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Whitman College

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What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Students (and parents) should never settle or be preemptively afraid of the application process. Many potential undergraduate students are scared away by SAT scores, GPA, and the like, while most schools actually place these quantitative values very low on their admissions priority list. Most schools will actually look first at the submitted essays, a student's involvement in their home community, and many other qualitative characteristics. Especially when applying to a smaller liberal arts school, admissions officers are looking for students who will nurture the schools creative, intellectual environment. Students at undergraduate schools should never be afraid to approach professors. When students take genuine interest and passion in any field of study, professors become invested. Most professors will go to great lengths to accommodate a student's intellectual growth. Students should never feel like--or tell themselves--that they are incapable of learning about things for which they are passionate. Parents should know their children, and be able to encourage them to grow: pursuing avenues they may not have even known existed, for at the end may be a passion for knowledge previously undiscovered. When a student is open to their own creativity, there is no stopping their intellectual exploration!

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Nothing in all the world is comparable to reading Ayn Rand beneath New York's skyline or to studying Nietzsche atop a mountain summit. Since childhood, the studies of philosophy and science have interested me profoundly. Having read many books on relativity, quantum mechanics, existentialism, religion, capitalism, democracy and post-Aristotelian philosophy, my quest for knowledge has only intensified. Certainly, the purpose of my life is to discover a greater understanding of the universe and its people. Specifically, I plan to better grasp the interrelationship among forces, matter, space, and time. In addition, I hope to find a unified field theory and a convincing explanation for the birth of the universe. During the summer of tenth grade, I took a number theory course at Johns Hopkins University with students from Alaska, California, and Bogota, Colombia. My attendance of the New Jersey Governor's School in the Sciences is another accomplishment that exemplifies my dedication to knowledge. During the summer following eleventh grade, I took courses in molecular orbital theory, special relativity, cognitive psychology, and I participated in an astrophysics research project. For my independent research project, I used a telescope to find the angular velocity of win with the angular.

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This applicant would challenge himself to remain focused and intrinsically motivated to retain the dream of attaining a higher education to acquire the soft and hard technological skills for the benefit of humanity and the environment in the spirit of excellence. All the while, he should sustain a spiritual balance and relationship with God, yet ever cognizant that he has been placed in this life to serve. The experiences gained while acquiring these technological skills in the halls of academia would enable and empower him with the rudimentary skills requisite of one who aspires to affect a catalyst for change to the world at-large. Because of his spiritual centeredness and worldly desire to be trained in a capacity to technologically, philosophically, and theosophically contribute to, and add his verve to this human melting pot, he must remain keenly aware of the impact he has on the behavior, thoughts, and actions of others. This striking awareness thereby causing him not to desire to abuse, mishandle, pervert, nor misuse those entrusted to his charge; this all, to the glory of God. Again, this applicant would endeavor to convey the ideology that with this great power comes due diligence and great responsibility.

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My going to college means everything to me. I am anxious to learn and receive a excellent education experience. I look forward to a career that will not only allow for great employment , but also enjoying and rewarding. The career field I have chosen; will allow me to help other people who are in need of medical relieve; being able to ease and relieve the pain of others gives me a great satisfaction, joy and knowledge of accomplishment. My ultimate goal in life is helping others feel better. This college experience has allowed me the opportunity to learn, grow, and discover more about my inner-self. The lessons I have learned combined with the values that have been instilled in me through my parents, community, and college has allowed me to become a better student and person, which has given me the opportunity to strive for my ultimate goal in life. My attending College is a important stepping stone along the pathway of reaching my ultimate goal and striving for a dream come true. I look forward to a rewarding career, the opportunity, and satisfaction of doing my best in making the world a better place for all equality

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When initially applying to the colleges, pick schools that fit the criteria most important to you. Say for example: academic reputation, big city/rural environment, class size or ability to interact with professors, athletics...and so on. Then make a list of at least six schools: 2 "dream schools" that you think might be a long shot considering it's competitive admissions process, 2 "most possible" schools that you think you have a pretty good chance of getting accepted, and 2 "for sure" schools that you "know" will accept you. Then, when acceptence letters come, visit those schools. A school might seem great on paper, but sometimes one just doesn't connect with the "feel" of the school. This is the most important factor in deciding what school is right for you. If you don't feel comfortable or can't picture yourself being at that school for four year, it doesn't matter if the school is everything you thought you wanted on paper - you will not be happy forcing yourself to attend that school. Once you start college, branch out and make new friends that first month. Then focus on perfecting a successful study routine. Good luck!

