Rochester, NY
University of Rochester


115 Ratings

On-Campus Housing

Off-Campus Housing

Campus Food

Campus Facilities

Class Size

Activities

Local Services

Academics

You may be eligible! These Lenders offer loans to students who attend University of Rochester

disclosure
*Results provided by SimpleTuition.
SimpleTuition is an independent comparison site and is not affiliated with colleges or universities that may be referenced in these results. Loan offers from participating lenders that appear also have no affiliation with any college or university referenced. Not all lenders participate in our site and lenders that do participate may not offer loans to every school. We remind users that there are many additional borrowing options available - use SimpleTuition as part of your larger quest for college financing. Shop around and make the choice that's best for you and maximize use of grants and federal aid options whenever possible. We may receive transaction or referral fees when a user selects a product from a partner lender or advertiser. Our company mission is based on the premise that choice and transparency are good. There is no additional cost to a user who selects a loan presented by one of our partners.

Recent Reviews

Alice
What is your overall opinion of this school?

The school is definitely a bubble, you won't get off campus much without a car. It's a study hard during the week, party hard...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

The school is definitely a bubble, you won't get off campus much without a car. It's a study hard during the week, party hard on the weekends type school. After the "new ivy" ranking, the administration has tried to crack down on the social scene. There's zero school pride in athletics, most people have never gone to a game for anything. Lots of diversity, lots of things to do for fun partying and otherwise.

Describe the students at your school.

Fairly nerdy but social and friendly. There is some racial diversity, lots of Asians, Indians and some African Americans. They are more noticeable around campus than in classes. Most people are either liberal or Libertarians. Everyone I've met has been up for friendly debate about issues and are socially aware.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

I'll be sad to leave in May but as the administration keeps cracking down on the party scene there won't be much left. It's cold. Colder and snowier than anything you could imagine. If you haven't lived this far north you are in for a surprise. Buy boots, scarves and a good winter coat. People wear uggs for a reason here. I've known girls who went out with their cute heels on and came home with frostbite.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

The nerdy part is true. As for rich most people are middle class and up, but there's quite a few people from lower income families. The financial aid packages are pretty generous.

What are the academics like at your school?

Lots of students are very type A and they work for good grades. It's a friendly competitive most students wouldn't hesitate to help each other out. Classes range widely in size I've taken a large 101 class with 90 people and a 200 level English class with 4 people. The cluster system is awesome. There's only one general education requirement a writing class, taken during your freshman year. After that you need to take 3 related classes in each field Humanities, Social Science and Natural Science. Your major covers one field and after that it's up to you. It's hard to end up taking many classes you don't like. Designing your own major or minor is really easy. Unless you are in engineering there's plenty of time for electives or going abroad. There's lots of cool classes on the history of rock, porn, fairy tales which can serve as a break in a science heavy schedule. There's lots of opportunity for internships and my resume is much better for having attended a research university. Professors in the Natural Sciences aren't easy to get a hold of and aren't that helpful. Every other area my professors have been really easy to talk to whenever I had a problem.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Music and theater groups are very present. There's shows a couple times a month on campus. It's easy to get over to Eastman to see the philharmonic. Greek life isn't a huge deal. If you are a part of it it does enhance your social calendar. But if you aren't its not a big deal and most fraternity parties are open anyway. Nobody cares about sports. There's lots of hooking up, not a lot of people date. It's by choice or self imposed social isolation. Most people meet significant others from class or through friends. The bars are fun and are a short drive from campus. There's a lot of sketchy locals so if you are female go in a group. The hard part is finding someone willing to stay sober to drive back.

Erika
What is your overall opinion of this school?

The size of Rochester is pretty amazing- small enough to give you personalized attention, but large enough to have decent res...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

