Wellesley, MA
Wellesley College


72 Ratings

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Recent Reviews

Katherine
Looking back onto 2010-2014

If you are okay with not having the "typical" college experience, and if you are extremely devoted to academics day-in and da...

Looking back onto 2010-2014

If you are okay with not having the "typical" college experience, and if you are extremely devoted to academics day-in and day-out, then perhaps Wellesley is the school for you. It is constantly laden with stress, but also filled with the most hardworking, driven women you will ever meet. If you want a social life, then you will have one (but you have to make it happen). You will enjoy Wellesley more if you do not procrastinate (see above- I repeat, extreme stress, blood, sweat, and tears are daily occurrences); try to remember, too, though that time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time at all. Sometimes Wellesley students are so caught up in academics and work that they forget to simply be young undergraduates who are still figuring things out. Cherish every opportunity that comes your way. And sleep. Please sleep.

Alice
Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

Wellesley is an all women's college, and a very beautiful place (figuratively and literally speaking), where emphasis is put ...

Describe how your school looks to someone who's never seen it.

Wellesley is an all women's college, and a very beautiful place (figuratively and literally speaking), where emphasis is put on how to think, than what to think, and where people are interested in becoming leaders in their respective fields.

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

Wellesley actively encourages students to explore different areas. I took the college's advice and walked out of my comfort zone my first semester, taking computer science and a class about Jewish and Muslim exiles. I had zero background, but they sounded interesting. I ended up loving coding, and I also want to continue studying the Middle East! This wouldn't have been possible without: 1) excellent teaching, (In 2012, Princeton Review rated Wellesley professors as #1 in the nation), 2) A mentality that people excel in what they love to do, so they should find what they love first.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I can be extremely shy. I would tell my younger self to not feel so self-conscious; the truth is, everyone feels that way the first few weeks of college. The questions "Will I make friends? Will people like me?" might be present, but even so, put yourself out there. I regret my first couple of weeks, where I kept to myself and stuck to what I knew. The third week, when I saw people jamming music in the dorm common room, I finally took the plunge. I spontaneously whipped out my mediocre singing voice and a violin, and those people became my best friends. Join things, you never know. Regarding grades, I would tell myself to prioritize. What if there's an event going on, and I have a test worth 40% of my grade tomorrow? Probably shouldn't bomb that one. What if it's one of the best events of the year and I have a minor quiz tomorrow? Go to the awesome event! I definitely had moments where I should have worked instead of played, and vice versa, played instead of worked. Have priorities, but try to be smart about them!

Christine
What do you brag about most when you tell your friends about your school?

Wellesley College was a unique experience that I will never have again in my lifetime. I was surrounded by women from all ove...

What do you brag about most when you tell your friends about your school?

Wellesley College was a unique experience that I will never have again in my lifetime. I was surrounded by women from all over the world in classes that were taught by mostly women that were held in rooms covered in posters of powerful, inspirational women that have accomplished great things. The greatest things Wellesley taught me was to suit up and show up, always think ahead, and that no matter what, a woman can overcome even the biggest of obstacles.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Dear Christine, I appreciate your enthusiasm to impress the pretty girls and handsome boys, but I assure you it is not necessary. Unfortunately you won't stay friends with most of them so bring it back to you. Remember how excited you were when you were doing Habitat for Humanity in Texas and Virginia? Those were times your soul came alive. Find more times your soul comes alive. That reminds me, George... you're little brother. You will have terrific conversations with him before school this year. Over coffee or cereal, the two of you will talk about everything. In college you may see George slip away from you, start getting involved in drinking, and eventually drop out of school. So I ask you to cherish every single moment with George. Create as many deep moments with him as possible. When you look back on high school, the moments with George will be the brightest, most memorable moments that make your heart warm. Forget about the boys and the parties and what you look like. Focus on your soul and spend as much time with George as possible. He will always be the light of your eyes. With Gratitude, Christine

What's the one thing you wish someone had told you about freshman year?

