George Washington University doesn't care about your SAT or ACT scores

By Danielle Goodman

According to CNN, George Washington University will make SAT and ACT scores optional on college applications, claiming that these test scores are a better reflection of income than academic potential. They hope this new policy will lead to a more diverse student body. GWU joins a host of other universities in eliminating standardized test requirements, including:

Wesleyan University

"We believe that students should have the power to decide how best to present themselves to the admission committee and whether — or not — their standardized test results accurately reflect their academic ability and potential." 

Wake Forest University

"For the record, it’s not that we think standardized tests are evil. We just think that the measure of your intelligence and potential requires a deeper dive. It’s about life experience, aspiration, work ethic, engagement and all of what makes you who you are. That’s why we believe so strongly in the interview process. Numbers rarely tell the whole story."

Bryn Mawr College

"Beginning with the 2014-2015 application cycle, undergraduate applicants to Bryn Mawr College will have the option of submitting standardized test scores."

Smith College

"SAT I or ACT scores are optional for US Citizens and US permanent residents."

Bowdoin College

"Bowdoin does not require that applicants submit SAT or ACT scores for the purposes of admission. The College has been 'test optional' since 1969. This policy allows applicants to decide for themselves whether or not their test results accurately reflect their academic ability and potential. For candidates electing to submit them, test scores will be reviewed along with other indicators of academic ability."

University of Mary Washington

"The University of Mary Washington does not require high school applicants to submit SAT or ACT scores for the purpose of admission if they have maintained at least a 3.5 grade point average when applying for admission to the university."