The size of Rochester is pretty amazing- small enough to give you personalized attention, but large enough to have decent resources and great aid. When I say I go to UR, most people, especially in academic circles, are really impressed. Alot of people not in academic circles think we're RIT. WE'RE NOT. We're way better. There's a lot of school pride- maybe not in the traditional sense of athletics, but in our school itself. Students wear a ton of UR clothes, and are really proud to be here. It gives us a great sense of community. On campus, I spend most of my time in Gleason, which is this awesome part of our library that was designed by students. It's technically a study area, but it's really more of a socializing/studying place. It's really fun, and really a great place to chill with friends and even maybe get some work done. There's not really a college town feeling, but there's plenty to do in Rochester. We're home of the original garbage plate (if you've never had one, they sound completely disgusting. If you've had one, you know they're amazing), and have a great music and theatre scene. There's lots of cute little diners and coffee shops in the city, but none are really within walking distance. However, the bus system here is really amazing. I go off campus quite a bit, and it's not difficult at all to find buses. They're a great resource. The only real complaint about Rochester (except maybe the price) is the meal plan. Our food is by no means great, and it's really expensive. But we do have some good places, and you learn where to go, and more importantly, where not to go pretty quickly. Hint: stay away from Danforth. Another hint: Douglass is pretty much the best place on campus to eat. Several people have told me we have the largest Starbuck's on a college campus- I'm not sure that's true, but it is a really nice one, and has pretty much all the options of a full Starbucks. Hillside, a little cafe in Sue B Residence Hall, now has panini's, which are delicious and made fresh when you order them, but because of that, there can sometimes be quite a line. That's new this year though, so maybe eventually they'll stop being so incredibly popular. One experience I'll always remember..... there are a million. But my first really great memory was Yellowjacket weekend, which is sort of a kickoff to the school year. You get a free "jersey", and there's a full fledge carnival. It was really fun, and msot of the school shows up. Like I said, everyone's really happy to be here.

Describe the students at your school.

We're not the most diverse school you'll ever find, but we do have a lot of international students. They're a really great presence here. Most of the people I've encountered have been Jewish, and fairly wealthy, but as I am neither, it's not like you don't fit in here if you don't have money. Most people geniunely don't seem to notice your family's socio-economic status. I don't think anyone would feel out of place here- we're a very accepting place. We have a fairly moderate political standing, that leans to the left; but we are a college campus after all. Most students don't really discuss their future earnings, but there are going to be some obnoxious people wherever you are. However, they are definitely a very small minority here.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

Rochester has a great community. If you're considering coming here, visit. Do an overnight stay. That was my deciding factor. The people are really friendly and helpful- people will hold doors for you if you have your hands full, will help you out with studying if you ask, etc. I can't really picture myself anywhere else. Everyone talks about the winters, but it really is a gorgeous campus, even in the snow. Honestly, it is hard work, but if you can get in, then you can probably handle it.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

No! Ok, we are pretty nerdy here, but we're more like the really relaxed nerds- we do study hard, but we're not obsessive about it. And the social thing is ridiculous. There's a million things to do on campus! We're not RIT, we're New Ivy. lol

What are the academics like at your school?

This one is sort of hard, because it really depends on your major. This year, as a freshman mind you, I have a literature class with 6 people in it. It's completely amazing. However, I also have a logic lecture course with about 50 people in it, and it's probably second only to the 6 person class. And then there are a lot of classes in between. Obviously the Natural Science courses are larger- the Humanities division is much more likely to have small classes. But I've never heard of a class here with over 200 people, which is really small compared to some schools. Class participation is encouraged by all the professors I've encountered, but obviously I can't speak for all. The curriculum is Rochester's number one draw. There are three divisions, Humanities (think English, Women's Studies, Philosophy, etc), Social Sciences (Anthropology, History, Political Science) and Natural Sciences (sciences and math). You obviously need to major in one of these, and your major will have certain requirements based on what it is (English and History are probably the two most flexible; some of the sciences leave virtually no extra time for other classes), and you need to complete a "cluster" of three related courses in the other two divisions. It's really relaxed, and I love it. General education sounds absolutely terrible, and I'm so glad we don't have it here. Students are competitive, but not in a bad way. We don't attack each other to make ourselves look good. It's more like "let's have an intellectual conversation". I've heard a few intellectual conversations going on in the halls and on the quad, but I don't think they're really common. Then again, I doubt they are at many universities. There's a pretty large amount of work that goes into our classes, and once the homework is done you need a break.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

A capella is really prevalent here- we have really great groups that are pretty famous and travel all over. Our most popular one is all-male, and is called the Midnight Ramblers. They travel a lot, and have made a ton of CD's. They've also been featured on a lot of random mainstream music. They're amazing. However, all music and theatre is pretty dominant here. There's a really cool artsy vibe in certain circles, and while most require auditions, there's always something for you to do that's true to your passion. The dating scene..... eh, no school has great typical dating. It consists of mostly hookups at frat parties. People here are truly of the opinion that you should study hard, party hard. During the week the scene is pretty dead, but on the weekends frats are very popular. However, if drinking isn't your thing, there's a ton to do on campus, and there are a million people like you. The party scene gets a lot of hype, but it's not like there's nothing else to do on a saturday night.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

That we're extremely nerdy, never go out, aren't very social, etc. That we're part of RIT

Tim
Describe the students at your school.

By far the most diverse group of geniuses, in their own way, that one school can have.

Describe the students at your school.

By far the most diverse group of geniuses, in their own way, that one school can have.