I wish I knew that high school reputations didn't matter, that I should have definitely considered my career after college when considering which college to pick, internships are incredibly important and should start in high school, the high school prom queen and king will not be able to wear their crowns to college nor will anyone care about their status, hard work is more important than boys kissed, true worth exists in the soul and most of our life journey should be focused on that, join more community services clubs, and help more people as often as possible.

Imara
Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

I'm going to go for the obvious and say that we are a historically women's college. What most people interpret, is that Welle...

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

I'm going to go for the obvious and say that we are a historically women's college. What most people interpret, is that Wellesley breeds women who haven't learned to jostle with men, leaving them unprepared for a "man's" world. What this really means is that being female is taken off of the table, and you learn that a woman's opinion is just as valid and valuable as a male's. It means that you gain confidence, knowledge, and learn how to make your prescence known in a sea of awesome, something wholly unique to Wellesley.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

There are a couple of things I found out about myself while I was transitioning into college life, both academically and socially. First is that no, I can't live without friends. The first thing I'd tell myself as a senior is "Hey, I know you're going to a Boston-Area school like a lot of your friends, but you need to meet new friends on your campus!" Maybe then I would've discovered the amazing group of friends I have now way earlier. I also found out that my favorite subject was not in fact English, but History. Honestly I wish I would have taken more classes that I just wanted to take, rather than sticking to a plan that is now useless anyway. So the second thing I'd say is "Ditch the plan. Take what looks cool!" Lastly, on a wholly practical level, I came into Wellesley with the worst senioritis-hangover ever. I wish I could go back to my senior year self, and scream "Keep studying! You can rest in the summer!" And maybe then I would have done better on some placement exams and not have to review material.

What kind of person should attend this school?

In order to suceed at Wellesley you have to be confident in your academic abilities. It's a really difficult school, especially for those who do not come from a rigourous educational background. Even if you don't, self-confidence is a must. You can't be afraid to ask for help, from professors or friends, and you have to know who you are. You will be surrounded by some of the most phenomenal women you have ever met in your life, and it can be hard to remember that if you got in, you're one of them!

Isabelle
What's the one thing you wish someone had told you about freshman year?

I wish I had known that it wouldn't be nearly as scary as I thought it would be! When I was preparing to leave home and fly a...

What's the one thing you wish someone had told you about freshman year?

I wish I had known that it wouldn't be nearly as scary as I thought it would be! When I was preparing to leave home and fly across the country to go to college, I was terrified, and I kept imagining all the terrible things that might happen-- I'd be homesick, I wouldn't have friends, no one to eat dinner with. But I arrived there, and I immediately felt welcome, and developed great friendships. I wish I could go back and tell myself, "It will be okay-- Wellesley's an amazing place, and you'll love it."

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

If I could go back in time and visit myself as a high school senior, I would offer myself words of comfort. Before I left home for college, I was terrified; I'm from California, so I was nervous about leaving my family and attending college in Massachusetts. I cried for days leading up to my departure. Even though, deep down, I knew everything was going to be all right, and that I would love college once I got settled in, the thought of leaving my family, friends, and beloved hometown was overwhelmingly sad. Now that I've completed one year of college and discovered how much I enjoy it, I wish I could go back and tell myself all about my positive experiences at Wellesley. I would talk about my caring roommate, my three best friends, my extracurricular activites, and, most importantly, the safe, friendly, environment that makes Wellesley feel like home, despite how much I worried that it would never feel that way. I would tell myself to be brave, and to keep in mind that no matter how scary college may seem at the moment, I will never regret having to undergo this dificult transition.

What's the most frustrating thing about your school?

The most frustrating thing about Wellelsey is that there is SO MUCH to do, and so little time to do it. Wellesley's academics are very rigorous, so homework takes up a lot of time. But then there are excellent extracurricular activities: I, for example, play the carillon (the bells), and edit GenerAsians Magazine. But there are hundreds of other organizations, many of which I would love to be a part of it I had the time. But life gets so busy that students can generally only pick one or two activities, even if they want to do more.

Gail
Describe your favorite campus traditions.

