Wellesley, MA
Wellesley College


74 Ratings

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Recent Reviews

Julia
What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best thing: the professors, and their amazing accessibility and friendliness and kindness. What would I change? THE SOCI...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best thing: the professors, and their amazing accessibility and friendliness and kindness. What would I change? THE SOCIAL LIFE. The campus is DEAD after 10pm and on weekends. The school is a little too small. I would add another thousand students. When I tell people I go to W, they usually either don't know it at all, or know it very well, and smile with a knowing grin, saying, "Oh!....A Wellesley woman, eh?!" as if it's some inside joke that I just don't get. Whatever that means... I spend most of my time on campus either at the library, at my job in the other library, in office hours, or rehearsing with my group. "WHAT COLLEGE TOWN?" Wellesley the town does not need the college: it's got its own reputation as the second-richest suburb in America (and no, I don't know the first). Wellesley's administration is helpful and friendly. Haven't had trouble with any red tape so far, although I hear study abroad prep can get complicated. The biggest controversy on campus recently was race related: a black girl published an article in an online magazine about why she didn't want to be a part of Ethos, the black student org on campus, because she felt it was reverse discrimination. She got "flamed on Community," meaning she was attacked on the online conferences that all Wellesley community members have access to. Not so much school pride sports-wise, but academically, yes. I would even say arrogance. I will always remember staying up until 3:30am the night before first-semester registration with my RA, who helped me pick my classes, calm my nerves and basically keep me sane. That's one thing you won't find elsewhere: someone who will ALWAYS be there to help you, no matter what time it is or how much work they have.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

Most Wellesley Wendys are intense and ambitious, and many are indeed spoiled and rich, especially those in the "societies," Wellesley's equivalent of sororities. There is a vocal lesbian minority on campus, but it IS a minority, and not a bad one, either. Wellesley women do have a tendency to get too worked up over issues and sometimes forget to keep assessing the situation, in favor of ranting and raving instead. The fuck truck is oft-ridden, simply to get a social life, but it is not a rule that you will fuck if you ride the truck. And...we do not ALL like Hillary- and we will not ALL vote for just because she's an alumna.

What are the academics like at your school?

My prof's DEFINITELY know my name, background, life story (some of them, anyway...and they would almost all be interested), strengths and weaknesses... Favorite class: Econ with Velenchik. She's hilarious, charismatic, and above all a very clear professor. She also tells it like it is, which I really respect. Least favorite: Astro 101lab. Prof French is awesome, but hot damn, don't take that class thinking it's going to be an easy A. It's not. And it's fucking cold outside at 11pm by the telescopes in winter (well, almost any time, really).

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

That they are really intense and ambitious. That they are aware of the world around them. That they are spoiled little rich girls. That they are easily offended and often complain for the sake of complaining. That they ride the "fuck truck" into Boston on the weekends to scout for boys (or other girls). That they are all liberal, tree hugging lesbians. That they all love Hillary Clinton.

Anne
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Wellesley is a great place for women who are self motivate and confident individuals. I love the friends that I've made and ...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Wellesley is a great place for women who are self motivate and confident individuals. I love the friends that I've made and the professors that I've worked with. They really care about me and want what is best for me, which is so assuring and encouraging. It's definitely a more intimate environment than a large university. I feel like an individual here, and it's because of the personal interaction I have with such a diverse student body. My one complaint is that Wellesley the town is not really a college town. It is very small and suburban, so it makes social outings more of an ordeal, but it's really what you make of it. I constantly am going off campus and getting involved in activities outside of Wellesley, so it's possible to find a balance.

Describe the students at your school.

Amazing- I've made some of the best friends I've had in my life. They come from all ethnicities, socioeconomic backgrounds, etc., and we all have a deep respect for each other. There really is a special sisterly bond between Wellesley women!

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

I think they are true to some degree, as are most stereotypes, but I love Wellesley despite some of the drawbacks. All of my friends and I are extremely hard working and motivated, but we have a sense of community that is really unique. We are not competitive with one another, and actually work to help each other through whatever we are going through, academically or personally. It's a fantastic environment. As for the political scene, it does tend to be liberal (as most northeastern schools are), but there is a complete spectrum of views here. The beauty

What are the academics like at your school?

It's the best! I love my professors and my classes are small, so you really get to know them. Since Wellesley is solely undergrad, so the professors are really here to teach and not quite as interested in research. I feel really challenged in all my classes, and it's really a fun place to live and go to school.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

In addition to being hard working, conscientious women, we are stereotyped as overly motivated and competitive with one another. We are also said to be extremely liberal politically.

Olivia
What is your overall opinion of this school?

I would change the social scene (which I am doing through SBOG) -- I don't know ... I get bored and antsy here a lot of the t...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

I would change the social scene (which I am doing through SBOG) -- I don't know ... I get bored and antsy here a lot of the time. I feel like I was a little lied to when I came here about what life would be like. It is a lot more low key ... you have to really try to have fun. This is what I feel like most people complain about. Not your normal college experience.

Describe the students at your school.

