Do colleges keep parents informed of their child's academic progress?

College Admissions

Our counselors answered:

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child's academic progress?

Patricia Krahnke
President/Partner Global College Search Associates, LLC

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child's academic progress?

Short answer: No. Google Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA): "FERPA gives parents certain rights with respect to their children's education records. These rights transfer to the student when he or she reaches the age of 18 or attends a school beyond the high school level. Students to whom the rights have transferred are 'eligible students.'" Detailed answer: Once students enter college, it is their responsibility to communicate with their parents. By law, unless the student signs a FERPA waiver, the college cannot legally reveal anything to the parents. This is not just in terms of academics, but also in terms of any social difficulties. The following is information from the government FERPA web site: The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99) is a Federal law that protects the privacy of student education records. The law applies to all schools that receive funds under an applicable program of the U.S. Department of Education. FERPA gives parents certain rights with respect to their children's education records. These rights transfer to the student when he or she reaches the age of 18 or attends a school beyond the high school level. Students to whom the rights have transferred are "eligible students." Parents or eligible students have the right to inspect and review the student's education records maintained by the school. Schools are not required to provide copies of records unless, for reasons such as great distance, it is impossible for parents or eligible students to review the records. Schools may charge a fee for copies. Parents or eligible students have the right to request that a school correct records which they believe to be inaccurate or misleading. If the school decides not to amend the record, the parent or eligible student then has the right to a formal hearing. After the hearing, if the school still decides not to amend the record, the parent or eligible student has the right to place a statement with the record setting forth his or her view about the contested information. Generally, schools must have written permission from the parent or eligible student in order to release any information from a student's education record. However, FERPA allows schools to disclose those records, without consent, to the following parties or under the following conditions (34 CFR § 99.31): School officials with legitimate educational interest; Other schools to which a student is transferring; Specified officials for audit or evaluation purposes; Appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student; Organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the school; Accrediting organizations; To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena; Appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies; and State and local authorities, within a juvenile justice system, pursuant to specific State law. Schools may disclose, without consent, "directory" information such as a student's name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, honors and awards, and dates of attendance. However, schools must tell parents and eligible students about directory information and allow parents and eligible students a reasonable amount of time to request that the school not disclose directory information about them. Schools must notify parents and eligible students annually of their rights under FERPA. The actual means of notification (special letter, inclusion in a PTA bulletin, student handbook, or newspaper article) is left to the discretion of each school. For additional information, you may call 1-800-USA-LEARN (1-800-872-5327) (voice). Individuals who use TDD may call 1-800-437-0833. Or you may contact us at the following address: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20202-8520

Frances Gard

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child's academic progress?

Colleges are not required to keep parents informed of the student's progress. FERPA privacy laws state that the student is 18 and therefore are not under the parent's jurisdiction. However, as the parent of a college freshman, colleges give the students the option to allow their parents access to some or all of their information. My child is pretty responsible so I requested access to the burser's (place you pay) office and the financial aid office. I also have the ability to put money on her account for her to use on campus. Check with the college that you attend for options.

Annie Reznik
Counselor/CEO College Guidance Coach

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child's academic progress?

Per FERPA (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act), colleges are prohibited from sharing student information (including grades and course registration) with anyone.

Shawn Rogers
Admissions Counselor Temple University Japan Campus

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child's academic progress?

Colleges do not give academic progress to parents of students who are 18 or older. This is because these students are legally considered adults, and distributing the records to parents would be considered a violation of privacy. That being said, most schools have some sort of release forms available. Basically, your student needs to sign these consent forms to allow the records to be released to you.

Mary Mariani

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child's academic progress?

Colleges are not required to keep parents informed of their child's academic progress. Once students attend a university, college, or even a community college, parents do not have the right to access information about their student. Students may select to give their parents access to this information by giving them the codes needed to access transcripts and any other information. I know that in many cases parents are not happy with this because many are financially supporting their children, but the institutions are governed by right to privacy laws that protects the students from anyone having access without their permission.

Renee Boone
The College Advisor

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child's academic progress?

Colleges do not keep parents apprised of their student's academic progress.

Dr. Bruce Neimeyer
CEO/Partner Global College Search Associates, LLC

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child's academic progress?

It is not likely that the parent will be informed of the students academic progress. Once student enter into college, they are considered adults and the law restricts what university personnel are permitted to share with anyone other than the student. Some colleges however have mechanisms in place that will allow student to indicate that information should be shared with the parents or guardians. But this is usually not automatic and requires the student to contact the appropriate office on campus and complete the necessary steps to allow such individuals access to their information. Keep in mind that this may give parents access but it is not automatic and typically the parents will need to reach and seek out the information each semester.

Ivery McKnight

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child's academic progress?

Report cards are generally mailed home at the end of each term. However, parents should be mindful that the college experience does not provide daily monitoring of attendance and or academic progress that one may have experienced within the high school setting. It is imperative for parents as stakeholders of their child's experience and future however, to maintain accurate records of their child performance in the event of discrepancies in Unit accumulation and order course completion for meeting degree requirements.

Eric Beers, Ph.D.
College and Career Counselor Air Academy High School

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child's academic progress?

No, because of the Privacy Act, parents are not kept informed of their child's academic grades, attendance, or performance. Parents must learn from their children what is going on with their classes. Parents must also teach students to be self-advocates, because parents can no longer talk to their children's teachers like they could in high school.

Carita Del Valle
Founder Academic Decisions

Do colleges keep parents informed of their child's academic progress?

No! It is against privacy laws. That is why good communication is vital before sending a child off to school.