It has a beautiful 500-acre campus complete with our very own lake! The students are friendly and will make you feel right at...

Describe your favorite campus traditions.

It has a beautiful 500-acre campus complete with our very own lake! The students are friendly and will make you feel right at home. The professors are easily accessible and are willing to go over problems one-by-one on your homework that you didn't fully understand. The classes are interactive; you won't be in a huge lecture hall with 100s of other students. The professor actually notices if you're missing or late.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Hello, Gail. It's me (you!) from the future. I know you're busy studying for the SAT Subject Tests, so I'll make this brief. You'll be moving thousands of miles away to a completely new region of the U.S. New England is cold, so bring snow boots and lots of sweaters. More importantly, though, be open-minded and friendly. Your first roommate will be amazing and gregarious, and you should take up her offers on going to a social event or hanging out. You shouldn't repeat the same habits you did in high school, i.e. completely forgoing a social life. Academics are important, sure, but did you know the best students thrive on a healthy balance with both social and academic fuel? That said, you'll meet many smart people in college. A lot of them are valedictorians. Don't overestimate your abilities, and never be too proud to ask for help. Even if you don't understand a concept the first time, keep asking for guidance! You'll never learn otherwise. Study at least 5 days in advance, and use the quiz-and-recall method. All right, cheers. Good luck.

What do you consider the worst thing about your school? Why?

Wellesley College is a bubble. You are secluded from the real world and are focused primarily on academia within these ivy walls. Our school is one of the few that do not offer credit for internships or co-ops. In the end, this only makes us narrow-minded and unable to see the real world and all its facets.

Sophia
Describe the students at your school.

There is so much diversity on campus that it's hard to create a simple description for everyone. However, I would say that th...

Describe the students at your school.

There is so much diversity on campus that it's hard to create a simple description for everyone. However, I would say that the campus is so accepting of different cultures, socio-economic backgrounds, races, and religions that most I feel are comfortable.

What are the academics like at your school?

As mentioned, the professors get to know you on a personal level, especially within the major. You have a high likeliness of taking multiple courses with the same professors and they personally guide you into developing a real understanding of the field. Personally, I have gotten to know many professors in my department and have become very close with almost all of them. Some professors (like my advisor) take their students out to get coffee, to eat meals together, and even cook at their house for their students. It's a wonderful environment to learn. Of course, it must be noted that Wellesley has a very rigorous curriculum and any student thinking about applying and attending Wellesley could be ready to stretch their brains in ways they have never before. Class participation is key since the classes can go as small as 6 students. This means that every students is given a prominent voice at every class, and also means that attendance is an important part of our grade. Students are very competitive, some more than others depending on the major.

Yu
What are the most popular student activities/groups?

I am a photographer for the Wellesley News and I enjoy this activity! I am also a member of Japan club, because I am taking J...

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

I am a photographer for the Wellesley News and I enjoy this activity! I am also a member of Japan club, because I am taking Japanese courses, and I've met some really wonderful people there. Chinese student association is also very popular here and we have a strong Asian pool. Because of the honor code, students trust each other and some definitely leave their dorms open. I sometimes just put my computer anywhere on campus and leave to have lunch and come back to get it. No one will take your belongings and it's the safest place. Wellesley has a lot of amazing traditions! You have to come to know:) Students tend to go to Boston over the weekend or hang around town. The shops and restaurants in the town are really cute:) As far as I know, there isn't a drinking scene on campus.

Describe the students at your school.

Students are very diverse here. Most students are friendly and they make really good friends with you, but some are overly competitive. In some classes, each student becomes friends with each other because the class atmosphere is so collaborative and friendly. Most students care about politics and social events and they are often very active. They intend to make a real difference and they do strive toward that in their college years.

What are the academics like at your school?