Ah, girls are crazy! And I love it ... there are always crazy activities happening on campus even if you are not interested in attending any of them.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

I think that was pretty much it.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

I mean, personally I don't think so as I don't fall into either category. I think stereotypes normally stem from some place, but really, everyone is different on this campus.

What are the academics like at your school?

They are hard. There are no breaks. Usually you have to go to class. People are smart here and they participate. You have to study for tests. It's a lot like high school ... but harder.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

I love SBOG. It helps to save this campus socially. As does Phi Sig.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

There are two main stereotypes: 1. Wellesley Students are losers and stay in and study all day. 2. Wellesley Girls are sluts.

Alex
What is your overall opinion of this school?

When I look back on my Wellesley experience, I won't remember the grades. Gasps and cries of shame come from my fellow studen...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

When I look back on my Wellesley experience, I won't remember the grades. Gasps and cries of shame come from my fellow students. Wellesley is an intense academic atmosphere; it pushes you to your limits, and sometimes breaks you to put you together, again. Wellesley women are driven; it's no secret. Sometimes, though, we can forget the big picture. Amidst the comma errors, the p-set miscalculations, and the philosophical fumbles, we can get so wrapped up in the Wellesley Bubble that we just about explode. Still, though, grades are not what I will remember. I will remember meeting my soul mates. Coming to Wellesley, I finally met people I could truly call my friends. We were on the same level intellectually, able to discuss books, current events, and all kinds of frivolous subjects. For me, coming to Wellesley was coming home, again.

Describe the students at your school.

Wellesley students are predominantly left-leaning liberals. It takes a brave soul these days to declare pride in the Bush administration or to admit support for presidential nominee McCain. Wellesley students may be from all over the world, but their politics are certainly not as diverse. The most heated debates are between Democrats arguing the minute differences of Obama and Clinton, illustrating the Wellesley habit of getting hung up on the details. Wellesley students are generally respectful of other peoples views especially differing cultural, religious, and socio-economic. But when it comes to political debate, let the flood gates open! Every week The Wellesley News publishes an editiorial by either the college Democrats or Republicans. The Republicans consistently provoke attacks in letters from the editors while the Democrat for the greater part sail smoothly into the night.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

While neither of these stereotypes are completely accurate, there are kernels, perhaps grain of truth. Wellesley students are pampered by our staff, administration, and professors. During finals week, we have treats (which include cookies) and are read bedtime stories by our professors. We even have dog-therapy for the over-stressed on occasion. Yes, Wellesley is an extremely open and welcoming campus and that hospitality extends to students of all sexual orientation. However, that does not necessarily mean that coming to Wellesley makes you a lesbian. Nor should it assume that your life will be male-deprived. There are women who feel this way, but it is only because they buy into the stereotypes. By realizing the amazing women and opportunities that surround a student each day, that student will fly by these "hurdles" to make the most of their experience.

What are the academics like at your school?

A friend from Dartmouth College once commented that, "The closer I get to Wellesley, the higher I can feel my blood pressure rising." Wellesley is not for the faint of heart. We are a community of driven, overachievers. We are used to being the best and find anything less hard to accept. This mindset would lead many to assume that Wellesley is an extremely competitive school, which is true. However, competition does not exist between individuals. The only place competition lives is within each student where a fierce battle rages between the student you are and the student you want to be. Academics are the focus of the college and generally a sense of quiet reigns over the campus (during finals week, it's more an eerie silence). Classes are never optional and participation is expected. This is great for creating dialogue and an exchange of ideas, but it also prompts the inevitable handraiser: the girl who always has a question or a comment, even if it happens to be identical to what the professor just said.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

The "Wellesley Bubble" is a common term among the community coined to express the ability of Wellesley to encompass its students in a haze of college politics. Wellesley is great, however it could do more to establish a weekend community of events, instead of having students migrate to Boston, MIT, or Harvard for the weekend. Parties do happen on campus as well as weekend movies, but typically on a weekend night Wellesley College is a bit of a ghost town. Not all students want to party or drink, so it would be nice to see Friday and Saturday night activities that addressed these needs without forcing a student to take a 40 minute Senate, albeit nice, bus ride to another campus.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

The media likes to pigeonhole Wellesley students into two contrary stereotypes. According to The Princeton Review, the typical Wellesley student eschews any form of liquor or alcoholic beverage for a glass of milk and a warm cookie. Wendy Wellesley works hard through the weekend and does not even whisper the word, "party." On the other end of the spectrum, thanks to Rolling Stone and Cashmere Mafia, we Wellesley students are crazed, lesbian nymphomaniacs who need to report to the next meeting of AA. Boys/Men are kidnapped and forced to be sex-slaves to our testerone starved beings.

Catherine
What is your overall opinion of this school?

Wellesley as a town really sucks; because I'm from there I feel like I am able to say that. The college, however, is a totall...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

Wellesley as a town really sucks; because I'm from there I feel like I am able to say that. The college, however, is a totally different world. Size-wise, it's small enough to get to know a good amount of your grade, but big enough to run into people you've never seen before. Without a doubt, the best thing about Wellesley is that it makes you feel like you can do anything. As much as we sometimes roll our eyes at the slogan of "Women who will," I feel like we all internalize it. I think I'm going to graduate a totally different, and better, person than I would have after a coed experience.

