Wellesley, MA
Wellesley College


74 Ratings

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Recent Reviews

Alexa
What is your overall opinion of this school?

I chose Wellesley for many reasons, but one of them was that I really wanted to be academically stimulated, and that has more...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

I chose Wellesley for many reasons, but one of them was that I really wanted to be academically stimulated, and that has more than been accomplished in my time here thusfar. These girls are driven; driven to cure cancer, change politics, paint a masterpiece, get social justice...just driven. One of the least common personalities you will find at Wellesley is apathetic. That makes for a very inspiring, yet intense, environment. There can be some heated competition, but I've never experienced it firsthand. Almost infallibly, everyone I've met here has been truly friendly and willing to help...whether they're a peer, professor, or otherwise. The size is perfect; it is definitely intimate, but in my opinion gives YOU that many more opportunities to take advantage of the large amount of resources at hand. Many people confuse Wellesley with Wesleyan, think of it as "that girls' school," or just don't know of it at all. But I find that in the areas that really matter (i.e. getting a job/internship/applying to grad school), all the right people know exactly what Wellesley is and are more than often impressed by its rigor and reputation in the "real world." The proximity to Boston is one of the best things about Wellesley. It is not right around the corner, but if you want to go into a large, vibrant college city, you can do so (at any time of the day/night/week). Sometimes it will cost you $3/trip, others it's free altogether...but it is always worth it! And the fact that you can come back to your cozy, quiet campus at the end of the night is even better than the proximity itself. The all-women factor is a bittersweet one. There are times I miss socializing with guys and wish I had them "at my disposal" so to speak, but I in no way feel that you feel "out of touch" with the male race when you're here. I am in Boston at least once a week, and have many friends both male and female at various institutions throughout the city and/or Cambridge. I do, however, love the academic environment of having all women. Coming from a fairly normal public high school, I didn't think I would be prepared to have all women in my classes, but I've found it not only to be "okay" but inspiring! There is a definite lack of school pride on campus, heightened by the fact that many women go off-campus for the weekend (when many sporting activities normally take place). However, there is so much general camaraderie on campus that it is definitely reflected in sports as well...just not as much as most large universities. One infamous Wellesley t-shirt comically spells out "Wellesley Football" on the front and "Undefeated since 1875" on the back. If you're looking for a tailgaiting party school, Wellesley is most likely not for you. But the universality of the liberal arts experience lets both our joys and sorrows translate across broad spectrums. One common belief is that Wellesley is just like a giant, eternal sleepover. I guess technically that's accurate! I adore the friends I've made here, and couldn't ask to have met more genuine, smart, fun people than I have throughout the student body. There is not nearly as much cattiness as I would have expected being at an all-women school, and I love that!

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

Student government is fairly popular here, as are the various cultural groups on campus who host lectures, parties, and dinners. Sometimes it's hard to dedicate time to a student group when you have so much academic work on your plate, but somehow people manage to do it. I'm involved with theater on campus, and love how Wellesley supports the arts (like almost everything else). Not many people attend athletic events, but crew and tennis are very popular/well respected. The community system that is started from the moment you get at Wellesley is the best way to make friends, and the residential life is amazing (both really supportive and not too in-your-face). Many students have boyfriends from schools nearby, and you can see them dotted all over campus on the weekends. If i'm awake at 2am on a Tuesday, I am either studying or procrastinating studying, and I don't know too many people who would be doing otherwise. Last weekend I met up with friends from high school who go to other colleges in the area for dinner. Then I hopped on a bus and went to a final club at Harvard (a similar institution to fraternities), met up with my Wellesley friends, and returned to campus for a quiet night of peace! There are very few well-attended events on campus on the weekends, but the cultural shows tend to garner population and the few parties the societies (similar to sororities) have are also fairly well-attended.

Describe the students at your school.

Arguably, one of the best things about Wellesley is the diversity. I came from a very homogeneously white upper/middle-class area, and I was scared for a culture shock. I love having floormates from Hawaii and Belgium, and roommates both from Sweden and the county next to mine! Learning about different cultures has been a great asset for me in my time here. Wellesley is not a fashion-forward place, but if you are, you can be. It is very non-judgmental, and I love it for that.

What are the academics like at your school?

