Rochester, NY
University of Rochester


109 Ratings

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Recent Reviews

Rosemary
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

College is something that most people spend a majority of their adolescent lives preparing for. You take the hardest courses...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

College is something that most people spend a majority of their adolescent lives preparing for. You take the hardest courses, participate in every possible activity, and spend hours in volunteer and leadership opportunities to become the perfect candidate. Choosing a college is one of the biggest decisions you will ever make in your life (no pressure though). The most important thing you as a student can do is visit your colleges of choice. Eat a meal in the cafeteria, check out the library, the student center, and of course a classroom or two. Wander off the beaten path of the tour. Talk to current students, and ask them questions. Try to picture yourself on those grounds. Choose the college that feels right to you. Do not choose a school because all of your friends are going there or because your parents went there. Choose it because it fits who you are, and who you will someday become.

What kind of person should attend this school?

Young adults who are willing to work hard in order to succeed should attend the University of Rochester. Here, you will be surrounded by students who are driven to achieve. Although we are competitive, we believe that we can still be compassionate at the same time. If you can handle both, the the University of Rochester is the place for you. Be warned, however, that you must be able to stand the cold and snow.

What's the most frustrating thing about your school?

Freshman weeder courses can be frustrating. While not exactly labeled as "weeder," they have a tendency to annoy many students out of a particular field. We don't like being taught that everything we've ever learned in Biology is wrong. Some professors also tend to ask some off the wall questions during tests that nobody has a clue how to answer, so watch out.

Michelle
Describe the students at your school.

My classmates are genuinely interested in academic topics half the time, sometimes stressed out, and ready to hang out and ha...

Describe the students at your school.

My classmates are genuinely interested in academic topics half the time, sometimes stressed out, and ready to hang out and have fun the rest of the time.

Describe your favorite campus traditions.

My school is best known as a research university, although it is also the prominent school for Optics, and has many pre-Med and psychology students.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Make sure that picking a college/major is based on the student's talents, preferences, and interests, not the parent's expectations. The best fit is where you find other students with a similar academic mindset, classes gauged to your level of difficulty and personalization, and a living arrangement that is comfortable for you. The best decisions can be made once they are prayed about. As a freshman you will find yourself with an unexpected boldness to make new friends and try new things, which will become less natural as a sophomore and beyond, but you will desire to maintain it. Be careful to learn how to live well as you are more on your own and challenge yourself to move forward and learn new life skills as you master old ones. Take opportunities to find and stay connected with similarly interested people, including your family, new friends, and old friends. Remember that your education is a blessing, so take your academic work seriously, but enjoy it and give yourself room to make helpful mistakes. Trust that God will help you wherever you go and don't be afraid of / resistant to changes that might bring you better things.

Eric
What kind of person should not attend this school?

Jocks, people who want to be able to party more than two nights a week, visual artists, extremely conservative religious peop...

What kind of person should not attend this school?

Jocks, people who want to be able to party more than two nights a week, visual artists, extremely conservative religious people, anyone desiring less than 50 people in their non-humanities classes, anyone desiring a high degree of ethnic diversity (while the UR undergrad population contains many East Asians and South Asians, Hispanics and blacks are sorely missing and the East Asian population keeps mostly to itself), anyone who dislikes gray and rainy/snowy weather 2/3 of their academic year, and anyone who wants a school with popular sporting events.

What kind of person should attend this school?

1) Would-be natural scientists, mathetmaticans, social scientists, engineers, doctors, lawyers, and anyone else who sees a strong program here that matches their interests. 2) Anyone interested in the extreme flexibility offered by the lack of general education requirements - double majors are generally easy to do and triple majors are much more feasible than they are at other schools of similar caliber.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

The college search can be a confusing and stressful journey, but the rewards for being thorough and honest with yourself are four years of opportunities. Looking for the right information now will help you arrive at a school that gives you the academic, social, and personal chances for growth that you want while avoiding the financial and personal disappointments you don't. Here are three tips that will help you make a better decision. First, there is more than one school out there that meets your needs. You don't NEED to go to an Ivy or to a Top Ten state school with a zillion Division I teams. If you think you do, then consider whether there are specific properties those schools have (that you could find elsewhere!) or whether you are simply caught up in a dream of glittering generalities and wishes. Second, don't rule out private schools as "too expensive." Private schools rarely charge sticker price tuition and may (as in my middle-class family's case) be cheaper than public schools. Finally, come up with a list of academic, geographic, and social/extracurricular criteria. Find out as much as you can about each candidate college!

Maryam
Describe the students at your school.

They are mostly pre-med and pre-law.

Describe the students at your school.

They are mostly pre-med and pre-law.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I would say that more than anything, you should look for a campus that seems friendly, open, and financially affordable. In addition, base your distance on your independence level; if you haven't been too far from home for the past 17 or 18 years, now is not the time to suddenly move 3,000 miles away from your parents. Look at the students in that school; would you be able to fit in with them? Most importantly, don't come away from college tours expecting everything that your guide said to be true. A large portion of their speech is pure exaggeration. No student has perfect college experience. When you begin college, some things will go wrong - these are just opportunities to grow. Just pick a college that is, over-all, a good match for your personality and your financial level. Then, it is up to you to use the tools the college makes available to create the best possible college experience - it's up to you.

What do you consider the worst thing about your school? Why?

There are too many cutthroat pre-med students who exaggerate their accomplishments and attempt to get on the professors' good sides through tactics that annoy the rest of the class.

Susana
Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

The diversity at my school and open curriculum is unique at my school. There are a variety of enthicities on campus including...

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

The diversity at my school and open curriculum is unique at my school. There are a variety of enthicities on campus including faculty members who work for the university. As far as open curriculum there is only one class that a student is required to take all four years of undergrad, most of the other schools had many required classes.