Describe the students at your school.

The student body is unbelievably eclectic. It was so refreshing after prep school where everyone looks the same!

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

I would say that the vast majority of students here have a love/hate relationship with Wellesley. It's not always fun, it's not ever really easy, and sometimes you wonder why you're working your butt off against grade deflation while the rest of your high school friends party. That being said, Wellesley changes you. It's made me a better, deeper thinker, more open minded, and braver than I ever thought I could be. If I could do it again I wouldn't change a thing.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

The vast majority of women do work like crazy...a lot also take themselves too seriously, but I have never had as much fun as I do at Wellesley with my friends. They're really what get me through all the stress and massive amounts of work. As much as I look forward to graduating, I can't imagine life without them right there a few rooms over.

What are the academics like at your school?

Academics at Wellesley are amazing. The professors are inspiring and want to know you and see you succeeded. My fellow students are vocal and hard working. It's just the best. Oh, and we work a ton, but I find the work I do to be very rewarding.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Wellesley Athletics are pretty much a joke. Having a social life in the traditional sense (frat parties, ect.) takes more effort than at a coed school, but lots of women do it. If you know the right people, however, you can find fun on campus any night of the week.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

That we all work like crazy, take ourselves too seriously, and have no fun.

Becca
What is your overall opinion of this school?

How do people react when you tell them you go to Wellesley? Ha. There are so many possible responses. (1) Oh, Wesleyan? Th...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

How do people react when you tell them you go to Wellesley? Ha. There are so many possible responses. (1) Oh, Wesleyan? That's really cool. (2) Wait, where? (3) Oh. Ohhhhh. A women's college. Uh-huh. (4) Oh... okay. (As in, I have no idea what that is, but I'm going to pretend I know, because I have a feeling I should.) (5) Wellesley! Now THAT'S a really good school. The last response is, of course, my favorite, although I only get it from doctors and guidance counselors, strangely. And of course the reactions from other students in the Boston area vary, but they know what Wellesley is, so there's that element. The administration kind of sucks sometimes. I'm just going to put that out there. The decision making process is NOT transparent, and it's a little ridiculously bureaucratic. That said, lower level administrative departments (like, not the deans and stuff, but Residential Life, Student Activities, etc) are awesome. I love the res life staff (and in fact am going to join them as an RA next year because I think they're fantastic), and Student Activities gets us discounted tickets to all these things in Boston, and stuff like that. So, the administration at its highest levels is irritating, but you don't come up against them all that much. And the people you interact with on a daily basis are almost always wonderful. The town of Wellesley would be a great college town... if college students were rich middle-aged women. The Ville, as we call it, is full of stores that close at 5pm, and even if they stayed open later, there wouldn't be anything we could afford in them anyhow. CVS, the Gap, and Lemon Thai (Wellesley's collective favorite delivery place) are basically all we can afford. BUT that's what Boston's for! Wellesley has buses into the city on the hour (and every forty minutes, on weekends), and Boston is great and super accessible and MORE than makes up for the Ville. I think there's a lot of school pride. At least, *I'm* proud of my school! Wellesley women know that, among their peers, Wellesley may not get the recognition it deserves, but out in the real, professional world, it does. (Which may be part of the reason we're perceived as so driven and future-focused and all that.) I think a lot of us are proud to be here. The best thing about Wellesley (besides the fantastic academics, which I'll get to in the next section) is the community. We have these amazing traditions, and honestly, the people here are the sort of people I want to be friends with in any situation. It's not because there AREN'T guys. It's because there ARE women who have decided, on balance, that they can deal without guys, in the service of becoming the best, brightest, strongest person they can be. They know that Wellesley can help them do that, and they're up to the challenge.

Describe the students at your school.