The academics is truly amazing. Professors not only know my name, but they do care! I can easily make an appointment with any professor, or go to his or her office hours, even if she doesn't teach me. Some professors you can even get to know them on a personal basis. I am a prospective architecture major, and I find all the professors in the art and architecture department are so charming. Each one has particular characteristics and they are all marvelous in their courses. Class participation is common, because most of the classes are small. But I also enjoy lectures, which normally have 20 to 30 people. Students study really hard here. I mean, really hard. But they are all very smart! You get to know really wonderful people here. Last semester I took introduction drawing class with Daniela, and she is the most charming professor I've ever met! She does not teach, but she INSPIRES you to draw. At the end of the semester, I found that I have grasped most of the drawing techniques and know how to draw from the inside and what it means to be an artist. Other professors are also amazing. It is a small liberal arts college, but you will be amazed at its abundant academic resources and the diverse courses that it provides. Because it is near Boston, students usually get wonderful internship and jobs. The courses are mostly for its own sake, but students care about internships and jobs so much that it is almost a peer pressure that you get an internship over the summer, even if you are just a first-year...

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

competitive: yes, or kind of. particularly in economics or art department, where students are very competitive. But in other departments the atmosphere is really collaborative. smart: true. Wellesley women are very smart:)

Alexa
What is your overall opinion of this school?

I chose Wellesley for many reasons, but one of them was that I really wanted to be academically stimulated, and that has more...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

I chose Wellesley for many reasons, but one of them was that I really wanted to be academically stimulated, and that has more than been accomplished in my time here thusfar. These girls are driven; driven to cure cancer, change politics, paint a masterpiece, get social justice...just driven. One of the least common personalities you will find at Wellesley is apathetic. That makes for a very inspiring, yet intense, environment. There can be some heated competition, but I've never experienced it firsthand. Almost infallibly, everyone I've met here has been truly friendly and willing to help...whether they're a peer, professor, or otherwise. The size is perfect; it is definitely intimate, but in my opinion gives YOU that many more opportunities to take advantage of the large amount of resources at hand. Many people confuse Wellesley with Wesleyan, think of it as "that girls' school," or just don't know of it at all. But I find that in the areas that really matter (i.e. getting a job/internship/applying to grad school), all the right people know exactly what Wellesley is and are more than often impressed by its rigor and reputation in the "real world." The proximity to Boston is one of the best things about Wellesley. It is not right around the corner, but if you want to go into a large, vibrant college city, you can do so (at any time of the day/night/week). Sometimes it will cost you $3/trip, others it's free altogether...but it is always worth it! And the fact that you can come back to your cozy, quiet campus at the end of the night is even better than the proximity itself. The all-women factor is a bittersweet one. There are times I miss socializing with guys and wish I had them "at my disposal" so to speak, but I in no way feel that you feel "out of touch" with the male race when you're here. I am in Boston at least once a week, and have many friends both male and female at various institutions throughout the city and/or Cambridge. I do, however, love the academic environment of having all women. Coming from a fairly normal public high school, I didn't think I would be prepared to have all women in my classes, but I've found it not only to be "okay" but inspiring! There is a definite lack of school pride on campus, heightened by the fact that many women go off-campus for the weekend (when many sporting activities normally take place). However, there is so much general camaraderie on campus that it is definitely reflected in sports as well...just not as much as most large universities. One infamous Wellesley t-shirt comically spells out "Wellesley Football" on the front and "Undefeated since 1875" on the back. If you're looking for a tailgaiting party school, Wellesley is most likely not for you. But the universality of the liberal arts experience lets both our joys and sorrows translate across broad spectrums. One common belief is that Wellesley is just like a giant, eternal sleepover. I guess technically that's accurate! I adore the friends I've made here, and couldn't ask to have met more genuine, smart, fun people than I have throughout the student body. There is not nearly as much cattiness as I would have expected being at an all-women school, and I love that!

