Can colleges revoke admissions offers? What behaviors can cause this, and how can students protect themselves?

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Can colleges revoke admissions offers? What behaviors can cause this, and how can students protect themselves?

Rod Bugarin
Former Admissions Officer Columbia, Brown, and Wesleyan University

Can colleges revoke admissions offers? What behaviors can cause this, and how can students protect themselves?

Here is my video response to the question.

Richard Nesbitt
Director of Admissions Williams College

Can colleges revoke admissions offers? What behaviors can cause this, and how can students protect themselves?

Here is my video response to the question.

Lily Trayes
Founder and CEO Ivy League Placement

Can colleges revoke admissions offers? What behaviors can cause this, and how can students protect themselves?

Here is my video response to the question.

Eric Furda
Dean of Admissions University of Pennsylvania

Can colleges revoke admissions offers? What behaviors can cause this, and how can students protect themselves?

Here is my video response to the question.

Nina Berler
Founder unCommon Apps

Revoking Offers of Admission

Yes, colleges certainly can revoke offers of admissions. I remember hearing Brown's Dean of Admission Jim Miller telling students that, once admitted, they should not go wild on band trips - meaning that behavioral violations could mean a decision could be revoked. Students should know what constitutes reasonable - not to mention legal - behavior. Criminal actions, underage drinking and involvement with narcotics won't be tolerated. Also on the list are honor code infractions. Students can protect themselves by watching what groups they choose to be part of and keeping a pleasant distance away from trouble.

Andrea Van Niekerk

When colleges fold up the welcome mat

Colleges revoke offers of admission reluctantly, but it happens: NACAC says in 2009 22 percent of colleges did so. The most obvious cause is a severe case of senioritis after acceptance, when seniors are required to keep grades and courses on par with their application transcripts. Colleges also assume their offers are contingent on students’ behavior and integrity during and after the application process, and lying about Early Decision pledges, cheating in school or committing crimes can encourage a college to cut an accepted student loose. Notice that most colleges cannily phrase their offer of admission as a conditional one!

Suzan Reznick
Independent Educational Consultant The College Connection

College can revoke at any time before you enroll!

When a college offers you admission, it is based on your present academic performance. If your grades significantly take a nose-dive because of- so-called "seniortits" many colleges will ask you why. If you cannot offer them a real reason- i.e. health or family issues etc, they have the right to revoke your offer. So, it is not a good idea to feel that you no longer have to do the required work. One college has a policy, for those students with poor year-end grades, to offer required summer readings followed with a 20 page paper. This is the students' only option if they want the option to enroll in September . Additionally - getting into serious trouble- drugs/drinking/cheating can also cause a college to revoke admissions.

Annie Reznik
Counselor/CEO College Guidance Coach

Slackers Beware

Colleges can and do revoke admission offers for two primary reasons. First, serious disciplinary infractions that involve suspension, expulsion or criminal charges will be carefully evaluated by college officials and can jeopardize admission offers. Secondly, significantly diminished academic performance can prompt a college to revoke an offer of admission. Students can protect themselves by abiding by all school policies and maintaining academic performance.

Laura O'Brien Gatzionis
Founder Educational Advisory Services

Revoking Admissions Offers

Final grades (failing classes or not keeping the standards that were indicated on your application), falsifying application information, disciplinary infractions, and double depositing have all been behaviors cited by public and private colleges as reasons for revoking offers of admission. Keep working hard through senior year and it will pay off for you when you enter college as a freshman.

Nancy Milne
Owner Milne Collegiate Consulting

Now you're in, now you're not!

An offer of admission is based on the facts presented in the application. If your circumstances change, you must realize that your offer may be in jeopardy. A typical situation may involve senior year grades. If you were borderline in the first place, you can be sure that the school will be requesting your final year grades. Depending on your high school's policy and the college's policy, you may be denied admission for legal violations that occur after the fact. Bottom line, keep up your hard work, don't be tempted to slack off and you'll be packing for school as planned.