Wellesley prides itself on being diverse (take a look at the admissions literature, if you don't believe me). How diverse is it really? Probably somewhat above average, but I don't know how much. I have a lot of Asian friends (Wellesley is something like 25% Asian), and I know a bunch of international students. Religiously, it's a little less diverse -- I'm Jewish, and I don't know too many other Jewish students. (Well, I know OF several, but most of them are really religious -- like, I don't know of any other Reform Jews.) That said, Wellesley is really open and welcoming about religious diversity, even if there isn't that much of it. I'm always explaining Jewish holidays to my friends, and they think it's cool. We even tried to make latkes! (It didn't work so well, but we had about two ingredients, so that's to be expected.) LGBT-wise, Wellesley is great. I don't know the statistics, but they are a small but active, open, and welcoming group of. I know several members of Spectrum, the LGBTQQA organization, and they're fantastic. Socio-economically, Wellesley has a pretty decent (and recently improved!) financial aid program, so we have a fair bit of that. And people are pretty open about whether they're on financial aid (I mean, you wouldn't ask, but no one would feel uncomfortable saying they were), so there's not too much tension surrounding that. The only people who would feel out of place at Wellesley are women who are really set on having your basic, traditional, all-American college experience. We're a women's college, yeah. It's a little different here. You have to come in with the mindset that your experience is going to be a little different -- NOT worse, but definitely different. Also, people who aren't interested in working hard. This is not a school for smart people who don't want to work. Being smart got you in, but spending a lot of time studying is going to keep you afloat. One other thing -- Wellesley women are very PC, and the joke around here is "I'm offended," because people do get offended when you aren't PC. So basically, you have to be open and considerate and, yeah, PC. Other than that, pretty much any sort of person would fit in here. If you know what you're getting into, and you're willing to work hard to get the most out of it, Wellesley will be a fantastic experience for you. What do most students wear to class? Oh, how it varies. There are some who have the "there are no guys to dress up for" mentality, and so they come to class in sweats. Then there are some who get dressed up and come to class in a skirt and sweater set and heels. Most people are in between. Jeans and a sweater/sweatshirt/t-shirt/whatever is very common. Umm... a lot of people around here have Uggs, but that's the only specific thing I can think of. Yes, different types of students interact. About half of my friends are of a different race than me, almost all of them have a different religion, a few are bisexual/lesbians, and while I don't know their specific socioeconomic situations, I'm sure there's a lot of diversity there as well. Where are most of us from? Northeast or California. Politically aware? YES. Especially with the upcoming election, most students at Wellesley know what's going on, and have an opinion on it. And of course it doesn't hurt that the first viable female presidential candidate is a Wellesley alumna! (Which does NOT AT ALL mean that Wellesley students who support Hillary do so only because she's an alumna, but I think the fact does get people interested in the race in general.) I know a ton of people who are incredibly, passionately politically involved. And yeah, like most private liberal arts schools, we lean left. But that doesn't mean there are no conservatives on campus. A girl down the hall from me is on the executive board of the College Republicans, and they have a hilarious fundraiser going on right now: t-shirts that say "Hillary Rodham for President... of Wellesley College Republicans" (because of course Hillary was a Republican until her junior year at dear Swelles). Some students talk about how much they'll earn one day, but it's not a predominant theme. Lots of people talk about the future, but not in terms of money. Wellesley women want to go places, do fantastic things, change the world, etc, and yeah, it would be nice to make a lot of money somewhere in there, but I don't think it's what most of us are focusing on.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

No. No no no, a thousand times no. Yes, there are some party girls (but there are some at every college). Yes, there are a few people who'd really like to find a husband (but there are some at every college). Yes, some of us are too focused on our studies to have time for guys (but there are some girls like that at every college). And yes, there are some lesbians (but there are DEFINITELY some at every college, and if you think that there aren't, you really don't know what you're talking about). But for the most part, Wellesley women are are creative and compassionate and hard-working and determined and independent and ambitious and talented and funny and eloquent and basically wonderful. No, not everyone is like that. (And even though there are some people who fit the above stereotypes, they are also wonderful, smart people.) But that's the average Wellesley woman: she works like crazy during the week, and on the weekends, sometimes she goes to parties, and sometimes she hangs out with her friends, and that's basically it.

What are the academics like at your school?

