Winston-Salem, NC
Wake Forest University


89 Ratings

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Recent Reviews

Terry
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Wake is expensive, but it's worth it. Literally. You come out with a degree that people recognize as extremely hard to get re...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Wake is expensive, but it's worth it. Literally. You come out with a degree that people recognize as extremely hard to get relative to other schools around the world, which translates to greater post-grad opportunities. Winston-Salem is founded on tobacco money. RJ Reynolds is down the street, and the sweet smell of tobacco (not cigarette smoke, but actual tobacco) floats around campus on clear days to remind you where you are. Swimming in the RJ Reynolds fountain, though illegal, is a favorite pastime of graduating seniors. School pride comes and goes. I came the year Chris Paul (2005 NBA Rookie of the Year) had just left the basketball team and many students were disappointed with the lackluster performance of the basketball team. A noticeable disinterest in attending games was known, and pride in the school seemed to have slightly diminished. However, the football team ended up going to the Orange Bowl after having its best season in history, leading to a resurgence in school pride (that would ultimately collapse until the 2008 basketball season when WFU reached #1 in the country for a few days).

Describe the students at your school.

Christians and non-believers are what seem to stick out the most to me. Kids go to church, but they also come from upper-class backgrounds that might exhibit a correlation with church-going. Students in Greek organizations interact mostly within their own realm, though the parties are open to anyone and friends are always there to be made regardless of background. Race doesn't seem to be an issue - the past two (or three?) student body presidents have been African-American, and the current Pres is the absolute man who actually cares what students think. Conservatism is probably the most prominent political leaning, while there are plenty of folks with open minds and differing political ideologies. Half my professors hint at their liberal, even socialistic beliefs, while the other half stick to their conservative, free-market guns (can you tell I study economics?)

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

The stereotype of "White Forest," though, is being openly acknowledged, and each class has become more and more diverse. From my experience, there are tons of northerners (Jerseyans in particular) that contrast interestingly enough with the slow-talking, deep-fried southerners. Some kids come from the west, a few from outside the US, but the students seem mostly to come from the east coast. There's even a couple kids from Rhode Island. Go figure. And, though generally not the most racially integrated student body, people of all backgrounds mix and mingle just fine. The "Work Forest" stereotype is as true as you want it to be. There are certainly ways of making it hard on yourself, say, by maintaining the same aspirations of graduating at the top of your class that you had in high school. Things are different here. There are so many great minds at Wake that standing out requires a particular creativity, not just making the grades.

What are the academics like at your school?

Academics? Tough. But not impossible. It's how I imagine it to be at most top-tier schools. Wake continually 1-ups itself in academic significance - the Dean's List requirements were raised my junior year to make sure the students have to work harder to earn such distinctions. Students are competitive and will leave you in the dust. But it's rarely a personal matter. Good minds inspire others, so being surrounded by a diligent student population causes the one-time slacker to often evolve into a hard-working success story. The size of the school is important. An average of about 16 students per class means high personal interaction with the professors. I even helped a professor edit a book she had published, and having dinner with professors isn't far-fetched by any stretch of the imagination. They love to help, and they most often have the ability to help because they only have to deal with 16 kids per class and not 200.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Wake kids party, and there is always something to do. I'll put it this way: as a freshman, I wandered around the outskirts of campus with a pack of similarly-clueless freshman in search of a party. When knocking on a random door and greeted by a couple seniors, we asked if they were having a party. They said "Well, there's no party, but we can change that." And thus one of the most memorable (or, more appropriately, least memorable) ragers of a party had started. The point is that students loves to kick back and see how long it takes before passing out. During exams week? Well, it's time to make up for the procrastinating you did all semester and actually study - for most people. There is a decent downtown area, though it is fairly small and limited to a dozen or so watering holes. A new campus shuttle program takes student downtown (a 4 or 5 mile trek) from Thursday - Saturday and from 8:00 p.m. to 3:00 a.m. thanks to that awesome student body president I mentioned earlier. Sports are big, too. Tailgate at football games and then party afterward. Adorn yourself in that hideous tie-dye and cheer at the basketball games for the streaky yet high-quality basketball team. And the soccer team won the national championship in 2007. Sports are big.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

People in recent history loved to label Wake Forest students as a bunch of rich white kids, many of whom will actually strive towards academic achievement. Wake is also known for its heavy course load and rigid academic standards. However, the work-hard/ play-hard mentality is alive and well; studying for many kids is usually post-ceded by binge drinking (and preceded for the Pi Phi's), as having a good time is the only way to take a load off whenever things get tough.