The professors are highly touted at Wellesley, and for good reason. They care so sincerely about their students, and the tiny class sizes make it almost impossible to not become close with most of your professors. This is NOT a sit-in-the-back-of-the-lecture-hall type school. Classes are engaging, and there is generally a lot expected of students. As a moderate-conservative in ideology, I am almost scared to venture into the Women's and Gender Studies department (one that is quite popular here). My political theory class was very liberally slanted, and it made me dislike the department, although it is mostly the doing of the student body and less of the professors. My favorite departments are French and Theater. French is a fairly large department, and the opportunities to study abroad are amazing (one program in particular sends about 30 students a semester to Aix-en-Provence, France). The theater department is really tiny, but I know of many students ranging from seasoned professionals to complete newcomers who love the intimacy of the department. The professors almost always care and are there to help you. There are a lot of academic requirements; in fact one of the few schools left who has so many. Personally, I didn't think skimping out of my lab requirement by taking Geosciences will be that helpful in the grand scheme of things, but I do love that there is some structure and it forces you to look at departments you'd never usually consider. Education is DEFINITELY geared toward learning, however I think many people really reap the benefits of that through the means of getting great jobs as well.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

No way! I know very few people at Wellesley who fit that entire stereotype. There are a few of each type, but that's what's great about Wellesley...it's so diverse. Culturally, economically, intellectually (well, usually) and socially diverse. I was almost scared to come here because I bought into that stereotype, but being here for almost two years has taught me that there is so much more about the school than just those labels.

Victoria
What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best part about Wellesley is the classroom dynamic. Classes are small, the students are there to learn and are usually s...

What is your overall opinion of this school?

The best part about Wellesley is the classroom dynamic. Classes are small, the students are there to learn and are usually studying the course material because they're interested it. Best of all, the professors are brilliant and highly approachable. The are no TAs, so if you have a question or hand in an exam, you're dealing directly with the profs. Size factors into other areas of college life too -- since there are only about 2,400 students at Wellesley, you'll get to know a lot of your classmates very well, which I love. And, because Wellesley is a women's school, students are rarely shy and are usually confident and outspoken. All in all, a great environment! If I were to change one thing it would be the location of the gym, which is on one end of campus rather than somewhere in the middle. That said, the campus has a gorgeous lake with a trail that loops around it, guaranteeing a beautiful run at any time of year. Wellesley College is located in the town of Wellesley, which is mostly populated by ridiculously rich people -- so while there are some great stores just off campus, most of them are outside the average student's budget. However, Wellesley provides frequent (usually hourly) transportation into Cambridge and Boston, the greatest college towns on the East Coast. A frequent complaint on campus is the lack of guys, but this is easily avoided by a short bus ride into a city populated by hundreds of thousands of college students. Wellesley students can also cross-register for classes at MIT, Olin, Babson, or Brandeis.

What is the stereotype of students at your school? Is this stereotype accurate?

Not many of my high school friends and teachers knew where or what Wellesley College is. When I explained that it's a women's college outside of Boston, the general reaction was, "What, are you a lesbian now?" After a year and a half at Wellesley, I can say that there definitely are lesbians (as well as students who are bisexual, trangendered, and more -- "sexuality is a spectrum not a binary"), but Wellesley, despite what people may say, is hardly a school "of" or "for" lesbians. We're a school of and for women, whatever their sexual orientation may be.

Describe the students at your school.

One of the stereotypes about Wellesley that actually is true is the student body's tendency towards liberalism. While there are definitely Republicans on campus, the overwhelming majority of us are Democrats. The campus is very diverse in every other way, however: students identify with every religion, race, socio-economic status, nationality, and sexuality imaginable, and with few exceptions we all interact and befriend each other without problems. One of the great parts about going to a women's college is that when it starts to get cold or when it's finals week and you don't have time to sleep, let alone put on makeup, no one give you the side eye when you show up to class in tights, a hoodie and no makeup. Although lots of students wear heels and classy outfits to class year-round, no feels judged when they show up to class in clothes they could easily have worn to bed.

What are the most popular student activities/groups?