What can I say about the academics at Wellesley? They really don't get much better than this. I know there are a few schools who are better known for this, but I firmly believe that the "anywhere else it would have been an A" mentality applies here. DON'T come to Wellesley looking for an easy A. There's no such thing around here. In fact, don't come here if you're dead set on getting A's, easy or not. But do come here if you want professors who are incredibly passionate about their subject and who know your name and are willing to go out of their way to help you, or if you want tiny classes (this semester, I don't have a single class above 20 students, and three of the four have under 15), or if you want a giant library and a fantastic course selection for such a small school, or if you want to live and learn with other women who are as focused and intelligent and hard-working as you are. You will work harder here than you think you will. That is, because Wellesley is a women's college, it's less selective (in terms of admissions) than comparable coed schools, because the applicant pool is automatically cut in half. So there's this perception, sometimes, that Wellesley is not as academically challenging as those schools. And this is so incredibly untrue that it's kind of funny. The grading standards for Wellesley's writing department, for example, say something like, "If you do everything your professor asks, and do it well, we feel that this work merits a B." No matter how smart you are, you're not guaranteed to do well here. You have to work, and hard. But if you do put in the work, it is so rewarding. Hardly anyone makes it out of here with a 4.0, but almost everyone leaves with an incredibly good education. Students are competitive, but more with themselves then with each other. Everyone is driven to do well, and there is pride in doing well, but it doesn't come into friendships. Like, I might mention to my friend that I got an A on a paper, but I wouldn't compare GPAs with her, and I certainly wouldn't ask about her grades in a class we were both taking. We study. Oh, how we study. We study A LOT. (We also procrastinate a lot, but you know how that goes.) Wellesley women taking studying VERY seriously. During reading period and finals, we have campus-wide 23-Hour Quiet Hours (as in, no loud noises anywhere in the residence halls), and people WILL call you out on it if you talk too loudly while they're trying to study. We're all constantly sleep deprived, and in most cases, it has nothing to do with going out. We work hard around here.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Guest speakers here are FANTASTIC: So far this year we've had Gloria Steinem, Elaine Brown, LeVar Burton, Hillary Clinton, and more. It's so great. Do people leave their doors open? Depends on the dorm; they all have different cultures. I live in Dower, which is the tiniest dorm on campus, but we also all know each other and have intense dorm spirit, so our doors are usually open. In some of the bigger dorms, it's not like that, but I'd say that in at least half of the dorms, doors are usually open. The dating scene? Um, I'm going to have to assume this is a generic question, because... Wellesley. Yeah. There isn't too much dating going on on campus (except of course for the les/bi/trans community, and I'm not totally sure how that goes). People have boyfriends at other area schools -- Harvard, MIT, BU, Babson, Olin, Brandeis, etc. People go to parties, but I think most serious relationships get started through cross-school events, mutual friends, etc -- as opposed to the MIT frat houses. If I'm up at 2am on a Tuesday, I am doing homework. (Or procrastinating.) In fact, forget Tuesday. If I'm up at 2am any day Sunday-Thursday (and I basically always am), I'm either doing homework, or pretending to do work, or taking a break from doing work, or whatever. We stay up late. We work hard. These two things are definitely connected. Traditions are so, so great! Midnight breakfast on the first night of reading period, Primal Scream the night before finals, dorm crew, class crew, Lake Day, big and little sisters, hoop rolling, Spring Week, dorm wars, teas, Community Dinner, and so much more. LOVE IT. Traditions are a big part of what gives Wellesley such a great community feel. People party, but they usually go off campus. On campus parties are, from what I hear, pretty lame. (I don't party too much, but that's what I've been told.) If people do go to on-campus parties, a lot of them pregame. And we obviously don't have frats. We have societies, which are sort of like sororities but with a stronger academic/community focus (like, there's an arts/music society, a literary society, etc), and they have houses, but the girls don't live in them (they just use them for parrties/events). Last weekend I watched a bunch of movies, did homework, and caught up on sleep. Sometimes I go into Boston, which is awesome. We go out to dinner/to movies/to plays/to museums/shopping/whatever. I think Boston is fantastic.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

Oh man. Wellesley has more stereotypes/rumors/reputations than you can even mention. I'll probably exceed the character limit on this box before I get to them all. Let's see. To quote an article in the Harvard Crimson (which I found online this one time that my friends and I wikipediaed "fuck truck"), "Rumors—and a scathing 2001 Rolling Stone article entitled “The Highly Charged Erotic Life of a Wellesley Girl”—paint Wellesley as a school populated by hyper-sexualized, lonely nymphets. Or maybe it’s a school filled with aspiring desperate housewives in search of their Harvard hubbies. Or maybe it’s a school of bookworms who would rather focus on academics than waste their time on guys. Or maybe they’re all just lesbians." So, that sums things up pretty nicely. Maybe we're crazy, overly promiscuous party girls. Maybe we're to (as my mom would say) get our "MRS degree." Maybe we're frigid bitches and snobs and too busy trying to change and/or take over the world to deal with boys. Or maybe we're just a bunch of lesbians. (As the facebook group has it: "I don't go to Lesbian University, I go to Lesbian College: we don't have grad students.) Wellesley has so many different reputations that it's a little ridiculous. Of course, because we're a women's college, we're not as well known as some comparable coed institutions, so it's easy for misinformation to go unchecked.

Casey
What is your overall opinion of this school?

In my opinion, the most incredibly part of the Wellesley experience is the feeling of sisterhood. There is something about ha...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

In my opinion, the most incredibly part of the Wellesley experience is the feeling of sisterhood. There is something about having gone to an all-woman's college that links us strongly to each other and to all the alumnae who have gone before us. I never dreamed I would meet friends like the ones I have met here. I have six best friends who would walk through fire for me- and I think our strong connection stems from the fact that there are no boys over whom we compete or who demand attention in social situations. Wellesley is in the suburbs of Boston but it is incredibly easy to get into the city. My friends and I venture into Boston at least once a week. We explore Harvard square or Chinatown or the North End or Quincy market and we have come to realize that Boston is truly one of the most fascinating and college friendly cities in the country. Aside from Boston there is always the town of Wellesley. The "Vil" as Wellesley students call it, is the quintessential New England Town. There is a Talbots, a Gap, a bagel store, several high-end baby stores and of course the life-line of the students, CVS. I have probably spent more time in that CVS than I have in all the other stores combined. As far as the Wellesley administration goes, there is certainly some tension between the student body and those "higher up." The most recent controversy was over whether or not the infirmary should shut down their 24-hour service. Despite the student protests and petitions the administration went ahead with the shut-down. While this was somewhat disheartening, the administration has never done anything that wasn't in the students' best interest so it is probable that the new infirmary policy will not be detrimental to the student experience. I think the thing that is the most unusual about Wellesley is the bond that we have with alums. There isn't a lot of athletic school spirit per se, but there is an intense pride that comes with being a Wellesley Woman. We are all intimately connected with the women who graduated 100 years ago and with those who will graduate in the next 100 years.

