach strangers to introduce yourself). I'd especially recommend doing this to people you'll likely see a lot, such as kids on your floor, in your classes, who you meet doing something you like (ex. playing basketball) etc. You can always meet new people and make new friends, but the beginning of freshman year is the best time to do so.

Ally

Go with your gut and do what you want to do. Take the time and chances given to go out and make new friends and just go up and talk to people. Sit next to people in class because they're looking for friends too. And you know what? If you miss a lecture, you'll still be okay. Keep in touch with your high school friends and make new friends too. And it will all be worth it in the end. Also, consider social work now so you don't find yourself unable to finish that major in time :D

Rebecca

If I had the oppurtunity to go back and talk to myself as a senior in high school and would make sure I told myself that it does get easier with time. Moving out on your own and transitioning into college life is hard, but its also a really great expirience. I would tell myself to be more out-going and more open-minded about the girls that I was living with. I would tell myself that its okay to talk to some random quiet girl in the dorms because she is going through the exact same thing. It isnt as awkward as you think it will be to meet new people. Everyone is in the same boat at you so everyone wants to make friends just as badly as you. Don't be afraid to step out of your comfort zone, college is where you will learn who you really are. And if will also be where you find your true friends. Stay in touch with your friends from high school but dont depend on them. Call your family every day because they do miss you, and its okay to be homesick. You can do it!

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