Sarah
Describe your favorite campus traditions.

Academics, Basketball and Football, Social Life, Sororities and Fraternities.

Describe your favorite campus traditions.

Academics, Basketball and Football, Social Life, Sororities and Fraternities.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Do not allow your student to transfer within the first year. Make sure he or she waits out a year and tries different activites and social groups before looking into transfering.

Max
Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

A place of intellectual stimulation in the classroom and carefree fun on the weekends.

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

A place of intellectual stimulation in the classroom and carefree fun on the weekends.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

The modern day college process is in need of serious reform. Activities like paying thousands of dollars to a specialist , combing through endless books, or going on college trips freshman year of high school may help you get into the "perfect" school. They also might make absolutely no difference and distract you from the important pieces of the college selection process. The immense pressure that high schoolers put on themselves to get into a specific college is simply counterproductive. Worrying will not help your GPA, or get you through the gilded gate of your choice university. Instead of that behavior, simply start the process with an open mind. When you remove those burdens you'll find that there is not a handful but dozens of institutions in which you would be happy. Your first action should be to go to your school counselor. There you can establish a broad definition of where you could be accepted. After that do research online and get one or two good books to give you a feel for what you might like. Simply visit these places, and you will soon be surprised by the plethora of fantastic options for those joyous for years.

What's unique about your campus?

The best thing about my school is the balance between time spent with the community and time spent studying. There's just enough work to keep the students busy, even the really bright ones. However, there's never so much classwork that people don't have time for fun. The majority of people I know, if they manage their schedule well, can get great grades and have lots of time for other persuits.

Nicole
Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

A wonderful place to learn about yourself and grow as an individual, where academics are placed above all else.

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

A wonderful place to learn about yourself and grow as an individual, where academics are placed above all else.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

Small class sizes, but large resources.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

If the school feels right for you, go for it, regardless of anyone else's opinions.

Ali
Describe the students at your school.

Friendly, helpful, acadmic minded

Describe the students at your school.

Friendly, helpful, acadmic minded

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I would say, look at the size of a school and whether or not it is in a city environment or a college town. Also, look at the different majors offered and how involved the school is in helping you find a career. Once at school I would try to be involved with as many activities as possible to try and network. Become close with some professors so they can you help you find a job or write you a recommendation. Always put academics first, but still be social and take time to have fun with friends.

Lindsay
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

In my experience, making the college decision was about finding the "perfect fit" where I would be guaranteed happiness--a sc...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

In my experience, making the college decision was about finding the "perfect fit" where I would be guaranteed happiness--a school with a well-rounded student body, smaller classes to facilitate teacher-student relations, respected academics, and strong school spirit. I also looked for parts of the country I would voluntarily live post-graduation in the event that my first job surfaced there--temperature and location ARE worthy factors. However, in looking back at my own decision and those of my friends, it seems that there really is no completely wrong answer. There is no way to "fail" in picking out a college because in reality, choosing to take the path of education is the most valuable decision to make. There will be great professors & there will be not so great professors, just as there will be great people and not so great people to befriend. Dig deep and ask probing questions--remember, the tour guides are instructed to steer away from answering questions that shed a poor light. Don't ask about what they like about the school, ask what changes they would like to see on campus. Know yourself, have your priorities, and you won't go wrong!

What's the most frustrating thing about your school?

Those who apply may know its reputation as "Work Forest", however, students don't truly realize the meaning behind that nickname until they come to the school. Classes are difficult and the studying/homework produces a stress level is often seen as an "unhealthy obsession." In addition, students do not have much to show for it when it comes to the GPA. For at Wake Forest, we do not have GPA inflators, but rather, GPA DEFLATORS. And with the economy as it is, the job market is even more competitive than ever. Low GPA's do not help our situation.