Describe the students at your school.

Wellesley students can't really be described in a nutshell. As noted above, there are prevailing stereotypes of Wellesley students but there really is a niche for everyone. So don't worry, if you don't own a set of pearls, or you aren't really into dating girls, you'll be ok. I would however put in a disclaimer. Wellesley students are not, on the whole, activist hippies who chain themselves to trees. We are more likely to change the world through bureaucracy and intelligence than through protests and sit-ins. Another thing that most Wellesley students are not, is conservative. Whether it is New England, or feminism or just being young, the prevailing political atmosphere on campus is definitely liberal. There might be 5 republicans. As for the racial and socioeconomic background of Wellesley students, Wellesley is one of the most diverse campuses in the country. There really is incredible opportunities to meet people who come from different cultures and to discuss your culture with them.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

One thing that I haven't talked about is the beauty of the campus. It is absolutely breath-taking. Some people have likened it to Hogwarts which I guess is a fair anaology minus the boys, broomsticks and odd creatures. But the gothic architecture and the huge, beautiful commmon rooms of the dorms make this school, in my opinion, the most beautiful in this country. My only other thing, is that I love this school and I think that any woman in this country would thrive here. People think that sexism has died but it hasn't, and going to a school like Wellesley will teach you that as a woman, you are powerful beyond measure and that nothing can hold you back.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

As with most stereotypes there is some accuracy but a lot of myth. There is a vocal LGBT community on campus and the students are, for the most part, gay friendly. However, there are far more girls in pearls and pumps than in baggy jeans and chains. As far as an obsession with men that stems from being in an all-girls environment 24-7, this stereotype is also only partially accurate. There certainly is a large sector of the student population that spends a large amount of time off campus- namely in places frequented by men. It seems that almost every student here either has a boyfriend or recently broke up with one. But there are also plenty of students who are far more intent on getting good grades than partying it up.

What are the academics like at your school?

The academic experience at Wellesley is truly phenomenal. It is so empowering to be in classes that are taught by women and to know that the smartest person in each course will be a woman, the person who participates most will be a woman, the one who gets the incredible government grant to research willbe a woman. I don't think there are many places in the world that tell women that they can be everything (and more) than men can be. What other school has a woman alumna who is running to be the first female president of the United States? Because there is this sense of empowerment, class participation is extremely advanced and often evocative. No one is ever afraid to speak out and to voice her opinion. And the fact that the professors here greatly respect students is absolutely incredible. I have spent a lot of time discussing the latest world news, the latest celebrity gossip, the buzz on campus or just my own stress level with my professors. I have had several meals at my professors' houses and it isn't unusual to get an email from a professor if you missed class to see if you're ok. Of course, this has its downside too. There just isn't any inconspicuous way to skip a class. Your absence will certainly be noticed. Wellesley students spend a lot of time studying- and they definitely spend some time in deep dinner conversations. There is definitely an intensely intellectual atmosphere on campus- and it can get almost suffocating at times. But the environment can also be stimulating...I have found myself dreaming of a future that I never imagined would be possible. And of course, having incredible friends makes the intensity that much less, well, intense. Wellesley women get the jobs they want. period. There are Wellesley women working on wall street, in the best medical and law schools, in business or academia. At home or abroad. The alumane network is truly one of the best in the country.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Wellesley students are nothing if not involved. There is a club for everything and everyone. Student government, and dorm government are big. The different language clubs are also very popular. One of the most visible group of extracurriculars are the "societies." There are no sororities at Wellesley, but the societies function like greek life. They have initiations, and events even though they are technically "literary" or "lecture centered." I'm involved in the Wellesley News which is the weekly paper on campus. It is a lot of work but it's also fun staying up late with the other editors rushing to get a paper out. As for the dorm culture, it really depends on the dorm. In my dorm which is by far the biggest on campus, people don't really leave their doors open. But the ones that are freshmen-centered are more open. Athletic events really aren't well attended- the school has such an academic focus that atheltics aren't a huge deal. There are quite a few speakers on campus but since there are so many schools in the Boston area there are tons and tons of opportunities to go to lectures and events. Wellesley is absolutely a school of traditions. Every year at the beginning of the first semester older girls sign up to be "big sisters" to one of the first-years. As the years go by, your little sisters get little sisters so it becomes a family. It is so much fun to watch your little sisters grow and experience college life, and it is a great system of advice and support. There is also hooprolling at the end of the year. This tradition has been around for over a century. Basically all the seniors get wooden hoops, dress up in their graduation robes and roll the hoops along a course. The winner is then carried into the lake and traditionally, she is going to be the "first to find success." Another tradition is step-singing. The different classes all get behind their banners (each class has a class color) and we try and outsing each other. There is also the infamous "Dyke Ball." The name of the event is self-descriptive so I'm not even going to try and explain it. If you really want to know, come and see for yourself!