What kind of person should attend this school?

Someone who is admant about learning, but doesn't want to lose the fun of social life. Friendship and Academics are the two most fundemental parts of this university. Friends you make here will help you through thick and thin, without any questions asked. If you are ready to suceed and want to do so with honor and comradery, then this is the school for you.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

You have to look for a school that not only is academically awesome, but you also need to find a school that you could see yourself living at. If you wouldn't build a house on your campus or you don't see yourself enjoying the area, then don't go. Academics is important, but so is your happiness.

Sasami
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Since I knew my senior year of high school (and a while before) that I wanted to study classical music, I researched a specif...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Since I knew my senior year of high school (and a while before) that I wanted to study classical music, I researched a specific and small list of colleges and conservatories that had strong programs in classical music. One thing that is VERY important is to find a school that has a strong program for the subject that you plan on studying, not necessarily highly regarded in general. Also visiting and getting a grasp for the community the school is in helps a lot too (particularly if you can get a tour from an honest, non-biased, current student). Also, it is never too early to start looking up scholarships and applying for them! College is expensive and they are giving out less and less financial aid so it is important to be proactive about finding alternate sources of funding.

What's the one thing you wish someone had told you about freshman year?

That it gets so hot in Rochester, NY near and during summer time.

Terence
Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

The University of Rochester is probably the only college I would have felt at home at.

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

The University of Rochester is probably the only college I would have felt at home at.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

It isn't about one specific statistic, or price, or class size. It is more than that, and it takes a combination of those factors that create what I call the 'home' factor. A place could be perfect on paper but not in real life. Visit the school you want, find out all you can, and TALK to other students. They won't lie most of the time. But enjoy the process, and you'll know when a palce fits right. You may not find it the first semester, or the second or third school even. But you will find it.

Stephanie
What's the most frustrating thing about your school?

Students here tend to form clics very quickly, so meeting new people after freshman year can prove difficult. Additionally, ...

What's the most frustrating thing about your school?

Students here tend to form clics very quickly, so meeting new people after freshman year can prove difficult. Additionally, meeting people is challenging without getting drunk on the weekends at the fraternity houses.

What kind of person should not attend this school?

People who are looking for a big party scene, as this school is extremely academically focused. I have known some politically active students to express discontent at the level of social awareness on campus, as well. Finally, any student not going into the science field may want to search elsewhere; while the liberal arts education is good, there are just not that many students taking those classes here. As a result, finding friends who share your intellectual interests is problematic and potentially depressing.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Don't place too much emphasis on the tours of colleges; a lot of the guides have been trained to answer questions and may not give their own honest opinion of the school. If the college offers it, definitely try to stay over night with a student. This ensures that you will get an honest opinion and have a chance to form one of your own. As for making the most of your college experience, don't let the academics dominate your life. Colleges offer a lot of entertainment (lectures, movies, performances, etc) right on your campus, and you only have 4 years to take advantage of it. Be active on your campus; it's the best way to actually meet people and make friends.

Rosemary
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

College is something that most people spend a majority of their adolescent lives preparing for. You take the hardest courses...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

College is something that most people spend a majority of their adolescent lives preparing for. You take the hardest courses, participate in every possible activity, and spend hours in volunteer and leadership opportunities to become the perfect candidate. Choosing a college is one of the biggest decisions you will ever make in your life (no pressure though). The most important thing you as a student can do is visit your colleges of choice. Eat a meal in the cafeteria, check out the library, the student center, and of course a classroom or two. Wander off the beaten path of the tour. Talk to current students, and ask them questions. Try to picture yourself on those grounds. Choose the college that feels right to you. Do not choose a school because all of your friends are going there or because your parents went there. Choose it because it fits who you are, and who you will someday become.

What kind of person should attend this school?

Young adults who are willing to work hard in order to succeed should attend the University of Rochester. Here, you will be surrounded by students who are driven to achieve. Although we are competitive, we believe that we can still be compassionate at the same time. If you can handle both, the the University of Rochester is the place for you. Be warned, however, that you must be able to stand the cold and snow.

What's the most frustrating thing about your school?

Freshman weeder courses can be frustrating. While not exactly labeled as "weeder," they have a tendency to annoy many students out of a particular field. We don't like being taught that everything we've ever learned in Biology is wrong. Some professors also tend to ask some off the wall questions during tests that nobody has a clue how to answer, so watch out.

Michelle
Describe the students at your school.

My classmates are genuinely interested in academic topics half the time, sometimes stressed out, and ready to hang out and ha...

Describe the students at your school.

My classmates are genuinely interested in academic topics half the time, sometimes stressed out, and ready to hang out and have fun the rest of the time.