What's the one thing you wish someone had told you about freshman year?

The grad deflation makes it that much more stressful to earn a 3.2 while my highschool friends at public universities make 4.0's without working half as hard as I do. It is definitely something to think about--a 4.0 at a big state school usually looks better than a 3.0, even at a top school like Wake. And more free time to actually enjoy college would be an added bonus. Not to say that I don't enjoy Wake, I am, but not as much as I would like.

Martha
What do you brag about most when you tell your friends about your school?

The academic quality. I am well prepared for graduate school

What do you brag about most when you tell your friends about your school?

The academic quality. I am well prepared for graduate school

What's the most frustrating thing about your school?

The cost and lack of financial aid that was not in the form of loans.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

It is perfectly understandable that the prospect of selecting a college can be overwhelming. You are essentially selecting an institution that will be responsible not only for your academic advancement, but for placing you with individuals who will become your future best friends, spouses and colleagues. Because it is such an important decision, give yourself time to analyze the different options. Of course look at the typical characteristics -- the dorms, the meal plans, the fitness facilities. But more importantly, go and speak with professors, see if they are willing to take time out to speak with you. Approach a student on campus, and see how friendly and willing to help they are. These are the people and the interactions that will truly shape your college experience, not how impressive the recreatonal facilities are. If you find an institution where you feel welcomed, and the individuals around you are excited to have you there, then you have probably found a school worthy of the most important four years of your edicational life.

Danielle
Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

It was small in size and academically prestigious but also had many features of a large state school, such as dynamic Divisio...

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

It was small in size and academically prestigious but also had many features of a large state school, such as dynamic Division I athletics and research facitlites.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

While ranking and prestige are factors are something to consider, parents and students should think of 'fit' before either. It is more important to consider where each individual student will thrive academically and socially.

What's the one thing you wish someone had told you about freshman year?

I wish I had known that the greek life was as omnipresent as it is.

Mason
What's the most frustrating thing about your school?

The dining staff is subcontracted and not necessarily composed of university staff. For this reason, they are not always held...

What's the most frustrating thing about your school?

The dining staff is subcontracted and not necessarily composed of university staff. For this reason, they are not always held to the standards of demeanor that other faculty and staff may be. It is often frustrating to interact with them when you have had a day just as bad or worse than they seem to be having.

What's the one thing you wish someone had told you about freshman year?

Although there are a great number of scholarships available to graduating high school seniors, there are also scholarships or other types of easily accesible funding that can be applied for depending on your chosen major(s). Some of these scholarships may even be applied to study abroad which does not necessarily have to be under the direct administration of the university to be eligible for course credits.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Beginning with the summer prior to your junior year of high school, you will begin to receive an umlimited amount of advice as to your collegiate future. It will likely range in form from themes such as, "If you hate high school, then you will love college" and "College will be the best four years of your life" to "Follow the money: you should choose whichever school offers you the most financial aid." During my time in college, however, I have found that the reality you will eventually live with does not always agree with the misleading, albeit honest, advice that you once received. The decision as to the right college for YOU should ultimately be left up to YOU. Take your time and outline those characteristics that you find most attractive in an academic environment and potential home, because it will be both of things, and more. The decision you make is not only for your academic training, but for your social, emotional, and otherwise personal development, as well. Ultimately, remember that the decision is for YOU, so that you can decide how you will spend the best years of your life--whether they are during college or afterwards.

Beili
Describe your favorite campus traditions.

I think my school is well known around the area as a prestigious school, with a big work load.

Describe your favorite campus traditions.

I think my school is well known around the area as a prestigious school, with a big work load.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Visit colleges you're interested in. Make sure the college is a good match for you, whether academically, culturally, or geographically.

What's the most frustrating thing about your school?

I think the most frustrating thing for me is the registration system. The school often underestimates how many students can take a certain class, so there is much waitlisting and contacting professors.

Details

  • Enrollment
  • 4,955
  • Tuition & Fees
  • $49,308
  • Acceptance rate
  • 30%

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