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University of Scranton

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The classes that I have taken at Scranton have allowed me to decide what I would like to do in my life and pursue my interests. In my major classes in Counseling and Human Services, I have been able to learn skills that I will be able to use throughout my professional career. Also, I have had the chance to challenge myself through stepping out of my comfort zone. These experiences, which have come through assignments, projects and service learning opportunities, have helped me learn more about myself. While the courses are challenging, faculty take the time to assist you in any way they can. Ultimately, they want their studetns to be successful and pursue their aspirations. I have been able to develop valued realtionships with faculty members, and they have been a great support to me as I have pursued my undergraduate degree. In all of my classes, my professors have known my name and have taken the time to know me as a person. I realized since my freshmen year how important my academic coursework is, and I have had the opportunity to engage in learning and studying. Yet, with graduation looming in the near future, I fell that my education at Scranton has prepared me to take the next step in my professional development. Upon graduation, I will be continuing my graduate studies at Scranton in the school counseling master's program. Through my courses, conversations I have had with professors and internship experiences, I have decided that I would like to be a school counselor. In deciding this, my professors assisted me with the graduate admissions process. I want to continue at Scranton because I know I will have the opportunity to continue to grow and develop as a professional and individual. I will be able to learn more skills as a counselor, and I will be prepared to work in the school counseling field. Even after four years of undergradute work, I know that Scranton will continue to be a significant part of my life for years to come.

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I love my program. I don’t know a single person that absolutely hates their major. They may complain about the workload, but in the end they know that they are heading in the right direction. I love being an occupational therapy major and I love the girls in my class. I have spent the last four years in every single OT class with them, and I would not have it any other way. The Occupational Therapy department helps me prepare for the real world, more than I had ever expected. Each teacher knows your name and if they don’t, they definitely know your face. Ever since my junior year, I have experienced two different settings and fields of OT. This coming summer, I will have my own client base and will be working independently, with help and guidance from my supervisor of course. I don’t have a favorite or a least favorite class. In each class I learn my strengths and weaknesses, how I work best and what I need to work on. The workload may be hard, but it’s what makes this major distinctive. Class participation is common and often required. Professors understand that there are some students that are quiet and shy, but it is part of their responsibility as our educators to challenge us to step out of our comfort zone. The most unique class I’ve ever taken is Introduction to Logic. This may have been one of the most challenging classes on campus. In this Philosophy elective, we discussed logical arguments and changed the sentences into symbols. You can only imagine my frustration, especially since this had nothing to do with my major! However, the professor of the class was very helpful. We were always welcome to come during open office hours if we had any questions and would gladly go over any concepts we were unsure of before our exams. In the end, I learned a lot about organization and logical reasoning, two things I will definitely need in the medical field and my everyday life.

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At Scranton there are no free rides, you have to work for your A' and B's. Students typically have a work hard play hard philosophy. The library is in full use sunday through thursday. Classes I enjoyed were: Priciples of Evidence, Penology, Childhood and Adolescence, Abnormal Psychology, Faith and Reason. The education at Scranton does gear you towards getting a job. They adhere to the liberal arts philosphy of being an effective communicator will help you in the working world no matter what your major is. You will take Composition, Public Speaking, Philosophy etc. and these course will help you rise up in the working world, be a lifelong student, well rounded and open minded. 9/10 of my professors did know my name, class participation is a must. If you want to hide in the back of class and not be noticed go to a large public school. Professors will also notice if you skip a class.

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I am a counseling and theology major and have had the ability to take a wide variety of classes. The most unique class I took was called HIV/AIDS, and it was awesome. We learned about the biological and sociological factors of the disease over the course of a semester. It's not uncommon to find people discussing class happenings outside of class, and we tend to study when we need to. Scranton students like to have fun, but we work hard and play hard, so the library is pretty full most of the time.

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You will have to work for your grades here, this isn’t a “joke school” professors here will not give you anything you dint earn, and that’s what you are paying for. You will have to know what you’re learning not just pretend that you’re following because that won’t work. You will spend your weekdays studying and doing hard work but can definitely find time for fun and a social life so long as you have a small ability to budget your time.

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Every single professor I have ever had knows my name and I have created excellent relationships with the! Students often study together and make friends in their classes because of the small class size. Class participation is very common because of the friendly and open atmosphere.

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Class sizes here are very small. All the professors who I have taken know my name within the first two weeks of classes. I very much like my philosophy classes (I am a biochemistry/philosophy major). Last semester, I took a seminar-based philosophy class with seven other students. We read texts from Aquinas, the professor would give a three or four minute synopsis of the reading, then we would spend the next hour and ten minutes of class discussing that texts (with the professor contributing to the discussion as a peer rather than as a lecturer). I thought that class allowed us to see the work from a very different and wonderfully interesting perspective compared to the usual lecture style class. My least favorite class was Spanish. I just don't have a mind for languages. I get tongue-tied and frustrated very easily when studying languages. It makes me a very reluctant participant in class, and I don't feel I got much out of my classroom style Spanish classes (but I think my personality and reluctance to work through some of the more difficult parts of the language contributed to that). Students do have intellectual conversations outside of class. Recently, we had "Food Justice Week" on campus and many of the conversations I heard over the course of that week were somehow related to that end. Although, I think the majority of conversations around campus will not be intellectual in nature (you'll hear mostly about the playoff woes of the Yankees or Phillies, about weekend plans or social stories), I still think many Scranton students engage in many intellectual conversations outside of the classroom. Scranton breeds an academic atmosphere of support. Students do not compete with each other for grades. The quality of your individual work will speak for itself, and beating another person does nothing for the quality of your grade in a class. Students help each other here, our focus is on success as a group rather than simply being the best individually. The most unique class I ever took here was "The Trivium," a wild public speaking and writing class taught by perhaps simultaneously the most brilliant and most eccentric professor I've met here, Dr. Stephen Whittaker. The class featured five high pressure speeches, all culminating in a recitation of Plato's "Phaedrus" from memory. We performed this recitation in the student center, at lunch time, while clad in Grecian-style togas. Speaking in such high pressure, nerve-wracking situations has made all later public speaking situations seem incredibly easy. I do research one-on-one in the microbiology department with Dr. Michael Sulzinski. Myself and several other biochemistry students have spent time with him outside of the classroom, even going to a barbecue at his home. The school requires a liberal arts background for all its students. I think this contributes to our character and our depth as a campus, and I think it is a good requirement. It really depends on your major whether the education here is focused on getting a job or learning for its own sake. I greatly value my education in philosophy, but I do not think that I will get a job based on it. I have read and tried to understand the classics for the sake of learning them. However, I think my background in science will greatly help me get a job. I believe I will be in medical school next year, hopefully on my way to eventually beginning a career as a doctor. I think all the material covered here is given a depth here due to the liberal arts focus of the school, but I also think this information (after being considered in and of itself) often times leads to opportunities for jobs after graduation.

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