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

There are several stereotypes of the Wellesley student that often conflict. Wellesley is obviously an all-girls school and as such, the lesbian jokes abound. There is the classic gay stereotype of 2400 raging dykes who cut their hair, wear piercings and tattoos and dress as men. On the other end of the stereotypical spectrum there is the image of Wellesley women as men-chasers. Harvard and MIT female students (and yes, there are women at MIT) are purported to have an extremely negative view of Wellesley students. After all, after the Wellesley women are done, there just aren't any boys left in Boston.

Margaret
What is your overall opinion of this school?

There isn't a best thing about Wellesley. The campus is gorgeous, and looks like the stereotypical New England College. As f...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

There isn't a best thing about Wellesley. The campus is gorgeous, and looks like the stereotypical New England College. As far as dorms go, some of the first year doubles are smaller, but all dorms have gorgeous common rooms equipped with a grand piano. There are six dining halls in various dorms some specialized, like the kosher dining hall, or the peanut free one. The options are great. Most students live on campus all four years, which gives the school a feeling of being closely knit. The size of the school is great, big enough that you don't know everyone, but small enough that you don't feel anonymous. The town of Wellesley is an affluent suburb that doesn't cater to college students, but luckily it has an easily accessible CVS and Starbucks.

Describe the students at your school.

I dont know if anyone would feel out of place here, because I think there are so many different kinds of students that it would just be a question of finding one's niche. There is a LGBT community on campus, but I've found sexuality to transcend all groups, and to become a non-issue among friends. People don't really care either way, and its just not a big deal. There is a lot of money here, but Wellesley is great about being very generous with financial aid, so there are definitely students who do not come from great means. The greatest thing about Wellesley is you can really be who you are, some people wear full make up, pearls, and heels to class whereas others come in their pajamas, or work out clothes if they just came from practice. All Wellesley students are serious about their studies and are at school to get a good education, they're all special or talented in one way. Every Wellesley woman is going to be successful in her own way.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

Wellesley is an amazing place, its not for everybody, and often people have a hard time adjusting to it, but it can really feel like home. There is something about a n all women's environment that attracts interesting and talented people, but allows women to really discover exactly who they are. Its so liberating but also enjoyable and nurturing. I wouldn't trade it for anything.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

There are really all types here, from conservative Christians, to prep school plaid wearing girls, to hippies that don't shower, to athletes, and Shakespeare experts. The stereotypes are not totally true, but of course there is a little bit of truth to each. The one thing that all Wellesley women have in common is that everyone here is smart and wants to receive a top notch education.

What are the academics like at your school?

Academics are taken seriously here. Everyone works hard and studies a lot. The professors are great, I have no complaints about any of my professors. All of my professors have been absolutely brilliant and proficient, they want us to learn and do well, so they are willing to help if students approach them with questions and concerns. Classes are definitely challenging, but interesting and not impossible. Students can get pretty competitive, but the honor code maintains that no one cheats, and professors don't proctor exams because they trust us enough not to cheat.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Wellesley has a ton of sweet traditions, like Lake Day and Midnight Breakfast. Organizations are also great about bringing guest speakers, so almost every night there is a lecture or show to attend. People tend to be involved in various organizations since there are so many groups and clubs on campus. There are always events on weekends, but often people just stay in with a pint of Ben&Jerry's and watch Grey's Anatomy. Your social life is what you make it, whether you want to spend your Saturday night going out, staying in, doing homework nobody will care and there will always be others doing the same. A lot of partying occurs off campus at places like MIT and Harvard, but people go into Boston for cultural events, and to go out to eat as well.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

So many: sex starved, gay, brilliant, driven, rich, snobby, preppy, hippie...

Lauren
What is your overall opinion of this school?

When telling people I go to Wellesley, it is usually met with blank stares or recognition as they cry, "Oh! My nephew played ...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

When telling people I go to Wellesley, it is usually met with blank stares or recognition as they cry, "Oh! My nephew played ice hockey there!" When assured that it is a women's college, and they still don't know what it is, I relent and ask them, "Have you ever seen the movie Mona Lisa Smile?" It seems that adults are more aware of the relevance and "name" of the school. During the week, I hardly notice that I go to a women's college. In fact, males are in a majority of my classes as students from Babson, MIT, and Olin can cross register. Nonetheless, the presence of a male on campus, particularly in the dining hall on the weekend, is met with stares and various degrees of shock. While Wellesley as vacillated between encouraging more of a social scene on the weekends for students, such as the infamous Dkye Ball or the newly introduced Remix, most students go into Boston for their free time. Wellesley students are usually readily accepted to join MIT frat parties or Harvard Final Clubs. While it is difficult to find a group of friends off campus, the myriad options of fun to be had in Boston make every weekend fun. There seems to be a dichotomy between the administration and the students. Certain aspects of college, such as wireless internet access, cable tv, or an accessible infirmary, which seem a natural part of any college life are null at Wellesley. It seems that years of protecting "Wellesley's women" from the big bad world has left the administration reluctant to change with the times. This would certainly be one of the most frequent student complaints. Nonetheless, changes are being made. For instance, the new Athletics Director, Bridget Belgiovine, is making huge strides in increasing pride for athletics and the school in general. Without a football team, it is easy to forget about athletics. Yet as a varsity field hockey player I have noticed a marked difference since Bridget's arrival as athletic accomplishments are met with more fanfare and support.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

Of course, everyone at Wellesley is smart. Combine the smartest girls from every high school into one class and you, inevitably, have a fair amount of women who raise their hand high and often. With the exception of finals period, although I cannot speak for everyone, bras are worn with vigor and regularity. Wellesley women are all passionate about something, be it saving Darfur, playing rugby, or organizing student government. The number of lesbians and bisexuals at our women's campus is comparable to any other college. If it seems as if there are more, it is only because they are given the space to be open about it.