It's not possible to pinpoint the "most popular" groups or organizations on campus because it's not really possible to say that some are overwhelmingly more popular than others. There are groups for everything from archery and Club Filipina to Spectrum, the LGBTQ organization, and Ethos, the black students' organization. There are clubs for individual academic departments, and there's even a Science Fiction and Fantasy club. There aren't any sororities at Wellesley, but there are "societies," which are basically social clubs with emphases on specific things. For example, the Shakespeare society performs Shakespeare plays, while Phi Sig is the "lecture society" and frequently funds and hosts lectures (including and fun one I went to on the future of Mars exploration). Lectures occur just about every day, and some -- such as last semester's lecture by Madeline Albright, a Wellesley grad, and a recent show by Ellie Goulding -- are incredibly popular. During my first year I went to a lecture by Paul Frommer, the inventor of Avatar's Na'vi language (he was awesome); I also attended a fantastic talk by Tamora Pierce, one of my childhood idols. Most students choose to involve themselves in one or two extracurriculars that they devote a lot of effort to. I'm an editor for the Wellesley News, the on-campus weekly newspaper, and I volunteer once a week by tutoring high school students off campus; I'm also the events coordinator for the Pre-Law Society. I also have a job working at the circulation desks at three of the five on-campus libraries. Many students on campus volunteer and/or have jobs, and people rarely have troubles finding a group to grow attached to.

What are the academics like at your school?

Professors usually know students' names by the second week of classes. Classes are small -- the smallest class I've had so far is 10 people, the largest 30 -- and not only do professors know your name, but a trend towards class discussion (especially in the social sciences and humanities) ensures that you often get to know your classmates fairly well too. There is a stereotype that Wellesley students (the most hardcore of us are called "Wendy Wellesleys") are cutthroat with regard to competition, but I have yet to encounter this. Classmates are friendly, approachable and helpful. If you miss a class, you can ask a complete stranger and she'll give you her notes. Like at any educational institution -- including both high schools and colleges -- there are a range of study habits outside of the classroom, where some students never leave their rooms while others have inhumanly active social lives. Classes at Wellesley are definitely demanding, but if you learn time management there's no reason why you shouldn't have lots of free time for Netflix, parties and friends. I'm double-majoring in history and biology, both of which are fantastic departments at Wellesley. I shopped around a lot before settling on these majors (throughout my first three semesters I considered majors in philosophy, political science, Spanish, English, and biochemistry), but Wellesley's flexible graduation requirements enabled me to try out lots of departments without falling behind. My favourite class to date is a history course I took on Alexander the Great, which detailed the life and death of the greatest conqueror the world has ever seen -- the class was awesome and the professor who teaches it is now my major advisor. Next year I want to spend a semester biology (especially genetics) in Dublin.

tara
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

If I was able to go back in time and give myself advice during my senior year in high school having the knowledge I have now ...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

If I was able to go back in time and give myself advice during my senior year in high school having the knowledge I have now as a college student, I would tell myself that studying is the most critical aspect in recieving a good grade. I would say that staying after class just for a few minuets to have the tecaher clarify any questions you may have will greatly improve your understanding of the subject. Your teacher is there as a resourse to help you, so utilize him/her. Your teachers want you to succeed, so do not be afraid to ask questions and recieve their help. Take organized notes during class so that they are understandable when you review them later on. Do not sit close to your friends beacuse they will distract you and cost you the knowledge of key concepts. By doing these things, you will be able to stay ontop in college and not fall short given the tough curriculum. Last, but not least, be yourself and enjoy the experience.

Krystal
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Be strategic in what classes you take, when you take them, and how you take them. Since no one stressed the above statemen...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

Be strategic in what classes you take, when you take them, and how you take them. Since no one stressed the above statement to me when I was a first year college student, my G.P.A. remains a poor reflection of my academic effort. Working hard is a fraction of the G.P.A. recipe. The other ingredients include the professor, the semester in which a student takes a course, his/her decision to take the class regular grading or pass/fail, and of course personal life issues. Had I been a wise incoming student, I would have gathered a variety of opinions on different professors, taken math and science courses pass/fail (considering that these are not my areas of strength), and probably arranged my schedule differently. I would not encourage myself to be obsessed with the G.P.A., but at the same time remind myself that despite any personal disagreement with the G.P.A. labelling system, it is something that will affect my future.