Describe your favorite campus traditions.

My school is best known as a research university, although it is also the prominent school for Optics, and has many pre-Med and psychology students.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Make sure that picking a college/major is based on the student's talents, preferences, and interests, not the parent's expectations. The best fit is where you find other students with a similar academic mindset, classes gauged to your level of difficulty and personalization, and a living arrangement that is comfortable for you. The best decisions can be made once they are prayed about. As a freshman you will find yourself with an unexpected boldness to make new friends and try new things, which will become less natural as a sophomore and beyond, but you will desire to maintain it. Be careful to learn how to live well as you are more on your own and challenge yourself to move forward and learn new life skills as you master old ones. Take opportunities to find and stay connected with similarly interested people, including your family, new friends, and old friends. Remember that your education is a blessing, so take your academic work seriously, but enjoy it and give yourself room to make helpful mistakes. Trust that God will help you wherever you go and don't be afraid of / resistant to changes that might bring you better things.

Eric
What kind of person should not attend this school?

Jocks, people who want to be able to party more than two nights a week, visual artists, extremely conservative religious peop...

What kind of person should not attend this school?

Jocks, people who want to be able to party more than two nights a week, visual artists, extremely conservative religious people, anyone desiring less than 50 people in their non-humanities classes, anyone desiring a high degree of ethnic diversity (while the UR undergrad population contains many East Asians and South Asians, Hispanics and blacks are sorely missing and the East Asian population keeps mostly to itself), anyone who dislikes gray and rainy/snowy weather 2/3 of their academic year, and anyone who wants a school with popular sporting events.

What kind of person should attend this school?

1) Would-be natural scientists, mathetmaticans, social scientists, engineers, doctors, lawyers, and anyone else who sees a strong program here that matches their interests. 2) Anyone interested in the extreme flexibility offered by the lack of general education requirements - double majors are generally easy to do and triple majors are much more feasible than they are at other schools of similar caliber.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

The college search can be a confusing and stressful journey, but the rewards for being thorough and honest with yourself are four years of opportunities. Looking for the right information now will help you arrive at a school that gives you the academic, social, and personal chances for growth that you want while avoiding the financial and personal disappointments you don't. Here are three tips that will help you make a better decision. First, there is more than one school out there that meets your needs. You don't NEED to go to an Ivy or to a Top Ten state school with a zillion Division I teams. If you think you do, then consider whether there are specific properties those schools have (that you could find elsewhere!) or whether you are simply caught up in a dream of glittering generalities and wishes. Second, don't rule out private schools as "too expensive." Private schools rarely charge sticker price tuition and may (as in my middle-class family's case) be cheaper than public schools. Finally, come up with a list of academic, geographic, and social/extracurricular criteria. Find out as much as you can about each candidate college!

Maryam
Describe the students at your school.

They are mostly pre-med and pre-law.

Describe the students at your school.

They are mostly pre-med and pre-law.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I would say that more than anything, you should look for a campus that seems friendly, open, and financially affordable. In addition, base your distance on your independence level; if you haven't been too far from home for the past 17 or 18 years, now is not the time to suddenly move 3,000 miles away from your parents. Look at the students in that school; would you be able to fit in with them? Most importantly, don't come away from college tours expecting everything that your guide said to be true. A large portion of their speech is pure exaggeration. No student has perfect college experience. When you begin college, some things will go wrong - these are just opportunities to grow. Just pick a college that is, over-all, a good match for your personality and your financial level. Then, it is up to you to use the tools the college makes available to create the best possible college experience - it's up to you.

What do you consider the worst thing about your school? Why?

There are too many cutthroat pre-med students who exaggerate their accomplishments and attempt to get on the professors' good sides through tactics that annoy the rest of the class.

Details

  • Enrollment
  • 6,177
  • Tuition & Fees
  • $45,372
  • Acceptance rate
  • 35%

Campus Topics

    • {{q.Category}}
      • {{q.Question}}
        ({{q.TotalAnswered}} answers)
      • No Answers Yet :(
        Be the first to write a review!
        {{vm.getPercentage(pa.TotalAnswered,q.TotalAnswered)}}% "{{pa.Answer}}"

Most-Answered Questions

We use student reviews and the most current publicly available data on our school pages. As such, we don't typically remove or edit college information. Sources for school statistics and data include the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics and the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System. Portions of college data include copyrighted material, which is reproduced on this website by permission of Wintergreen Orchard House, a division of Carnegie Communications. © 2009-2016 by Wintergreen Orchard House. All rights reserved.

University of Rochester administrators: claim your school to add photos and details.