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Student government is fairly popular here, as are the various cultural groups on campus who host lectures, parties, and dinners. Sometimes it's hard to dedicate time to a student group when you have so much academic work on your plate, but somehow people manage to do it. I'm involved with theater on campus, and love how Wellesley supports the arts (like almost everything else). Not many people attend athletic events, but crew and tennis are very popular/well respected. The community system that is started from the moment you get at Wellesley is the best way to make friends, and the residential life is amazing (both really supportive and not too in-your-face). Many students have boyfriends from schools nearby, and you can see them dotted all over campus on the weekends. If i'm awake at 2am on a Tuesday, I am either studying or procrastinating studying, and I don't know too many people who would be doing otherwise. Last weekend I met up with friends from high school who go to other colleges in the area for dinner. Then I hopped on a bus and went to a final club at Harvard (a similar institution to fraternities), met up with my Wellesley friends, and returned to campus for a quiet night of peace! There are very few well-attended events on campus on the weekends, but the cultural shows tend to garner population and the few parties the societies (similar to sororities) have are also fairly well-attended.

Describe the students at your school.

Arguably, one of the best things about Wellesley is the diversity. I came from a very homogeneously white upper/middle-class area, and I was scared for a culture shock. I love having floormates from Hawaii and Belgium, and roommates both from Sweden and the county next to mine! Learning about different cultures has been a great asset for me in my time here. Wellesley is not a fashion-forward place, but if you are, you can be. It is very non-judgmental, and I love it for that.

What are the academics like at your school?

The professors are highly touted at Wellesley, and for good reason. They care so sincerely about their students, and the tiny class sizes make it almost impossible to not become close with most of your professors. This is NOT a sit-in-the-back-of-the-lecture-hall type school. Classes are engaging, and there is generally a lot expected of students. As a moderate-conservative in ideology, I am almost scared to venture into the Women's and Gender Studies department (one that is quite popular here). My political theory class was very liberally slanted, and it made me dislike the department, although it is mostly the doing of the student body and less of the professors. My favorite departments are French and Theater. French is a fairly large department, and the opportunities to study abroad are amazing (one program in particular sends about 30 students a semester to Aix-en-Provence, France). The theater department is really tiny, but I know of many students ranging from seasoned professionals to complete newcomers who love the intimacy of the department. The professors almost always care and are there to help you. There are a lot of academic requirements; in fact one of the few schools left who has so many. Personally, I didn't think skimping out of my lab requirement by taking Geosciences will be that helpful in the grand scheme of things, but I do love that there is some structure and it forces you to look at departments you'd never usually consider. Education is DEFINITELY geared toward learning, however I think many people really reap the benefits of that through the means of getting great jobs as well.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

No way! I know very few people at Wellesley who fit that entire stereotype. There are a few of each type, but that's what's great about Wellesley...it's so diverse. Culturally, economically, intellectually (well, usually) and socially diverse. I was almost scared to come here because I bought into that stereotype, but being here for almost two years has taught me that there is so much more about the school than just those labels.

Victoria
What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best part about Wellesley is the classroom dynamic. Classes are small, the students are there to learn and are usually s...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best part about Wellesley is the classroom dynamic. Classes are small, the students are there to learn and are usually studying the course material because they're interested it. Best of all, the professors are brilliant and highly approachable. The are no TAs, so if you have a question or hand in an exam, you're dealing directly with the profs. Size factors into other areas of college life too -- since there are only about 2,400 students at Wellesley, you'll get to know a lot of your classmates very well, which I love. And, because Wellesley is a women's school, students are rarely shy and are usually confident and outspoken. All in all, a great environment! If I were to change one thing it would be the location of the gym, which is on one end of campus rather than somewhere in the middle. That said, the campus has a gorgeous lake with a trail that loops around it, guaranteeing a beautiful run at any time of year. Wellesley College is located in the town of Wellesley, which is mostly populated by ridiculously rich people -- so while there are some great stores just off campus, most of them are outside the average student's budget. However, Wellesley provides frequent (usually hourly) transportation into Cambridge and Boston, the greatest college towns on the East Coast. A frequent complaint on campus is the lack of guys, but this is easily avoided by a short bus ride into a city populated by hundreds of thousands of college students. Wellesley students can also cross-register for classes at MIT, Olin, Babson, or Brandeis.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Not many of my high school friends and teachers knew where or what Wellesley College is. When I explained that it's a women's college outside of Boston, the general reaction was, "What, are you a lesbian now?" After a year and a half at Wellesley, I can say that there definitely are lesbians (as well as students who are bisexual, trangendered, and more -- "sexuality is a spectrum not a binary"), but Wellesley, despite what people may say, is hardly a school "of" or "for" lesbians. We're a school of and for women, whatever their sexual orientation may be.

