Northwestern University Top Questions

Describe the dorms.

Robb

The dorms vary a lot. Some like Allison or Elder, are almost resorts. Others, like Sargent, don't have overhead lighting or air conditioning. Honestly, it really doesn't matter. You adapt to your life and its just part of the experience. I was in Sargent Hall my freshman year, and I had an amazing time while living one of the worst dorms on campus.

Allison

All of the dorms are said to have their own, individual personality. That being said, I highly suggest reading student reviews of each dorm that you're interested, as the "personality" of a dorm can affect the quality of your stay there just as much as the location of the dinning hall. Personally, I spent my freshman and sophomore years in dorms. Freshman year I was placed in Elder Hall, a medium-sized dorm devoted to incoming students only. While the rooms were decently sized and the dining hall was nice enough, I found that my personality didn't really mesh with that of the dorm in general. This isn't to say that the dorm was bad in any way, but I wouldn't suggest it for someone who, like me, is somewhat more introverted and not as keen on going to the near-by fraternity parties. Sophomore year I spent my time in Foster-Walker, which is said to be rather more reclusive. As a freshman this may have been isolating, but as I knew my suite-mates and a fair number of the other residents, I didn't find this to be a problem. Overall, my experience in the dorms was not bad, but I've much preferred the time I've spent outside of them and the freedoms/responsibilities that come with such a move.

Daniel

Alison and Willard are the best dorms in the south. Elder, CCI, and Slivka are probably the best in the north. I basing these answers on room size, sociability, not too loud at night, etc. But the dorm food sucks, and everyone has to deal with it freshman year and if you stay on campus.

Karen

There are many dorms on campus, and almost all freshmen live in one. They all vary in size (I lived in Jones the first year, and we had the smallest rooms on campus, but it didn't bother me because we had AC and heating, kitchenettes and suites) and all have their own perks. You can find a lot more info on dorms by checking the housing website (http://www.northwestern.edu/living/) and asking a current student. Campus news site NBN has a great guide: (http://www.northbynorthwestern.com/story/freshman-housing-guide-2010/) and many dorms have their own websites or Facebook groups you can check out. There are two types of residences, one called a residential college (which are traditionally smaller, and have a theme such as "arts and music" (like Jones) or communications/journalism (CRC) or international studies (ISRC) and can provide a good community with lots of organized events. The other is a residential hall, which are typically bigger but they are starting to have professors move into a suite in them, which is pretty neat.

Karen

There are many dorms on campus, and almost all freshmen live in one. They all vary in size (I lived in Jones the first year, and we had the smallest rooms on campus, but it didn't bother me because we had AC and heating, kitchenettes and suites) and all have their own perks. You can find a lot more info on dorms by checking the housing website (http://www.northwestern.edu/living/) and asking a current student. Campus news site NBN has a great guide: (http://www.northbynorthwestern.com/story/freshman-housing-guide-2010/) and many dorms have their own websites or Facebook groups you can check out. There are two types of residences, one called a residential college (which are traditionally smaller, and have a theme such as "arts and music" (like Jones) or communications/journalism (CRC) or international studies (ISRC) and can provide a good community with lots of organized events. The other is a residential hall, which are typically bigger but they are starting to have professors move into a suite in them, which is pretty neat.

Grace

It's hard to describe the dorms as a whole, because all the dorms are very different from each other. We have several Residential Colleges, which are themed and host events based on their theme like "Coffee and Conversation" with faculty and guest speakers. I live in PARC (Public Affairs Residential College). We don't stick to our theme very strictly, but we do all kinds of cool events. So far this quarter, we've had two formal dances (one on a yacht on Lake Michigan), a trip to the Christkindl Market in Chicago, Coffee and Conversation almost ever Thursday, trips to movies and dinner with faculty, and several philanthropy events. The drawback of PARC is that it's tiiiiiiiny. I feel extremely cramped in here sometimes, especially since the university does not allow lofts. This rule gets broken a lot in other dorms, but people don't really get away with it in PARC. Still, it has a good location, good people, and it's really not a bad place to live. We have suites, so every quarter of every floor has its own little communal living room that people hang out in or use to study. We also have a game room, a practice room for musicians and a TV lounge. At the other end of the spectrum, we have Seabury. Seabury is a dorm in the middle of campus that is almost exclusively inhabited by upperclassmen. It's an old seminary, so it looks like a castle, and every person gets an ENORMOUS (basically the size of a double in any other dorm) single all to themselves, with a lounge and a bathroom they share with just two other people. There are additional lounges and kitchenettes on every floor. So, housing really varies on how lucky you get and what year you are.

Chelsea

Students usually live off campus in Evanston for one or two years of their college careers.

Chelsea

Students usually live off campus in Evanston for one or two years of their college careers.

Chelsea

Elder Hall is the only all-freshmen dorm on campus. It’s considered one of the most social and also the most tightknit.

Chelsea

The most popular place to live on campus is in the dorms. Some are nicer than others, but consider North or South.

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