What are the academics like at your school?

Academics are one of my most favorite parts of Wellesley. All of my professors know my name, and go out of their way to be available at most hours of the day whenever students feel particularly stressed about a paper or a job interview, or if someone just wants to share what has been going on in their life. Wellesley students rave about professors and classes the way other schools rave about varieties of beer of frat houses. Other students opinions are held in high regard when choosing classes, and personally, I have recommended a number of classes to other people. My favorite classes were a Political Science class titled "Weapons, War, and Strategy," taught by my major advisor Stacie Goddard, and an English class called "Short Narrative," a short story class. Class participation, particularly in more "right brained" subjects such as Political Science, English, or Women's Studies is frequent and helpful. In some ways, particularly with the grading curve which requires each class to have a B+ average, students can be cutthroat about grades. It takes a marked difference of work between a B and an A.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

Wellesley students are assumed to be bitingly smart and entirely uninterested in wearing a bra, spouting bits of their senior thesis on riveting dichotomies between various isms and writing love letters to their girlfriends.

Sally
What is your overall opinion of this school?

What I like best about being a Wellesley woman is the relaxed atmosphere. Of course we are always nervous about that upcoming...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

What I like best about being a Wellesley woman is the relaxed atmosphere. Of course we are always nervous about that upcoming midterm, but we have no problem taking time out of our day for a quick round of frisbee. We are all hardworking and passionate about the various events from around the world, especially when it comes to justice for women. One of the things I would like to change about Wellesley are the stupid steps outside of the Hazard Quad on the way to the Science building. They aren't even steps anymore, more like a trip/fall/concussion hill. Personally, I think the school size is perfect, we are large enough not to know every single person's name and background, but when I walk to class I can still say hi to twenty people who know me. When I tell people about Wellesley, I get one of two reactions: Never heard of it, or stunned silence because we all how amazing Wellesley is. I am from a small town in Wisconsin, so most of those reactions are oblivious to the level of Wellesley. I am sure out here on the East Coast, more people are aware of Wellesley and its reputation, but I have not really had the chance to talk to people outside of Boston who all know Wellesley. Wellesley is located in a really QUIET town. We have cute shops and places to eat, but it is a typical rich little town.

Describe the students at your school.

No one feels out of place at Wellesley. No one cares about your background or what your orientation is. We can't help but love everyone. If you make even a small effort to talk to someone, you've basically made a friend. Students mostly wear comfortable clothes all of the time. There is no one to impress except yourself, so most people don't even bother. Myself included. People mix like cake batter here at Wellesley. Most students are from the East Coast and California. Very few Midwesterners, I count myself lucky. Students are EXTREMELY politically aware. Right now, one of our alums is up for the Presidential Election, how can we not be aware? And we are very dominantly left-winged. No one says a word on their hopeful income, except there are a lot of ambitious pre-med students.

Is the stereotype of students at your school accurate?

Though we do have a lot of students from the gay community, no one cares and everyone is accepted for exactly who they are at Wellesley. Your sexual orientation has absolutely no basis in people's perceptions of you. And, sorry gentlemen, but we are not like bloodhounds on the hunt when you come on campus. Though it is a rare sight to see men at our women's college, it is not viewed as a time to grab men before someone else does. Honestly, we aren't desperate because men come to us. Though we have a large asian population, we are a very diverse campus with women from around the world. It is not uncommon to be in the dining hall where one table is speaking French, and a seperate table discusses topic in Italian. While we do attend a fierce intellectual school, we go out on the town (aka Boston) all of the time and have events on campus weekly.

What are the academics like at your school?

Professors know my name and they know what I took for classes last semester. Favorite class: Astronomy 101 with Prof. French. He is the coolest man. Period. Class particiaption is usually 100%. The classes are so small the professor knows when you are gone and sometimes drops an e-mail to find out where you are. Wellesley has very demanding list of requirements that leave a lot of people scrambling to fullfill them at the end of their senior year. Wellesley is geared for getting a job. Wellesley basically equals CEO. Ever heard of Hillary Clinton? Madeline Albright? Diane Sawyer? Yeah, all Wellesley Alums.

What is the stereotype of students at your school?

There are a lot of stereotypes about Wellesley women. For example, a lot of people assume that we are all lesbian or bisexual or that we jump on top of men the second we catch sight of them. Another stereotype is that we are all of asian descent, and refuse to go outside because we are too busy studying.

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