What's unique about your campus?

The class structure is one that offers the best environment for learning. Most of my classes have not exceeded a size of 15 students. This small number allows professors to offer me and the other students personal attention that is not afforded in a larger institution. This individual attention extends outside the classroom; professors are VERY willing to help their students and the small classroom size makes this possible. It is also easier to participate in classroom discussions, which are rarely lecture based. I genuinely feel that my intellectual development has progressed because of the class sizes.

What's the most frustrating thing about your school?

The grade deflation policy is the most frustrating aspect of this institution. The reasoning behind its implentation involves increasing the school's competitiveness. I, however, believe that the policy hinders academic achievement and personal development. For one, the G.P.A is no longer a reflection of a student's effort. Moreover, the manipulated numerical value negatively affects one's chances of attaining specific opportunities that require a certain G.P.A. Secondly, and more importantly, grade deflation stifles one's willingness to work hard since the rewards granted are not merit based.

Cathy
Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

I particularly love the empowering atmosphere provided at Wellesley. Although it is a relatively small college, it simply doe...

Here's your chance: Say anything about your college!

I particularly love the empowering atmosphere provided at Wellesley. Although it is a relatively small college, it simply does not fail in allowing each student to feel that at Wellesley, anything is possible. Being surrounded by curious, passionate, and like-minded individuals has been socially and academically satisfying for me. In addition, the small class sizes allows for professors to develop wonderful relationships with their students, thus leading to stellar recommendations and lifelong friendships. At Wellesley, I am among the best, brightest, and most determined women in the nation, and I cannot imagine myself attending any other college.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

I would tell my high school self to reach out in all aspects of the college experience. Whether it be in class, at the campus center, or at orchestra, it is important to extend your connections in every opportunity presented. There are so many individuals at Wellesley who are intelligent and share the same interests. To make the most of the collegiate experience, not only is it important to study hard, it's also important to develop friendships. This is one of the most important aspects of the first few weeks of college. However difficult the task may be because of the overwhelming number of unfamiliar faces, it is entirely feasible. As a transfer student in high school, I was discouraged because of the difficulty in successfully transferring socially into my new educational atmosphere. I felt the same when I first arrived to college, but I now know that everyone felt those exact emotions upon arriving. Therefore, I feel that it would be important to tell my high school self to be as outspoken and as friendly as possible because developing friendships are of paramount importance and reaching out to others is a feat we all must overcome.

What's unique about your campus?

One of the best aspects of Wellesley is the strong communal relationship among the student body. This is clearly evident in our use of Big and Little Sisters, whom we keep in touch with throughout the year. In addition, there is an strong alumni network present, which also provides evidence of Wellesley's sense of community. At larger universities, it would be easy to feel lost in such a large student body. However, this is not the case at Wellesley. The friendly atmosphere, sense of community, and dedication to the college post-graduation really draw me to this school.

Vanessa
Describe the students at your school.

My classmates are very competitive, studious, and hardworking.

Describe the students at your school.

My classmates are very competitive, studious, and hardworking.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

As a high school valedictorian I felt the pressure to get accepted into an ivy league school. I blindly applied to five top schools solely based on their rank and never visited the campuses even after I got accepted to them. I could not have made a more wrong choice. Yes, education is the main reason for going to college, yet it is definitely not the only one. Looking back at the college selection process, I wish I had done my research as to what type of environment I would be living in, how the social life was, how happy current students felt at such school, what type of weather would dominate, etc. As I apply now for graduate school, my decision on the schools I apply to will be based on whether they are a right fit for me and not because of their prestigious image. This time around I will visit the campuses, talk to current students , sit in on a class, talk to a professor, have lunch in the dining hall, and explore all the resources available to me. I am very grateful that I have a second chance to learn from my mistakes!

What's unique about your campus?

The best thing about Wellesley College is when you are able to say that you are an alum of the college. I say that because during your time at Wellesley you will experience a very demanding, competitive, cut-throat, and depressing environment. Happiness only ensues when you end your time there and are able to say that you are an alum of this prestigious school.

Beilin
Describe your favorite campus traditions.

Most people know of Wellesley as an elite all-women institution that is academically competitive. Among other college student...

Describe your favorite campus traditions.