Describe the students at your school.

One of the stereotypes about Wellesley that actually is true is the student body's tendency towards liberalism. While there are definitely Republicans on campus, the overwhelming majority of us are Democrats. The campus is very diverse in every other way, however: students identify with every religion, race, socio-economic status, nationality, and sexuality imaginable, and with few exceptions we all interact and befriend each other without problems. One of the great parts about going to a women's college is that when it starts to get cold or when it's finals week and you don't have time to sleep, let alone put on makeup, no one give you the side eye when you show up to class in tights, a hoodie and no makeup. Although lots of students wear heels and classy outfits to class year-round, no feels judged when they show up to class in clothes they could easily have worn to bed.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

It's not possible to pinpoint the "most popular" groups or organizations on campus because it's not really possible to say that some are overwhelmingly more popular than others. There are groups for everything from archery and Club Filipina to Spectrum, the LGBTQ organization, and Ethos, the black students' organization. There are clubs for individual academic departments, and there's even a Science Fiction and Fantasy club. There aren't any sororities at Wellesley, but there are "societies," which are basically social clubs with emphases on specific things. For example, the Shakespeare society performs Shakespeare plays, while Phi Sig is the "lecture society" and frequently funds and hosts lectures (including and fun one I went to on the future of Mars exploration). Lectures occur just about every day, and some -- such as last semester's lecture by Madeline Albright, a Wellesley grad, and a recent show by Ellie Goulding -- are incredibly popular. During my first year I went to a lecture by Paul Frommer, the inventor of Avatar's Na'vi language (he was awesome); I also attended a fantastic talk by Tamora Pierce, one of my childhood idols. Most students choose to involve themselves in one or two extracurriculars that they devote a lot of effort to. I'm an editor for the Wellesley News, the on-campus weekly newspaper, and I volunteer once a week by tutoring high school students off campus; I'm also the events coordinator for the Pre-Law Society. I also have a job working at the circulation desks at three of the five on-campus libraries. Many students on campus volunteer and/or have jobs, and people rarely have troubles finding a group to grow attached to.

What are the academics like at your school?

Professors usually know students' names by the second week of classes. Classes are small -- the smallest class I've had so far is 10 people, the largest 30 -- and not only do professors know your name, but a trend towards class discussion (especially in the social sciences and humanities) ensures that you often get to know your classmates fairly well too. There is a stereotype that Wellesley students (the most hardcore of us are called "Wendy Wellesleys") are cutthroat with regard to competition, but I have yet to encounter this. Classmates are friendly, approachable and helpful. If you miss a class, you can ask a complete stranger and she'll give you her notes. Like at any educational institution -- including both high schools and colleges -- there are a range of study habits outside of the classroom, where some students never leave their rooms while others have inhumanly active social lives. Classes at Wellesley are definitely demanding, but if you learn time management there's no reason why you shouldn't have lots of free time for Netflix, parties and friends. I'm double-majoring in history and biology, both of which are fantastic departments at Wellesley. I shopped around a lot before settling on these majors (throughout my first three semesters I considered majors in philosophy, political science, Spanish, English, and biochemistry), but Wellesley's flexible graduation requirements enabled me to try out lots of departments without falling behind. My favourite class to date is a history course I took on Alexander the Great, which detailed the life and death of the greatest conqueror the world has ever seen -- the class was awesome and the professor who teaches it is now my major advisor. Next year I want to spend a semester biology (especially genetics) in Dublin.

Details

  • Enrollment
  • 2,482
  • Tuition & Fees
  • $48,802
  • Acceptance rate
  • 29%

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