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Start early on your college search and spend time to really think about what you want in a college. Make sure after you've narrowed it down to visit the colleges you're interested in, try to stay a night in a dorm, talk to students, talk to professors and check out departments that you are interested in. When you receive your acceptance letters and financial aid packets, this information along with the information you've gained from researching and visiting the schools will combine to form the best decision. Having embarked on the college experience, it can be difficult to balance a perhaps highly social atmosphere and freedom with school work. To be successful, set priorities early. Make sure that you don't fall behind in readings and classworks, study to do well on tests, and then be able to enjoy time spent with friends and weekends. Being involved in extra-curricular activities can be great ways to meet new people and a fun way to spend time. Make sure you don't sign up for too much and make your work load impossible to handle. The key to success in college is finding ways to balance your time.

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We line up; the time starts; I run; I finish; That is the story of my first fitness test as a Whitman College varsity soccer player. Along with my matriculation at Whitman College in April came the knowledge that I would be playing varsity soccer and have to complete an assessment measuring my physical preparedness. This entailed a summer of training and anxiety. By August 18th, I was sufficiently scared out of my wits. While my fears that the test would be the most physically exhausting activity of my life did prove true, after ten minutes it was over and I could look forward to what came next. In retrospect, this fitness test was emblematic of my entire college transition. There was a lot of hype, it lived up to most of the hype, and then it was over and a new chapter begins. My most important advice to myself would be to recognize change as inevitable and to not let petty apprehensions detract from what is the most life-altering, positive transition of my life. Don’t get overwhelmed by fears, but enjoy your last months as a naïve high school student and embrace the change to come.

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The first thing I would tell myself has to deal with change. I would ask myself what I expected, then tell myself to forget that and not expect anything. College is going to challenge and change you in ways that you can not even dream of. The things you would like to change will not necessarily change, and the things that you would like to keep the same could possibly change. Learning to allow change in your life will be difficult, but will ultimately help you to become a much more confident and knowledgeable person. The second thing I would tell myself deals with self-confidence. Learning to be confident in college will take making friends that really care about you and that will help you find out your strengths as a person. Learning to trust and enjoy the people around you will be the most important thing you learn your freshman year of college. The third thing I would tell myself is to get ready to work harder than you have ever worked in your life. You will need to spend more time on schoolwork than you ever have before, but it will be exceedingly more rewarding in college.

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After I read this question, I was tempted to make a list of things to avoid at college. Never procrastinate, avoid that class, do not date that boy. But I realize giving myself advice about what NOT to do was negative. Instead, I would give myself a list of five positive tips. First, I would look my younger self straight in the eye and say: "have faith." Have faith in your talent, creativity, and charm. You are smart and strong, so have faith in yourself. Second, despite your strength, you will stumble sometimes. Ask for help when you falter. Friends and professors will be happy to give you support. Third, work hard. Fully apply yourself to everything you do. Anything less than your best is just not good enough. Fourth, let yourself fall in love. Fall in love with a subject that makes you excited to learn more. And let yourself fall in love with a boy. No, not your first boyfriend (he turns out to be rotten). But the second guy you love is definitely worthwhile. Fifth, revel in being young. You have options, opportunities, and open doors right in front of you. Enjoy every minute!

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There are so many different colleges out there, and so many of them seem to fit the same description - it can be a daunting task to filter through all of them to find the 'right one.' Yet, it is important not to become overwhelmed by your many choices. Instead, you should follow your own instincts and ideas of what sort of college atmosphere will work best for you in order to narrow down the huge list to a chosen few. It is also important to remember, however, that a written description cannot possibly encapsulate each and every facet of a school. Each college has a certain something that differenciates it from all others, and visiting the colleges you are looking at will help you to determine which ones truly 'fit'. As far as the college experience goes, it too can be a bit overwhelming. However, even when you feel overwhelmed by everything going on in your life, the easiest way to deal with stress is to face things one step at a time. If you stay focused on accomplishing the task at hand and leave time for the many new experiences college has to offer, you will do fine.

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