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Wellesley College

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Describe the students at your school.

Wellesley's student body is extremely diverse. I don't know the numbers, but I'm sure they're somewhere on the Wellesley homepage. We have many races, cultures, religions, social orientations, etc. When my older brother started college at the University of New Hampshire, he had to take a class on diversity. At Wellesley, you can learn about diversity by just striking up a conversation with someone. Everyone is willing and eager to talk about themselves (ok - sorry! No generalizing! The girls who are not either working on their theses or buried in books are the ones to talk to. Most of the time) and their situations. One thing though - if you come here, do NOT ask someone where they are from... originally. I look Indian, because my father is from Pakistan. I, however, was born and raised in the US. I don't associate with a culture other than 'American', and I only speak English. I can't tell you the number of times I have been asked about my origins. One girl just kept asking the same question over and over when I told her that I was born in Florida. I finally had to say 'Look. I was born in Florida. I've never been out of North America. That's just the way it is.' Long story short - be accepting of different people and their situations. You probably won't have a great time if you aren't (unless... you find the other people on campus who are like that. But there certainly aren't that many). Another valuable Wellesley lesson: There is no such thing as "Normal" - so don't worry about it. Be yourself.

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the campus has literally hundreds of organizations. All of which are usually easy to become involved in. the campus is mostly democratic, although there is a republican group. Racially i found the student body to be very diverse, but i come from the white bread midwest. The majority of the student body are white or asian, but there is a nice mixture of all sorts of race and cultures. Students are from all over the world. The economic status of the girls usually fall into the upper middle class, but there are many variations. Because of the financial aid packages, i have met many women coming from families of the much lower end of the economic spectrum. There is a strong sense of school spirit, but what i found to be the best thing about wellesley is how supportive the enviorment is to all students. Being an all girl school, that alone both unites, and allows many of the students to speak up about things they would otherwise deem taboo. I have never been in such an accepting enviorment of differnt beliefs, lifestyles, sexualities, race, and economic status. (except repubicans...they are not as easily embraced. I am a registered repubican, although am closer to independent. this was met with more hostility than any other issue i could ever think up. :p ) no one will attack you for your political stading, but if you are not full blood democratic, you can expect some heated debates.

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Any type of student you could possibly imagine, she is here at Wellesley. We have students from all over the globe of all religious denominations and cultural affiliations. I have met students who are so different from the students I went to high school with. The town I grew up in was very white, Catholic, middle-class residents. Now some of my closest friends are from across the Atlantic Ocean and my friends have experienced things that I never could have imagined. I take it for granted every day that my parents are able to pay my way through college, but there are so many students here who are fortunate to have the support of Wellesley to come to this wonderful school. Many students are trying to pay their own way through college and at the same time you have students like myself. It is really important to have this diversity on campus because if everyone was the same, your learning would not be really complete. Learning is not restricted to the classroom and when I was looking at schools, this diversity was very important to me and Wellesley has succeeded in having a very diverse student body.

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At the risk of sounding really racist, I think one of the clique-y-est groups at Wellesley is the Asians, probably seconded by the African Americans. However, no groups on campus, religious, racial, sexual orientation/gender, socio-economic, political, or whatever are actually in-your-face about anything unless it happens to be Latina Pride Month or something like that. For the most part, I think students get along and interact. To be honest, I don't know much about what socio-economic backgrounds dominate, since most people don't flaunt their relative wealth, but I do know that the majority of my friends have some kind of financial aid. I think that very girls who are very conservative, in terms of religion, politics, and social issues, would feel out of place at Wellesley because there's a heavy emphasis on awareness and sensitivity to others' situations. Wellesley students generally are politically aware and active, and mostly liberal.

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Wellesley students are predominantly left-leaning liberals. It takes a brave soul these days to declare pride in the Bush administration or to admit support for presidential nominee McCain. Wellesley students may be from all over the world, but their politics are certainly not as diverse. The most heated debates are between Democrats arguing the minute differences of Obama and Clinton, illustrating the Wellesley habit of getting hung up on the details. Wellesley students are generally respectful of other peoples views especially differing cultural, religious, and socio-economic. But when it comes to political debate, let the flood gates open! Every week The Wellesley News publishes an editiorial by either the college Democrats or Republicans. The Republicans consistently provoke attacks in letters from the editors while the Democrat for the greater part sail smoothly into the night.

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Wellesley is very culturally diverse and very supportive of the LGBT students as well (although we have had some trouble getting a full time advisor). Socioeconomically, Wellsley maybe pretty diverse but the awareness about hese issues is very low compared to the cultural sensitivity. Some girls have quite the sense of entitlement. Students wear all levels of things to class, mostly jeans. A few get dressed up and the later you get into the semester, the more pjs you see in class! :) Wellesley is extrememly politically aware. Mostly liberal, there are student groups that focus on these issues but the most action probably happens in discussions at meals. A great thing about Wellesley is that if your friend is brainstorming this idea at dinner, you'll find the whole table is joining in and signing up to help. It's a very take charge atmosphere!

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No one feels out of place at Wellesley. No one cares about your background or what your orientation is. We can't help but love everyone. If you make even a small effort to talk to someone, you've basically made a friend. Students mostly wear comfortable clothes all of the time. There is no one to impress except yourself, so most people don't even bother. Myself included. People mix like cake batter here at Wellesley. Most students are from the East Coast and California. Very few Midwesterners, I count myself lucky. Students are EXTREMELY politically aware. Right now, one of our alums is up for the Presidential Election, how can we not be aware? And we are very dominantly left-winged. No one says a word on their hopeful income, except there are a lot of ambitious pre-med students.

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Every kind of person goes to Wellesley. It is an extremely diverse environment. The main diversity issues on campus are making the faculty more diverse and serving the needs of male-identified (or at least, not female-identified) transgender students on campus. People of all different backgrounds find themselves mixing in the dorms and in classes, but there are a lot of student organizations based on race/sexual orientation/religion that are vibrant parts of students' lives. This can lead to some segregation on campus. There is definitely not always peaceful co-existence between the various groups of students, but those conflicts ultimately lead to dialogue and greater understanding, so I think that in the end that's okay.

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I, as an Orthodox Jew, feel out of place at Wellesley. Students wear a vareity of clothes to class: some wear sweatpants and shirts, while other dress up in the latest fashions and makeup every day. Students of different races interact with each other. Most Wellesley student seem to be from the Northeast, California, or Florida. Students are politically aware. Both the Democrats and Republicans host lectures, and there is also an organization dedicated to non-partisan politcal action. The student newspapaer prints newsfom around the world, and opinion articles are often about world news. Most students are democrats. Students don't usually discuss how much money they pan to earn in the future.

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Many different people thrive at Wellesley. While one may look around campus and see predominantly white people, we have many students of colour and from various ethnic backgrounds. Most students are from the New England area and California. Of course, there are students from all over the United States and the world. Yet you will be surprised by how many MA natives attend Wellesley. The "international" kids tend to hang out together, like the "black," "asian," and "rich white" kids. While breaking down stereotypes and cultural barriers is a constant point of discussion at Wellesley, students do self-segregate. I believe this is natural, and my comments of course are generalized.

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