Most people know of Wellesley as an elite all-women institution that is academically competitive. Among other college students, Wellesley women are known for being intelligent, aggressive, and fun.

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

First of all, RELAX! College is as much about personal growth and enjoying the experience as it is about grades and academic prestige. The friends you make in college are the most amazing people you will ever meet and you should not be too stressed out to meet them. Friends will help you through the toughest times, and you will feel rewarded when you help them as well. Second, college is a lot more challenging than you expect. Getting good grades in high school was difficult and arduous, but getting the same grades in college will be next to impossible. Do not worry though! When you push yourself to do your best and set realistic expectations, you will be prouder of a "B-" that you earned than an "A" that was too easy. The most important lesson is how to motivate, discipline, and appreciate yourself. Picking yourself up after a disappointment is one of the hardest things to do; know that you tried as well as you could and keep looking forward. Finally, no mistake can ruin your life. You are the master of your fate: If you flunked one test, try harder on the next one. Live & Be Happy!

What's unique about your campus?

I love that Wellesley produces strong women who are dedicated to their dreams and ambitions and are eager to challenge society's expectations of them.

Margarita
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

i would inform myself that college is a unique experiance and a journey that I have the privlegde of going on in my life. I w...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

i would inform myself that college is a unique experiance and a journey that I have the privlegde of going on in my life. I would also tell myself to work hard but to remember to enjoy myself and leave time to spend with good friends. Furethermore, I shoulf be proud of my accomplishments and always look towards the positive side of every situation because everything in life happens for a reason and every situation turns out to work in your favor in some way or another. Work hard and play ahrd is a good motto to remember while in college. Not everything will be easy though, sometimes you will run into situations that may worry you and cause you pain, but it is important to remember that you will get through these sitations, and these unpleasant situtaions shape you as a person and help you learn from your mistakes.

What's the most frustrating thing about your school?

Sometimes the academic pressure gets frustrating. The work load is intense and although thr classes are very interesting, the academic demands of the school can beocme tedious and stressful.

What kind of person should not attend this school?

A person who is not willing to put in work and effort to learn and succeed in school. This school has a rigorous academic program that involves alot of work and preparation .

Judee
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

If I could go back to when I was a senior I would tell myself to slow down. As a senior I was very focused on getting into a ...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

If I could go back to when I was a senior I would tell myself to slow down. As a senior I was very focused on getting into a top college/university that I let it take a toll on other areas of my life. I would tell myself to be nicer to those around me. I was always cranky towards my parents, the two people who helped me the most to get into college. I regret that. I would also encourage myself to take that precious time before college to explore a new interest. When I got to college, I discovered that I didn't like to do the extracurriculars that I did in highschool such as, field hockey and student government. I felt sort of lost because I didn't know what made me, me. I think its important that we live in the moment, even as we prepare for what lies ahead.

What's unique about your campus?

The best thing about my school are all of the opportunites that are offered to the students. Last year I got to go on a volunteer trip for Habitat for Humanity to New Orleans and it was all paid for by my school. Without the funding, I would never have gotten that opportunity to bond with other students in a new area and in turn learn more about myself. I genuinely feel that my school helps to promote self-growth and achievement amongst its students.

What's the most frustrating thing about your school?

My school is extremely academically competitive and that can be frustruating sometimes. It can be defeating when you think you're doing your best and then you see what other students are accomplishing with internships, job interviews and their GPAs. I always feel like I am being compared to others at my school and it doesn't help to motivate me.

Jermaine
What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

The advice I would give to myself for the transition into college would be to look more into scholarships that I am able to ...

What should every freshman at your school know before they start?

The advice I would give to myself for the transition into college would be to look more into scholarships that I am able to receive and qualify for. Research the College more in depth, rather than just going to a school because it was alway from home. Secondly, I would have been on top of my school work more so I woud have maintain a gpa greater than 3.75. In other words i would have been opened to more scholarships. Thirdly, I would have scheduled more more college visitation and visit with professors and department heads to understand what my school could offer me while matriculating through their program in the Natural Science and Mathematics Deparment. Finally, Ask myself want is it that I want to be and shadowed the fields of interests prior to freshmen year so that by sophmore year I could declare a major.

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