What kind of person should not attend this school?

A kind of person that is looking for a school with a big party life should not attend this school. U of R has many frats and sororities but the party life is not as big as schools it is for schools like Syracuse.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

The advice I would give parents about helping their child find the right college and making the most of their experience is to not be bias and allow the student to make their own decision. Financially discuss with the student how much can be spent toward their education. Encourage the student to be active around campus joining clubs, sports teams, student government, and even getting a job. Remind students that,"the purpose of the university is to make students safe for ideas-not ideas safe for students" (Clark Kerr). I would advise students to choose a school that they feel most comfortable with when visiting and that offers everything they are are looking for in a college. This will be a place where they will be spending most of their time for four years so never settle for something less than what they want. A list of pros and cons often helps. Once in college a student should get involved around campus and make an effort to learn new things. I had a great time in the clubs I joined and met alot of great people so it is definetely worth your time. Not only study hard, but have fun!

Claudia
Describe your favorite campus traditions.

It is probably best known for it's prestigious science departments (great school for anyone wanting to go into medicine) and ...

Describe your favorite campus traditions.

It is probably best known for it's prestigious science departments (great school for anyone wanting to go into medicine) and political science department (one of the top in the nation). It is also very well-known for being a New Ivy League (listed in Newsweek).

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I believe it's important to research a school before and apply to schools that offer a variety of options for new students who may or may not what they are interested in studying. It is also very important to visit a school in order to see if it's a good fit for you.

What's the one thing you wish someone had told you about freshman year?

I wish I would have known more about how much time is spent doing schoolwork. It varies from one major to the next--my major, political science, has a lot more reading than I anticipated.

Andrea
What's the one thing you wish someone had told you about freshman year?

Being involved makes life a lot more fun and helps you meet people Don't live with someone with a different sleep schedule th...

What's the one thing you wish someone had told you about freshman year?

Being involved makes life a lot more fun and helps you meet people Don't live with someone with a different sleep schedule than you. I go to bed at the same time my roommate wakes up!

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Make sure to think about your needs three years or so from now, and not just what you're looking for freshman year (this is easiest to keep in mind) and your career plans (these will most likely change). How will you grow and change, and how will this affect what you'll be looking for while still an undergrad, but in a few years? The steps to declaring a major or finding internships, leadership opportunities available, and living in upperclass housing are just as important as what orientation is like and how the college fits into your planned career path. One thing that I never read about in advice books, but that I have found to be important, is access to necessities: at each school, how easy is it to find and purchase YOUR PREFERRED BRAND of shampoo, cold medicine, etc.? This seems like a minor detail but really affects day-to-day life. In terms of success in college, it's important to learn about your own learning style. Do you do better taking notes in class, or recording what's said? Rereading notes, explaining them verbally, or writing study guides? Try different methods and see what works.

Leah
Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

There was a flexible curriculum allowing you to take classes you were interested in rather than required courses. The campus ...

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

There was a flexible curriculum allowing you to take classes you were interested in rather than required courses. The campus was beautiful also isolated from the city with beautiful scenery and bike trails and a river for the crew team. Yet the campus was a short distance from the city's best attractions.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I'd advise doing thorough research on potential schools and visititing schools. During your visit, interact with current students and possibly professors, and bring a list of questions with you. Find out as much as you can about student life on campus, academic cirriculum, and extracirricular activities. Then weigh the school's advantages and disadvantages based on what's important to you. A strong personal essay can be very advantageous at many schools, so put a lot of effort into it and make sure it reflects who you are and your pursuits. Also, apply to schools "safety schools", several schools that seem like a "good fit" (sufficiently academically challening), and then a few "reach" schools. Most importantly, don't not apply to a school you want to go to just because you're afraid of getting rejected or someone says you can't. My guidance counselor in high school said that I would never get into my best fit school because "people from here don't go to places like that." I not only got accepted but received several scholarships from the university. Know what you're capable and but don't ever let anyone cause you to doubt yourself.

What kind of person should attend this school?

Someone who is incredibly focused, can learn independently, interested in research, and has a strong sense of their career goals. U of R is particularly strong in the sciences, music, and research. The school courages students to pursue their studies beyond undergraduate studies and give back at a global level. The school is academically challenging and most people live on campus, creating a sense of community.

Lilly
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Take the time to find the right school for you. I was so ready to go to college, I accepted one that I wasn't that intereste...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Take the time to find the right school for you. I was so ready to go to college, I accepted one that I wasn't that interested in after I got rejected from my top choice. I wasn't very happy my freshman year and ended up transfering. I love the school I'm at now. It's the perfect size, atmosphere etc. for me. But I should have been here my whole four years. I should have taken a year or a semester to travel or work and find a place where I would really fit in. College can be a big change for some people, and there's no reason to rush it for someplace that's less than perfect for you. Take you time at school visits, go back a second time if you need to. Don't just settle for a school to get out of home and into college. Make sure you set yourself up for four years at your perfects school.

What's the one thing you wish someone had told you about freshman year?

How close to an airport it was. I was really worried about not getting home from upstate NY, so I almost went to school closer to home (NC). The campus is a 5min ride to the airport, and the school runs shuttles. Its also a $10 cab ride to the airport or train station. Getting home couldn't be any easier.

What do you consider the worst thing about your school? Why?

I get tired of being cold. A lot of people fall in love with this school in July. You should really visit in January, so you know what it's going to be like. I love the snow and really love going sledding between classes, but if you don't like that, don't come here.

Details

  • Enrollment
  • 6,177
  • Tuition & Fees
  • $45,372
  • Acceptance rate
  • 35%

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